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  • Eochaid Muinremuir mac Oengus, Rí na Dál Riata (c.380 - 439)
    Notes for Eochaid Muinremar King Of Dalriada Weis' "Ancestral Roots. . ." (170:1). King of Dalriada. (But note that it was his son Erc who died in 474). This is line taken from the Book of Leinster...
  • Ruadrí mac Domnall, Mormaer of Moray (c.995 - 1020)
    Caution: A lot of nonsense is circulating about this line. One example is the entirely contemporary Lebor Clann Glas. Irish genealogies show the descent of Findlaech MacRory from "cenel Loairn, one o...

The identity of Raudri King of Moray - Máel Coluim of Moray (or Máel Coluim mac Máil Brigti) was King or Mormaer of Moray has been the subject of historic argument for centuries. This project is to look at all documentation and historic sources that may help in correctly identifying the parentage and ancestry of Raudri and his lineage.

This project is an ongoing research collecting project.

Preliminary Lineage for Ruadri goes as follows:

Generation 1 - Ruadri King of Moray

Generation 2 - Cuiléain mac Iduilb or Indulf Another name for Indulf is Idulb mac Causantín

(Scottish : Idulb mac Causantín) was king of Scotland from 954 until 962, although there is no record of his coronation, if there ever was one. He was son of King Constantine II, second cousin of the previous king Malcolm I, and second cousin first removed of his successor Dubh.

The name Idulb is a Gaelicisation of either the Old Norse name Hildulfr or the Anglo-Saxon name Eadulf. Idulb later became rendered Indulf under French influence.

During his reign, a rebirth of Danish invasions began. These visits, which were growing more familiar but not more welcome, came to brace the patriotism of the nation when in danger of becoming relaxed. The Norsemen crossed the sea in a fleet of fifty ships. They ravaged the southern shores of England. Intent, however on gathering more booty before returning to their own country, they sailed northward and entered the Firth of Forth . Their appearance spread terror along both shores of the Firth. The timid left their houses and fled. The courageous hastened to the beach, and mustered in such force that the Danes deemed it prudent to withdraw. Dropping down the Firth past the Isle of May, their galleys crept round the "neuk" of Fife and entered the Firth of Tay. Again a phalanx of determined combatants lined the shores of the river and the invaders saw that there was no safe landing place. They sailed away, and coasting along the shores of Angus and Mearns, they arrived off Buchan, searching all the way for an unguarded creek or bay into which they might run their galleys and let loose their ravaging hordes like a flock of vultures upon the land. The coast bristled with defenders ready to grapple with the foe should he dare to land and throw him back into the waves. The invaders put their helms about and bore away to the Danish shore. It was a feint. After vanishing in the blue, they suddenly reappeared. Finding the coast unguarded, they landed unopposed in Banffshire near Cullen. Brief time was given them to pillage and slay. Indulf soon came up with them and the two armies were installed in combat. The Danes were worsted and driven to their ships and hoisting sail, this time in earnest, they made off to their own country.

Indulf left one lasting contribution. His father, Constantine II, fleeing before Athelstan, had abandoned the Lothian, and with the Lothians a city destined one day to be the capital of Scotland, to the English. In a decisive victory over Edwin of Deira, Indulf recaptured the fortress in Edinburgh, Dun Eden.

Indulf married at some point in his life, but the details are scanty. The date and place of the marriage are unrecorded, and the name of his wife is similarly unknown. He had three sons, all of whom later died violently in separate engagements.

Like his father before him, Indulf at least intended to abdicate and become a monk. Conflicting accounts state that he was killed by invading Vikings in 962 at the Battle of the Bauds in Findochty, Banffshire. It is unclear whether at the time he was still king or if he had already abdicated.

His son, Culen, later became king in 966.

Generation 3 - Causantín mac Áeda

Constantine II (Causantín mac Áeda) ( 874 ?- 952) was king of Scotland from 900 to 943. He was the son of King Aedh, first cousin of the previous King Donald II, and first cousin once removed of his successor Malcolm I, to whom he left his kingdom upon abdicating and becoming a monk. Constantine II's reign is the second longest reign in Scottish history.

Constantine II succeeded Donald II to the Scottish throne in 900. If a coronation took place, then there is no surviving record of it.

During his reign, Constantine II had to fend off Viking raids from the north and west. The earliest of these involved driving the Vikings away from Scotland, and this reached a triumphant climax at the Battle of Scone in 904, after which the Vikings were forced to withdraw from Scotland. However, by then, the Vikings had laid waste to much of Scotland, and in particular Dunkeld.

Constantine II later struggled to win land from, or at least not lose land to, his neighbours to the south, the Anglo-Saxons earldom of Northumbria and the Norse kingdom of York, where the Vikings, led by the Viking king Rognvald, had resettled themselves. Constantine II and the Earl of Bamburgh, Ealdred I, were involved in two battles with Rognvald Gudrodsson (referred to as the Battles of Corbridge ) in that area in 915 and 918, both of which resulted ultimately in a cessation of hostilities there with the Norse.

When he was not involved in fighting Vikings, Constantine II remodelled the Christian church of the day to be more Gaelic in nature. This included a Synod at Scone in 906 , and he introduced the mormaer ( earls ) system to Scotland. Constantine II married at some point in his life, but virtually nothing is known of it. The date and place of the marriage are unrecorded, and his wife's name is likewise forgotten. It is known, however, that the marriage produced at least three children: two sons and a daughter.

Constantine II's daughter, whose name is also no longer known, married Olaf III Guthfrithson, the Norse King of Dublin at the time, in 937, in order to establish a more stable relationship with the Norse. At least three children later came from this marriage. If it was intended to contribute to holding back Northumbria, it did not. Constantine II was defeated at the Battle of Brunanburh by King Athelstan of England in 937. One of Constantine II's sons, Cellach, died in this battle.

In 943, Constantine II abdicated in favour of Malcolm I (943-954) and entered a Culdee monastery in St Andrews, Fife, and eventually became Abbot there. He died peacefully in 952, and was probably buried at the monastery. Constantine II's surviving son, Indulf, later became King of Scotland.

Generation 4 - Áeda mac Causantín Other names for Aed were Aedh and Aodh.

Aed (c. 840 - 878), sometimes spelt Aedh or Aodh, became King of Scots in 877 when he succeeded his brother Constantine I of Scotland.

He was killed shortly after taking the throne by Giric of Scotland, also known as Gregory the Great, who had conspired with Aedh's nephew, Eochaid of Scotland.

Not much is known of Aedh, or even if he was actually the one named by Constantine to hold the throne. Both Giric and Eochaid ruled jointly following Aedh's death.

Aedh did marry at some point in his life, but the details, including the date and place of the marriage, and the name of his wife are not known. One son, Constantine II of Scotland, ruled later (900-942/43), while another son, Donald mac Aed, became King of Strathclyde in 908.

Aedh died violently in 878 at Strathallan, Perth and Kinross. He may have been buried at Maiden Stone in Aberdeenshire. He was succeeded under the Scottish tanistry system by his nephew, Eochaid.

Generation 5 - Causantín mac Domnall or Máel Coluim Mac Domnaill

Máel Coluim mac Domnaill (Modern Gaelic : Maol Chaluim mac Dhòmhnaill),[1] anglicised as Malcolm I, and nicknamed An Bodhbhdercc, "the Dangerous Red"[2] (before 900 - 954) was king of Scots , becoming king when his cousin Constantine II (Causantín mac Áeda) abdicated to become a monk. He was the son of Donald II (Domnall mac Causantín).

In 945 Edmund the Elder , King of England, having expelled Olaf Sihtricsson (Amlaíb Cuaran) from Northumbria , devastated Cumbria and blinded two sons of Domnall III (Domnall mac Eógain), king of Strathclyde . It is said that he then "let" or "commended" Strathclyde to Malcolm in return for an alliance.[3] What is to be understood by "let" or "commended" is unclear, but it may well mean that Malcolm had been the overlord of Strathclyde and that Edmund recognised this while taking lands in southern Cumbria for himself.

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba says that Malcolm took an army into Moray "and slew Cellach". Cellach is not named in the surviving genealogies of the rulers of Moray , and his identity is unknown.

Malcolm appears to have kept his agreement with the late English king, which may have been renewed with the new king, Edmund having been murdered in 946 and succeeded by his brother Edred . Eric Bloodaxe took York in 948, before being driven out by Edred, and when Olaf Sihtricsson again took York in 949-950, Malcolm raided Northumbria as far south as the Tees taking "a multitude of people and many herds of cattle" according to the Chronicle.[6] The Annals of Ulster for 952 report a battle between "the men of Alba and the Britons [of Strathclyde] and the English" against the foreigners, i.e. the Northmen or the Norse-Gaels . This battle is not reported by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, and it is unclear whether it should be related to the expulsion of Olaf Sihtricsson from York or the return of Eric Bloodaxe.

The Annals of Ulster report that Malcolm was killed in 954. Other sources place this most probably in the Mearns , either at Fetteresso following the Chronicle, or at Dunnottar following the Prophecy of Berchán . He was buried on Iona .[8] Malcolm's sons Dub and Kenneth were later kings.

Noted events in his life were:

• Crowned: King of Scots, 943.

His children were:

+ 2 M i. Cinaed King of Scots 3 4 5 was born about 932 in Scotland, died in 995 in <Fettercairn, (Aberdeenshire), Scotland> about age 63, and was buried in Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland.

+ 3 M ii. Dub of Scotland 6 died about 967.

DONALD (-killed Dun-fother [900], bur [Isle of Iona]). The 10th century Pictish Chronicle Cronica de Origine Antiquorum Pictorum records that "Donivaldus filius Constantini" reigned for eleven years, after the expulsion of Eochlaid[46]. The 11th century Synchronisms of Flann Mainistreach name (in order) "Cinaet mac Ailpin…Domnall mac Ailpin, Custantin mac Cinaeta, (Aedh mac Cinaedha), Girg mac Dungaile, Domnall Dasachtach (mac Custantin)" as Scottish kings, dated to the 9th and 10th centuries[47]. The 12th century Cronica Regum Scottorum lists "…Duneval filius Constantini xi…" as king[48]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that "Donald…the son of…Constantine, son of Kenneth the Great" succeeded in 892 after the death of Gregory and reigned for eleven years[49]. He succeeded his cousin as DONALD II "Dasachtach" King of Scotland. The 10th century Pictish Chronicle Cronica de Origine Antiquorum Pictorum records that the Scots defeated the Danes during Donald´s reign, and that he was killed "opidum Fother"[50]. The Annals of Ulster record the death in 900 of "Domnall son of Constantine king of Scotland"[51]. The Chronicle of the Scots and Picts dated 1177 records that "Donald mac Constantine" reigned for 11 years, died "in Fores" and was buried "in Iona insula"[52]. The Chronicle of the Picts and Scots dated 1251 includes the same information.

Additional notes:

   Named for sept of the Clann Cheallaigh (e.g. Mac Domhnaill or Mac Donnell). Ceann Coradh, now Kincora, was the stronghold of Brian, near the mouth of the Shannon river. For 1031, Diarmait, mac Domhnaill, mic Faoláin, king of the Deisi. The names of the Gallowglass who then came and remained in the county are: in Connacht – Mac Domhnaill, Mac Ruaidhri and Mac Suibhne.
   O'Cannon, ousted as kings of Cenél Conaill in the 13th century, settled here for a time here. Arda Midhair, The Ó Dochartaigh (O'Dohertys), of Cenél Conaill, were cited as chiefs of Arda Midhair (Ardmire, perhaps the Finn Valley) in the barony of Raphoe, county Donegal. At the turn of the 13th century two Ó Dochartaigh were noted as kings of Tír Chonaill, breaking a long hold the O'Cannons and O'Muldorys (Mulderrys) had on this title. Early prominent septs of Cenél Aedha in the area of Tirhugh included Ó Maeldoraidh, Ó Canannáin (O'Cannon) and Ó Gallchobhair (O'Gallagher).
   MacDonnell of Clan Celleagh

Generation 6 - Domnall mac Causantín

Domnall macCausantín (anglicised Donald II) was King of the Picts or King of Alba in the late 9th century. He was the son of Causantín mac Cináeda. Domnall is given the epithet dásachtach by the Prophecy of Berchán, meaning a violent madman. Domnall became king on the death or depositionof Giric mac Dúngail, the date of which is not certainly known but usually placed in 889. The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba reports:

Doniualdus son of Constantini held the kingdom for 11 years [889 - 900]. The Northmen wasted Pictland at this time. In his reign a battle occurred between Danes and Scots at Innisibsolian where the Scots had victory. He was killed at Opidum Fother [modern Dunnottar] by the Gentiles. It has been suggested that the attack on Dunottar, rather than being a small raid by a handful of pirates, may be associated with the ravaging of Scotland attributed to Harald Fairhair in the Heimskringla.[3] The Prophecy of Berchán places Domnall's death at Dunnottar, but appears to attribute it to Gaels rather than Norsemen; other sources report he died at Forres. Domnall's death is dated to 900 by the Annals of Ulster and the Chronicon Scotorum, where he is called king of Alba, rather that king of the Picts. He was buried on Iona.

The change from king of the Picts to king of Alba is seen as indicating a step towards the kingdom of the Scots, but historians, while divided as to when this change should be placed, do not generally attribute it to Domnall in view of his epithet. The consensus view is that the key changes occurred in the reign of Causantín mac Áeda, but the reign of Giric has also been proposed. The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba has Domnall succeeded by his cousin Causantín mac Áeda. Domnall's son Máel Coluim was later king. The Prophecy of Berchán appears to suggest that another king reigned for a short while between Domnall and Causantín, saying "half a day will he take sovereignty". Possible confirmation of this exists in the Chronicon Scotorum, where the death of "Ead, king of the Picts" in battle against the Uí Ímair is reported in 904. This, however, is thought to be an error, referring perhaps to Ædwulf , the ruler of Bernicia, whose death is reported in 913 by the other Irish annals.

Generation 7 - Caustantín mac Cinaeda son of Fergus

Caustantín or Constantín mac Fergusa (English: Constantine son of Fergus) (before 775–820) was king of the Picts (or of Fortriu), in modern Scotland, from 789 until 820. He was until the Victorian era sometimes counted as Constantine I of Scotland; the title is now generally given to Constantín mac Cináeda. He is credited with having founded the church at Dunkeld which later received relics of St Columba from Iona.

It had been proposed that Constantín and his brother Óengus were sons of Fergus mac Echdach, King of Dál Riata, but this is no longer widely accepted. Instead, it is thought they were kin to the first king Óengus mac Fergusa, perhaps grandsons or grandnephews. This family may have originated in Circinn (presumed to correspond with the modern Mearns), and had with ties to the Eóganachta of Munster in Ireland.

Constantín's reign falls in a period when Irish annals have relatively few notices of events in Scotland, possibly due to the failing of the annals believed to have been kept in Scotland at Iona and Applecross. Perhaps for that reason, there are only two reports which mention him. Other entries make it clear that the Vikings were active in Ireland and on the western coasts of Scotland in this time, which may also account for the lack of records. Iona was a target, and it may be that Abbot Noah of Kingarth, on the Isle of Bute, was killed by raiders.

The first report, in 789, is the record of a battle in Pictland between Constantín and Conall mac Taidg, in which Constantín was victorious. Conall later reappears in Kintyre, where was killed in 807. It is not known whether Constantín was king before defeating Conall. The king lists give varying lengths for his reign, from 35 to 45 years, and are not to be relied upon without independent confirmation.[6] The second report is that of Constantín's death in 820..

The Dupplin Cross was long assumed to commemorate Cináed mac Ailpín's final victory over the Picts, as indeed, was Sueno's Stone. Recent analysis has revealed a small part of an inscription on the Cross, in which Constantín is named. Accordingly, it is supposed that this monument was commissioned by him, or as a memorial to him. He appears there as Custantin filius Fircus[sa], a Latinisation derived from the Old Irish version of his name rather than the presumed Pictish form Castantin filius Uurguist found in the Poppleton Manuscript and similar Pictish king lists. The Martyrology of Tallaght (University College Dublin Ms. A3) from the Book of Leinster, c. 1180.

It has been proposed that the St Andrews Sarcophagus was made for Constantín, but this is a minority view, as is the suggestion that the relics of Columba, perhaps including the Monymusk Reliquary, may have been translated from Iona to Dunkeld uring Constantín's reign.[8] The idea that Columba's relics may have come to Dunkeld in the time of Constantín, rather than thirty years later in the time of Cináed mac Ailpín is based on an entry in the Chronicon Scotorum for 818

That Constantín established Dunkeld is stated by later chroniclers such as John of Fordun who are following some variants of the Pictish king lists or other materials now lost. Andrew of Wyntoun dates the foundation to 815, although he states that this was after the deaths of Charlemagne and Pope Leo III, which would date it to 816 or later. It is suggested that Constantín is commemorated by the Martyrology of Tallaght, a product of one of the principal céli dé monasteries of the day. As a patron of the céli dé, and perhaps a collaborator of Abbot Diarmait of Iona, it is thought that Constantín may have been a church reformer, in line with céli dé ideals.Caustantín appears also to have been a patron of the Northumbrian monasteries, as he is commemorated, along with his nephew Eogán, in the Liber Vitae Dunelmensis, which contains a list of those for whom prayers were said, dating from around 840.

Constantín was succeeded by his brother Óengus. His son Drest was later king. Constantín's son Domnall is believed to have been king of Dál Riata from around 811 until 835. Constantín's reputation among the kings who followed him may, perhaps, be demonstrated by the use of his name on for three kings in the century and a half following his death when it is not attested as a kingly name in Scotland prior to his reign.

Generation 8 - Fergus mac Echdach

Fergus mac Echdach was king of Dál Riata (modern western Scotland) from about 778 until 781.

   Scotland at the beginning of recorded history was composed of the kingdom of Picts in the north, awith other warlike tribes in their vincinity; the kingdom of the Scots, or Dalriada from Ireland in the west, later called Argyll; the Cymric, or Welsh, in the southwest called the kingdom of the Strathclyde Britons; and the Angles in the southeast. The English domain included the part of Scotland called Lothian and the northern part of England which for many years was contested betweenthe two countries. Gaelic was spoken by both the Picts and the Scots. Each of these regions were in constant warfare with the others, but with the union of the Picts and Dalriada Scots came a kingdom whichabsorbed the Welsh and Englaish region south of it.
   (ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpin_II_of_Dalriada) Alpín mac Echdach may refer to two persons, or to one, or to none. The first person is a presumed king of Dál Riata in the late 730s. The second is the father of Cináed mac Ailpín. The name Alpín is taken to be a Pictish one, derived from the Anglo-Saxon name Æelfwine; Alpín's patronymic means son of Eochaid or son of Eochu. Irish annals such as the Annals of Ulster and the Annals of Innisfallen name Cináed's father as one Alpín. This much is reasonably certain.
   The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba usually begins with Cináed, but some variants include a reference to Cináed's father: "[Alpín] was killed in Galloway, after he had entirely destroyed and devastated it. Andthen the kingdom of the Scots was transferred to the kingdom [variant: land] of the Picts." John of Fordun (IV, ii) calls Cináed's father"Alpin son of Achay" (Alpín son of Eochu) and has him killed in war with the Picts; Andrew of Wyntoun's version mixes Fordun's war with thePicts with the Chronicle version which has him killed in Galloway.
   The genealogies produced for Kings of Scots in the High Middle Ages traced their ancestry through Cináed mac Ailpín, through the Cenél nGabráin of Dál Riata to Fergus Mór, and then to legendary Irish kings such as Conaire Mor. These genealogies, perhaps oral in origin, were subjected to some regularisation by the scribes who copied them into sources such as the Chronicle of Melrose, the Poppleton Manuscript and the like. Either by accident, or by design, a number of kings were misplaced, being moved from the early 8th century to the late 8th and early 9th century. The original list is presumed to have resembled the following:
   1. Eochaid mac Domangairt
   2. Ainbcellach mac Ferchair
   3. Eógan mac Ferchair
   4. Selbach mac Ferchair
   5. Eochaid mac Echdach
   6. Dúngal mac Selbaig
   7. Alpín
   8. Muiredach mac Ainbcellaig
   9. Eógan mac Muiredaig
   10. Áed Find
   11. Fergus mac Echdach
   After modification to link this list of kings of Dál Riata to the family of Cináed mac Ailpín, the list is presumed to have been in this form:
   1. Eochaid mac Domangairt
   2. Ainbcellach mac Ferchair
   3. Eógan mac Ferchair
   8. Muiredach mac Ainbcellaig
   9. Eogan mac Muiredaig
   10. Áed Find
   11. Fergus mac Echdach
   4. Selbach mac Ferchair (called Selbach mac Eógain)
   5. Eochaid mac Echdach (called Eochaid mac Áeda Find)
   6. Dúngal mac Selbaig (name unchanged)
   7. Alpín (called Alpín mac Echdach)
   However, the existence of the original Alpín is less than certain. Noking in Dál Riata of that name is recorded in the Irish annals in theearly 730s. A Pictish king named Alpín, whose father's name is not given in any Irish sources, or even from the Pictish Chronicle king-lists, is known from the late 720s, when he was defeated by Óengus mac Fergusa and Nechtan mac Der-Ilei. For the year 742, the Annals of Ulster are read was referring to the capture of "Elffin son of Crop" (the former reading had besieged rather than captured). Whether Álpin son of Crup is related to the Álpin of the 720s is unknown.

He succeeded Áed Find. He is stated to have been a son of Eochaid mac Echdach, and thus a brother of Áed. Some much later sources make him a son of Áed, but this is not credited by modern studies. His death is noticed in 781 by the Annals of Ulster.

Generation 9 - Eochaid mac Echdach

Eochaid mac Eochaid was king of Dál Riata (modern western Scotland) from 726 until 733. He was a son of Eochaid mac Domangairt.

Eochaid came to power as king of Dál Riata in 726, presumably deposing Dúngal mac Selbaig. Selbach may have tried to restore his son to power, and fought against Eochaid's supporters at Irros Foichnae in 727, but without apparent success. The annals vary as to whether the despatch of a fleet from Dál Riata to Ireland to aid Flaithbertach mac Loingsig in his war with Áed Allán should be placed in the reign of Eochaid, or that of his successor.

At his death in 733, Eochaid is named king rather than lord of Dál Riata, which may suggest that after the defeat of Dúngal and Selbach his reign was unchallenged. His son, Áed Find, was later king of Dál Riata.

As Dál Riata certainly maintained a separate existence until 736, Eochaid must have had a successor, or successors. It appears that he was succeeded by Muiredach mac Ainbcellaig, who had replaced Dúngal mac Selbaig as king of the Cenél Loairn.

Generation 10 - Eochaid mac Domangart

Eochaid mac Domangairt (died ca. 697) was a king of Dál Riata (modern western Scotland) in about 697. He was a member of the Cenél nGabráin, the son of Domangart mac Domnaill and father of Eochaid mac Echdach; Alpín mac Echdach may also be a son of this Eochaid.

He is named in Dál Riata king-lists, the Duan Albanach and the Synchronisms of Flann Mainistrech. In some sources he is called Eochaid Crook-Nose (Riannamail), but modern readings take this is a being a garbled reference to Fiannamail ua Dúnchado rather than an epithet.

The killing of Eochu nepos Domnaill, Eochaid grandson of Domnall Brecc, is reported in the Annals of Ulster for 697.

Generation 11 - Domangart mac Domnall

Domangart mac Domnaill (died 673) was a king in Dál Riata (modern western Scotland) and the son of Domnall Brecc. It is not clear whether he was over-king of Dál Riata or king of the Cenél nGabráin.

Domangart is not listed by the Duan Albanach but is included in other sources, such as genealogies of William the Lion, and that of Causantín mac Cuilén found with the Senchus fer n-Alban. In these genealogies he is noted as the father of Eochaid mac Domangairt.

The Annals of Ulster for 673 report: "The killing of Domangart, son of Domnall Brecc, the king of Dál Riata." Some king-lists state that in his time the Cenél Comgaill separated from the Cenél nGabráin.

It is not clear who succeeded Domangart as king of Dál Riata, if he was such, or as king of the Cenél nGabráin. Known kings after Domangart include Máel Dúin mac Conaill and Domnall Donn of the Cenél nGabráin and Ferchar Fota of the Cenél Loairn is assigned a long reign of 21 years by the Duan Albanach and other king-lists, and this would place the beginning of his rule close to the death of Domangart.

Generation 12 - Domnall mac Echdach or Domnall Brecc

Domnall Brecc (Welsh: Dyfnwal Frych; English: Donald the Freckled) (d. 642 in Strathcarron) was king of Dál Riata, in modern Scotland, from about 629 until 642. He was the son of Eochaid Buide.

He first appears in 622, when the Annals of Tigernach report his presence at the battle of Cend Delgthen (probably in the east midlands of Ireland) as an ally of Conall Guthbinn of Clann Cholmáin. This is the only battle known where Domnall Brecc fought on the winning side.

Domnall suffered four defeats after he broke Dál Riata's alliance with the Cenél Conaill clan of the Uí Néill. In Ireland, Domnall and his ally Congal Cáech of the Dál nAraidi were defeated by Domnall mac Áedo of the Cenél Conaill, the High King of Ireland, at the Battle of Mag Rath (Moira, County Down) in 637. He also lost to the Picts in 635 and 638 and lastly to Eugein I of Alt Clut at Strathcarron in 642, where he was killed.

A stanza interpolated into the early 9th Century Welsh poem Y Gododdin refers to these events:

   I saw an array that came from Pentir,
   And bore themselves splendidly around the conflagration.
   I saw a second one, rapidly descending from their township,
   Who had risen at the word of the grandson of Nwython.[1]
   I saw great sturdy men who came with the dawn,
   And the head of Dyfnwal Frych, ravens gnawed it.

Domnall's son Domangart mac Domnaill was later to be king of Dál Riata and from him the later kings of the Cenél nGabráin were descended. A second son, Cathasach, died c. 650, and a grandson of Domnall, also called Cathasach, died c. 688.

Generation 13 - Eochaid mac Áedán or Eochaid Buide

Eochaid Buide was king of Dál Riata from around 608 until 629. "Buide" refers to the colour yellow, as in the colour of his hair.

He was a younger son of Áedán mac Gabráin and became his father's chosen heir upon the death of his elder brothers. Adomnán's Life of Saint Columba has Columba foresee that Eochaid, then a child, will succeed his father in preference to his adult brothers Artúr, Eochaid Find and Domangart.

In the last two years of his reign, 627–629, Eochaid was apparently co-ruler with Connad Cerr, who predeceased him. Eochaid was followed by his son Domnall Brecc.

Eochaid's other sons named by the Senchus fer n-Alban are Conall Crandomna, Failbe (who died at the Battle of Fid Eoin), Cú-cen-máthair (whose death is reported in the Annals of Ulster for 604), Conall Bec, Connad or Conall Cerr (who may be the same person as Connad Cerr who died at Fid Eoin), Failbe, Domangart and Domnall Donn (not the same person as Domnall Donn unless his obituary is misplaced by 45 years like that of Ferchar mac Connaid)

According to the Fled Dúin na nGéd, Eochaid Buide was the grandfather of Congal Cáech. The story has anachronistic features as it has Eochaid alive at the time of the battle of Mag Rath (securely dated to within a year of 637), but it is chronologically feasible that Congal Cáech could have been the son of Eochaid's daughter if the identification of Cú-cen-máthair and the dating of his death is correct.

Generation 14 - Áedán mac Gabráin

Áedán mac Gabráin (pronounced [ˈaiðaːn mak ˈɡavraːnʲ] in Old Irish) was a king of Dál Riata from circa 574 until his death, perhaps on 17 April 609. The kingdom of Dál Riata was situated in modern Argyll and Bute, Scotland, and parts of County Antrim, Ireland. Genealogies record that Áedán was a son of Gabrán mac Domangairt.

He was a contemporary of Saint Columba, and much that is recorded of his life and career comes from hagiography such as Adomnán of Iona's Life of Saint Columba. Áedán appears as a character in Old Irish and Middle Irish language works of prose and verse, some now lost.

The Irish annals record Áedán's campaigns against his neighbours, in Ireland, and in northern Britain, including expeditions to the Orkney Islands, the Isle of Man, and the east coast of Scotland. As recorded by Bede, Áedán was decisively defeated by Æthelfrith of Bernicia at the Battle of Degsastan. Áedán may have been deposed, or have abdicated, following this defeat.

Generation 15 - Gabrán mac Domangairt

Gabrán mac Domangairt was king of Dál Riata in the middle of the 6th century. He is the eponymous ancestor of the Cenél nGabraín.

The historical evidence for Gabrán is limited to the notice of his death in the Irish annals. It is possible that his death should be linked to a migration or flight from Bridei mac Maelchon, but this may be no more than coincidence.

The king lists show Gabrán as the successor of his brother Comgall (d. ca. 537), and as the predecessor of Comgall's son Conall. The Duan Albanach gives him only a two year reign [Duan Albanach, 131], while the Latin Lists give 22 years [Poppleton MS, KKES, 253; Lists "D", "F", pp. 264, 270; probably correct] or 34 years [List "I", ibid., 281, probably an error for the 34 assigned to his son Áedán; Gabrán is accidently omitted by List "K", ibid., 286].

Date of Birth: Unknown. Place of Birth: Unknown.

Date of Death: d. ca. 559. ["... & mors Gabrain mc. Domangairt." AU (s.a. 559, also a duplicate entry s.a. 557); "Bass Gabrain maic Domanguirt ríg Alban." AT 17: 142; "Mors Gabráin mic Domangoirt, Rí Alban." CS, 52] Place of Death: Unknown.

Father: Domangart mac Fergusa, d. ca. 506?, king of Dál Riata.

Mother: Uncertain. See the Commentary section.

Spouse: Unknown. See the Commentary section.

Children: His five sons are named by Senchus Fer nAlban ["Cúic meic immora la Gabrán .i. Áedán. Éoganán. Cuildach Domnall. Domangart." Senchus, 41]. Only two of these sons are known from other sources.

MALE Áedán mac Gabráin, d. ca. 604, king of Dál Riata, ca. 573-ca. 604.

MALE Eóganán mac Gabráin, d. ca. 593. ["Mors Eugain m. Gabrain." AU (s.a. 594); "Bass Eoghain maic Gabran." AT 17: 160] Iogenanus is mentioned by Adomnán as a brother of Aidanus, the latter of whom St. Columba at first refused to consecrate as king, because he loved Eóganán more [Adomnán, iii, 5 (p. 189)].

MALE Cuildach mac Gabráin.

MALE Domnall mac Gabráin.

MALE Domangart mac Gabráin.

Gabrán mac Domangairt, King of Dál Riata Male Father: Domangart mac Fergusa, King of Dal Riata ++ [AR7]

	 	Name	 		 	Gabrán mac Domangairt King of Dál Riata [S1329]  
	 	Name	 	[unproved]	 	Gabran King of Dalriada [Gabran the Treacherous] 
	 	Name	 	++	 	Gabran [AR7]  

abt 510 Birth [unproved] Source References: [AR7] Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came To New England before 1700, 7th Ed. [S1329] The Henry Project - Gabrán mac Domangairt Baldwin says his mother is uncertain

Gabrán mac Domangairt, King of Dál Riata and Unknown Children:

   Aidan mac Gabran, king of Dalriada (~540-~608) ++ [AR7]

Generation 16 - Domangart mac Fergus or Domangart Reti Of mac Fergus, Rí na Dál Riata

Domangart mac Fergus, was the King of Dalriada from about 501-507, following his father's death. Domangart married Feldem Foltchain, daughter of Brion, son of Eochaid Mugmedon. Brion was an older half -brother of the famous Niall of the Nine Hostages.

Generation 17 - Fergus Mòr Mac Earca or Fergus Mor

The historical record, such as it is, consists of an entry in the Annals of Tigernach, for the year 501, which states: Feargus Mor mac Earca cum gente Dal Riada partem Britaniae tenuit, et ibi mortuus est. (Fergus Mór mac Eirc, with the people of Dál Riata, held part of Britain, and he died there.) However, the forms of Fergus, Erc and Dál Riata are later ones, written down long after the 6th century. The record in the Annals has given rise to theories of invasions of Argyll from Ireland, but these are not considered authentic.[1]

Fergus is also found in the king lists of Dál Riata, and later of Scotland, of which the Senchus Fer n-Alban and the Duan Albanach can be taken as examples. The Senchus states that Fergus Mór was also known as Mac Nisse Mór. These sources probably date from the 10th and 11th centuries respectively, between 30 and 40 generations after Fergus may have lived.

The Senchus and the Duan name Fergus's father as Erc son of Eochaid Muinremuir. A Middle Irish genealogy of the kings of Alba gives an extensive genealogy for Fergus: [Fergus] m. h-Eircc m. Echdach Muinremuir m. Óengusa Fir m. Feideilmid m. Óengusa m. Feideilmid m. Cormaicc, and a further forty-six generations here omitted.[2] While it was suggested some believe Fergus claimed lineage to Arthur, the historian John Morris has suggested, instead, that Fergus was allowed to settle in Scotland as a federate of Arthur, as a bulwark against the Picts.

These sources, while they offer evidence for the importance of Fergus Mór in Medieval times, are not evidence for his historical career. Indeed, only one king in the 6th century in Scotland is known from contemporary evidence, Ceretic of Alt Clut, and even this identification rests upon a later gloss to Saint Patrick's Letter to Coroticus. The first kings of Dál Riata whose existences are reasonably sure are Fergus's grandsons Gabrán mac Domangairt and Comgall, or perhaps his great-grandson Áedán mac Gabráin.

Generation 18 - Erc of Dalriada

Erc was king of Irish Dál Riata until 474. He was the father of Fergus Mór and Loarn mac Eirc, and may have been the great-grandfather of Muirchertach mac Muiredaig. Confusion arises from the latter's matronym, Macc Ercae, said to come from his legendary mother Erca, daughter of Loarn mac Eirc. She married Muiredach mac Eógain. According to the Duan Albanach and the Senchus Fer n-Alban Erc of Dál Riata's father was Eochaid Muinremuir. They may have been descendants of Conaire Cóem.

Suggestions that he was identical with Muiredach mac Eógain and thus belonged to the Uí Néill are based on late sources, such as the Annals of the Four Masters. In fact the Dál Riata are considered Érainn or Darini and claimed to be descendants of the famous Érainn king Conaire Mór. It is typical in late genealogies for unrelated peoples or those only related through marriage to be worked into a single genealogical scheme and all be made descendants of the same legendary founder.

Erc is significant as he has been traditionally regarded as the ancestor, through his son Fergus Mor, of the kings of Dalriada, and through them the Kings of Scotland, but more recently much of this tradition has been questioned.

Generation 19 - Eochaid Muinremuir MAC ÁENGUSA of the Dál-Riata

This is line taken from the Book of Leinster (see CGH p.328-9) and two contemporary pedigrees of William the Lion published in Skene's "Chronicles of the Picts and Scots", considered by Luke Stevens, who has thoroughly compared the various sources, as being probably the most accurate available.

The following is taken from an Internet posting of Michael R. Davidson of Edinburgh. Scotland, on 23 Oct 1995:

II. The Dal Riata and the Pseudo-Historical Section

The Dal Riata, the people from which the Scottish kings are descended, were originally settled on the north east coast of Ireland. Perhaps as early as the third century, and no later than the fifth century, they began to settle on the west coast of what is now Scotland. It is in the late fifth century that the names in the genealogy begin to take on some historical credibility. In any case, the ruling dynasty of the Dal Riata had established itself in the area corresponding to modern Argyll by the late fifth century. The most important information for this period is the text, probably first written in the seventh century, known as the _Senchus Fer nAlban_, or 'History of the Men of Scotland.' Its early material however, seems to have far too neat an appearance. Rather than make a fruitless effort to separate fact from fiction, I will instead quote from the _Senchus_, and let the reader come up with their own conclusions. (The genealogies make Eochaid Munremar a son of Oengus Fir, the last name in the above section.)

Two sons of Eochaid Munremar .i. Erc and Olchu. Erc, moreover, had twelve sons .i. six of them took possession of Scotland .i. two Loarnds

.i. Loarnd Bec and Loarnd Mor, two Mac Nisses .i. Mac Nisse Becc and Mac Nisse Mor, two Ferguses .i. Fergus Bec and Fergus Mor. Six others in Ireland .i. Mac Decill, Oengus, whose seed, however, is in Scotland, Enna, Bresal, Fiachra, Dubthach. Others say that this Erc had another son who was called Muredach.

Olchu, son of Eochaid Munremar, had, moreover, eleven sons who live in Murbolc in Dal Riata, Muredach Bolc, Aed, Dare, Oengus, Tuathal, Anbolmaid, Eochaid, Setna, Brian, Oinu, Cormac. (Translation Bannerman)

Generation 20 - Áengus Fert MAC FEIDEILMID

Angus Fir, King of Dalriada

Father: Fedelmid Aislingech, King of Dalriada

Children:

Eochaidh Muinreamhar, King of Dalriada Áengus Fert mac Feideilmid b. circa 350 Father Fedelmid Aislingich mac Áengusa

    Áengus Fert mac Feideilmid was born circa 350. He was the son of Fedelmid Aislingich mac Áengusa

Family Child

   Eochaid Muinremar mac Áengusa+ b. c 375, d. b 4392

Citations

   [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, RfC, 165-54.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 109.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 108.

Generation 21 - Fedelmid Aislingich MAC ÁENGUSA

   Born: Abt 375
   Died: Before 439

Fedelmid Aislingich Mac-Aengusa Parents: Aengus Buiding Mac-Feideilmid .

Children were: Angus Fert Mac-Feideilmid.

Generation 22 - Aengus Buiding Mac-Feideilmid

Áengus Buiding mac Feideilmid was the son of Fedelmid Ruamnach mac Senchormac.2 Family Child

   Fedelmid Aislingich mac Áengusa+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 107.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 106.

Generation 23 - Fedelmid Ruamnach mac Senchormac Fedelmid Ruamnach mac Senchormac was the son of Senchormac mac Cruithluithe.2 Family Child

   Áengus Buiding mac Feideilmid+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 106.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 105.

Generation 24 - Senchormac mac Cruithluithe Senchormac mac Cruithluithe was the son of Cruithluithe mac Finn Family Child

   Fedelmid Ruamnach mac Senchormac+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 105.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 104.

Generation 25 - Cruithluithe mac Finn

Cruithluithe mac Finn was the son of Finn Fiacc mac Achir Family Child

   Senchormac mac Cruithluithe+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 104.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 103.

Generation 26 - Finn Fiacc mac Achir

Finn Fiacc mac Achir was the son of Achir Cirre mac Echach Family Child

   Cruithluithe mac Finn+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 103.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 102

Generation 27 - Achir Cirre mac Echach

Achir Cirre mac Echach was the son of Eochaid Antóit mac Fiachrach.2 Family Child

   Finn Fiacc mac Achir+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 102.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 101

Generation 28 - Eochaid Antóit mac Fiachrach

Eochaid Antóit mac Fiachrach was the son of Fiachra Cathmáil mac Echach Family Child

   Achir Cirre mac Echach+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 101.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 100.

Generation 29 - Fiachra Cathmáil mac Echach

Fiachra Cathmáil mac Echach was the son of Eochaid Riada mac Conaire.2 Family Child

   Eochaid Antóit mac Fiachrach+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 100.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 99.

Generation 30 - Eochaid Riada mac Conaire

Father Ard-rí na h'Éireann Conaire mac Moga Láma Uí Éremóin3 d. 165 Mother Sarad ingen Conn

    Eochaid Riada mac Conaire emigrated first, away from the severe famine in his home of Munster, to the North East of Ireland (Antrim) to found the kingdom of Dal Riata at Ireland. He was born at Munster, Ireland. He ancestor of the Scottish Dal Riada ("a quo Alban Dal Riada"). He was the son of Ard-rí na h'Éireann Conaire mac Moga Láma Uí Éremóin and Sarad ingen Conn. Also called Cairbre Riadal. Eochaid Riada mac Conaire fell out with his followers and crossed the sea, leaving his son behind in fact, to found a second, Scottish, Dal Riata kingdom ("Britain recieved a third nation, that of the Irish, they migrated from Ireland under their chieftain Rueda") in 125 at Scotland. He fought in battle against Dadera, the Druid; Neimhidh, son of Sroibhcinn whom he killed in revenge for his father; and the south of Ireland in 186 at the Battle of Ceannfeabhrat.

Family Child

   Fiachra Cathmáil mac Echach

Citations

   [S291] Linea Antiqua, online http://members.aol.com/lochlan/clanmac.htm
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 99.
   [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M165.1.

Generation 31 - Ard-rí na h'Éireann Conaire mac Moga Láma Uí Éremóin Father Mug Láma mac Lugaid Uí Éremóin2 Mother Eithne ingen Lugdach Uí Ítha3

    Ard-rí na h'Éireann Conaire mac Moga Láma Uí Éremóin was the son of Mug Láma mac Lugaid Uí Éremóin and Eithne ingen Lugdach Uí Ítha.2,3 Ard-rí na h'Éireann Conaire mac Moga Láma Uí Éremóin was Conaire, son of Modh Lamha.2 Also called Conaire MacMogha Laine.4 He married Sarad ingen Conn, daughter of Conn Cétchathach, Ard-rí na h'Éireann.5 Ard-rí na h'Éireann Conaire mac Moga Láma Uí Éremóin succeeded his 7th cousin, 1x removed, Conn of the Hundred Battles, and ruled his first year over Ireland in 158.2 111th Monarch of Ireland between 158 and 165.2 He died in 165. After having been eight years in the sovereignty of Ireland, fell by Neimhidh, son of Sruibhgheann.5

Family Sarad ingen Conn Children

   Eochaid Riada mac Conaire+ 5
   Cairbre Baschaein mac Conaire 5
   Cairbre Musc mac Conaire 5

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 98.
   [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M158.1.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Íth mac Breogain, 58.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #51, pg. 785.
   [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M165.1.

Generation 32 - Mug Láma mac Lugaid Uí Éremóin

Father Lugaid Allathach mac Cairpre Uí Éremóin2

    Mug Láma mac Lugaid Uí Éremóin was the son of Lugaid Allathach mac Cairpre Uí Éremóin.2 Also called Modha Cromcinn.3 Mug Láma mac Lugaid Uí Éremóin married Eithne ingen Lugdach Uí Ítha, daughter of Lugaid mac Dáire Uí Ítha.4

Family Eithne ingen Lugdach Uí Ítha Child

   Ard-rí na h'Éireann Conaire mac Moga Láma Uí Éremóin+ d. 1655

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 97.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 96.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #51, pg. 785.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Íth mac Breogain, 58.
   [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M158.1.

Generation 33 - Lugaid Allathach mac Cairpre Uí Éremóin Father Cairpre Crommchenn mac Dáire Uí Éremóin

    Lugaid Allathach mac Cairpre Uí Éremóin was the son of Cairpre Crommchenn mac Dáire Uí Éremóin.2 Also called Luigheach Allathach.3

Family Child

   Mug Láma mac Lugaid Uí Éremóin

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 96.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 95.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #51, pg. 785.

Generation 34 - Cairpre Crommchenn mac Dáire Uí Éremóin Cairpre Crommchenn mac Dáire Uí Éremóin was the son of Dáire Dornmór mac Cairpre Uí Éremóin. Also called Cairbre Cromcinn. Family Child

   Lugaid Allathach mac Cairpre Uí Éremóin+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 95.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 94.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #51, pg. 785.

Generation 35 - Dáire Dornmór mac Cairpre Uí Éremóin or Cairbre Cromcinn

Dáire Dornmór mac Cairpre Uí Éremóin was the son of Cairpre Finn Mór mac Conaire Uí Éremóin.2 Also called Daire Dornmór.3 Family Child

   Cairpre Crommchenn mac Dáire Uí Éremóin+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 94.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 93.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #51, pg. 785.

Generation 36 - Cairpre Finn Mór mac Conaire Uí Éremóin or Cairbre Fionnmór


Cairpre Finn Mór mac Conaire Uí Éremóin was the son of Conaire Mór mac Eterscéoil, Ard-rí na h'Éireann.2 Also called Cairbre Fionnmór.3 Family Child

   Dáire Dornmór mac Cairpre Uí Éremóin+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 93.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 92.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #51, pg. 785

Generation 37 - Conaire Mór mac Eterscéoil, Ard-rí na h'Éireann or Conaire Mór

d. 0040 B.C. Father Eterscél mac Éogan, Ard-rí na h'Éireann1 d. 0110 B.C. Mother Mes Buachalla ingen Echach Uí Éremóin2

    Conaire Mór mac Eterscéoil, Ard-rí na h'Éireann died 0040 B.C. At Bruighean Da Dhearg, Ireland. After having been seventy years in the sovereignty of Irelend, was slain by insurgents.1 He ruled his first year over Ireland 0109 B.C..3 97th Monarch of Ireland 0109-0039 B.C..3 He was the son of Eterscél mac Éogan, Ard-rí na h'Éireann and Mes Buachalla ingen Echach Uí Éremóin.1,2 Conaire Mór mac Eterscéoil, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was the son of Ederscel.1,4 Also called Conaire Mór.

Citations

   [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M5160.1.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 91.
   [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M5091.1.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #40, pg. 785.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 92.

Generation 38 - Eterscél mac Éogan, Ard-rí na h'Éireann d. 0110 B.C. Father Éogan mac Ailella Uí Éremóin2

    Eterscél mac Éogan, Ard-rí na h'Éireann died 0110 B.C..1 95th Monarch of Ireland 0115-0110 B.C.. He was the son of Éogan mac Ailella Uí Éremóin.2 Also called Edersceal.3 Eterscél mac Éogan, Ard-rí na h'Éireann married Mes Buachalla ingen Echach Uí Éremóin, daughter of Eochaid Airem mac Finn, Ard-rí na h'Éireann and Esa ingen Echach Uí Éremóin.1 Eterscél mac Éogan, Ard-rí na h'Éireann was the father of Conaire Mór mac Eterscéoil, Ard-rí na h'Éireann; the son of Ederscel.4,5

Family Mes Buachalla ingen Echach Uí Éremóin Child

   Conaire Mór mac Eterscéoil, Ard-rí na h'Éireann+ d. 0040 B.C.4

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 91.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 90.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #38, pg. 785.
   [S334] Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M5160.1.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #40, pg. 785.

Generation 39 - Éogan mac Ailella Uí Éremóin

Father Ailill Anglonnach mac Iar Uí Éremóin

    Éogan mac Ailella Uí Éremóin was the son of Ailill Anglonnach mac Iar Uí Éremóin.2 Also called Eoghan.3

Family Child

   Eterscél mac Éogan, Ard-rí na h'Éireann+ d. 0110 B.C.1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 90.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 89.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #38, pg. 785.

Generation 40 - Ailill Anglonnach mac Iar Uí Éremóin

Father Iar mac Dedad Uí Éremóin

    Ailill Anglonnach mac Iar Uí Éremóin was the son of Iar mac Dedad Uí Éremóin.2 Also called Oilioll.3

Family Child

   Éogan mac Ailella Uí Éremóin+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 89.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 88.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #38, pg. 785.

Generation 41 - Iar mac Dedad Uí Éremóin

Father Dedad mac Sin Uí Éremóin

    Iar mac Dedad Uí Éremóin was the son of Dedad mac Sin Uí Éremóin.2 Also called Iar.3

Family Child

   Ailill Anglonnach mac Iar Uí Éremóin

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 88.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 87.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #38, pg. 785.

Generation 42 - Dedad mac Sin Uí Éremóin Father Suin mac Roshin Uí Éremóin2

    Dedad mac Sin Uí Éremóin was the son of Suin mac Roshin Uí Éremóin.2 Also called Deagha.3

Family Children

   Iar mac Dedad Uí Éremóin+ 1
   Dáire Donn mac Dedaid Uí Éremóin+ 4

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 87.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 86.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #38, pg. 785.
   [S335] Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, 22].

Generation 43 - Suin mac Roshin Uí Éremóin

Father Roshin mac Trer Uí Éremóin

    Suin mac Roshin Uí Éremóin was the son of Roshin mac Trer Uí Éremóin.2 Also called Luin a typo?3

Family Children

   Dedad mac Sin Uí Éremóin+ 1
   Echdach mac Sin Uí Éremóin+ 2

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 86.
   [S335] Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, 1686.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #38, pg. 785.

Generation 44 - Roshin mac Trer Uí Éremóin Father Trer mac Rothrer Uí Éremóin2

    Roshin mac Trer Uí Éremóin was the son of Trer mac Rothrer Uí Éremóin.2 Also called Roisin.3

Family Child

   Suin mac Roshin Uí Éremóin+ 4

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 85.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 84.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #38, pg. 785.
   [S335] Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, 1686.

Generation 45 - Trer mac Rothrer Uí Éremóin

Father Rothrer mac Airndil Uí Éremóin

    Trer mac Rothrer Uí Éremóin was the son of Rothrer mac Airndil Uí Éremóin.2 Also called Trein.3

Family Child

   Roshin mac Trer Uí Éremóin+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 84.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 83.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #38, pg. 785.

Generation 46 - Rothrer mac Airndil Uí Éremóin or Trein

Father Rothrer mac Airndil Uí Éremóin2

    Trer mac Rothrer Uí Éremóin was the son of Rothrer mac Airndil Uí Éremóin.2 Also called Trein.3

Family Child

   Roshin mac Trer Uí Éremóin+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 84.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 83.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #38, pg. 785.

Generation 47 - Rothrer mac Airndil Uí Éremóin or Rotherein

Father Airndil mac Maine Uí Éremóin2

    Rothrer mac Airndil Uí Éremóin was the son of Airndil mac Maine Uí Éremóin.2 Also called Rotherein.3

Family Child

   Trer mac Rothrer Uí Éremóin+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 83.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 82.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #38, pg. 785.

Generation 48 - Airndil mac Maine Uí Éremóin

Father Maine Mór mac Forga Uí Éremóin2

    Airndil mac Maine Uí Éremóin was the son of Maine Mór mac Forga Uí Éremóin.2 Also called Airindil.3

Family Child

   Rothrer mac Airndil Uí Éremóin+ 1

Citations

   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 82.
   [S278] DfAdam, online unknown url, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara, 81.
   [S310] John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees, The Line of Heremon #38, pg. 785.

--------------------------------

Ruadri Lineage Sources:

The Book of Leinster (Irish Lebor Laignech), is a medieval Irish manuscript compiled ca. 1160 and now kept in Trinity College, Dublin, under the shelfmark MS H 2.18 (cat. 1339). It was formerly known as the Lebor na Nuachongbála "Book of Nuachongbáil", a monastic site known today as Oughaval.

The Martyrology of Tallaght, which is closely related to the Félire Oengusso or Martyrology of Óengus the Culdee, is an eighth- or ninth-century martyrology, a list of saints and their feast days assembled by Máel Ruain and/or Óengus the Culdee at Tallaght Monastery, near Dublin.[1] The Martyrology of Tallaght is in prose and contains two sections for each day of the year, one general and one for Irish saints. It also has a prologue and an epilogue.

The Annals of Ulster (Irish: Annála Uladh) are annals of medieval Ireland. The entries span the years between AD 431 to AD 1540. The entries up to AD 1489 were compiled in the late 15th century by the scribe Ruaidhrí Ó Luinín, under his patron Cathal Óg Mac Maghnusa on the island of Belle Isle on Lough Erne in the province of Ulster. Later entries (up to AD 1540) were added by others.

Previous annals dating as far back as the 6th century were used as a source for the earlier entries, and later entries were based on recollection and oral history. T.M. Charles-Edwards has claimed that the main source for its records of the first millennium AD is a now-lost Armagh continuation of The Chronicle of Ireland. The Annals used the Irish language, with some entries in Latin. Because the Annals copied its sources verbatim, the annals are useful not just for historians, but also for linguists studying the evolution of the Irish language.

A century later, the Annals of Ulster would become an important source for the authors of the Annals of the Four Masters.

The Library of Trinity College Dublin possesses the original manuscript; the Bodleian Library in Oxford has a contemporary copy which fills some of the gaps in the original. There are two main modern English translations of the annals — Mac Airt and Mac Niocaill (1983) and MacCarthy (1893).

Kings of Dál Riata: Alpín Mac Echdach, Áedán Mac Gabráin, List of Kings of Dál Riata, Fergus Mór, Gabrán Mac Domangairt, Comgall Mac Domangairt [Paperback]

Duan Albanach - The Irish version of the Historia Britonum of Nennius (Author: [unknown])

Anderson, Alan Orr, Early Sources of Scottish History A.D 500–1286, volume 1. Reprinted with corrections. Paul Watkins, Stamford, 1990. ISBN 1-871615-03-8

  

Broun, Dauvit, The Irish Identity of the Kingdom of the Scots in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. Boydell, Woodbridge, 1999. ISBN 0-85115-375-5

Adomnán, Life of St Columba, tr. & ed. Richard Sharpe. Penguin, London, 1995. ISBN 0-14-044462-9

Lebor Clann Glas

Décès En 560: Clodoald, Chramne, Gabrán Mac Domangairt, Cynric de Wessex (French Edition) [Paperback]

Francis John Byrne, Irish Kings and High-Kings. Four Courts Press. 2nd edition, 2001.

   

Thomas Charles-Edwards, Early Christian Ireland. Cambridge University Press. 2000.

   

Donnchadh Ó Corráin (ed.), Genealogies from Rawlinson B 502, at University College Cork: Corpus of Electronic Texts. 1997.

   

John O'Donovan (ed. and tr.), Annala Rioghachta Eireann. Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the Earliest Period to the Year 1616. 7 vols. Royal Irish Academy. Dublin. 1848-51. 2nd edition, 1856.

   

John O'Hart, Irish Pedigrees. Dublin. 5th edition, 1892.

   

T.F. O'Rahilly, Early Irish History and Mythology. Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. 1946.

Linea Antiqua, online http://members.aol.com/lochlan/clanmac.htm'''

DfAdam, The Line of Fiachu Fer Mara

Emma Ryan Vol. 1, Myriam Priour Vol. 2 & 3 and Floortje Hondelink Vol. 4, A4M, M165.1

Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Rawl. 502, 22

http://cafamilies.org/finley/ancient-rts.html

http://cafamilies.org/finley/macbeth-rts.html#lorne

http://www.angelfire.com/biz/finleyfindings/

http://cafamilies.org/finley/clan_finley.html

http://irvinemclean.com/peerage/mar.htm

http://www.duffus.com/sundaynews9_2_00.htm

http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/earldoms/chapter1s1.htm

http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p234.htm

http://www.algerclan.org/getperson.php?personID=I17238&tree=alger

http://en.rodovid.org/wk/Person:142611

http://clanmaclochlainn.com/pedigree.htm

Celtic Scotland: a history of ancient Alban, Volume 3 By William Forbes Skene Pg. 477

http://www.magma.ca/~mmackay/moray.html

http://forums.totalwar.org/vb/archive/index.php/t-30879.html

http://nobleworldchrono.9f.com/britishisles.htm

http://web.raex.com/~obsidian/scot.html#Moray

---------------------------------------- Other notes:

From: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm

Malcolm I had [one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress]:

3. [KENNETH . The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that "Constantine the Bald, son of King Culen" succeeded in 994 after King Kenneth II was killed, but that he was "continually harassed by Malcolm [son of King Kenneth] and his illegitimate uncle…Kenneth" and killed in battle "in Laudonia by the banks of the river Almond" after reigning for one and a half years[184]. He is not mentioned in any of the earlier sources so far consulted. His existence should be treated with caution.]

[DONADA . Many secondary sources name Donada as a younger daughter of King Malcolm II and the mother of King Macbeth. It seems that the proof for this connection is slim. The only source so far identified which refers to Macbeth´s maternal origin is the Chronicle of Huntingdon which names "Maket Regem [=King Macbeth] nepotem dicti Malcolmi" when recording that he was expelled from Scotland after ruling 15 years[175]. The word "nepos" is of course treacherous, and could indicate a variety of relationships in addition to grandson. However, it appears that early historians assumed that "grandson" was the correct translation. For example, Ralph Holinshed´s 1577 Chronicle of Scotland names "Doada" as second daughter of Malcolm II King of Scotland and adds that she married "Sinell the thane of Glammis, by whom she had issue one Makbeth"[176]. Another variation is provided by the Cronykil of Andrew of Wyntoun, which records that "Makbeth-Fynlak, his systyr sowne" murdered King Duncan[177]. From a chronological point of view, it is unlikely that Macbeth could have been a nephew of King Duncan, but it is possible that the passage represents an interpretation of "nepos" from an earlier source and has confused the king with whom Macbeth enjoyed this relationship. No source earlier than Holinshed has been found which names her Donada. m as his second wife, FINDLAECH MacRory Thane of Angus Mormaer of Moray, son of RUAIDHRI Mormaer of Moray & his wife --- (-1020). The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1020 of "Finnlaech son of Ruadrí king of Alba…killed by his own people"[178].]

Máel Coluim mac Domnaill (anglicised Malcolm I)

Máel Coluim mac Cináeda (Modern Gaelic: Maol Chaluim mac Choinnich,[1] known in modern anglicized regnal lists as Malcolm II; died 25 November 1034

Cináed mac Maíl Coluim (Modern Gaelic: Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim[1] anglicised as Kenneth II

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Deacon_of_Pndapetzim/Kings

Máel Coluim of Moray (or Máel Coluim mac Máil Brigti) was King or Mormaer of Moray (1020–1029), and, as his name suggests, the son of a Máel Brigte. As with his predecessor Findláech mac Ruaidrí, sources call him "King of Scotland."

Rather confusingly for some of our sources and for some historians, Máel Coluim held the kingship contemporaneously with another Máel Coluim, Máel Coluim II (mac Cináeda) of Scotland. The Orkneyinga Saga for instance tells us that Thorfinn Sigurdsson, Earl of Orkney was the son of the daughter of Máel Coluim, king of Scotland. Some historians have argued that this was Máel Coluim mac Cináeda of Scotland, but Hudson has suggested that Máel Coluim mac Máil Brigti is the more likely candidate (p. 135).

His death date derives from the Annals of Tigernach, which notes s.a. 1029, "Mael Colaim mac Mael-Brighdi mac Ruaidrí, rí Alban mortuus est (="Máel Coluim, son of Máel Brigte, son of Ruadrí, King of Scotland, dies")." As can be seen, if it were not for the mac Mael-Brighdi, we could easily assume we were being given an inaccurate date for the death of King Máel Coluim II.

Máel Coluim mac Máil Brigti seems to have been succeeded by his brother Gille Coemgáin.

Domnall mac Máil Coluim, "son of the King of Scotland", whose death is reported by the Annals of Ulster s.a. 1085, may have been a son of this Máel Coluim, or perhaps of Máel Coluim mac Donnchada (Malcolm III). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%A1el_Coluim_of_Moray

Findláech of Moray, or Findláech mac Ruaidrí, was the King or Mormaer of Moray, ruling from some point before 1014 until his death in 1020. In the Annals of Ulster and in the Book of Leinster, Findláech is called rí Alban, which meant "King of Scotland" in the Gaelic language. As far as we know from other sources, the only rí Alban of the time was Máel Coluim mac Cináeda, i.e. Máel Coluim II, so this title can only mean that Findláech, as ruler of Moray, was understood by many to have been the High-King of all northern Britain. However, Findláech's main claim to fame these days is as the father of Mac Bethad, made famous by William Shakespeare's play Macbeth. Indeed, the Irish historian known in Latin as Marianus Scotus calls Macbethad simply MacFindlaeg. Historians are fairly certain that Findláech was ruling before 1014 because the Orkneyinga Saga reads that before the Battle of Clontarf, Jarl Siguðr of Orkney fought a battle with the Scots, who were led by a Jarl Finnlekr (i.e. Findláech the Mormaer). An Irish princess called Eithne made a banner for Siguðr, which had on it a raven. The saga records that Siguðr later brought the banner to Clontarf, where he was killed. If we believe this, then Findláech would be ruler quite a bit before 1014. His death date, as mentioned above, derives from the Annals of Ulster, which notes s.a. 1020 Finnloech m. Ruaidhri, ri Alban, a suis occisus est, that is, that Findláech was killed by his own people. No reason for this is given, but the logical thing is to conclude that his successor, his nephew Máel Coluim mac Máil Brigti, had something to do with it. Indeed, the Annals of Tigernach tell us that the sons of Máel Brigte were responsible; the only sons we know of are Máel Coluim and Gille Coemgáin, both of whom evidently benefited from the killing, as both succeeded to the throne.

http://www.euppublishing.com/doi/abs/10.3366/shr.2000.79.2.145

The Scottish Historical Review is the premier journal in the field of Scottish Historical Studies, covering all periods of Scottish history from the early to the modern, encouraging a variety of historical approaches.

http://www.republicofheaven.org.uk/bloodroyal/br_app1_cor.htm

From Book "People of the Green Race"

http://one-evil.org/people/people_11c_malcolm_I.htm

Mac Bethad mac Findlaích was born to King Findláech mac Ruadrí of Moray--of the legendary Kings of Dál Riata and later Alba (Scotland)-- the "Holly"

(Cuilliaéan) druid priest kings originally from Ireland and Fergus Mor in the 8th Century.
 	In 997, Holly King Causantín mac Cuiléain of Alba (Scotland) was murdered by Cináed mac Ailpín (Kenneth MacAlpin) of the treacherous Uí Néill declaring himself the new King. Later, the origin of Kenneth MacAlpin was deliberately corrupted by "writer for hire" John of Fordun who in the 14th Century was paid handsomely by King Edward III to destroy the true history of Scotland and Ireland and write a wholly ficticious tale.
 	After the historic coup, the last remaining Holly bloodline and rightful heir to the throne of Scotland was the younger brother of Causantín, King Ruadrí of Moray. When "King" Kenneth was killed at the battle of Clontarf in 1005, his son Máel Coluim mac Cináeda (Malcolm the destroyer) took the throne. His first act as King was to invite King Ruadrí of Moray to discuss terms of a peace treaty, at which King Malcolm broke his solemn oath as a King and had King Ruadrí murdered. King Ruadrí was then succeeded by his son Findláech mac Ruadrí as King of Moray.
 	The continuing treachery of the Uí Néill usurpers to the throne of Scotland plunged the whole region into civil war for thirty years, during which Malcolm succeeded in destroying virtually every major landmark, building, church, school, monastery and asset of Scotland--hence his historic name. By 1032, he finally achieved his aim in killing King Findláech mac Ruadrí of Moray in 1032 -- the father of Macbeth.
 	In 1034, King Malcolm the destroyer finally died and was succeeded by his son Donnchad mac Crínáin also known as Duncan as King of Alba (Scotland). In 1039, Duncan planned one final push to invade the kingdom of Moray and eliminate Macbeth and the last of the Holly. However at the battle of Pitgaveny near Elgin, upon the orders by Duncan for his troops to attack Macbeth full-frontal, his troops rebelled and killed the King. Thus in 1039, Macbeth became the last Holly King of Scotland.
 	Unfortunately, the infant son of Duncan, whose name was Máel Coluim mac Donnchad (Malcolm the Traitor) escaped with his family to Northumbria and the court of Siward the Dane. Siward then raised him as his own son, even granting him the title of King of Strathclyde.
 	When Siward the Dane died in 1055, Malcolm, the son of Duncan and Earl of Northumbria took his army northward to confront Macbeth but was badly beaten. Upon his return to Northumbria, Malcolm was then humiliated in being stripped of his inheritance by King Edward the Confessor (1042-1066) who then appointed Tostig Godwinson as the new Earl.
 	Malcolm made a desperate appeal to Edward the Confessor for troops, including his oath and loyalty as a vassal of England--effectively selling Scotland to the House of Wessex to regain the crown. With that deal, Edward provided Malcolm with a large mercenary army which invaded Scotland in 1058.
 	Heavily outnumbered, Macbeth held Malcolm's forces at the north side of the Mounth, but was forced to retreat over the Cairnamounth Pass where at the battle of Lumphanan Macbeth was severley wounded. Malcolm mistakenly believed that Macbeth had been taken back to his family castle at Dunsinane Hill and ordered it destroyed, killing the entire Macbeth clan. Instead, Macbeth was taken to Scone, where he died in 1058 --the last Holly king of Scotland.
 	 
From "Labor Clan Galss" - 

Home Scripture Book Index < Previous Next > you are here: > The Book of the Clann Glas (Green Race) > Chapter 27

 	

Chapter 27 - 904 CE

 	  	 

563. 1. From the year 904 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (904 AD) 3. A Sadducee House of unheralded evil 4. known as the counts of Tusculum 5. did seize the Papacy and political power 6. First through Pope Sergius III 7. a man of unprecedented evil 8. For he introduced a tradition to the Popes 9. that they would not only father 10. illegitimate children as almost all Popes 11. had done for generations 12. but that the Popes would commit incest 13. with their own children 14. in order to produce more Popes 15. Further that those children not favoured 16. would be used for great ceremonies 17. of human sacrifice in honor of the demonic gods 18. of the Sadducee jews 19. So it was that Pope Sergius III 20. did commit incest with his daughter Marozie 21. who he made his mistress 22. and their son then 23. became Pope John X 24. also known as Pope John XI, Pope John XII 25. and Pope John XIII to hide the fact 26. of his great reign as Supreme Pontiff of the Catholic Church 27. But the reign of Pope Sergius III 28. was nothing to compare to the Papacy of his son 29. A rule of over 37 years across at least four papacy's 30. For upon his first papacy 31. he converted all the convents of Rome into brothels 32. he openly participated in satanic masses in daylight 33. murdering countless innocent victims 34. Pope John did also take his mother Marozie 35. to be his mistress and wife 36. and even fathered several children 37. with his mother 38. Except for the city wide orgies of the Borgia Popes 39. in many years to come 40. Rome has never seen the rivers of blood 41. nor pure evil as the reign of the House of Tusculum 42. for over 100 years 564. 1. In the year 943 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (943 AD) 3. Holly King Causantín mac Áeda 4. Son of Áeda mac Causantín 5. grandson of Causantín mac Domnall 6. great grandson of Domnall mac Causantín 7. great great grandson of Caustantín mac Fergusa 8. three times great grandson of Fergus mac Echdach 9. four times great grandson of Eochaid mac Echdach 10. five times great grandson of Eochaid mac Domangart 11. six times great grandson of Domangart mac Domnall 12. seven times great grandson of Domnall mac Echdach 13. eight times great grandson of Son of Eochaid mac Áedán 14. nine times great grandson of Áedán mac Gabráin 15. ten times great grandson of Gabrán mac Domangairt 16. eleven times great grandson of Domangart mac Fergus 17. twelve times great grandson of Fergus Mor 18. Descendent of the most ancient Holly druids 19. Descendent of the High Kings of Ireland 20. Did give up the ghost 21. The kingship of Alba (Scotland) then did fall 22. to his son Ildulb mac Causantín 23. the sixth king of united Scotland 565. 1. In the year 962 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (962AD) 3. Holly King Ildulb mac Causantín 4. Son of Causantín mac Áeda 5. grandson of Áeda mac Causantín 6. great grandson of Causantín mac Domnall 7. great great grandson of Domnall mac Causantín 8. three times great grandson of Caustantín mac Fergusa 9. four times great grandson of Fergus mac Echdach 10. five times great grandson of Eochaid mac Echdach 11. six times great grandson of Eochaid mac Domangart 12. seven times great grandson of Domangart mac Domnall 13. eight times great grandson of Domnall mac Echdach 14. nine times great grandson of Son of Eochaid mac Áedán 15. ten times great grandson of Áedán mac Gabráin 16. eleven times great grandson of Gabrán mac Domangairt 17. twelve times great grandson of Domangart mac Fergus 18. thirteen times great grandson of Fergus Mor 19. Descendent of the most ancient Holly druids 20. Descendent of the High Kings of Ireland 21. Did give up the ghost 22. The kingship of Alba (Scotland) then did fall 23. to his son Cuiléain mac Iduilb 24. whose name means Holly 25. the seventh king of united Scotland 566. 1. In the year 971 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (971 AD) 3. Holly King Cuiléin mac Iduilb 4. Son of Ildulb mac Causantín 5. grandson of Causantín mac Áeda 6. great grandson of Áeda mac Causantín 7. great great grandson of Causantín mac Domnall 8. three times great grandson of Domnall mac Causantín 9. four times great grandson of Caustantín mac Fergusa 10. five times great grandson of Fergus mac Echdach 11. six times great grandson of Eochaid mac Echdach 12. seven times great grandson of Eochaid mac Domangart 13. eight times great grandson of Domangart mac Domnall 14. nine times great grandson of Domnall mac Echdach 15. ten times great grandson of Son of Eochaid mac Áedán 16. eleven times great grandson of Áedán mac Gabráin 17. twelve times great grandson of Gabrán mac Domangairt 18. thirteen times great grandson of Domangart mac Fergus 19. fourteen times great grandson of Fergus Mor 20. Descendent of the most ancient Holly druids 21. Descendent of the High Kings of Ireland 22. Did give up the ghost 23. The kingship of Alba (Scotland) then did fall 24. to his son Causantín mac Cuiléain 25. known as the true Constantine IV 26. the eighth king of united Scotland 567. 1. In the year 997 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (997 AD) 3. Holly King Causantín mac Cuiléain 4. Son of Cuiléain mac Iduilb 5. grandson of Ildulb mac Causantín 6. great grandson of Causantín mac Áeda 7. great great grandson of Áeda mac Causantín 8. three times great grandson of Causantín mac Domnall 9. four times great grandson of Domnall mac Causantín 10. five times great grandson of Caustantín mac Fergusa 11. six times great grandson of Fergus mac Echdach 12. seven times great grandson of Eochaid mac Echdach 13. eight times great grandson of Eochaid mac Domangart 14. nine times great grandson of Domangart mac Domnall 15. ten times great grandson of Domnall mac Echdach 16. eleven times great grandson of Son of Eochaid mac Áedán 17. twelve times great grandson of Áedán mac Gabráin 18. thirteen times great grandson of Gabrán mac Domangairt 19. fourteen times great grandson of Domangart mac Fergus 20. fifteen times great grandson of Fergus Mor 21. Descendent of the most ancient Holly druids 22. Descendent of the High Kings of Ireland 23. Was murdered by the commander of the Royal guard 24. Known as Cináed mac Ailpín 25. And as Kenneth the Brown 26. And as Kenneth MacAlpin 27. wrongly re-written as Cináed mac Duib 28. by artificer of the pen John of Fordun 29. to hide the truth of his clan of assassins 30. most spineless and treacherous 31. changed of name to hide his evil deed 32. Formed the House of Alpin 33. falsely known as the House of Dunkeld 34. on account of his grandson 35. upon murdering the Holly High King 36. and his whole family 37. Kenneth MacAlpin did claim 38. The sons of the Holly King 39. Did kill their father and Kenneth 40. Did slay them as assassins 41. Inheriting the crown upon his adoption 42. As a son of the King 43. And his dying wish 44. Many of the cousins of the Holly King 45. Did protest such claims as clearly false 46. Ruadrí of Moray 47. the younger brother of The slain King Constantine 48. Did protest loudly 49. At the falseness of these claims 50. But too powerful was MacAlpin 51. On account of the alliances 52. He had made with Uí Néill king 53. Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill 54. Of the Clann Cholmáin of the southern Uí Néill Of Ireland 55. a relative of Kenneth MacAlpin 56. And alliances for troops 57. with Waltheof the King of Bernicia and Earl of Northumbria 58. Kenneth MacAlpin the assassin 59. Was a crafty king 60. And upon being crowned 61. upon The white (limestone) stone of destiny 62. And the Marble throne of Amen-Ra 63. King Kenneth did claim the ancient right 64. Of the lands to the north of Ireland 65. As being the Kingdom of Alba 66. On account of them once being part of Dál Riata 67. Calling himself Emperor of the Celtic Tribes 68. The northern Uí Néill did reject his claim 69. And King Kenneth MacAlpin 70. Did invade the north of Ireland 71. In the year 1005 72. And the Battle of Clontarf did ensue 73. At which King Kenneth was killed 74. Later to be reborn as Brian Boru 75. Through the creative lies 76. Of the Uí Brian 77. To claim kingship 568. 1. In the year 1005 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (1005 AD) 3. Cináed mac Ailpín the assassin 4. Known as King Kenneth MacAlpin 5. Was succeeded by his son 6. Máel Coluim mac Cináeda 7. known as Malcolm the destroyer 8. A bloodthirsty tyrant was Malcolm 9. And set about killing all the Holly family 10. He could find 11. enslaving the Scots 12. and taxing all merchants as much as he could 13. Within his first year he succeeded 14. In killing Ruadrí of Moray 15. the younger brother of the slain King Constantine 16. But his family escaped 17. And Malcolm turned his attention 18. To building alliances for his own greatness 19. Malcolm did go to Rome 20. And even to England 21. And in 1032 Malcolm 22. Did kill Findláech mac Ruadrí 23. The King of Moray 24. And rightful heir of the throne of Alba (Scotland) 25. Yet himself did die two years later (1034) 569. 1. In the year 1032 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (1032 AD) 3. And the murder of Findláech mac Ruadrí 4. The true King of Alba (Scotland) 5. By Malcolm of the House of Assassins 6. Known as Alpin 7. His son known as Mac Bethad mac Findlaích 8. Whose name was MacBeth 9. Of the fame of stories and legends 10. But was the true Heir to the Kingship of Alba (Scotland) 11. On account of being of the Holly family 12. The Cuileain and Cuilleain 13. The most ancient druids and High Kings of Ireland 14. Descendents of the greatest prophets and kings 15. Did become King of Moray 16. MacBeth was a mighty warrior 17. And wise king 18. Who earned the name Rí Deircc 19. Which means the Red King 20. While he longed for the day to avenge 21. The murder of his family 22. By one of the most treacherous families 23. To ever walk the sacred earth of Scotland 24. He was wise to wait for the right opportunity 25. Lest the alliance of the House of Alpin 26. Bring great war upon the land 570. 1. In the year 1034 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (1034 AD) 3. The son of Malcolm 4. And grandson of Kenneth MacAlpin 5. Whose name was Donnchad mac Crínáin 6. Also known as Duncan 7. Did become King of Alba 8. A poor general of men 9. Who inherited all the wickedness of his father 10. Hated by all of Scotland 11. On account of his cruel murder of many scholars 12. of priests and innocent people 13. And those that would not worship him as a great king 14. In the year 1039 15. Duncan decided he would invade the lands of Moray 16. And kill MacBeth and all the remainder of his clan 17. So no more contest would there be 18. against the house of treachery 19. The house of Alpin and Dunkeld 20. But MacBeth was a greater match for Duncan 21. And the troops of Duncan did suffer great losses 22. Upon a battle at Pitgaveny near Elgin 23. Upon the order of the mad King Duncan 24. That his troops attack full frontal upon MacBeth 25. His own troops did kill the King 26. And surrender to MacBeth 27. Recognizing his legal right and Kingship 28. Thus in the year 1039 29. MacBeth became the last Holly King 30. To rule Scotland 31. The very last Holly King 32. of all history 571. 1. In the year 1039 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (1039 AD) 3. At the royal court in Scone 4. King MacBeth was the last Holly King 5. And the last King on either British or Irish soil 6. To be anointed upon the true 7. White (limestone) Stone of Destiny 8. And to sit upon the Green Marble Throne of Amen-Ra 9. King MacBeth showed himself as wise a king 10. As any of the Great Holly High Kings 11. Of ages past 12. Upon the wars between the English Earls and Kings 13. He accepted Norman exiles into his court 14. Treating all with respect and justice 15. He restored the rights of laws of the land 16. So wickedly taken by the House of Alpin 17. And increased trade with all 18. But Máel Coluim mac Donnchada 19. Also known as Malcolm 20. The infant son of Duncan who was slain by own troops 21. Did escape with some of his household 22. To Northumbria and the court of Siward the Dane 23. Who did raise Malcolm the son of Duncan 24. As his own 25. And when he was of age, he was granted the title 26. Of King of Strathclyde 27. By his adopted father 572. 1. In the year 1055 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (1055 AD) 3. Upon the death of Siward the Dane 4. The Earl of Northumbria 5. Malcolm, the son of Duncan 6. Did take the army northwards 7. And confront King MacBeth 8. MacBeth was a superior commander 9. And held his ground against the superior numbers 10. Of the Northumbrians 11. But did encounter heavy losses 12. as fate would have it 13. The commanders of the Northumbrians 14. Were called to withdraw 15. By the English crown 16. As a new Earl of Northumbria 17. Whose name was Tostig Godwinson 18. Did the English appoint 19. And the invasion was abandoned 20. Malcolm did go to England 21. To make his case against MacBeth 22. It is here that he did speak such vile lies 23. And wicked untruth concerning 24. King MacBeth 25. by using the true evil of his own ancestry 26. And claiming it as MacBeth 27. Upon hearing of such trickery 28. And wishing a strong ally in the Scots 29. The English did supply the traitor 30. And liar Malcolm with a new army 31. With which to defeat MacBeth 573. 1. In the year 1057 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (1057 AD) 3. King MacBeth did receive word 4. That Malcolm the traitor of Scotland 5. From the House of Assassins 6. The House of Alpin 7. was approaching with a massive army 8. As MacBeth prepared his battled plans 9. An old woman from the far North 10. Known to be a prophetess 11. Did come to MacBeth 12. And foretold of his defeat 13. And the end of the line of the Holly Kings 14. That he must save the ancient relics 15. From falling into the hands of the traitor Malcolm 16. For surely they would then be given to the English 17. And with such symbols of power 18. The English could wage great evil and war 19. So MacBeth ordered his most trusted troops 20. To take the Stony of destiny 21. The Marble Throne of Amen-Ra 22. The round tables of Cormac Mac Art 23. the Standard of the House of Judah 24. and other most ancient relics 25. and buried them deeply 26. near his ancestral home 27. the castle of Dunsinane Hill 28. in the lands of Perthshire 574. 1. In the year 1058 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (1058 AD) 3. Malcolm and his mercenary army 4. Did invade Scotland 5. And Macbeth valiantly held the forces at bay 6. At the north side of the Mounth 7. But heavily outnumbered he retreated 8. over the Cairnamounth Pass 9. and his last battle Lumphanan 10. wounded and defeated his guard 11. took him from the battlefield 12. Malcolm believed MacBeth had been taken 13. To his fort at Dunsinane Hill 14. And ordered it destroyed 15. Killing the family of MacBeth 16. And his heirs 17. Instead, MacBeth was taken to Scone 18. as was prophesized 19. and the good king died 20. Malcom triumphant through his treachery 21. And treason against the honor of Scotland 22. Then proclaimed himself king 23. But upon finding the most sacred artifacts 24. And no one alive to torture as to their location 25. He cursed the name MacBeth 26. And try as he might 27. as did his descendants 28. None did find the location of the true relics 29. For eight hundred more years 30. The Last Holly King was dead 31. A legend begun from the beginning of time 32. Was gone forever 575. 1. In the year 1099 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (1099 AD) 3. Christian Knights, priests 4. and members of the first crusade 5. slaughtered every single man, woman, child 6. and animal in Jerusalem, 7. sparing not one soul 8. upon the specific and clear orders 9. of Blessed Pope Urban II 10. Over two hundred thousand souls died 11. by the order of the Pope 12. sixty thousand of which were Jewish 13. But on account they were not Sadducee jews 14. of noble blood, not one was spared. 576. 1. In the year 1102 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (1102 AD) 3. Magnus III of Norway 4. invaded Ireland and captured Dublin. 5. the city rebuilt by his ancestors 6. Yet his stay and life in Ireland was short lived 7. for the following year (1103) 8. Muircheartach Ua Briain 9. a thoroughly wicked and immoral leader 10. had him assassinated 11. by dressing up some of his men as priests 12. at Downpatrick, County Down 13. In the year 1104 14. Muircheartach Ua Briain 15. did commission the first of three horrendous frauds 16. all designed to strengthen his claim of Kingship 17. and secure the claims of his heirs 18. The first was a heavily doctored version of Táin Bó Cúailnge 19. the foundation story of the Ulster Epic 20. originally commissioned by Cormac Mac Art 21. over eight hundreds years prior 22. but now resembling it only in name 23. within the publication Lebor na hUidre 24. which means Book of the Dun Cow 25. by the Christian monastery of Clonmacnoise 26. in exchange for a handsome bribe 27. The second great forgery was the work called 28. Cogadh Gaedhil re Gallaibh 29. The War of the Irish with the Foreigners 30. by Muirchertach Ua Briain 31. In which a completely fabled king called Brian Boru 32. was supposed to be the founder of the clan 33. The truth of Thomond long buried 34. The truth of the Ua Briain history as petty mercenaries 35. from foreign lands 36. long written out of a new history which they created 37. The third and final fraudulent epic 38. created by Muirchertach Ua Briain 39. was called Brjánssaga 40. which means Brjáns saga 41. Yet another story of mythical heroes 42. from which the Ua Briain were supposed to have risen 43. Not as paid mercenaries who came in search 44. of gold and plunder during the first invasions 45. of Papal forces in the year 430 577. 1. In the year 1119 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (1119 AD) 3. Two veteran French knights from the first crusade 4. whose names were Hugues de Payens and Godfrey de Saint-Omer 5. came into the possession 6. of a most ancient letter 7. from the time of the House of Ananias 8. Upon request The two knights 9. did receive permission 10. by Baldwin II of Jerusalem 11. to establish a monastic order 12. for the protection of pilgrims 13. and specifically requested the vacant Temple Mount site 14. The king agreed and the order was formed under the title 15. Poor Knights of Christ and the Temple of Solomon 16. or Templar Knights 17. But for the first eight years 18. the Templars did nothing but dig 19. and around the maze of caves and catacombs 20. that exist within the base of the Temple Mount 21. Then in the year 1128 22. The two men discovered 23. a most ancient and preserved head 24. hidden in a clay jar 25. They went on to call this head 26. The Baphomet 27. The wise head 28. Also known as the head of prophecy 29. It being the severed head 30. of Jesus known as Christ 31. which Paul of Tarsus cut off 32. when he murdered him in France 33. bringing the head to the High priests 34. who in turn hid it within the bowels of the Temple 35. Within one year of their discovery 36. The Templars had the patronage of Bernard of Clairvaux 37. one of the wealthiest men 38. and official recognition by the church 39. Within ten more years (1139) 40. Pope Innocent II with a papal bull 41. named Omne Datum Optimum 42. exempted the Order from obedience to local laws. 43. Thus the Templars for two hundred years 44. became the most powerful and mysterious order 45. to ever exist within the Catholic Church 46. Yet upon their disbandment 47. The Baphomet was never found 48. Nor were the secret documents found 49. at the same time 50. The location of the Templar Treasure 51. being these things has remained a mystery 578. 1. In the year 1151 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (1151 AD) 3. Pope Eugine III did commission 4. a master forger named Gratian 5. to create a supremely false document 6. called the Decretum 7. using cleaned and ancient parchments 8. incorporating the forged Isidorian Decretals 9. then combined with two other major forgeries 10. The Donation of Constantine 11. and the Liber Pontificalis 12. along with other falsified writings 13. and codified into a system of Church law 14. which elevated Gregory 15. and all his successors as absolute monarchs 16. claiming supremecy of the world 579. 1. In the year 1154 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (1154 AD) 3. King Henry II of England 4. Did undertake a plan that would once and for all 4. Destroy the sacred soul of Ireland 4. And render it a broken vassal of England 4. First, he did address the seizure 4. of the sacredness of Ireland 4. King Henry II commissioned Geoffrey of Monmouth 5. and a team of founding scholars 6. granted to form Oxford University 7. To produce a wholly fraudulent work 8. called Historia Regum Britanniae 9. History of the Kings of Britain 10. wholly stolen from real Irish history 11. to eliminate all real Irish history 12. by assigning it to England 13. a strategy that largely succeeded 14. for over 900 years 15. Second, King Henry II 16. undertook an agreement with Pope Adrian IV 17. whereby the Pope issued a Papal Bull 18. One of the most evil documents of history 19. called Laudabiliter 20. which was doctored in later centuries 21. to hide its real contents 22. For in 1155 this claim of the Pope 23. Based on all the forgeries of the past Popes 24. was that the Vatican legally owned Ireland 25. including its people 26. So Pope Adrian IV did then sell Ireland 27. and all the Irish as slaves 28. to King Henry II of England 29. in exchange for a handsome annual sum 30. a tribute of supreme evil 31. only ended under the reign of another Henry 32. with many wives 33. The truth that the Vatican was paid by England 34. The fact that the Popes sold the Irish nation 35. as slaves now disputed 36. by yet more frauds and lies 580. 1. In the year 1158 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (1158 AD) 3. King Henry II of England 4. Did continue his rape of the soul of Ireland 5. By stealing the official standard 6. of the cuilleain the Holly 7. as last remaining bloodline of House of Judah 8. the lion rampant 9. A symbolizm of his claim over Ireland 10. And the former Holly kingdom of Scotland 11. But in colour reverse did the King order it 12. a golden lion on a red field 13. a theft of historic proportions 14. that has held for far too long 15. No right to the lion did England have 16. Nor has England ever had 17. Other than pillagers, brigands and assassins 581. 1. In the year 1169 2. Since the birth of John the Baptist (1169 AD) 3. The Army of King Henry II 4. did land in Wexford 5. and crush the Irish forces 6. on request of deposed High King 7. and traitor Diarmuid MacMorrough 8. Upon regaining High Kingship 9. using Henry's forces 10. The great traitor of Ireland 11. Diarmuid MacMorrough 12. did then switch sides again 13. nominating his own son as successor 14. In the year 1170 15. King Henry II 16. did send his most cruel and evil general 17. whose name was Richard de Clare 18. also known as Strongbow 19. In the following year (1171) 20. King Henry II sent an even larger army 21. that landed at Waterford 22. The first English King 23. to ever set foot on Irish soil. 24. Henry did then make Strongbow King of Leinster 25. Upon being made a King 26. Strongbow ordered the complete dismantling of Tara 27. That no memory be left, not one stone 28. Thus a force of several thousand Englishman 29. using Irish as slaves 30. Forced the removal of millions of stones 31. of countless beams of wood 32. The stones then used for Norman forts 33. Until all that was left of Tara 34. was a hill of dirt 35. soon to be fields 36. As if it had never existed 37. Thus the damnation of Ireland was complete 38. Its history stolen 39. The truth turned to myth 40. Its people enslaved by the church the followed 41. Captive to a force that hated them with every fibre 42. Every book of its history 43. Burnt or corrupted beyond recognition 44. Every ancient road torn up 45. Every ancient school destroyed 582. 1. But for one thing Ireland did survive 2. Not for lost history 3. Nor for ancient Kingship 4. The memory of greatness 5. It was the most precious thing 6. The one thing that could not be stolen 7. The spirit, the soul 8. that dwells in all Irish 9. the same spirit that enlightened the world 10. the same spirit that saved the world 11. many times over 12. a spirit that is called again 13. as darkness and resolution approach 14. first priest first king 15. the green race.

(The above taken from the Islamic Scriptures "Lebor Clan Glass"

Below is as written by author Frank O'Collins (unsourced) -

Mac Bethad mac Findlaích was born to King Findláech mac Ruadrí of Moray--of the legendary Kings of Dál Riata and later Alba (Scotland)-- the "Holly"

(Cuilliaéan) druid priest kings originally from Ireland and Fergus Mor in the 8th Century.
 	In 997, Holly King Causantín mac Cuiléain of Alba (Scotland) was murdered by Cináed mac Ailpín (Kenneth MacAlpin) of the treacherous Uí Néill declaring himself the new King. Later, the origin of Kenneth MacAlpin was deliberately corrupted by "writer for hire" John of Fordun who in the 14th Century was paid handsomely by King Edward III to destroy the true history of Scotland and Ireland and write a wholly ficticious tale.
 	After the historic coup, the last remaining Holly bloodline and rightful heir to the throne of Scotland was the younger brother of Causantín, King Ruadrí of Moray. When "King" Kenneth was killed at the battle of Clontarf in 1005, his son Máel Coluim mac Cináeda (Malcolm the destroyer) took the throne. His first act as King was to invite King Ruadrí of Moray to discuss terms of a peace treaty, at which King Malcolm broke his solemn oath as a King and had King Ruadrí murdered. King Ruadrí was then succeeded by his son Findláech mac Ruadrí as King of Moray.
 	The continuing treachery of the Uí Néill usurpers to the throne of Scotland plunged the whole region into civil war for thirty years, during which Malcolm succeeded in destroying virtually every major landmark, building, church, school, monastery and asset of Scotland--hence his historic name. By 1032, he finally achieved his aim in killing King Findláech mac Ruadrí of Moray in 1032 -- the father of Macbeth.
 	In 1034, King Malcolm the destroyer finally died and was succeeded by his son Donnchad mac Crínáin also known as Duncan as King of Alba (Scotland). In 1039, Duncan planned one final push to invade the kingdom of Moray and eliminate Macbeth and the last of the Holly. However at the battle of Pitgaveny near Elgin, upon the orders by Duncan for his troops to attack Macbeth full-frontal, his troops rebelled and killed the King. Thus in 1039, Macbeth became the last Holly King of Scotland.
 	Unfortunately, the infant son of Duncan, whose name was Máel Coluim mac Donnchad (Malcolm the Traitor) escaped with his family to Northumbria and the court of Siward the Dane. Siward then raised him as his own son, even granting him the title of King of Strathclyde.
 	When Siward the Dane died in 1055, Malcolm, the son of Duncan and Earl of Northumbria took his army northward to confront Macbeth but was badly beaten. Upon his return to Northumbria, Malcolm was then humiliated in being stripped of his inheritance by King Edward the Confessor (1042-1066) who then appointed Tostig Godwinson as the new Earl.
 	Malcolm made a desperate appeal to Edward the Confessor for troops, including his oath and loyalty as a vassal of England--effectively selling Scotland to the House of Wessex to regain the crown. With that deal, Edward provided Malcolm with a large mercenary army which invaded Scotland in 1058.
 	Heavily outnumbered, Macbeth held Malcolm's forces at the north side of the Mounth, but was forced to retreat over the Cairnamounth Pass where at the battle of Lumphanan Macbeth was severley wounded. Malcolm mistakenly believed that Macbeth had been taken back to his family castle at Dunsinane Hill and ordered it destroyed, killing the entire Macbeth clan. Instead, Macbeth was taken to Scone, where he died in 1058 --the last Holly king of Scotland.