Start My Family Tree Welcome to Geni, home of the world's largest family tree.
Join Geni to explore your genealogy and family history in the World's Largest Family Tree.

Project Tags

This is the Umbrella Project Page for Suffolk, England.

Suffolk

  • Administrative centre Ipswich
  • County Flower - Oxlip
  • People from Suffolk are called - ?
  • The county Motto is Opus Nostrum Dirige - "Direct or Work"
  • Famous for:
  • Flatford Mill - featured in many of Constable's paintings
  • Landmarks and Places of Interest

Suffolk is a ceremonial county of historic origin in the East Anglia, England. It has borders with Norfolk to the north, Cambridgeshire to the west and Essex to the south. The North Sea lies to the east.

The name Suffolk is of Anglo-Saxon origon meaning "Southern People" to distinguish them from the "Northfolk". It was first recorded in 895 as Suth Folchi.

The county is low-lying with very few hills, and is largely arable land with the wetlands of The Broads in the North. The Suffolk Coast and Heaths are an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

West Suffolk is renowned for archaeological finds from the Stone Age, the Bronze Age and the Iron Age. Bronze Age artefacts have been found in the area between Mildenhall and West Row, in Eriswell and in Lakenheath. Many bronze objects, such as swords, spearheads, arrows, axes, palstaves, knives, daggers, rapiers, armour, decorative equipment (in particular for horses) and fragments of sheet bronze, are entrusted to St Edmundsbury heritage service, housed at West Stow just outside Bury St Edmunds. Other finds include traces of cremations and barrows.

In the East of the county is Sutton Hoo, the site of one of England's most significant Anglo-Saxon archæological finds; a ship burial containing a collection of treasures including a Sword of State, gold and silver bowls and jewellery and a lyre.

The majority of agriculture in Suffolk is either arable or mixed. Soil types vary from heavy clays through to light sands. Crops grown include winter wheat, winter barley, sugar beet, oilseed rape, winter and spring beans and linseed, although smaller areas of rye and oats can be found in lighter areas along with a variety of vegetables.

Much of Suffolk is low-lying, founded on Pleistocene sand and clays. These rocks are relatively unresistant and the coast is eroding rapidly. Coastal defences have been used to protect several towns, but several cliff-top houses have been lost to coastal erosion in the past, and others are under threat. The continuing protection of the coastline and the estuaries, including the Blyth, Alde and Deben, has been, and remains, a matter of considerable discussion.

The coastal strip to the East contains an area of heathland known as "The Sandlings" which runs almost the full length of the coastline. Suffolk is also home to nature reserves, such as the Trimley Marshes, a wetland under the protection of Suffolk Wildlife Trust.

The west of the county lies on more resistant Cretaceous Chalk. This chalk is the north-eastern extreme of the Southern England Chalk Formation that stretches from Dorset in the south west to Dover in the south east. The Chalk is less easily eroded so forms the only significant hills in the county. The highest point of the county is Great Wood Hill, the highest point of the Newmarket Ridge, near the village of Rede which reaches 128 m (420 ft).

The Districts of Suffolk

//photos.geni.com/p13/73/ba/51/40/5344483a6123695b/suffolk_districts_original.jpg

  1. Ipswich
  2. Suffolk Coastal
  3. Waveney
  4. Mid Suffolk
  5. Babergh
  6. St Edmundsbury
  7. Forest Heath

Towns in Suffolk

  • Aldeburgh
  • Bury St Edmunds
  • Felixstowe, one of the largest container ports in Europe.
  • Framlingham
  • Gorleston
  • Haverhill
  • Lavenham
  • Long Melford
  • Lowestoft
  • Newmarket
  • Woodbridge

For Historical information about Suffolk visit Historic Suffolk - including connections to Historical figures, Gentry and political people connected with Suffolk.

For Information about research in the County and Families Researched on Geni (Including Emigrants) go to Suffolk - Family Heads

For Famous or Notable People from Suffolk visit Suffolk - Famous People

If you have Suffolk connections please join the project and if you live in Suffolk and are prepared to offer advice or help of any kind please add yourself to the list above.

To participate in any project


- you do need to first be a collaborator - so please join the project using the request link under "actions" at the top right of the page. Visit Geni Wikitext, Unicode and images which gives a great deal of assistance. See the discussion Project Help: How to add Text to a Project - Starter Kit to get you going!

How to Participate

  • If you have any queries please start a discussion linked to this project. (See the menu top right).
  • Please add related projects to the menu on the right.
  • If you have links to related web pages that would be of interest to others please add them in the relevant section at the bottom of the page. In order to do this use the drop down menu at the top left of the screen and Join the Project. If this option is not available to you then contact a collaborator and ask to be added to the project. As a collaborator you will be able to edit this page.
  • Add any documents of interest using the menu at the top right of the page, and then add a link to the document in the text under the heading below. If you do not know how to do this please contact one of the other collaborators to assist you.

Please do not add the profiles off all your Suffolk born ancestors to this project or the People connected to Suffolk project. Rather add the earliest known person of a Suffolk family to the Suffolk - Family Heads project.

Parish Map

//photos.geni.com/p13/d4/76/45/f1/5344483a61236959/suffolk_parishes_75_original.jpg

from The Phillimore Atlas and Index of Parish Registers 1984.

See http://www.geni.com/photo/view/4560155096930045739?photo_id=6000000019139457001 - open full view.

Resources

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suffolk