Abner Brooks Casey

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Abner Brooks Casey

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Tyrone, Ulster County, Ireland
Death: 1796 (95-96)
Whitmire, Newberry County, South Carolina, United States
Place of Burial: Whitmire, Newberry County, South Carolina, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of John Nicholas Casey and Sarah Edith Casey
Husband of Sarah F Casey and Harriet "Hettie" (Green) Casey
Father of Sarah Billups; William Casey; Jesse Bartholemew Casey; John Casey; Capt. Benjamin Casey and 10 others
Brother of Peter Casey; Nicholas Casey; John Casey, Jr. and Elizabeth Casey

Occupation: Farm laborer
Label: Immigration 1726
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Abner Brooks Casey

Casey Family

The name “Casey” originated from the Gaelic name “O’Cathasaigh” or “Calesythe” over a thousand years ago (“O” meaning “of” and sometimes used, sometimes dropped). The original meaning of the name was “dart-armed chief in battle.” The Gaelic name mutated through the centuries. After the Anglo-Norman invasion of 1169 it became “O’Casey”. “Casey” was in use by 1490.

One source says, “The Casey family is descended from the Ui Nialls (O’Neals) of Tyrone County in Ireland, through Cathasach, great-great-grandson of Baodun Ui Niall, 137th King of Ireland.” (There was also a King MacNeill who ruled 428-463 and during whose reign St. Patrick converted many natives to Christianity).

(For extra historical reading, see the book, Wars of the Irish Kings)

Another source says that Princess Tamar "Tea Tephi", daughter of Zedekiah, King of Judah, married in 580 B.C. to King Heremon (ancestor of the Caseys), second Monarch of Ireland, who himself was a descendant of Milesius, King of Spain, whose mother was Scoto, daughter of Pharoah Nectonieus. If this is correct, then the succeeding kings of Ireland were descended from the Jewish King David, and thus from Adam! [interesting reading indeed!]

O’Cathasach means “brave”, so the patronymic (Ui Cathasac) O’Casey, as applied to this branch means “sons of the brave.” “During the early part of the 12th century the O’Casey clan had become of sufficient importance to be listed among the more prominent Irish clans. They occupied a domain of no mean size in West Meath, Leinster Parish, Tyrone County, Ireland. They were mostly herdsmen, farmers, and hunters, and considered very hospitable” [source?]. (Tyrone County is located in Northern Ireland or Ulster district, therefore the Caseys were possibly English or Scotch Protestants; Leinster, however, is a district south of Ulster.)

Thomas Casey who came to Newport, Rhode Island by 1658 remembered that he was the orphaned son of parents killed in the Irish Massacre of 1641 “when so many of the Pale lost their lives”, and that his nurse rescuing him, carried him to England where kinsfolk reared him [3]. This "massacre" of 1641 appears now to have been a myth surrounding an Irish uprising intended to cause a backlash of English protestants against the Irish. The Caseys in this quote were evidently English Protestants living around Dublin in the English colony called The Pale, in the district of Leinster. (Another Casey family history says they were Scotch-Irish.)

However, another source of Irish names says the Casey name (originally O’Cathasaigh) was from Limerick County and Cork County. The archaeological remains called "Casey's Lios" at Ballygunnermore indicate the residence of Caseys near Waterford. The so-called census of 1659 indicates that the name was then quite numerous in that county, but mainly in the southwestern corner of it; from the same source we learn that the O'Caseys—then usually called O'Cahassy—were, at that time, principally found in County Limerick and adjacent areas.

Brief history of Ireland:

The various tribes of Ireland were first subdued by the Scots (probably becoming what was then known as the original Celts), then by invading Norsemen from the 700’s until 1014, and finally by English-Normans in 1169, after an Irish king asked for their help in keeping his throne. These groups intermarried easily, especially since the Normans and the Celts shared the same Catholic faith, but they continued to be in subjection to the English and were treated harshly over the centuries, causing many uprising and rebellions.

King Richard II of England knighted “four Irish chieftains of the clans of O’Neill, O’Connor, O’Brien, and MacMurrough in 1395 in a conciliatory gesture toward Ireland.” [2]. And by the time of the War of Roses (1455-85) “the authority of the English crown became limited to the area known as the English Pale, a small coastal district around Dublin and the port of Drogheda.” [2]

Henry VIII’s daughter, Mary I began colonization of Ireland by English settlers, a practice that Elizabeth I continued in the northern province of Ulster after an uprising led by Ulster chieftain Shane O’Neill (1530?-67). Hugh O’Neill, the earl of Tyrone, won several victories but was later defeated by the English in 1603. Munster and Ulster were laid desolate from the fighting and more inhabitants died from hunger than from war.

During this time the Irish were still Gaelic-speaking and refused to accept the new doctrines forced upon them by the Anglican church. The area around Dublin called the Pale, where the English colony lived was English-speaking and governed by English laws. “The greater part of Ireland outside the Pale wanted to remain Gaelic-speaking and Catholic” [1]. The following king, James I, confiscated the land in six counties of northern Ulster and “planted” a group of English and Scotch settlers. The old Gaelic owners not only lost their lands but the English excluded them from schools, universities, and from practicing law.

The next king, Charles I, offered some religious toleration because of his Catholic leanings, but the Puritans in Parliament were not so generous. Therefore, “a conspiracy was formed in 1641 to seize Dublin and expel the English. The Irish succeeded in driving the English settlers out of Ulster and committed many outrages. English writers have estimated that at least 30,000 were put to death by the Irish, but this number is thought to be exaggerated; the Scottish in Ulster were, as a rule, spared” [2]. After Charles I was beheaded the Irish proclaimed his son, Charles II as king. In 1649 Oliver Cromwell came to Ireland and regained a great part of the land for the English. “Cromwell’s name is the most hated in all Irish history. Nearly the whole of the island was confiscated” [1]. Before Cromwell, Catholics owned about two-thirds of the land in Ireland. After he died and Charles II was restored the throne, they had about one-third of the land.

The next king was James II. He was strongly supported by the Irish because he was a Catholic, but he became so unpopular in England that the English called for his daughter, Mary and her husband, William to come from Holland and become the next rulers. The Irish fought for James in 1689-90 and lost. King William promised them freedom and security but Parliament changed the course: no Catholic could sit in Parliament, hold any office, have any say in government. They could have no schools, no lands, no clergy, no churches, no votes, no elections, no arms. Their commerce and industries were crushed by the English causing the “gradual economic decline of Ireland. A large percentage of the population immigrated, the Roman Catholics to Spain and France and the Protestants to America” [2]

Under Queen Anne (1702-1714) the Irish fared even worse, and under George I “unfair rents, famine and crop failure drove more thousands of Irish to America. The strong tide of westward migration was to continue for about two hundred years” [1].

This was the situation in Ireland that probably brought Abner Casey to America in 1726. He was probably Scots-Irish in northern Ireland and a Presbyterian, but they were also persecuted in the 1700's by the English Anglicans.

---------------------------- There are no historical documents attached to Abner Brooks.

https://ancestors.familysearch.org/en/LJ2P-VF5/abner-brooks-casey-1...

Abner Brooks Casey 1700–1786 (Age 86) County Tyrone, Ireland

The Life Summary of Abner Brooks

When Abner Brooks Casey was born in 1700, in County Tyrone, Ireland, his father, John Nicholas Casey, was 20 and his mother, Sarah Lnuk Edith Brooks, was 20. He married Harriet Green about 1725, in Maryland, United States. They were the parents of at least 9 sons and 2 daughters. He lived in South Carolina, United States for about 31 years. He died in 1786, in Laurens, South Carolina, United States, at the age of 86, and was buried in Whitmire, Newberry, South Carolina, United States.

Spouse and Children

Abner Brooks Casey Male 1700–1786

Male

Harriet Green Female 1710–1786

Female

Marriage about 1725 Maryland, United States

Children (11)

Jesse Bartholemew Casey Male 1726–1779

Male

John Casey Male 1727–1816

Male

Benjamin L Casey Male 1731–1779

Male

James Casey Male 1733–1830

Male

Sarah Casey Female 1735–1822

Female +6 More Children

Sources (0)

Sources There are no historical documents attached to Abner Brooks.

Parents and Siblings

John Nicholas Casey Male 1680–1763

Male

Sarah Lnuk Edith Brooks Female 1680–1771

Female Siblings (7)

Nicholas Casey Male 1698–Deceased

Male

John Casey Male 1698–Deceased

Male

Randolph Casey Male 1700–1742

Male

Abner Brooks Casey Male 1700–1786

Male

Elizabeth Casey Female 1702–Deceased

Female +2 More Children VIEW ALL Name Meaning

Casey

Abner

Brooks Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cathasaigh ‘descendant of Cathasach’, a byname meaning ‘vigilant’ or ‘noisy’. Dictionary of American Family Names © Patrick Hanks 2003, 2006. Possible Related Names Cayce Keasey Activities

Heritage Learn about Abner Brooks's homeland.

Traditional Dress Put your face in a costume from Abner Brooks's homelands. Family Time Line

Spouse and Children

Parents and Siblings 1680 1700 1720 1740 1760 1780 1800 1820 1840 1860 1880 Abner Brooks Casey

1700–1786 Harriet Green

1710–1786 Marriage: about 1725

Jesse Bartholemew Casey

1726–1779 John Casey

1727–1816 Benjamin L Casey

1731–1779 James Casey

1733–1830 Sarah Casey

1735–1822 Randolph Casey Sr.

1738–1814 Aaron Casey

1742–1830 Nancy Casey

1743–1824 Levi Garrett Casey

1749–1803 William Casey

1754–1843 Christopher Columbus Casey

1755–1840 World Events (3) 1714 Age 15 Catholics hold just 7% of land in Ireland. 1776 Age 77 Thomas Jefferson's American Declaration of Independence endorsed by Congress. Colonies declare independence. 1776 Age 77 Maryland is the 7th state.


https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/145634659/abner-brooks-casey Abner Brooks Casey

BIRTH 1700 Ireland

DEATH 1796 (aged 95–96) Whitmire, Newberry County, South Carolina, USA

BURIAL Casey Family Cemetery Whitmire, Newberry County, South Carolina, USA PLOT on family land near Whitmire MEMORIAL ID 145634659

Abner Brooks Casey born ca 1700 in Tyrone County, Ireland came to the colonies with brother Peter Casey. Abner Casey married twice and had many sons and two known daughters. His known sons were: Jesse Bartholomew Casey, John Casey, Randolph Casey, James Casey, Benjamin Casey, Christopher [Columbus?]Casey, Levi Garrett Casey, Moses Casey and Aaron Casey. The known daughters are Sarah Casey and Nancy Casey.

Abner Casey himself aided the cause and may have also seen service during the Revolutionary War. Abner's sons Randolph Casey, Benjamin Casey, Christopher Casey and Levi Casey all saw service during the Revolutionary War. Levi Casey rose in rank to Brigadier General and was one of the Overmountain Men who fought at major battles including King's Mountain and Cowpens.

A family cemetery located on the land belonging to Abner or one of his sons was in existence when Abner died. The cemetery was on land near the Whitmire community in Old Ninety-Six District which is now Newberry County. The cemetery has long been lost with all the souls buried there.

Family Members

Spouse

Harriet Green Casey 1700–1786

Children

Levi Garrett Casey 1752–1807

Christopher Casey 1755–1840

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/145634659/abner-brooks-casey

Abner Casey

1st generation

ABNER BROOKS CASEY was born in 1700, maybe in Tyrone County, in northern Ireland. No documentation has proved who the father of Abner Brooks Casey is. Some say, John or Aaron or Nicholas. Maybe he was the son of John Casey (b 1680, Tyrone, Ulster, N. Ireland) & Sarah Lnuk or Brooks. His siblings may have been Peter Casey & Elizabeth Casey. (Some Casey researchers feel that Abner’s family was from Tyrone County in northern Ireland, but there were Caseys in other parts of Ireland, particularly in Limerick County and Cork County. Casey is an uncommon name in Tyrone County, so if he was from there, possibly his father moved there alone.)

 Beginning in 1610 Scottish people were settled in northern Ireland by the English crown to help bring the catholic country under protestant control.  By 1703 the English parliament began imposing Test Acts against not only Catholics but also Scottish Presbyterians.  This harsh treatment resulted in thousands of Scots-Irish (maybe 200,000-400,000) immigrating to America in the 1700s.  (See book: Born Fighting )

One story is that in about 1725 the two brothers, Peter and Abner Casey, came to America from Tyrone County, Ireland, possibly to escape political or religious persecution or economic suffering. This second wave of Scots-Irish from northern Ireland was so large that even the Enlish Parliament was concerned.

They settled in the colony of Maryland near Baltimore in 1725. Abner married Harriet “Hettie” Green, of Welsh descent, born in Baltimore, MD abt 1710. They later moved to Hampshire Co., West Virginia, where brother Peter lived for the remainder of his life.

1730 Va, Md & Carolina

At right is a 1730 map of Carolina, Virginia & Maryland.

In 1735 the family may have moved to the James River in Virginia, then by 1738 to the Roanoke River (south-central Va.) in Roanoke County (now WV). All their children were born there. Their 4th son, Randolph, was supposedly named for a family friend. They had eight sons and one daughter between the years of 1726 and 1760 [This is a 34-year span, meaning that Hettie had her children between the ages of 16-50!]

Abner had five slaves. In 1760 (or 1748) the family moved to Spartanburg, SC and settled in Old District 96 which is now Newberry and Spartanburg counties in South Carolina. All the Casey sons were in the Revolutionary War from South Carolina. Randolph served under Francis Marion, the “Swamp Fox” of the Santee. Levi, was a Colonel of the South Carolina troops during the War. Moses, was a Captain in 1820-26.

In 1790 the family was in Newberry Co., S.C. A list of Justices of the Peace of Newberry Co. 1791-1800 included Abner Casey. Abner was also on the 1st grand jury. Abner died about 1786 in Newberry, S.C.; he might be buried in Whitmire Cemetery.

In 1800 there were Caseys in Spartanburg, Co., SC. The family may have been members of a Baptist church there, possibly Mt. Tabor Baptist Church.

Gen. Levi later represented Spartanburg, SC District, in the House of Representatives of the US Congress from 1802 to 1807. Levi granted land in 1783 in Whitmire County, Washington City, South Carolina, for a Casey Family Cemetery. Both father Abner and son Levi are buried there [another source says Levi is buried in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, DC].

One of Abner's famous descendants was Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain). This is his line: Abner Casey, John Casey, William Casey, Margaret Casey Lampton, Jane Lampton Clemens, Samuel Clemens.

CHILDREN: (This list varies a little from one family historian to another, so it’s not necessarily completely accurate.)

1. JESSE CASEY

Jesse was born 1726, Baltimore, Maryland. Jesse grew to manhood in Virginia. He married Phoebe ?. They lived in Greene Co, Ga between 1744-48. Two children were born there. He moved to Roane, Tn about 1750 where a couple more children were born, then later moved to Spartanburg, SC (District 96) where he died. He fought all through the Revolutionary War (1775-1783).

Five Caseys: Aaron, John, Jesse, Moses, and Abner, are all recorded in the 1790 Census as heads of families in South Carolina. Jesse probably died between 1794 and 1800 (abt 1795), since he is not in the 1800 Census.

Children:

1a) AARON CASEY, born 1742, is the first son of Jesse. He was born in Roanoke River Valley, Virginia. He married MARY "Polly" WAYNE, who was born in South Carolina in 1752. (She was a first cousin to "Mad Anthony Wayne," of Revolutionary War fame, who was an intimate friend of Benjamin Franklin.) About 1800 Aaron moved to Georgia. Then in a few years, to Roane Co, Tn (near Knoxville). Mary died in 1845 (age 93) and is buried in Buffalo Cemetery, Newton County, AR., next to her grandson, Jesse E. Casey. Aaron & Mary had 6 children:

....1a1) JESSE CASEY, b 1770, SC. Married Polly Ellison. Jesse had 53 acres on Cainy Creek, Roane Co, Tn. In 1817, Morgan Co was created from Roane Co, which included Crab Orchard Creek also called "Casey's Creek."

   In abt 1834, Jesse and his brother Abner led a wagon train of friends and relatives from Morgan Co, Tn, and headed west. There were 42 wagons in the train; and after crossing the Mississippi River, the train split up. Jesse and his son, Jesse E. Casey, went northwest to settle in Franklin Co Mo. The others continued on to settle on the Big Mulberry River now Johnson Co, AR., then on to Newton Co, AR., on the Buffalo River. children:
   •Ambler Casey, b 1791 McMinn Co, Tn; m Polly Ellison, 1809, Roane, Tn
   • Jesse Elax Casey, b 1797, Ga/Tn; m 10 Apr, 1817, in Roane Co. TN to Martha “Patsy” Coe; ch: Stephen (Newton Co, AR 1850-60)

....1a2) ABNER CASEY, born abt 1766/80 in South Carolina. He married Elizabeth Bowen (b 1782). Abner moved to Roane Co, Tn.

   •In 1811, Abner Casey posted bond for the marriage of William Pennalan to [his sister] Mary Casey in Roane Co, Tn.  
   •Abner Casey served as a Grand Juror in the July, 1812 term of the Roane Co, Tn court.  
   •In 1814 and 1815, Abner Casey is listed in Capt. Rogers Company Tax List as owning 200 acres of land situated on the Tennessee River in Roane Co, Tn.  
   •In August, 1815, Abner Casey is found on a list of voters in Roane Co, Tn.  
   •On June 8, 1816, Abner Casey sold 200 acres of land located on the Tennessee River to Abner Underwood in Roane Co, Tn.  
   •In 1830, Abner Casey (b 1780-90) was listed in the census of Rhea Co, Tn.  
   •On Sept 8, 1838, Abner Casey sold 160 acres of land located on Hurricane Creek to Thomas Bottom in Roane Co, Tn.  
   •Another Abner Casey lived in McMinn Co, Tn from 1829 to 1835.  There is a possibility that these two men were the same person.
   •Also, in 1823, there was an Abner Casey that was found on a tax list of Captain Pipers Company in Rhea Co, Tn.
   Abner & Elizabeth died between 1850-60 and are buried in Buffalo Cemetery, Newton Co, Ar.
   Children:
   • Levi Casey, b Apr 23, 1805, Tn/Ga; m Polly Haggard, Tn; d Jan. 10, 1859, Taney Co, MO.
   • Turner Franklin Casey, b July 8, 1805; m Sarah Ann Clark (b 1807 AR); ch: Christopher Columbus Casey (b 1827, Tn), Uriah R. Casey (b 1848 Johnson Co Ar; d 1912 Ar), Gen. Andrew Jackson Casey (b abt 1850 Johnson Co, Ar), & several daughters
   • Anthony Casey, b abt 1807, Ga
   • Susan Casey, b Oct 12, 1807
   • Marion Casey, b abt 1809
   • Uriah Casey, b abt 1811,
   • Mary Ann Casey, b Feb 26, 1813
   • Abner Ellsberry Casey, b 1820
   • Jesse Tipton Casey, b Oct. 31, 1824;

....1a3) ANTHONY CASEY, b abt 1770, Spartansburg, SC

....1a4) ALEXANDER CASEY, b abt 1782, Spartansburg SC

....1a5) MARION CASEY, b abt 1784, Spartansburg, SC

....1a6) MARY CASEY, b abt 1793, Spartansburg, SC; m 1811, Roane Co, Tn to William Pennalan

....1a7) URIAH CASEY, b abt 1796, Spartansburg, SC

1b) MARY CASEY, b abt 1744, Green Co, GA

1c) JESSE CASEY, b abt 1746

1d) JOHN CASEY, b abt 1748, Greene Co, Ga

1e) MOSES CASEY, b abt 1750, Roane, Tn

1f) ABNER CASEY, b abt 1752, Roane, Tn

....1f1) JOHN CASEY, b 1782, SC; m Anna Turner (m abt 1804 Ga; d Greene Co, MO); ch?:

   • Jane Casey, b 1805, Ga
   • Hethey Casey, b may 29, 1807, Tn; m James Ellison
   • John Allen Casey, b abt 1819, Roane Co, TN; m Susan Cardwell
   • Elizabeth Ann Casey, b abt 1820; m Samuel R. Robinson (m 1844 Greene Co, MO)
   • Frances Mariah Casey, b abt 1822
   • Sarah Casey, b abt 1824
   • Clarissa E. Casey, b abt 1826
   • Susanne E. Casey, b abt 1828
   • Kizziah Casey, b abt 1830
   • Polly Ann Casey, b abt 1832

2. JOHN CASEY

John was born 1727, Baltimore, Maryland. Married Isabella Allison. Died after 1816, Spartanburg Co, SC

2a) WILLIAM CASEY, b abt 1751, Baltimore, MD. He married Elizabeth Allison. He died about 1843, Autauga, AL. children:

   • Green Casey, b Adair Co, Ky
   • Randall Casey
   • Abner Casey
   • Isaac Casey
   • Thomas Casey
   • James Casey, b 1774
   • Jean Casey, b 1776; m William Stone
   • Robert Casey, b 1783

2b) JOHN CASEY, b abt 1753, Adair Co, KY

2a) JOSEPH CASEY, b abt 1749, Baltimore, Co, MD

2b) MOSES CASEY, b abt 1755, Baltimore Co, MD

2c) ALLISON CASEY, b abt 1757, Baltimore Co, MD

2d) JENNY CASEY, b abt 1759, Baltimore Co, MD

2e) SUSANNAH CASEY, b abt 1761, Baltimore Co, MD

2f) JESSE CASEY, b 1763, Baltimore Co, MD; d 1860

2g) MARY CASEY, b abt 1765, Baltimore Co, MD

2h) CASANDER CASEY, b abt 1767, Baltimore Co, MD

2i) ABNER CASEY (?Abner, son of John F. Casey migrated to Wayne County, TN then to Marshall County, KY with son Abner Jr.)

3. BENJAMIN CASEY

Benjamin was born Jan 27, 1730/1, Anne Arundel, MD. He married Julia Carson in 1753 in Va. He served in Revolutionary War. He probably died Apr 14, 1779, Camp Middlebrook, PA (or Frederick Co, Va). But in 1800 there was a Benjamin Casey in Charleston, Co, SC. Children:

3a) WILLIAM CASEY, b 1754, Frederick Co, Va (great-grandfather of Samuel Clemens)

3b) JOHN CASEY, b abt 1756, Frederick Co, Va

3c) NANCY CASEY, b abt 1758, Frederick Co, Va

3d) SAMUEL CASEY, b abt 1760, Frederick Co, Va

3e) JOSEPH CASEY, b abt 1762, Frederick Co, Va

3f) AGNES NANCY CASEY, B 1767, VA; m Thomas Fletcher, 1785 in Lincoln Co, Va; Agnes d 1836, Thomas in 1849, both in Adair Co, Ky.

4. CHRISTOPHER CASEY

Christopher was born 1730-1754 in Newberry, SC; married in SC to Sarah Smith. He died Aug. 2, 1840 Cole Co, MO.

Children:

8a) JOHN CASEY Sr, b Feb 11, 1775; m Drucilla Hill; d 8/19/1849; children

8b) KEZIAH CASEY, b abt 1760; m Joseph T. Cooley; ch: Eveline, Elizabeth, Christopher Columbus

8c) CHRISTOPHER CASEY, Jr.; ch: John

5. JAMES CASEY

James was born in 1733; married Nancy ? ; son: Jesse?

6. MOSES CASEY

Moses was born abt 1735; was captain of South Carolina troops in Revolutionary War. He was in Spartanburg, Co, S.C. in 1800 & 1810. He married Abigail Pennington (sister of Randolph’s wife, Charity Pennington)

7. SARAH CASEY

SARAH was b abt 1735; m Philip Trapnal.

8. RANDOLPH CASEY [my ancestor]

Randolp h was born in 1737, on the Roanoke River in VA; he may have married about 1760 in Va or SC to Mary Jane Pennington (b ca 1745, parents unknown).

  Randolph Casey is not listed in the DAR Patriot Index, even though 3 of his brothers were: Capt. Benjamin, Lt. Christopher, and Lt. Col. Levi.  However, Randolph seems to have had war service:
  He was a sergeant in the 2nd SC regiment, serving under Francis Marion. He and his brothers fought in the Revolutionary War with SC troops, and supposedly he was at the meeting when a British officer came to treat with Francis Marion and later said, "I have seen an American general and his officers, without pay, and almost without clothes, living on roots and drinking water; and all for LIBERTY! What chance have we against such men!"  (See also: The Life of General Francis Marion at right) Francis Marion became very famous about 25 years after the war when a book was written about him, and it seems like there were as many baby boys named Francis Marion as there were George Washington!
   Randolph did marry Charity Pennington, daug of Jacob (she's listed as wife in Randolph's will; if he married Mary Jane first, then he married Charity about 1788). [There is some doubt that he married Mary Jane.  This is based on an old manuscript written in 1876 by Lewis F. Casey, great-grandson of Randolph.  Lewis said that his sources were his grandmother, Nancy, wife of Abraham Pennington Casey, and also Gov. Zadok Casey, Abraham's brother.  Lewis said that their mother was Mary Jane Pennington, but there has been no other evidence and Zadok's mother could not have been Mary Jane.]
   Randolph raised his family in SC (from 1760 to about 1795).
   In 1796 they were in Green Co., GA where their youngest child, Zadok, was born.  
   About 1805-10 they moved to Sumner Co., TN.  He died in Smith/Macon Co., TN in 1813. 

Children:

Mary Jane's (I guess):

8a) LEVI CASEY, b 1768, SC; m Mary Sherrel; moved to Ill, 1817; d Johnson Co., IL.

8b) RANDOLPH CASEY, Jr., b 1769, SC; m Sallie Perkins; d Iowa

8c) ISAAC CASEY, b Apr 5, 1770, SC; m Elizabeth Mackey, 1788 moved to Barren Co, KY. Moved to IL where she died 1834; he m 2nd Jemima Oard, 1836. He d 1854, Jefferson Co, IL.

8d) ABRAHAM PENNINGTON CASEY, b Nov 1, 1772, SC; m 1794, Nancy Baker; d 1841, Oregon Co, MO; ch:

8e) REBECCA CHARITY CASEY, b abt 1775, SC; m 1st Erasmus Noble [I have heard that there is a will of Erasmus' out there, but I haven't seen it]; m 2nd William DePriest; d Jefferson Co, IL abt 1834. Ch: Lucinda NOBLES, Green, Isaac C., & Charity DePRIEST.

Charity’s:

8i) NANCY CASEY, b 1788. She was not mentioned in Randolph's will. She married John Dotson about 1810 in Smith Co, TN.

8f) HIRAM CASEY, b 1789, SC; m 1807 Catherine DePriest; d 1828 (age 39) Hardeman Co, TN.

8g) SAMUEL CASEY, b 1793; m Ruth Gilbert; d 1850, Jefferson Co, IL.

8h) ZADOK CASEY, b 1796, GA; m 1815, TN to Rachel King; moved to IL 1817; was Lt. Governor of IL in 1830; d 1862 in Caseyville, IL.

9. Hon. LEVI CASEY

General Levi Casey was born 1749 (DAR says b SC); married Elizabeth Duckett (b 1759 Md; d Dec 1, 1839, Lauderdale Co, AL).

He is listed in the DAR Patriot Index as:

"Casey, Levi, b 1749 SC, d 2-1-1807 DC, m Elizabeth Duckett, Lt.Col. SC, PS (patriotic service)"

In the Revolutionary War he was a Lieutenant, then a Colonel of South Carolina troops, and finally a Brigadier-General, commanding the brigade consisting of the Laurens and Newberry regiments. He commanded a company at the attack on Savannah, and distinguished himself at Rocky Mount, King’s Mountain, Hanging Rock, Musgrove’s Mills, Fishing Creek, Blackstocks, and Cowpens.

After the fall of Charlestown, the British authorities considered South Carolina as being under British control, and some of the rebels even went to the British camp and sought protection. Levi and others would have no part in it as they were staunch patriots of the American cause and would take any risk.

South Carolina was the setting of more battles during the American Revolution than any other state.

 

After the War he got interested in politics and served as a tax collector, and as a commissioner to divide the 96th district in 1783. He was a member of South Carolina state senate, 1781-82 & 1800-02; justice of Newberry County Court in 1785; state court judge, 1785; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1786-88, 1792-95 & 1798-99.

In 1790 & 1800 census he was in Newberry Co, SC.

In 1802 he was elected as a Republican to serve in the US House of Representatives (the 8th and 9th Congresses) from SC 7th District (Abbeville, Laurens &Newberry districts) and served from March 4, 1803, until his death in 1807. He was elected to the 10th Congress before the close of the 9th Congress, but he died Feb. 1 (or 3 or 15), 1807, during his term of office in Washington D.C. and was buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery in Georgetown. Then in 1809 he was moved to the Union (or Congressional) cemetery in Washington D.C.

Levi's children:

9a) SINA CASEY, b abt 1778, Newberry, SC

9c) ELIZABETH CASEY, b abt 1780, Newberry, SC

9b) NANCY CASEY, b abt 1790, Newberry, SC

9d) JOHN A. CASEY, b abt 1792, Newberry, SC

9e) LEVI CASEY, Jr. “Ole Flynn”, b abt 1794, Newberry Co, SC; m Chloe Hill in Ky; she died in Warren Co, Ky.

9g) JACOB DUCKETT CASEY, b Nov. 23, 1796, Newberry, SC; m 1st Charity Whitmire (1801-38); moved to Alabama 1833; m 3rd 1840 in Lauderdale, AL to Sarah Frances Lucas (1819-51); Jacob died June 11, 1853, Lauderdale, AL.

9f) SAMUEL OTTERSON CASEY, b 1801, Newberry, SC; m Rachel Lawson (1826-72); d 1866; CH:

9h) HETTIE CASEY, m James Ellison

10. NANCY CASEY

Nancy was born 1761; married ? Pickett (Aaron?)

11. WILLIAM CASEY

It's questionable whether William was a son of Abner. He was supposedly born in NC, while the rest of the children were born in VA or SC.

Wars of the Irish Kings

Born Fighting : How the Scots-Irish Shaped America

Scots-Irish in the Carolinas

The Life of General Francis Marion

"Devil of a Whipping: The Battle of Cowpens"

Other related books:

"The Road to Guilford Courthouse: The American Revolution in the Carolinas"

"Partisans and Redcoats: The Southern Conflict that Turned the Tide of the American Revolutions"

Piedmont Soldiers and Their Families,

by Cindy Casey


http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/d/i/p/Adabelle-J-Wade/GE...

Casey Family

The name “Casey” originated from the Gaelic name “O’Cathasaigh” or “Calesythe” over a thousand years ago (“O” meaning “of” and sometimes used, sometimes dropped). The original meaning of the name was “dart-armed chief in battle.” The Gaelic name mutated through the centuries. After the Anglo-Norman invasion of 1169 it became “O’Casey”. “Casey” was in use by 1490.


GEDCOM Source

Yates Publishing U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.Original data - This unique collection of records was extracted from a variety of sources including family group sheets and electronic databases. Originally, the information was derive MH:S18

GEDCOM Source

Source number: 9000.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: WAY 0

GEDCOM Source

Yates Publishing U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.Original data - This unique collection of records was extracted from a variety of sources including family group sheets and electronic databases. Originally, the information was derive MH:S18

GEDCOM Source

Source number: 23852.001; Source type: Pedigree chart; Number of Pages: 2 0

GEDCOM Source

Ancestry Family Trees Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. MH:S3 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created.

GEDCOM Source

Ancestry Family Trees 0 http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=40697284&pid...


Abner Brooks Casey was born about 1700 in Ulster, County of Tyrone, Northern Ireland. He was probably the son of John Nicholas Casey and [Brooks|Sarah Brooks]]

In about 1725 two brothers, Peter and Abner Casey came to America from Tyrone Co., Ireland, most likely to escape political and religious turmoil. This was during the reign of English King George I.

“In the reign (1714-27) of George I unfair rents, famine and crop failure drove more thousands of Irish to America.” [1] Tyrone county was an Scots-Irish county in Northern Ireland. They witnessed much tension and fighting between the native Irish and the Scots immigrants from Scotland. The Caseys were probably native Irish since there were O'Caseys all over Ireland and not just in Northern Ireland.

In 1725 Abner was about 26 years old when he sailed to America. The boat docked at Baltimore and Abner and Peter settled in the colony of Maryland near Baltimore.

By 1725, Abner married Harriet Green (1705-1786) (prob in Maryland, though it's possible he married before arriving in America).

Abner's wife was Harriet Green, a woman of Welsh descent. She immigrated from Wales. Her birth date is given as 1701 and sometimes 1716.


https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Casey-727

Abner Brooks Casey (abt. 1700 - aft. 1790)

Abner Brooks Casey

Born about 1700 in Ulster, County Tyrone, Ireland

Son of John Nicholas Casey and Sarah (Lnuk) Casey

Brother of Peter Casey

Husband of Harriet (Green) Casey — married 1725 in Baltimore, Baltimore County, Maryland

Father of Jesse Bartholemew Casey, John Casey, Nancy Casey, Benjamin Casey, Moses Casey, James Casey, Sarah Casey, Randolph Casey Sr., Aaron Casey, Levi Garrett Casey and Christopher Casey

Died after 1790 in Newberry, Newberry, South Carolina, USA

Profile last modified 9 Aug 2019 | Created 26 Jan 2013

2 DIFERENT STORIES ABOUT HIM:

Biography

Abner Brooks Casey was born about 1700 in Ulster, County of Tyrone, Northern Ireland. He was probably the son of John Nicholas Casey and [Brooks|Sarah Brooks]]

In about 1725 two brothers, Peter and Abner Casey came to America from Tyrone Co., Ireland, most likely to escape political and religious turmoil. This was during the reign of English King George I. “In the reign (1714-27) of George I unfair rents, famine and crop failure drove more thousands of Irish to America.” [1] Tyrone county was an Scots-Irish county in Northern Ireland. They witnessed much tension and fighting between the native Irish and the Scots immigrants from Scotland. The Caseys were probably native Irish since there were O'Caseys all over Ireland and not just in Northern Ireland.

In 1725 Abner was about 26 years old when he sailed to America. The boat docked at Baltimore and Abner and Peter settled in the colony of Maryland near Baltimore.

Marriage

By 1725, Abner married Harriet Green (1705-1786) (prob in Maryland, though it's possible he married before arriving in America).

Abner's wife was Harriet Green, a woman of Welsh descent. She immigrated from Wales. Her birth date is given as 1701 and sometimes 1716.

OR She was born in Baltimore, MD about 1705.

About 5 years after arriving the brothers moved away. Peter moved to Hampshire Co., (W)V in the 1730's where he married Mary Magdalea Dupuis and lived for the remainder of his life.

______________________________ ALTERNATE STORY: Abner Brooks Casey born ca 1700 in Tyrone County, Northern Ireland came to the colonies with brother Peter Casey. He and Peter Casey left Ireland about 1738. He may have arrived at Baltimore, but he went to the Roanoke River area in Virginia and then to South Carolina, arriving before 1749. Peter and Abner Casey were said to have settled in the colony of Maryland near Baltimore. They later moved to Hampshire County, West Virginia, where Peter Casey lived for the remainder of his life. When Abner Casey and his family lived in the Roanoke River Valley of Virginia there was an abundance of fish and wild game and other natural resources were in abundance. They lived in the Valley until about 1748 when he and his family and other families of the community migrated to the western part of South Carolina and settled in Old District 96 in what now is Newberry and Spartanburg County in the colony of South Carolina. [There are problems with dates in this story.] ______________________________

From “History of Jefferson County, Illinois”: “The Casey family was and is the most numerous, perhaps, as well as the most prominent, of all the pioneer families of Jefferson County. Abner Casey, the progenitor of the family in America, was born in the County Tyrone, Ireland, and there, upon arriving at the years of maturity, married a Welsh lady, who, like himself, possessed great physical and mental powers. They emigrated to American somewhere about the middle of the eighteenth century and settled in Virginia, close neighbors to Edmond Randolph. Their children were all born while they lived on the Roanoke, and were Levi, Randolph and a daughter--Randolph being named for their illustrious neighbor.” [2] [The Randolphs were a prominent family in Virginia. However, the famous Edmund Randolph was born in 1753, several years after Randolph Casey was born in 1737. Edmund’s father was John Randolph, a cousin of Thomas Jefferson. John was a Loyalist but his son Edmund was a patriot. John’s father, also John Randolph, died in 1737, so perhaps that was who Randolph Casey was named for.]

Move to Virginia

Abner moved first about 200 miles SW to Virginia and settled on the James River (possibly near Lynchburg, VA), then soon afterwards moved about 50 miles SW to the Roanoke River Valley (near present Roanoke, VA), where they stayed until about 1760. Most of their children were born here. The Roanoke Valley is about twenty miles long, from the Roanoke River gorge near Virginia's Explore Park in the east to Shawsville in the west, and as much as ten miles wide around Roanoke City though the width is closer to five miles in most areas.[3] "The first European settlers ventured into the valley around 1740; they were primarily Scotch-Irish immigrants."[4] Settlement around Roanoke was sparse until after the French & Indian War ended in 1763. Abner and Harriet Green Casey had eight sons and one daughter between the years of 1726 and 1760. They are also shown as having five slaves before moving to Spartanburg, South Carolina.

Move to South Carolina

the family moved to Spartanburg, SC and settled in Old District 96 which is now Newberry and Spartanburg counties in South Carolina. “They family moved to South Carolina about the year 1760 (or 1748) and settled in Old district 96 (which is now Newberry and Spartanburg counties), located near Spartansburg, where they lived until after the close of the Revoluntionary war. They were stanch patriots and bore an active and honorable part in the war for liberty and independence...”

From “A History of Newberry County, SC”: p. 62 - “First grand jury drawn consisted of . . . Abner Casey . . .” p. 65 - list of justices of peace 1791-1800 included Abner Casey [5]

SC State Records 1770, Apr 18 - Abner Casey, plat for 100 acres in Berkley County, (Broad River, Enoree River, Saluda River)[6]

Abner Brooks Casey's Residences over time

1770, owned 100 acres, 96th District, Newberry County, South Carolina 1 Dec 1777, sold property to Levi Casey in South Carolina[7] 1778, Miscellaneous Act No. 1123 - The Determination of Jury Lists for District Ninety-Six 79. The Jury Lists of South Carolina, 1778-1779, page 78 and 79 Page 78 shows his residence in the Middle Division between Broad and Saludy Rivers; page 79 lists name 1779, Ninety Six, Greenwood, South Carolina[8] 1779, Ninety-Six District, no township listed [9] 1780, Ninety-Six District, Ninety Six District at Little River bottom, Broad and Saludy. Remarks: He is on "A List of Petit-Jury Men and Jury Men in Civil Causes" from "Little River between Broad & Saludy." [10] Before 1786, Age: 86 Newberry County, South Carolina Justice of the Peace. A list of Justices of the Peace of Newberry County, South Carolina from 1791-1800 included the name of Abner Casey. Abner was also on the first Grand Jury in that county.[11] 1790, Newberry, South Carolina, USA 1800, an Abner Casey is listed with four households between him and John Casey in the Spartanburg District of South Carolina.[12] Abner Casey was gifted a land grant in the uncharted territory of Kentucky for his service during the Revolutionary War as follows: Grantee: Abner Casey Number of Acres: 160 Township: S E Qr Sec 4 Range: T-3 R-3 E Book Number: 1 Page number: 274[13] Death

Abner died After 1790 and before 1800. He was buried in the Casey Family Cemetery, Whitmire, Old 96 District now Newberry County, South Carolina, USA [Plot: on family land near Whitmire].[14] This Cemetery likely lost

He might be buried Whitemire Cemetery, Newberry, SC. The bounty maps show Abner to have land just south of Whitemire and it supposedly contains a lost Casey family cemetery on it with Abner and Harriet buried there. Levi owned land just SE of Abner's and some say the Casey cemetery was located there. Other brothers, John, Jesse & Randolph, also owned land in the same vicinity.

A family cemetery located on the land belonging to Abner Casey or one of his sons was in existence when Abner Brooks Casey died. The cemetery was on land near the Whitmire community in Old Ninety-Six District which is now Newberry County. The cemetery has long been lost along with all the souls buried there. It was named the Casey Family Cemetery and was located at Whitmire in Old 96 District. That is believed to be Abner Casey's final resting place.

Children

Abner had eight sons and one daughter between the years of 1726 and 1760. OR Abner Casey possibly married twice and had many sons and two known daughters. His known sons were: Jesse Bartholomew Casey, John Casey, Randolph Casey, James Casey, Benjamin Casey, Christopher (Columbus?) Casey, Levi Garrett Casey, Moses Casey and Aaron Casey. The known daughters are Sarah Casey and Nancy Casey.

It is believed that Harriet died in Old 96 District in South Carolina. Some researchers believe that Abner Brooks Casey had more than one wife, but no substantiation has been discovered; those researchers give a marriage date of around 1751.Harriet Green Casey's death date varies from one source to another, but is believed to be between 1786 and 1790.

Jesse Bartholomew Casey, b abt 1726 Baltimore, MD; m Phoebe Jane Holloway; d 1811 SC John Casey, b 1727, Baltimore, MD; m Isabella Allison; d aft 1816, Spartansburg, SC Benjamin Casey, b Jan 27, 1731, Anne Arundel, MD; (He was not the Benj. Casey who d Apr 14, 1779, Frederick Co, VA; that man was the son of Peter Casey;[15] & perhaps also the man who m Julia Carson); this Benj was unmarried. James Casey, b 1733, Roanoke Valley, VA; m Nancy ?; d Spartanburg, SC Moses Casey, b 1735, prob James River; m Abigail Pennington Sarah Casey, b 1735, prob James River; m Philip Trapnal (maybe) Randolph Casey Sr, b ab5 1737, prob Roanoke Valley, Va; m Charity Pennington; d bef Nov 1814, Smith Co, TN Christopher Casey, b 1740, Roanoke Valley, Va; m Sarah Smith; d Aug 2, 1840, prob Cole Co, MO Gen. Levi Garrett Casey, b 1749, Roanoke, VA (or SC); m Elizabeth Duckett; d 1807 Washington, D.C. Nancy Casey, b 1751, Roanoke (or SC); m Aaron? Pickett Aaron Casey (no info) Abner's sons, Benjamin, Levi and Randolph were in the Second Carolina Regiment under Col. Elijah Clark and fought in the Battle of King's Mountain. And served with Francis Marion "the Swamp Fox."

Abner Casey himself aided the cause and may have also seen service during the Revolutionary War. Abner's sons Randolph Casey, Benjamin Casey, Christopher Casey and Levi Casey all saw service during the Revolutionary War. Levi Garrett Casey rose in rank to Brigadier General and was one of the Overmountain Men who fought at the major battles including King's Mountain and Cowpens. Br Gen Levi Casey was close friends with and fought with many notables of the Revolutionary War. He became a legislator and a member of the Senate serving a number of terms after the war. He died at age 59 of a massive heart attack while serving in Washington City and had just been re-elected to serve another term.

The Casey family distinguished itself over the generations. Many of the Casey men served in the military. Others were senators, congressmen, and gave valuable service to the infant country of their choosing. There were notable people within the ranks of their heritage. Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) was one of Abner Brooks Casey's famous descendants through his son Benjamin Casey's lineage. (Benjamin Casey, William Casey, Margaret, Jane, Samuel Clemens). Levi Garrett Casey's wife Elizabeth Duckett Casey is considered a forgotten heroine of the Revolution as she provided supplies to the cause and has been inducted into the DAR as a patriot. No doubt, there are countless others who deserve recognition.

Descendants of Abner Brooks Casey through his son Jesse Bartholomew Casey. Pictured are William Casey and wife Missouri Cook Casey and their extended family.

The William and Missouri Casey homestead about 1900. L to R: Tisha Casey holding Roy, Ben Casey, Cora, Jim Hicks holding Mabel, Bertie, Button, Calvin, Jeff, Aunt Sis and Uncle Ben McKinney, Dock, Price, Lonnie, Missouri, and Mandy holding Edna. The children in front are Mack, Ralph, Alpha, Bertha, Manferd, and Claudia. The house, built before the Civil War, is still standing.[16]

A study of the Old 96 District might be useful to genealogists; Levi Casey was appointed as one of the men to initially break up the huge district and make more manageable districts or counties:

The Old "Ninety-Six" District of South Carolina was created (original) in 1769 and was abolished in 1798. (The 96th District from 1785 to 1798 consisted of present day Union County) It consisted of (present-day)

Abbeville County (formed 1785) Part of Abbeville County to Greenwood County (formed 1897) Part of Abbeville County to McCormick County (formed 1916) Edgefield County (formed 1785) Part of Edgefield to Aiken County (formed 1871) Part of Edgefield to Greenwood County (formed 1897) Part of Edgefield to Saluda County (formed 1896) Laurens County (formed 1785) Newberry County (formed 1785) Spartanburg County (formed 1785) Part of Spartanburg County to Cherokee County (formed 1897) Union County (formed 1798) Part of Union. County to Cherokee County (formed 1897) Sources

↑ Book of Knowledge, “The Story of Ireland”, p.2942 ↑ History of Jefferson County, IL, p143-4 ↑ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roanoke_Valleyhttps://www.roanokecountyva.gov/805/History ↑ “A History of Newberry County, SC” (Vol 1, 1749-1860, by Thomas H. Pope) ↑ Colonial Plat Books S213184, Vol 14, page 22, item 2 http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/ - search “Casey, Abner” ↑ Deed Abstract: Sold land to Levi Casey Misc 1 DEC 1777 South Carolina ↑ Colony of South Carolina Records of 1716 to 1783, record for Abner Brooks Casey, page 12 ↑ Early Census Index of South Carolina, 1790-1890 ↑ South Carolina U.S. Census Reconstructed Records, 1660-1820 ↑ A list of Justices of the Peace of Newberry County, South Carolina from 1791-1800 ↑ 1800 United States Federal Census for Abner Casey, South Carolina, Spartanburg District ↑ The Kentucky Land Grants. Louisville, KY, USA: Filson Club Publications, 1925.Original data: Jillson, Willard Rouse. The Kentucky Land Grants ↑ Find A Grave Memorial# 145634659 ↑ Benj. Casey - https://lists.rootsweb.com/hyperkitty/list/casey.rootsweb.com/1998/12/ ↑ From County Tyrone to Taney EARLY HISTORY OF THE CASEY FAMILY, by Margaret Casey, White River Valley Historical Quarterly, Volume 1, Number 11 - Spring 1964 Casey Ancestors -- http://rfmin.net/mjgen/casey/casey.htmll Freeman, Mary Jo. Profile of Abner Brooks Casey (archived). "Willard & Related Families", RootsWeb, 9 October 2017. Acknowledgements

Biography by Carolyn Murray Other Contributors: Mary Jo Freeman

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Abner Brooks Casey's Timeline

1700
1700
Ulster County, Ireland
1726
1726
Baltimore, Maryland
1727
1727
Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, USA
1730
January 27, 1730
Anne Arundel County, Maryland
1735
1735
Mathews, Virginia Colony, UK
1735
Of, Newberry, South Carolina, United States