Genealogy Projects tagged with ghetto on the Geni Family Tree

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  • Theresienstadt Ghetto

    This project aims to collect all of the profiles of persons who were inmates of the concentration camp Theresienstadt also referred to as Theresienstadt Ghetto located in what is now the Czech Republic. Overcrowding and disease During WWII, the ghetto Terezín (Theresienstadt) was one of the major sites of suffering and death for the Jews of the Bohemian Lands and several European cou...

  • Kovno Ghetto

    Kovno Ghetto Hidden History of the Kovno Ghetto Kovno Pogrom The Kaunas (Kovno) pogrom, under the direction of the Nazi SS Brigadeführer Franz Walter Stahlecker, was a massacre of Jewish people living in Kaunas, Lithuania that took place in from June 25 to June 29, 1941 – the first days of the Operation Barbarossa and of Nazi occupation of Lithuania. The most infamous in...

  • Lodz Ghetto גטו לודז

    The Łódź Ghetto (German: Ghetto Litzmannstadt ) was the second-largest ghetto (after the Warsaw Ghetto) established for Jews and Roma in German-occupied Poland. Situated in the town of Łódź and originally intended as a temporary gathering point for Jews, the ghetto was transformed into a major industrial centre, providing much needed supplies for Nazi...

  • Minsk Ghetto גטו מינסק

    The Minsk Ghetto was created soon after the German invasion of the Soviet Union. It was one of the largest in Eastern Europe , and the largest in the German-occupied territory of the Soviet Union. It housed close to 100,000 Jews, most of whom perished in The Holocaust. The ghetto was created soon after the German invasion of the Soviet Union and capture of the city of Minsk, capital of the Be...

  • Riga Ghetto גטו ריגה

    The Riga Ghetto was a small area in Maskavas Forštate, neighborhood of Riga, Latvia, designated by the Nazis where Jews from Latvia, and later from Germany, were forced to live during World War II. On October 25, 1941, the Nazis relocated all Jews from Riga and the vicinity to the ghetto while the non-Jewish inhabitants were evicted. Most of the Latvian Jews (about 24,000) were killed ...

  • Opole Ghetto

    On February 15, 1941, and February 26, 1941, two deportation transports with 2,003 Jewish men, women and children on board left Vienna Aspang Station bound for Opole, a small town south of Lublin. Opole had a long established Jewish community; when war broke out about 4,000 Jews lived here, i.e. about 70 percent of the population, a proportion which rose further after the beginning of the war...

  • Izbica Ghetto

    The Izbica Ghetto was a Jewish ghetto created in Izbica in occupied Poland during World War II, serving as a transfer point for deportation of Jews from Poland, Germany, Austria and Czechoslovakia to Belzec and Sobibor extermination camp s. SS-Hauptsturmführer Kurt Engels was the commandant of the camp. In the camp, the Jews from Germany were differentiated from Polish Jews by the colo...

  • Lublin Ghetto גטו לובלין

    The Lublin Ghetto was a World War II ghetto created by Nazi Germany in the city of Lublin in occupied Poland, on the Nazi-administered territory of the General Government. Its inhabitants were mostly Polish Jews, although a number of Roma were also present. The Lublin Ghetto, set up in March 1941, was one of the first Nazi-era ghettos in occupied Poland to be "liquidated". In November 1942 ar...

  • Warsaw Ghetto גטו ורשה

    The Warsaw Ghetto was the largest ghetto in all of Nazi occupied Europe, with over 400,000 Jews crammed into an area of 1.3 square miles (3.4 km2), or 7.2 persons per room.From there, about 254,000 Ghetto residents were sent to Treblinka extermination camp during the two months of summer 1942. The sheer death-toll among the Jewish inhabitants of the Ghetto during the Großaktion ...

  • Shanghai Ghetto הגטו בשנחאי

    The Shanghai ghetto , formally known as the Restricted Sector for Stateless Refugees (無国籍難民限定地区 mukokuseki nanmin gentei chiku?), was an area of approximately one square mile in the Hongkou District of Japanese-occupied Shanghai, to which about 20,000 Jewish refugees were relocated by the Japanese-issued Proclamation Concerning Rest...

  • Vilna Ghetto גטו וילנה

    Vilna Ghetto Out of 70,000 Jews living in Vilna (Vilnius), only 7,000 would survive the war; the Jewish culture in Vilnius, one of the greatest in Europe, ceased to exist. Jews constituted 30% of the total population of Vilnius before the Holocaust. Over 96% percent of the Jews living in Vilna were murdered during the Nazi occupation. No other Jewish community in Nazi-occupied Eur...

  • Przemysl Ghetto

    The Przemysl Ghetto is situated on the San River, in the former Lwow district of eastern Galicia. Today it is part of Podkarpackie voivodship. Before WW2 about 24,000 Jews lived in the town. The Germans entered the town for the first time on 15 September 1939. Repressions and humiliations, aimed at the Jewish population, started almost immediately. Around 20,000 Jews still lived in Przemysl a...

  • Bialystok Ghetto גטו ביאלסטוק

    The Bialystok Ghetto was set up by Nazi Germany between July 26 and early August 1941 in the new capital of Bezirk Bialystok district of German-occupied Poland. About 50,000 Jews from the vicinity of Białystok and the surrounding region were herded into a small area of the city. The ghetto was split in two by the Biala River running through it (see map). Most inmates were put to work...

  • Grodno Ghetto

    Grodno Ghetto was created by Nazi Germans in November 1941, in the city of Hrodna (Grodno), which was part of the Second Polish Republic until the Soviet invasion of Poland, and subsequently incorporated by the Soviets into the Belarusian SSR. Hrodna (German: Garten) was annexed by the Nazis to the Bezirk Bialystok district of East Prussia in the aftermath of the German attack on the Soviet Uni...

  • Lvov Ghetto גטו לבוב

    The Lviv Ghetto or the Lwów Ghetto (also known as Lvov or Lemberg Ghetto , Polish: getto lwowskie) was a World War II ghetto set up in the city of Lwów (now Lviv, Ukraine) on the territory of Nazi-administered General Government in German-occupied Poland. It was one of the largest Jewish ghettos established by Nazi Germany after the joint Nazi-Soviet invasion of Poland. The ci...

  • Radom Ghetto גטו ראדום

    Radom Ghetto was a World War II ghetto set up in March 1941 by Nazi Germany in the city of Radom in occupied Poland, for the purpose of persecution and exploitation of the local Polish Jews. Liquidation of the ghetto began in August 1942 and ended in July 1944, with approximately 30,000–32,000 victims sent to their deaths in cattle trucks at the Treblinka extermination camp. ה...

  • Kraków Ghetto

    Kraków Ghetto was one of five major, metropolitan Jewish ghettos created by Nazi Germany in the General Government territory for the purpose of persecution, terror, and exploitation of Polish Jews during the German occupation of Poland in World War II. It was a staging point to begin dividing "able workers" from those who would later be deemed unworthy of life. The Ghetto was liquida...

  • Tarnów Ghetto

    The Jews of Tarnów and the Ghetto==Before World War II, about 25,000 Jews lived in Tarnów. Jews, whose recorded presence in the town went back to the mid-15th century, comprised about half of the town's total population.[citation needed] A large portion of Jewish business in Tarnów was devoted to garment and hat manufacturing. The Jewish community was ideologically diverse ...

  • Pińsk Ghetto

    The Pińsk Ghetto (Polish: Getto w Pińsku) was a World War II extermination ghetto created by Nazi Germany for the confinement of Polish Jews living in the city of Pińsk (now Pinsk, Belarus) in the eastern territory of occupied Poland. Pińsk was overrun by the Red Army in 1939 during the Soviet invasion of Poland and captured in 1941 by the Wehrmacht in Operation Barb...

  • Swieciany Ghetto

    The Swieciany Ghetto was liquidated April 4, 1943. The people were told that they were being resettled in either the Vilna or the Kovno ghettos. The train with the Jews of Swieciany was detained at the Vilna depot while murder operations proceeded with the Jews of Sol. Then the train went to Ponary. When Swieciany Jews found themselves at Ponary they realized that they had been tricked. The...

  • Rejowiec Ghetto

    The Rejowiec Transit Ghetto Transit stop for the murder of Slovak Jews Map of Rejowiec in the Krasnystaw districtRejowiec in the district of Chelm, acquired municipal rights during the 16th Century and became famous thanks to Mikolaj Rej, a distinguished poet of the Polish Renaissance. At the end of the 16th Century Rejowiec was populated mostly by Jews, and by the 20th Century the Jews account...

  • Mlawa ghetto גטו מלאבה

    Mlawa is part of the Plock region, Warsaw. A village with the name of Mlawa dates back to the end of the 14th century with Jews having been cited living there already in 1507. With the third partition of Poland in 1795 Mlawa was annexed to Prussia and by 1807 was included in the principality of Warsaw. In 1815 it became part of the Polish Kingdom. The Jewish population began to develop only...

  • Kielce Ghetto

    Kielce was occupied on 4 September 1939 by the German army. Approximately 24,000 Jews lived in the town, a third of all inhabitants. Like in all other occupied towns anti-Jewish actions took place immediately: Lootings, expropriations, forced labour and killings were the order of the day. Soon a Judenrat was established. Its first chairman was Moses Pelc who refused to collaborate with th...

  • Dvinsk (Dünaburg, Daugavpils) Ghetto

    Daugavpils Ghetto Following the occupation of Latvia by Nazi Germany in the summer of 1941, the Daugavpils Ghetto (German: Ghetto Dünaburg) was established in an old fortress near Daugavpils. Daugavpils is the second largest city in Latvia and the principal city of the Latgalia region. It was located in southeastern Latvia on the Daugava River. The city was militarily important as a ma...

  • Dabrowa Ghetto

    The place name "Dąbrowa", derived from the Polish word dąb (oak), denotes an "oak grove", as the territory of the original village is believed to be covered by oak forests back in the early days of its existence. Since in the 19th century the settlement grew to be an important coal mining center, its name was supplemented by the adjective "Górnicza" ("mining") in 1919. Du...

  • Częstochowa Ghetto

    The Częstochowa Ghetto was a Jewish ghetto set up by Nazi Germany in the city of Częstochowa in south-central Poland, for the purpose of persecution and exploitation of local Jews during the German occupation of Poland. The approximate number of people confined to the ghetto at its beginning was around 40,000 and at its peak – right before mass deportations – 48,00...

  • Bochnia Ghetto

    Bochnia Ghetto, Krakow In 1941, Bochnia Ghetto, Krakow , a closed ghetto, surrounded by a wooden fence, was established in Bochnia. At the beginning of April 1941, all “Aryan” inhabitants of the future ghetto area were resettled, and in July 1941 Jews were prohibited from leaving the ghetto without a special permit. From October 1941, by order of Hans Frank, to do so was pun...

  • Bilgoraj Ghetto

    The town of Bilgoraj is the principal town of its county in Lublin province. As of 2009 its population was 27.341. It is located on Bilgoraj Plateau, on the Lada River (right tributary of the Tanew River), in the vicinity of Roztoczanski National Park. On August 2, 1919 the province of Lublin consisting of 19 districts was established, including Bilgoraj district with the principal town being B...

  • Lutsk (Luck) Ghetto

    Lutsk is a city in Volhynia, the Ukraine and is situated on the river Styr, 470 km from Kyiv. During World War I the Jews suffered both from the armies and from war devastation, as the town changed hands several times and was occupied by Russian and German troops. Between the world wars the Lutsk community led a rich religious and cultural life as well as several social and medical organiza...

  • Siauliai (Shavli) Ghetto

    The Ghettos in Šiauliai (Shavli); The Lithuanians succeded in killing over 2000 Šiauliai Jews before the incarceration of the remaining Jews in the two Ghettos, one in the Kafkaz area and the other in the Traku neighborhood, about 500 meters away. The Ghetto gates closed behind about 5500 Jews that were crammed in an area of about 8000 square meters of living space; 1.5 m per pe...

  • Dereczyn Ghetto

    This Ghetto contained Jews from Dereczyn, Halinka and Kolonia--Sinaiska. The Ghetto was liquidated by the SS Death Squads - Einsatzgruppen on July 24, 1942 or 10 day of Av 5702. -------------------------- El Moley Rachamim Holocaust Prayer

  • Otwock Ghetto

    Following the Nazi–Soviet Invasion of Poland, a murderous Action T4 euthanasia program was carried out by the Nazi Germans in a local psychiatric hospital. In December 1939, German authorities established a Jewish ghetto in Otwock, in order to confine its Jewish population for the purpose of persecution and exploitation. The Ghetto was liquidated between August and September 19, 1942, wh...