William the Conqueror, King of England - Hunting William the Conqueror's DNA

Started by Justin Durand on Monday, July 22, 2013
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Showing 421-444 of 444 posts
9/30/2013 at 5:59 PM

Dale C. Rice. I caught your post on the
W. T C R1b1 DNA . Where might I get a copy of that. My brothers have done a 60 marker test, and it would be interesting to compare. We've been stuck on my Great Grandfather as far as genealogy is concerned for many years. He just kind of sprung up from nowhere in 1822 in SC. Benton Sir name. he was in the middle of a slew of Bentons residing in the smae town but unable to tie him to any of them. We have never been able to find his parents or any siblings. I look the spiting image of Thomas Hart Benton but no connection that we can find. My great Grandmother was a Bowen and we have the ap Owain connection in Wales, and of course no end of pedigree there. and William the Conqueror is my 24th great grandfather on my Great grandmothers side. It would be an interesting exercise to work from the backside if I could show a Connection on the Benton side of the Family. If that is possible.

9/30/2013 at 6:15 PM

Hello CPB: If you click on this very thread, the first thing you will see is the Article referenced by Curator Justin Swanstrom. It's a direct connection to the Article you seek and they give the 37 markers on the Y Chrom. as they have reconstructed it....FYI good luck and the thread started with Post 1 of 422....LOL that's a ways back, in May or June I believe. Kind Regards DCR 1948

Private User
9/30/2013 at 6:36 PM

The author made a few too many unwarranted assumptions, and may have excluded the very thing he was looking for. He's got a loosely defined kin-group that may OR MAY NOT include William himself.

10/1/2013 at 6:33 AM

While Geni connects us to certain lines, when you connect with someone like William King of England, do we have any special rights or access to places or events? As I find more and more connections my wife is smiling in disbelief.

It would be nice to find access to founded Universities and Colleges for family members especally for those in need .

10/1/2013 at 10:06 AM

Michael W. McDermott: What a lovely thought that would be, to be recognized by those institutions who's very existence is owed to this or that ancestor....Nice Idea, alas proving the connection is a very long and at times painful process....the Geni connections are an indication and an encouragement for us to continue digging....in iteself the connections are input by various individuals so one must be circumspect when viewing....Most Royal connections are extremely well doccumented and reasearched throughly, but not likely to serve as "PROOF" to a University. But who knows, present your idea to Oxford or Queens College (founded by Margaret Beaufort from her own funds) you may get a green light.....I just know that proving one's ancestory is not as easy as this wonderful site makes it appear......Regards DCR 1948

3/30/2014 at 7:01 PM

Please continue this discussion here:
http://www.geni.com/discussions/134239

Private User
5/6/2014 at 12:52 PM

I would like to have more info on the medical genetic mutations of the Norman-Welsh, as I seem to have about a thousand years of very close intermarriage in this group in my background, and they definitely had some issues with Spondolytic disease (Richard III, Edmund Crouchback, etc.). I know the Vikings descendants have a very particular finger deformation. Any studies yet in this area to collect data?

5/7/2014 at 2:21 AM

Yes the deformation of the finger is widely known, it is called the Swordfinger.
I am working with one that have that deformati of the finger.
I think the mutant gen comes from Norway, but don't hang if im wrong.

5/7/2014 at 2:29 AM

Pamela maybe you would like to see a BBC show called Blood of the Vikings.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1MLw4lYfm44

it is quiet interesting.

5/7/2014 at 5:27 AM

Per Skulason
I googled "swordfinger" but just got a lot of kungfu. Do you have other links than the video?

Private User
5/7/2014 at 6:00 AM

Pamela's comment on Spondolytic disease is interesting. It is in my family. No finger issue, though. Was it John Perrot (my 13th GGF) that had a curvature of his spine?

5/7/2014 at 11:31 AM

Joan Nathan: You are a 15th cousin 5 times removed according to GENI so I am very interested in your statement that John Perrott is your 13th GGF. Perhaps through the HUSSEY line? That would give me some hope! LOL.

I think you will find the Spine curvature was a feature of the Plantagenents at Henry Crouchback, to Richard III. Justin would know for sure. Kind Regards, and Glad to know of your status as a 13th ggrandaughter of John Perrott 1528. DCR 1948

5/7/2014 at 3:16 PM

Ok heres a link

It's also refered to as the Viking finger.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1305903/

hope this a little better

5/7/2014 at 3:23 PM

Thanks Per, seems it's called Dupuytren’s disease.
Not what i thought it might be, looks horrible!

5/7/2014 at 8:24 PM

Just to calm you all down, in Scandinavia this is a very rare disease, though it increases with age. In a clinical study in Norway where 16950 persons were included the result was 9% male and 3% female of the persons had some form of the disease.

I have worked in the hospital community for a couple of decades, and have never seen this disease at all. So Private User just calm down the probability is extremely low.

People, please let us not make a hysteria over something so rear.

Private User
5/7/2014 at 8:50 PM

Oh, for heaven sake. It's just an extra finger or toe. I had a friend who had double several organs.I had another friend who was born with little tiny fingers and toes and she did just fine and my father was born deformed. Back caved in , check puffed out because of the way his spin curved, one arm and leg shorter then the others and except for the fact he wasn't one of the nices people in the world , he led a normal life and lived to 86 ,outliving all his brothers and sisters.

Private User
5/7/2014 at 8:50 PM

Oh, for heaven sake. It's just an extra finger or toe. I had a friend who had double several organs.I had another friend who was born with little tiny fingers and toes and she did just fine and my father was born deformed. Back caved in , check puffed out because of the way his spin curved, one arm and leg shorter then the others and except for the fact he wasn't one of the nices people in the world , he led a normal life and lived to 86 ,outliving all his brothers and sisters.

Private User
5/8/2014 at 8:59 PM

I was simply just making the observation that it will be very interesting in the future to see how these genetic diseases have developed. Severe spinal disease already runs in my family, and I already have a titanium spine, so all the excitement is already over for me, so no need to " calm" down. And, I have seen " Blood of the Vikings" and read several medical papers about the the genetics of Dupuytren's disease. It's also found in Viking descendants in the UK. Now, back to the scoliosis, since I seem to have hordes of inbred ancestors descended from the Normans who continued to sort of inbreed in New England, it would be really interesting if this is a result of their inbreeding practices in England. An interesting hypothesis at least. Would like to hear if anyone comes across more analysis of genetic markers as they develop in the studies of people of English aristocratic ancestry. It's like being interested in how many people have true green eyes ( 1-2% of humanity). Somewhere along there was a rather rare mutation.

Private User
5/8/2014 at 9:21 PM

FYI, it was through reading about the genetic studies that have been done on the Jewish population, who have multiple genetic diseases because of keeping themselves an isolated group because of religious belief since leaving the Middle East, that geneticists are beginning to understand how certain diseases have developed. The Habsburgs descended into deformed, short lived monarchs. So, it's cutting edge medicine, if we can identify the defective gene, and how it's passed down; in the near future we will be able to correct it before birth. If you have ever suffered a genetic disease, this would be quite a blessing.

Private User
5/9/2014 at 10:56 AM

My father's problem wasn't Scoliosis. It was some other rare generic thing. Someone told me once but I forget what it was.

Private User
6/8/2014 at 6:28 PM

I've always wondered about when they state that bloodlines have " died out". Descendants of the Warrens came to America ( I'm one). The 6th Earl openly acknowledged his children by his mistress, Maude de Nerford, in his will, because he didn't want his line to die out, and the king wouldn't let him divorce his wife, the kings niece. This is all extremely well documented. There must be boatloads of Warren's in Chesire as well. Sometimes I think genealogists and historians and geneticists never look at each other's work.

6/9/2014 at 2:16 AM

#Pamela Bigelow Johnson

If you want to study Genetic, I suggest you look at the Faroe Island it is a lot of small inhabitted Islands, I know there for many years was a part of the population at some of the Island that was born deef and deefnes ran in the familys, so you could have a hole family who was deef and huge part of the inhabitens at that particually Island.

Kind regards
Per

6/12/2014 at 10:37 PM

Do you have any information that the Alford family is related to William the Conqueror or simply a member of his army? Any help would be appreciated.

4/25/2018 at 3:27 AM

William the conqueror is my 26th great grandfather my haplagroups are maternal N1A and paternal is R-L21

Showing 421-444 of 444 posts

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