Лариса Иосифовна Богораз

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Лариса Иосифовна Богораз

Birthdate: (77)
Birthplace: Kharkiv, Kharkiv Oblast, Ukraine
Death: Died in Moscow, gorod Moskva, Russia
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Иосиф Аронович Богораз and Мария Самуиловна Бо­го­ра­з
Wife of Анатолий Марченко
Ex-wife of Юлий Маркович Даниэль
Mother of <private> Марченко; <private> Даниэль; Private User and <private> Марченко

Occupation: советский и российский лингвист, правозащитница, публицист
Managed by: Aton Cevey-Goryainov
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Лариса Иосифовна Богораз

[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larisa_Bogoraz] Larisa Iosifovna Bogoraz (Russian: Лари́са Ио́сифовна Богора́з(-Брухман), full name: Larisa Iosifovna Bogoraz-Brukhman, Bogoraz was her father's last name, Brukhman her mother's, August 8, 1929, Kharkiv – April 6, 2004, Moscow) was a dissident in the Soviet Union. Contents [hide] 1 Biography 2 Other 3 References 4 Articles 5 External links 6 Further reading Biography[edit source] Born in Kharkiv, at the time capital of the Ukrainian SSR, to a family of Communist Party bureaucrats, she graduated as a linguist from the University of Kharkiv and in 1950, married her first husband, Yuli Daniel, a writer. Together, they moved to Moscow. Her marriage to Daniel would ultimately lead to her becoming involved in activism. In 1965, Daniel and a friend of his, Andrei Sinyavsky, were arrested for a number of writings that they had had published overseas under pseudonyms (see Sinyavsky-Daniel trial). The trial of the two men was the beginning of a crackdown on dissent under General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev. They were both sent to terms in forced labor camps. After their detention, Bogoraz wrote to Brezhnev in protest, despite knowing that such an act could land her in prison.

"For our freedom and yours", one of the protester's banners, 1968 Bogoraz became well known when, on August 25, 1968, she organized seven people to protest in Red Square against the Soviet Union's invasion of Czechoslovakia at the 1968 Red Square demonstration, together with Pavel Litvinov, Natalya Gorbanevskaya, Vadim Delaunay and other protesters.[1] As all participants, Bogoraz was arrested, tried and sentenced to four years of exile in Siberia, which she spent in a woodworking plant. Daniel was released in 1970, while Bogoraz was still in Siberia. Their marriage did not survive much longer, and they soon divorced. However, soon after her release, Bogoraz resumed her resistance of the Soviet regime. She signed many public appeals to the authorities. She co-wrote an underground book, Memory, which detailed Stalin's terror and was subsequently published overseas. She also contributed to the underground publication A Chronicle of Current Events. In 1975, she wrote a letter to Yuri Andropov, who was the head of the KGB at the time, requesting that he open the organization's archives. Bogoraz later married Anatoly Marchenko, another prominent dissident. Together, they co-wrote a number of appeals. Marchenko was arrested in 1980, and unlike Daniel, did not survive his sentence. Bogoraz launched a campaign in 1986 to have all political prisoners freed.[2] The campaign was successful, as the following year, General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev began releasing them. This came too late for Marchenko, who died as a result of a hunger strike shortly before the initial release. In 1987, she tried to initiate a campaign for amnesty for political prisoners.[3] In 1989, Bogoraz joined, and subsequently became chairwoman of, the newly re-founded Moscow Helsinki Group. She acted as a bridge between the old guard of dissidents, and the new generation that were arising as the Soviet Union dissolved. After the demise of the Soviet Union, Bogoraz continued her activism, visiting prisoners and holding seminars on the defense of human rights. She also became chairwoman of the Seminar on Human Rights, a joint Russian-American nongovernmental organization. She resigned from the latter in 1996, but continued to exert influence in human rights circles up until her death. Not long before her death, she issued an open letter condemning both the 1999 NATO bombing of Yugoslavia and the 2003 Iraq War. She died on April 6, 2004, aged 74, after a series of strokes [4][5] Other[edit source] Bogoraz is mentioned in the song Ilyich (in Russian) by Yuliy Kim, available at several sites.[6][7][8] That song is about reaction of Brezhnev on the demonstration catches the spirit of the epoch of Brezhnev stagnation, although at the time of writing of the song, the text of the letter of Andropov to Central Committee[9] was not available. References[edit source] Jump up ^ Christopher Andrew and Vasili Mitrokhin (2000). The Mitrokhin Archive: The KGB in Europe and the West. Gardners Books. ISBN 0-14-028487-7. (Larisa Bogoraz was betrayed as organizer of this demonstration by KGB agent Anatoli Andreyevich Tonkonog codenamed TANOV) Jump up ^ Mydans, Seth (2004-04-08). "Larisa Bogoraz, Soviet Dissident, Dies at 74". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-05-07. Jump up ^ Александр Подрабинек (2015). Наша кампания за амнистию [Our campaign for amnesty]. Zvezda (in Russian) (4). Retrieved 2 September 2015. Jump up ^ Jeremy Bransten. Russia: Soviet Dissident Larisa Bogoraz Dead At 74. RADIO FREE EUROPE, Wednesday, April 7, 2004, http://www.rferl.org/featuresarticle/2004/04/d2168abb-7df4-4093-8a93-5cd729656bec.html Jump up ^ Larisa Bogoraz, 74 Early Soviet dissident. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Apr 9, 2004. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4196/is_20040409/ai_n10960625 Jump up ^ Yuliy Kim, "Ya sam sebe Iliich" (in Russian), http://www.bards.ru/archives/part.php?id=6188 Jump up ^ Yuly Kim, "Ya sam sebe Iliich" (in Russian), http://geo.web.ru/bards/Kim/part43.htm Jump up ^ Yuly Kim, "Ya sam sebe Iliich" (in Russian), http://poetrus.by.ru/142/142s-2.htm#25 Jump up ^ Andropov to the Central Committee. The Demonstration in Red Square Against the Warsaw Pact Invasion of Czechoslovakia. September 20, 1968. (Russian original and English translation), Sakharov KGB file, http://www.yale.edu/annals/sakharov/documents_frames/Sakharov_008.htm Articles[edit source] Bogoraz, Larisa (April 2002). "Living the movies". Index on Censorship. 3 (2): 15–17. doi:10.1080/03064220208537038. External links[edit source] Obituary: Larisa Bogoraz, The Independent, April 10, 2004 Obituary: Larisa Iosifovna Bogoraz, http://www.artukraine.com/historical/bogoraz.htm CAUCASIAN KNOT / PERSONS. Bogoraz, Larissa Iosifovna http://eng.kavkaz.memo.ru/printperson/engperson/id/656175.html Further reading[edit source] Vaissié, Cécile (2000). Russie, une femme en dissidence : Larissa Bogoraz [Russia, a woman in dissent: Larisa Bogoraz] (in French). Plon. ISBN 225919155X.

О Ларисе Иосифовне Богораз (русский)

http://www.sakharov-center.ru/asfcd/auth/?t=author&i=1374 Богораз-Брухман Лариса Иосифовна (1929-2004)

 филолог, правозащитник

1929. — Родилась в Харькове. Отец – Иосиф Аронович Богораз (1896–1985), экономист. 1946–1950. — Учеба на филологическом факультете Харьковского университета. 1950. — Замужество. Муж – Юлий Маркович Даниэль. 1951, 11 марта. — Рождение сына Александра. 1964. — Отъезд Л.И. Богораз с сыном в Новосибирск. Жизнь в Академгородке. 1965, 8 сентября. — Приезд Ю.М. Даниэля в Новосибирск. Попытка восстановить семью. 1965, 12 сентября. — Возвращение Л.И. Богораз и Ю.М. Даниэля в Москву. Арест Даниэля во Внуковском аэропорту. 1967, весна. — Знакомство Л.И. Богораз с А.Т. Марченко. Помощь в его работе над книгой «Мои показания». 1968, январь. — Составление совместно с П.М. Литвиновым «Обращения к мировой общественности» по поводу суда над А.И. Гинзбургом, А. Добровольским, В. Лашковой. Направление телеграммы в поддержку голодовки заключенных. Вызов «на беседу» к прокурору. 1968, 21 августа. — Суд над А.Т. Марченко за книгу «Мои показания». 1968, 25 августа. — Участие в демонстрации на Красной площади против вторжения советских войск в Чехословакию вместе с К.И. Бабицким, Н.Е. Горбаневской, В.Н. Делоне, В.А. Дремлюгой, П.М. Литвиновым, В. Файнбергом. Арест. Обыск в квартире. Встреча с сыном, вернувшимся из Тарту после полученного им отказа в приеме в университет. Лефортовская тюрьма. Помещение в одиночную камеру. Условия содержания заключенных. Получение записки от сидящей в тюрьме двоюродной сестры Ирины Белогородской. Перевод в общую камеру. Занятия в камере. Суд. 1968, 10 декабря. — Перевод в Краснопресненскую пересыльную тюрьму. Этап в поселок Чуна (Иркутская область). Встреча на этапе с П.М. Литвиновым. Свердловская и Новосибирская пересыльные тюрьмы. Судьбы заключенных. 1968, 31 декабря. — Прибытие в Чуну. Встреча Нового года в камере предварительного заключения (КПЗ). 1971. — Приезд в Чуну А.Т. Марченко. Замужество. 1971, 11 декабря. — Окончание ссылки. Возвращение в Москву. Участие в правозащитном движении. 1973. — Рождение сына Павла. 1975, 25 февраля. — Жизнь семьи в Тарусе. Арест А.Т. Марченко. Приговор: 4 года ссылки в Сибирь. 1976–1984. — Участие в выпуске самиздатского исторического журнала «Память». 1980. — Написание воспоминаний. Публикация статьи «Третье дано» совместно с А.Т. Марченко в журнале «Континент». 1981. — Приговор А.Т. Марченко за антисоветскую агитацию: 10 лет ИТЛ и 5 лет ссылки. 1986, конец. — Обращение к деятелям советской культуры с призывом поддержать требование освобождения политзаключенных. 1986, 8 декабря. — Смерть А.Т. Марченко в Чистопольской тюрьме (Татария). 1987, декабрь. — Участие в подготовке и работе Международного общественного семинара. 1989. — Избрание сопредседателем восстановленной Московской Хельсинкской группы. 1990-е гг. — Возвращение степени кандидата филологических наук, аннулированной в 1978 (1990). Руководство просветительским семинаром по правам человека для общественных организаций (с 1991). Членство в правлении российско-американской Проектной группы по правам человека (с 1993). Публикация ряда статей по истории и теории правозащитного движения. 2004, 6 апреля. — Скончалась Л.И. Богораз.

  • сведения, выходящие за рамки воспоминаний, выделены курсивом

http://old.memo.ru/history/teatr/Chapter8.htm НА КАНИКУЛЫ В ВОРКУТУ

[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larisa_Bogoraz] Larisa Iosifovna Bogoraz (Russian: Лари́са Ио́сифовна Богора́з(-Брухман), full name: Larisa Iosifovna Bogoraz-Brukhman, Bogoraz was her father's last name, Brukhman her mother's, August 8, 1929, Kharkiv – April 6, 2004, Moscow) was a dissident in the Soviet Union. Contents [hide] 1 Biography 2 Other 3 References 4 Articles 5 External links 6 Further reading Biography[edit source] Born in Kharkiv, at the time capital of the Ukrainian SSR, to a family of Communist Party bureaucrats, she graduated as a linguist from the University of Kharkiv and in 1950, married her first husband, Yuli Daniel, a writer. Together, they moved to Moscow. Her marriage to Daniel would ultimately lead to her becoming involved in activism. In 1965, Daniel and a friend of his, Andrei Sinyavsky, were arrested for a number of writings that they had had published overseas under pseudonyms (see Sinyavsky-Daniel trial). The trial of the two men was the beginning of a crackdown on dissent under General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev. They were both sent to terms in forced labor camps. After their detention, Bogoraz wrote to Brezhnev in protest, despite knowing that such an act could land her in prison.

"For our freedom and yours", one of the protester's banners, 1968 Bogoraz became well known when, on August 25, 1968, she organized seven people to protest in Red Square against the Soviet Union's invasion of Czechoslovakia at the 1968 Red Square demonstration, together with Pavel Litvinov, Natalya Gorbanevskaya, Vadim Delaunay and other protesters.[1] As all participants, Bogoraz was arrested, tried and sentenced to four years of exile in Siberia, which she spent in a woodworking plant. Daniel was released in 1970, while Bogoraz was still in Siberia. Their marriage did not survive much longer, and they soon divorced. However, soon after her release, Bogoraz resumed her resistance of the Soviet regime. She signed many public appeals to the authorities. She co-wrote an underground book, Memory, which detailed Stalin's terror and was subsequently published overseas. She also contributed to the underground publication A Chronicle of Current Events. In 1975, she wrote a letter to Yuri Andropov, who was the head of the KGB at the time, requesting that he open the organization's archives. Bogoraz later married Anatoly Marchenko, another prominent dissident. Together, they co-wrote a number of appeals. Marchenko was arrested in 1980, and unlike Daniel, did not survive his sentence. Bogoraz launched a campaign in 1986 to have all political prisoners freed.[2] The campaign was successful, as the following year, General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev began releasing them. This came too late for Marchenko, who died as a result of a hunger strike shortly before the initial release. In 1987, she tried to initiate a campaign for amnesty for political prisoners.[3] In 1989, Bogoraz joined, and subsequently became chairwoman of, the newly re-founded Moscow Helsinki Group. She acted as a bridge between the old guard of dissidents, and the new generation that were arising as the Soviet Union dissolved. After the demise of the Soviet Union, Bogoraz continued her activism, visiting prisoners and holding seminars on the defense of human rights. She also became chairwoman of the Seminar on Human Rights, a joint Russian-American nongovernmental organization. She resigned from the latter in 1996, but continued to exert influence in human rights circles up until her death. Not long before her death, she issued an open letter condemning both the 1999 NATO bombing of Yugoslavia and the 2003 Iraq War. She died on April 6, 2004, aged 74, after a series of strokes [4][5] Other[edit source] Bogoraz is mentioned in the song Ilyich (in Russian) by Yuliy Kim, available at several sites.[6][7][8] That song is about reaction of Brezhnev on the demonstration catches the spirit of the epoch of Brezhnev stagnation, although at the time of writing of the song, the text of the letter of Andropov to Central Committee[9] was not available. References[edit source] Jump up ^ Christopher Andrew and Vasili Mitrokhin (2000). The Mitrokhin Archive: The KGB in Europe and the West. Gardners Books. ISBN 0-14-028487-7. (Larisa Bogoraz was betrayed as organizer of this demonstration by KGB agent Anatoli Andreyevich Tonkonog codenamed TANOV) Jump up ^ Mydans, Seth (2004-04-08). "Larisa Bogoraz, Soviet Dissident, Dies at 74". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-05-07. Jump up ^ Александр Подрабинек (2015). Наша кампания за амнистию [Our campaign for amnesty]. Zvezda (in Russian) (4). Retrieved 2 September 2015. Jump up ^ Jeremy Bransten. Russia: Soviet Dissident Larisa Bogoraz Dead At 74. RADIO FREE EUROPE, Wednesday, April 7, 2004, http://www.rferl.org/featuresarticle/2004/04/d2168abb-7df4-4093-8a93-5cd729656bec.html Jump up ^ Larisa Bogoraz, 74 Early Soviet dissident. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Apr 9, 2004. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4196/is_20040409/ai_n10960625 Jump up ^ Yuliy Kim, "Ya sam sebe Iliich" (in Russian), http://www.bards.ru/archives/part.php?id=6188 Jump up ^ Yuly Kim, "Ya sam sebe Iliich" (in Russian), http://geo.web.ru/bards/Kim/part43.htm Jump up ^ Yuly Kim, "Ya sam sebe Iliich" (in Russian), http://poetrus.by.ru/142/142s-2.htm#25 Jump up ^ Andropov to the Central Committee. The Demonstration in Red Square Against the Warsaw Pact Invasion of Czechoslovakia. September 20, 1968. (Russian original and English translation), Sakharov KGB file, http://www.yale.edu/annals/sakharov/documents_frames/Sakharov_008.htm Articles[edit source] Bogoraz, Larisa (April 2002). "Living the movies". Index on Censorship. 3 (2): 15–17. doi:10.1080/03064220208537038. External links[edit source] Obituary: Larisa Bogoraz, The Independent, April 10, 2004 Obituary: Larisa Iosifovna Bogoraz, http://www.artukraine.com/historical/bogoraz.htm CAUCASIAN KNOT / PERSONS. Bogoraz, Larissa Iosifovna http://eng.kavkaz.memo.ru/printperson/engperson/id/656175.html Further reading[edit source] Vaissié, Cécile (2000). Russie, une femme en dissidence : Larissa Bogoraz [Russia, a woman in dissent: Larisa Bogoraz] (in French). Plon. ISBN 225919155X.

[http://beg777.livejournal.com/14476.html] Сыновья Ларисы Иосифовны - Александр Юльевич Даниэль и Павел Анатольевич Марченко

ЛАРИСА ИОСИФОВНА БОГОРАЗ (1929 – 2004)

Ученый-лингвист, кандидат филологических наук, писатель, активная участница правозащитного движения в СССР, участница демонстрации 25 августа 1968 года на Красной площади в знак протеста против ввода советских войск в Чехословакию, в 1978-1981 вместе с мужем А.Т. Марченко и сыном Павлом проживала в г. Карабаново Александровского района Владимирской области.

1929, 8 августа – родилась в Харькове 1936 – арест отца, Иосифа Ароновича (5 лет лагерей и ссылка в Воркуту) 1941-1944 – в эвакуации у родственников в Сызрани 1944 – возвращение с матерью в Харьков 1946 – окончание школы и поступление на филологический факультет Университета им. Горького в Харькове 1946 – знакомство с Ю. М. Даниэлем 1948, январь – поездка к отцу в Воркуту 1950 – завершение учебы в университете, смерть матери, переезд в Москву, брак с Ю.М. Даниэлем 1951 – рождение сына Александра


Родилась в 1929 г., Харьков; еврейка; образование высшее; филолог, уч. демонстрации на Красной пл. (25.08.1968). Проживала: Москва.

Арестована 25 августа 1968 г.

Приговорена: Московский городской суд 11 октября 1968 г., обв.: 190-1, 190-3.

Приговор: 5 лет ссылки, помилована в 1971

~ Источник: Архив НИПЦ "Мемориал", Москва

~ Жертвы политического террора в СССР, 4-ое издание

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Лариса Иосифовна Богораз's Timeline

1926
August 8, 1926
Kharkiv, Kharkiv Oblast, Ukraine
2004
April 6, 2004
Age 77
Moscow, gorod Moskva, Russia