Abraham Vanderpool Sr.

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About Abraham Vanderpool Sr.

Abraham Vanderpool is known as the "father of the southern Vanderpool's". It was Abraham Vanderpool who ventured from what is now Albany, New York to Washington County, Tennessee - no mean feat in the early to mid 1700's.

He was truly a pioneer adventurer, whether by choice, economics, or both it is not known. It is known, from various records and documents, that Abraham traveled as a child, from Albany, New York, probably to what is now New York City, then to Newark, Essex County, New Jersey. As a married adult, he migrated from New Jersey to Virginia, North Carolina and Tennessee. He was also, perhaps, in Pennsylvania and South Carolina as well.

It is with Abraham, that the records of this Van der Poel line first use the spelling "Vanderpool" instead of the Dutch spelling, "Van der Poel". The reason for this is unknown. It may well be attributed to the inability of clerks to spell the name correctly, in the geographical areas to which Abraham migrated. These areas of the then, new frontier were outside the original New York and New Jersey Dutch settlements where the Dutch spelling characteristics would have been more familiar.

Abraham Vanderpool was the child of Wynant Van der Poel and Catherine De Hooges Van der Poel. He was born in Albany, New York, most probably in the year 1709. Some Vanderpool researchers believe the date to be 1707. The Dutch custom to baptize an infant as soon as possible, would lend credence to the date 1709, as he was baptized on February 13, 1709 in the Dutch Reformed Church. (The church was then located on the what is now the corner of Broadway and State Streets. It was built in 1656 but was replaced by a new structure in 1715. This structure was razed in 1806 and the new church was built a few blocks away. This church contains the original pulpit brought over from the Netherlands in 1656. This is the oldest pulpit in America.)

Abraham probably spent most if not all of his childhood years in Albany, New York. At some point in the early 1700's, at least by 1725 to 1729, Abraham's parents moved to the Newark, New Jersey area. The family must have spent at least a brief time in New York City, according to baptismal records dated June 30, 1725 for child, Catherine Vanderpool, youngest sister of Abraham.

The Bergen area (now Jersey City), of New Jersey was the oldest permanent settlement in New Jersey, which had come under English rule in 1664. There was a steady settlement of New Jersey by Dutch families from all sections of New Netherland. Some, including the Van der Poel's , came from the Albany, New York area. (This Dutch characteristic of migration and settlement as part of a group, continued eventually to the Van der Poel's group migration to North Carolina.)

The specific reason for the move to New Jersey, by Abraham's parents, is unknown but was probably economic in nature. Abraham's father was a younger son and it would be doubtful that he would have inherited property. Also, large holdings of land were being held by speculators and others, for future big profits instead of being sold. There was little land available for purchase in normal amounts of acreage. One had the choice of being a Tennant or moving on to new areas of the country. The Van der Poel's may also have been involved in mining pursuits that would have involved them moving to New Jersey. It is known that the family of Abraham's mother, Catherine De Hooges, were involved in mining endeavors.

What ever the reason for the migration to New Jersey, Abraham Vanderpool, as an older child or young man (by the age 20 or perhaps as young as age 16), had moved west of the Hudson River by July 13, 1729. There were church records entered July 13, 1729, at the Second River Dutch Reformed Church (organized in 1700), in Newark New Jersey, which establish the family as there at least by that date.

Abraham and Jannetje Weibling (spelling variations of Webliin, Wibling and Welling can be found with this family), were probably married by early 1734 as they had a child by late 1734. It is unknown if they were living in Newark or Belleville, New Jersey at the time of this birth. The child died in 1736 and was buried in Newark, New Jersey. They were probably living in Belleville at least in 1738, when they had a child baptized in Belleville, New Jersey on May 14, 1738.

It is probable that Abraham Vanderpool was a miner or involved in mining endeavors, as were other Vanderpool's in the area. Abraham's brother, Melgert was killed by a fall in a mine near Newark New Jersey. He plunged 114 feet to his death on April 04, 1743 as reported in both Benjamin Franklin's "Gazette" and John Zenger's "New-York Weekly Journal".

A court order dated May 16, 1740 listed Abraham living in Wallpack (now Newton), New Jersey, in the Delaware River Valley. This move may have been necessitated by following the mining opportunities.

Abraham may also have lived in Pennsylvania. There are church records dated in 1741, in Smithfield Pennsylvania. Smithfield is located across the Delaware River from New Jersey, so they may have simply crossed the river for worship and continued to have lived in New Jersey.

The next migration by Abraham and perhaps Jannetje Weibling Vanderpool was south to Virginia. It is unknown if Jannetje was living and made the trip to Virginia. It is known that by 1743, Abraham had moved south and west to Frederick County, Virginia, where his name appeared on a Fee List. He remained in Frederick at least until November 1745, as his name appears on documents until that time. By September 04, 1746, Abraham had moved further south to Augusta County, Virginia, where documents establish him living through 1751.

Jannetje Weibing Vanderpool probably died between 1741 and 1745. As no records have been found of her death, in New Jersey, it may be more likely that she died in Virginia. This would establish her death as 1743 to 1745. Some Vanderpool researchers believe her death may have been attributed to a hostile Indian raid but that has never been established.

Abraham could have remarried more than once but it is known that he was remarried at least by 1748 to Rebecca Vanderpool. This

date was established by property purchased in that year which required the assent of his wife when he sold hit in 1751.

The maiden surname of Rebecca Vanderpool is unknown. The theory has been posed, that she may have been a "Westfall" or "Bogart", as they were closely associated with the Vanderpool's in Virginia. She may have been a widow at the time of their marriage, as well. Rebecca was the mother of Ann and probably of the younger Abraham Jr., as well.

Abraham applied for a patent on 430 acres in Augusta County, Virginia, on October 19, 1748. He was already occupying the land at that time. (He may in fact, have been used to 'squatting on land in the past.) This was truly frontier land at this time. This area had a few settlers as early as 1735, but was largely uninhabited until purchased by Lord Thomas Fairfax in 1748. After purchasing a large tract of land on the South Branch of the Potomac, Lord Fairfax hired a surveyor (who had a young, sixteen year old helper named George Washington, who would later be the first president of the United States. George Washington reported there were Dutch living on Lord Fairfax's land, and Abraham Vanderpool may have been one of them) and then advertised the land as available for purchase.

Abraham and Rebecca sold this land on the South Branch of the Potomac, on May 25, 1751. Their whereabouts are uncertain between the years 1751 and 1756. It is thought by some researchers that they were living in the Greenbriar River area, first settled in 1749. This area is not far from Vanderpool, Virginia (now located in present day Watauga County, North Carolina) 1and Vanderpool Gap. Vanderpool Gap is on the border of Virginia and West Virginia and was discovered by John Vanderpool, the brother of Abraham.

By 1756, the Vanderpool's had left the Greenbriar area. At this time there were growing hostilities between the settlers and the native Indians, all along the edge of the frontier. The Vanderpool's retreated to North Carolina, after a series of attacks led by the Shawnee Indian leader named "the Cornstalk". These attacks drove the settlers eastward from the Greenbriar area and several Dutch settlers were killed. One Vanderpool female may have been captured. (A letter to George Washington from a militia captain dated May 14, 1756, mentions that his unit had tracked a band of Indians near Vanderpool's house, described as being close to the head of the Jackson River and near the Black River, not too far from Fort Dinwiddie. This area includes both Vanderpool Gap and today's town called Vanderpool. It is not clear who the Vanderpool was, but it could not have been Abraham, as he had removed to Orange County, North Carolina.)

As Indian tribes attacked European settlements all along the edge of the frontier areas, settlers were driven back north and east, throughout 1755 and 1756. These hostilities would later erupt into the French and Indian War.

Whatever the cause of Abraham and Rebecca leaving Virginia, it is known from records that Abraham as in the Parish of St. Matthew at Rocky River in Orange County, North Carolina, by April 06, 1756. On August 20, 1756, Abraham Vanderpool was listed as a certified chain-carrier for a surveyor. He was next listed in records at Sandy Creek in Orange County, in 1757. The last record of Abraham in Orange County (that part now in Randolph County, North Carolina), North Carolina, was dated November 05, 1757.

Abraham next appears on a Fee List in Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia on May 12, 1757. Abraham may have taken his family back to Frederick County, where he had lived in 1743, and then by himself went to North Carolina to work and perhaps locate land. Or they may have all moved to North Carolina and then back to Frederick County, Virginia by May 1757.

Whatever the situation, there was then a decade, (from 1757 to 1767) in which their whereabouts are unknown. We do know that at least by 1767, Abraham Vanderpool was established in Rowan County (later became Surry County) North Carolina and was a "road overseer". In 1768, either Abraham Vanderpool or his son, Abraham, was serving as "constable" in that area. Having these career positions in Rowan County, would probably suggest that Abraham Vanderpool had been in this area long enough to establish himself as a reliable and established citizen of the county.

The section of Rowan County that the Vanderpool's lived in, later became part of Wilkes County, in 1777. It is known that Abraham Vanderpool and his son, Abraham, continued to reside in Rowan County, later Wilkes County, until at least June 12, 1778. as is verified by tax lists and land grants.

Abraham Vanderpool probably died between June 12, 1778 and May 12, 1779. June 12, 1778 is the last recorded date known at this time, of Abraham in Wilkes County, North Carolina. On May 12, 1779, his wife, Rebecca Vanderpool, signed her will and it did not mention Abraham. This would indicate he was probably deceased by this time. Rebecca Vanderpool was in Washington County, North Carolina, now Tennessee, when she signed her will. A tax list in 1779 for Washington County, North Carolina (now Tennessee) lists Abraham Vanderpool as deceased. It is unknown if Abraham died in Wilkes County, North Carolina or Washington County, North Carolina, which became Washington County, Tennessee in 1790.

It seems plausible that Abraham Vanderpool did go to Washington County, North Carolina. First, in her will, Rebecca lists six cattle and two plows among other things. If she had moved to this county by herself, she would not likely have brought or purchased cattle and plows. Second, Abraham is listed as deceased on the Washington County tax list which would seem to indicate he had previously been alive in that county.


   Abraham, Sr. married Rebecca Isaac. (Magoffin County Historical Society Newsletter, 2007.
   http://www.rootsweb.com/~kymhs/columns/2007/122007.htm)
   DUTCH REFORMED CHURCH OF ALBANY BAPTISM, 13 FEB 1709: ABRAHAM OF WYNAND VAN DER POEL & CATHARINA DEHOOGES. WITNESSES MELGERT VAN DER POEL JR., CATHARINA VAN DER POEL.
   WASHINGTON CO TN RECORDS,VOL. 1, LIST OF TAXABLES 1778-1801:
   1779-ABRAHAM VANDERPOLE (DEC'D) ESTATE OF: 1 SITE,100 ACRES $100 VALUE; 1 HORSE $100 V ALUE; 5 CATTLE, $50 VALUE, NO READY MONEY, NO NEGROES, TOTAL SUM $250.
   TEETER NAVE- 1 SITE, 300 ACRES $800 VALUE; 6 HORSES $825 VALUE; 15 CATTLE $150 VALUE; $24.16 READY MONEY, NO NEGROES, TOTAL SUM $1799.16.
   The King's Mountain Men, by K.K. White, p.26 notes that on 24 May 1779, Teter Nave 'have leave to administrative on the estate of Abraham Vanderpool, give bond and security for the same."
   WILL OF REBECCA VANDERPOOL MADE 12 MAY 1779 WASHINGTON CO TN.
   14 JULY 1736 UNEXECUTED LEASE (NJ-H.S. MSS PACA XL1#17): NATHANIEL ROGERS OF NEWARK, TAYLOR TO VANDERPOOL-TURNER TENANT AND 5 1/2 ACRE LOT IN NEWARK BD ON ROAD BY THE BANE. JOHN BRIEN, SIGNED JAMES WHEELER, WITNESS JOSIAH GILBERT AND JOSEPH ROGERS FOR 4 YEARS FROM 15 APRIL NEXT, 4 POUNDS PER AN. NOT EXECUTED.
   FROM INDEX TO NORTHERN NECK SURVEYS ON FILE (VA), PAGE 155: PATENTS ISSUED DURING THE REGAL GOUT. GRANTEE'S NAME: ABRAHAM VANDERPOOL OF AUGUSTA CO. DATE 19 AUG 17 42; 432 ACRES, NO 10, UPON SOUTH FORK OF THE WAPPACOMA ON GREAT SOUTH BRANCH OF POTOMACK RIVER.
   HISTORY OF SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA AND WASHINGTON CO: 1741 ABRAHAM VANDERPOOL-JUSTICE OF COUNTY COURT AUGUSTA COUNTY.
   WILL BOOK 1, PAGE 42, 21 MAY 1747 ABEL WESTFALL QUALIFIES AS EXECUTOR OF JOHN BOUGARD WITH SURETIES THOMAS WEST & JOHN STATES. TESTE SAMUEL PORTEUS.
   PAGE 43, 4 SEPT 1746 JOHANNES BOUGARDS WILL OF THE SOUTH BRANCH. WIFE SARAH, BIG WITH CHILD, WHO MUST BE BOUGHT UP IN HER FATHERS HOUSE; BROTHER ANTHONY BOUGARD, SHOEMAKERS TEATHER; DAUGHTER ANN BOUGARD. EXECUTORS ABEL WESTFALL & ANTHONY BOUGARD. TESTE ABRAHAM VANDERPOOL, JOHN WESTFALL & JACOB WESTFALL. PROVED BY JACOB WESTFALL 21 MAY 1747. PROVED BY OTHER WITNESSES 28 JUNE 1747.
   PAGE 337, 28 MAY 1751 ALICE CHERRY'S BOND AS ADMINISTRATIX OF EDWARD CHERRY, WITH SURETIES ROBT RENNICK, ABRAHAM VANDEPOOLE.
   PAGE 392, 6 JUNE 1751 APPRAISEMENT OF ISAAC JONES BY ABRAM VANDERPOOL , HENRY SHIPLES, JOHN MCDADE.
   DEED BOOK 3, PAGE 239, 25 MAY 1751 - ABRAHAM V ANDERPOOL & REBECCA TO GEORGE YOCCUM (YOCCOMB) NO. 10 HELD BY PATENT OF LORD FAIRFAX, 19TH OCTOBER 1748, ON YE SOUTH FORK OF YE WAPPACONEE (OR) GREAT SOUTH BRANCH OF POTOMAC, 430 ACRES. ENDORCED & DELIVERED TO JAMES MACHIR FOR GEORGE HARNOST, SR. ONE OF THE HEIRS OF THE GRANTEE, 16TH JULY 1806. TESTE WILLIAM WHITE, THOMAS MOORE.
   THE GRANVILLE DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA 1748-1763, VOL. TWO.
   PATENT BOOK 12, PATENT #2241, PAGE 51: LORD GRANVILLE TO WILLIAM VESTAL; 5 NOVEMBER 1757, 410 ACRES IN ORANGE COUNTY IN THE PARISH OF ST. MATTHEW ON BOTH SIDES OF ROCKY RIVER. SIGNED WILLIAM VESTAL. WITNESSES ABM VANDERPOOL, AND HERMAN HUSBAND. SURVEYED 6 APRIL 1756. SWORN CHAIN CARRIERS GEORGE HOBSON, BRINSLEY BARNES. SURVEYOR W.CHURCHTON.
   PATENT BOOK 14, PATENT #3912, PG 409 LORD GRANVILLE TO HERMAN HUSBAND, 25 JULY 1760; 321 ACRES IN ORANGE COUNTY IN THE PARISH OF ST. MATTHEW ON THE WATERS OF SANDY CREEK AND ROCKY RIVER CALLED LEVELS ADDITION TRACT, JOINING A BRANCH OF THE SD CREEK, HUSBANDS LINE, AND BOTH SIDES OF A BRANCH OF ROCKY RIVER. SIGNED HERMON HUSBAND. WITNESSES JAS. WATSON, JOSEPH M ADDOCK. EXAMINED BY RICH'D VIGERS & W. CHURTON. SURVEYD 20 AUG. 1757. SWORN CHAIN CARRIERS ABRAHAM VANDERPOOL, JOSEPH YORK. W.CHURTON, SURVEYOR.
   AUGUSTA CO . VA COURT RECORDS - FROM CHRONICLES OF THE SCOTCH IRISH SETTLEMENT IN VA. 28 A UGUST 1750
   PAGE 421 - GEORGE SAY, GEORGE SAY JR, SIMON SAY & OTHERS ADDED TO LIST OF TITHABLES
   PAGE 422 - GEORGE YOCKHAM & OTHERS ADDED TO LIST OF TITHABLES
   PAGE 423 - ABRAHAM VANDERPOOL, ABEL WESTFALL, ANTHONY BOGART, JACOB WESTFALL, LEONARD NEIFF, JOHN WESTFALL, HERMANUS SHOOK, ANTHONY REGER, JR, ANTHONY REGER AND OTHERS ADDED TO LIST OF TITHABLES.
   I don't know how many of you saw the original reference to this find that was published in the Vanderpool Newsletters many years ago, but since it is online I thought you might enjoy seeing it. The "Vanderpool house" mentioned is no doubt that of Abraham Vanderpool, b 1709, who was on the Virginia frontier in the 1740s and 1750s. He removed to North Carolina by August of 1757. * Fort Dinwiddie (also known as Warwick's Fort; Byrd's Fort) was a prominent French and Indian War defense located on Jackson River, about 5 miles west of the present town of Warm Springs in Bath County, Virginia. It was erected in 1755. It served as a frontier defense until as late as 1789. Source: the George Washington Papers at the Library of Congress, 1741-1799. * Peter Hog to George Washington, May 14, 1756. Letters to Washington and Accompanying Papers. Published by the Society of the Colonial Dames of America. Edited by Stanislaus Murray Hamilton.-vol. 01. * FORT DINWIDDIE 14 May 1756. SIR/ On Saturday the 9th: Instant I rec'd advice that the Track of 7 Indians had been discovered at the house of VANDERPOOL at the head of this River: by two Men of the party detached from my Company for the protection of Mesrs: Millers & Wilson's Families; I immediately ordered a Sergt. to gett a party ready to March next Morng. to join the 2d. Detachment. & goe in Search of the 2d. Tracts. * But that Evening a Messenger arrived Express from the plantation of Robt. Armstrong to Inform me that 6 Indians had Called at the house that Morning & Spoke in their own tongue to the Woman, Signified that they were going to War agt. the Cherokees Called themselves Senekas & Wanted to goe down the Rivr. Immediatly Sent Ensign Fleming Wt. 12 Men & a Sergt. Who arrived there that Night tho' the Rivr. was so high that 3 of the Men Lost their Arms & it was near Sun Sett before the Messenger gott to the Fort the party of 8 Men & Sergt. gott to the head of the Rivr. on Monday where they Tracted the Indians from VANDERPOOL's house down along Back Rivr. & By the Account given by the Ensign they were the same who Came thro' the Gap at Armstrong's where he traced them down the Rivr. down this Rivr. near Dunlops place & there they seemed to have turned back & soon after the Tracts were Lost by which he Imagined they had taken a Spur of the Mountain towards Green Briar. * On Thursday the 13th: a Messenger arrived from Alexr Galespies abt. 12 Mile from the Fort to Acquaint me that 2 Girls belonging to his Family being out after the Cattle as they were digging some Roots of Ginsang heard the tread of feet Crossing a dry Run at the foot of the Spur which on Looking up they discovered to be 2 Indians. I Sent off a Sergt. Wt. 10 Men & a Corporal from the parade as the Compay. happened to be under Arms, it was then abt 6 o'Clock in the Evening they came of the tracts but could not make them out far as they look up the Side of a Stony Mountain. I sent out another Command to day But after a Large Range they could only discover their Tracts at the Draughts of the Mountain where the Ground was Soft & then they appeared to have no direct Course this afternoon Felix Gilberts Came up from Armstrongs & told me that on Wed. Evening Nicholas Canute being out a hunting as he sat on a tree to Listen for his Dogs was Shot at by 5 dift: pieces on Starting up he saw an Indn: running up to him wt. a Tomhawk & another run a Cross to head him. he took to a tree & his pursuers soon Concealed themselves behind others he fired his Rifle at the head of one & going to Load he missed his Shot Bag which had been Carried away by one of the Shots another wounded his Side he then took to his heals & reaced Armstrongs in a Miles distance where I had a Corporal Command ever since the first Alarm. This eveng, I saw a party of the Militia who wee going to sd. place where they were Stationed & they told me that the other Compy: would be on the other parts of the Rivr. tomorrow, On the Whole I Believe they are only Spies But that we may Expect a Visett soon, I formerly desired your Concurrence to Lineing & Covering the passage to the Water as it would be attended Wt. some Expence But you did not give me any Answer as it is absolutely Necessary in case the Garrison is Attacked I have Sett abt: in as frugal & Imperfect away as I can to make it answer the End. I inclosed one Return to you of the 3d April the day of my Arrival here & desired the 2 Months pay for the Company might be Sent up, as also Cash to Compleat the Company, there is now 3 Months due and the Men very Clamourous for their money & Cloathes as Indeed they are greatly in Want of both most of them having neither Shoes Stockings nor Coats. You will See by the Inclosed Returns that I have Enlisted 2 Men since my Arrival & would probably have gott more if I had money. Henry Shelly a Batman is so Grievously tormented wt: Convulsive Fitts that he is of no manner of Use But rather a Burthen as he requires 2 Men to Attend him when the Fitts are on him which are seldom Less than once a day. he offers to gett another good Man in his Room But I would not discharge him Untill I had you approbation, there is also one Robt. Bridget a Recruit of Mr Flemings who is a Soft sort of Fellow & dull of Hearing. He was imprest into the Service just before the Expiration of the Act. I should take it as a particular favr. if you would allow me to Accept of a Likely Young Fellow in his Stead which he is Willing to procurre by his own Industry, and Which the Officers shall allow to be fitter for the Service. there is the Arrears due to the Recruits that were draughted from the other officers Last spring which I now Send you an Accot. of as also the pay from 29th: Decr. to the 1st. Mar. 55 due to Jno. Roe & 4 Months from 29th: Sept. Due to me that I hope will be Sent up with the pay as the Men think it had that those under Majr. Lewis should be payed & they Left out of it, I now Send the Pay Roll for Sept which was made out but forgot to be Inclosed in the hurry of my Going off I can find no Conveyance to Send the Receipts & Send this to meet wt. one at Court I am respectfully ... SIR ...Your Very hum Servt. ... PETR. HOG.
   http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/24006927/person/1502020521/story/2a0...
   Abraham?s grandmother was a Verplanck and her father was an Abraham who was a son of an Isaac. (Myra Vanderpool Gormley, 2016)
   http://genealogymagazine.com/check-your-facts.html

----------------------------
Abraham Vanderpool BIRTH 1709 DEATH unknown BURIAL Unknown, Specifically: Washington County, North Carolina (later Tennessee) MEMORIAL ID 169682663 · View Source

MEMORIAL PHOTOS 0 FLOWERS 14 FATHER OF THE SOUTHERN VANDERPOOLS

He was born in Albany County, Province of New York, British Colony to Wynant II Melgertse van der Poel and Catherine de Hooges van der Poel. His early years were spent in Albany, then his family began to go south. They spent some time in New York City where a sister was baptised, then they removed to Belleville Township, Province of New Jersey, British Colony. At Belleville, Abraham married Jannetje Weibling about 1734. They were parents of five children: Catharine (died young), Catharine, Sarah, Wynant and John.

It is possible Abraham was a miner or involved in mining endeavors, as were other Vanderpools in the area. Abraham's brother, Melgert was killed by a fall in a mine near Newark, NJ. He plunged 114 feet to his death on Apr 3, 1743 as reported in both Benjamin Franklin's "Gazette" and John Zenger's "New York Weekly Journal"

A court order dated May 16, 1740 listed Abraham living in Walpack, New Jersey, in the Delaware River Valley. The move may have been necessitated by following the mining opportunities. He may have also lived in Pennsylvania. The Smithfield Church in Monroe County, PA had a baptism record for a daughter on Jul 26, 1741. The location being just across the Delaware River from New Jersey they may have simply crossed the river to worship and continued to live in New Jersey.

By 1743, Abraham had moved to Frederick County, Virginia (now WV), where his name appears on a fee list. His name appears in documents until 1745. Jannetje probably died in this area, as no records found elsewhere. By Sep 4,1746 he had moved further south to Augusta County, VA, where documents establish him living through 1751 on the South Branch of the Potomac River (now part of counties in West Virginia).

Abraham remarried at least by 1748 to Rebecca Vanderpool. Her maiden name has not been ascertained. This date was established by property purchased in that year which required signature of his wife when he sold it in 1751. The land patent was for 430 acres from Lord Thomas Fairfax along the South Branch of the Potomac River. When Lord Fairfax was having his land surveyed, George Washington reported there were Dutch living on the land. This was prior to Abraham's patent so he was probably a land squatter.

His whereabouts between the years 1751 and 1756 is uncertain, but it is believed he was in the Greenbrier River area (Augusta Co., VA, now in counties of West Virginia) in 1756 or earlier. This area is not far from Vanderpool Gap, discovered by John Vanderpool, assumed brother of Abraham and present day Vanderpool in Highland County, Virginia. Abraham's family as did the other families retreated to safer locations, after a series of attacks by the Shawnee Indians along the Greenbrier. Later some families returned when they felt it to be safe. In a few years they were led to believe by the Indians that they were friends as a ploy and several Dutch settlers were killed, especially men and older boys and some others. The women and children were captured. including Abraham's daughter and children. Her husband being killed by the Indians and their leader, Cornstalk in the bloody Muddy Creek Massacre.

A letter to George Washington from a militia captain dated May 14, 1756, mentioned that his unit had tracked a band of Indians near Vanderpool's house, near the head of Jackson River and near the Black River not far from Fort Dinwiddie. This includes both Vanderpool Gap and today's Vanderpool community. Abraham's name is not mentioned, but he would have been in the area around that date.

The Vanderpools had moved to Orange County, North Carolina by 1757. Then their whereabouts for about ten years is uncertain. By 1767, Abraham was established in Rowan County, NC. The area of Rowan County they lived in became part of Wilkes Co. in 1777. They appear in a tax list through Jun 12, 1778.

Abraham probably died on a date between Jun 12, 1778 and May 12 1779. His wife, Rebecca signed her will May 12, 1779 in Washington County, North Carolina (later Tennessee), where Abraham probably died and they are both buried. (lt)

Family Members Parents Wynant Melgertse van der Poel 1683–1750

Catherine de Hooges van der Poel 1686–1744

Spouse Jannetje Weibling Vanderpool 1715 – unknown

Children Catherine Vanderpool See 1725–1806

Wynant Vanderpool 1742–1810

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/169682663/abraham-vanderpool

view all 19

Abraham Vanderpool Sr.'s Timeline

1708
February 13, 1708
Albany, Albany County, New York
1709
February 13, 1709
Age 1
Dutch Reformed Church, Albany, Albany County, New York
February 13, 1709
Age 1
Albany, NY
1738
May 14, 1738
Belleville, Essex County, NJ, United States
1738
1740
1740
1741
1741
PA, United States
1743
1743
Augusta County, Province of Virginia
1744
1744
Wilkes, North Carolina, United States