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Anderson Genealogy and Anderson Family History Information

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Profiles

  • Aaron Anderson, Landsman (USA) (1811 - 1886)
    Aaron Anderson or Sanderson (born 1811, date of death unknown) was a Union Navy sailor during the American Civil War and a recipient of America's highest military decoration, the Medal of Honor. He...
  • Abraham Anderson (1776 - 1838)
    Birth: Mar. 10, 1776 Death: Aug. 18, 1838 Father of Rachael Anderson Still Buried at Still Cemetery Bowling Green Kentucky Birth: 10 Mar 1776 - Baltimore County (Baltimore) Marriage: 09 Oct 1801 ...
  • Adelaide Otilia Anderson (1880 - 1953)
  • Agnes Anderson (1740 - d.)
  • Agnes Mary Chatfield (1847 - 1912)

About the Anderson surname

Anderson

1. Variant of Andrew, Andrieu etc

This ancient surname recorded world-wide in over two hundred and fifty spellings, and including as examples Andre, Aindrias, Andrew, Anders, Jendrusch, Vondrak, Dandy, Andriol, Andretti, Ondracek, Vondraeck, Andress, Jedrzejewicz, and Andriuis, is of pre Christian Greek origins.

It derives from the personal name "Andreas", meaning manly, and was held by the first of Christ's disciples. Prior to the 10th century a.d., the name as a first name only, there were no surnames before the medieval period, was almost exclusively held by members of the church, one of the first of such recordings being that of a monk "Andreas", in the English Domesday Book of the year 1086. The name gained in popularity throughout Europe after the 12th century Crusades to free the Holy Land. These expeditions were largely unsuccessful, nethertheless it became the normal practice for returning soldiers to name their children after biblical and particularly Christian, saints or martyrs. St Andrew is the patron saint of both Scotland and Russia, and legend has it that his remains were brought to what is now the city of St. Andrew's in Scotland, in the year 900 a.d.. Certainly the name is very popular in that country. The surname was also one of the earliest settler names in America. Anthony Andrew being recorded in the first listings for the state of Virginia in 1623. The very first recorded spelling of the family name anywhere, is probably that of William Andreu, which was dated 1237, in the ancient charters of the county of Buckinghamshire, England, in the year 1237. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop", often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

http://mysurna.me/surname.php?s=Andersson

2. Scandinavian

This last name was also originally a typical Scandinavian Patronymic: http://wiki.geni.com/index.php/Patronymics For Scandinavian families it was only introduced as a last name or family name around 1850-1900.

Anderson This interesting surname is of English and Scottish origin, and is a patronymic of the surname Andrew, which is derived from the personal name from the Greek "Andreas", a derivative of "andreios", manly, from "aner", man, male. This was the name of the first of Jesus Christ's disciples, and it is also the name of the patron saint of both Scotland and Russia. The personal name was first recorded as "Andreas" in the Domesday Book of 1086, and the surname was first recorded in Scotland with one John Andree, who was present at the perambulation of the boundaries of Kyrknes and Louchor in 1395. The modern surname can be found as Andrew(e)s, Andress, Andriss, Anderson, Enderson, McAndrew and Kendrew. One William Anderson was an early settler in America, setting sail from London on the "Alexander" bound for the Barbadoes in May 1635. Among the recordings in London is the christening of Neal, son of Erasmus and Mary Anderson, on March 19th 1698, at St. Katherine by the Tower. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Rogerus Andreweson, which was dated 1272, in the "Poll Tax Returns of Yorkshire", during the reign of King Edward 111, known as "The Father of the Navy", 1327 - 1377. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.