Ada Elizabeth Ball

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Ada Elizabeth Ball (Hall)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Bromley, Kent,England
Death: October 01, 1967 (92)
Cockeysville, Maryland,USA
Place of Burial: Oak Lawn Cemetery, Eastpoint, Baltimore County, Maryland, USA
Immediate Family:

Daughter of William Henry Hall and Laura Hall
Wife of William R Perine and Martin Luther Ball
Mother of Martin Luther Ball and Edgar William Ball

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Ada Elizabeth Ball

https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-survivor/ada-ball.html

Ada Elizabeth Ball ( née Hall )

  • Titanic Survivor
  • Born: Sunday 9th May 1875 in Hackney, Londod, England
  • Age: 36 years 11 months and 6 days (Female)
  • Nationality: English
  • Marital Status: Widowed
  • Last Residence: in Bristol, England
  • 2nd Class Passengers
  • First Embarked: Southampton on Wednesday 10th April 1812
  • Ticket No.; 28551 £13
  • Cabin No.; D-?
  • Destination: Jacksonville, Florida, United States
  • Rescued: (Boat 10)
  • Disembarked Carpathia: New York City on Thursday 18th April 1912
  • Died: Sunday 1st October 1967 aged 92 years
  • Cause of Death: Leukemia
  • Buried: Oak Lawn Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Reference: https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-lifeboat-10/ R.M.S. Titanic's lifeboat 10
  • Reference: https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/titanic-deckplans/ deck plans of R.M.S. Titanic

Ada moved from London to Bristol, Somerset after the death of her husband and later decided to emigrate to Jacksonville, Florida to be near her sister, Emily and brother-in-law Reverend Robert James Bateman and to carry out missionary work in that area. She left her adult sons behind in England.

She boarded the Titanic at Southampton travelling second class (ticket number28551, £13), accompanying her brother-in-law Rev. Bateman destined for Florida. She shared a cabin on D-Deck with Marie Marthe Jerwan .

Ada survived the sinking. As she entered the lifeboat (? 10, 12 or 14) Bateman called to her 'If I don't meet you again in this world, I will in the next'. He then removed his neck-tie and threw it to her as the boat was lowered. Rev. Bateman died in the sinking.

After the disaster Ada remarried to William R. Perine and apparently lived a very happy life. She was a devout Christian woman who was known for her kindness and generosity to all she met. She later moved to Pittsfield, Massachusetts and died, on 1 October 1967 in Cockeysville, Maryland.

R.M.S. Titanic Survivor. She was the daughter of William Hall and Laura M. Hall (née Powell) and sister to Emily Jane Hall. She boarded the Titanic at Southampton traveling second class (ticket number28551, £13)(13.0 GBP = $20.90. $20.00 in 1912 would be $500.00 today), accompanying her brother-in-law Rev. Bateman destined for Florida. She was 36 years old. She shared a cabin on D-Deck with Marie Jerwan. Ada survived the sinking. As she entered the lifeboat 10, Rev. Bateman called to her 'If I don't meet you again in this world, I will in the next'. He then removed his neck-tie and threw it to her as the boat was lowered. Rev. Bateman died in the sinking. She later lived with her parents at Exeter House, Hackney, London. She married Martin Luther Ball in London in 1896. She had 2 sons, Martin Luther Ball (later Reverend; b. 6 September 1897, d. ?Alabama 26 March 1989) and Edgar William Ball (b. 4 May 1899, d. Baltimore, Maryland December 1985). She moved from London to Bristol, Somerset after the death of her husband and later decided to emigrate to Jacksonville, Florida to be near her sister, Emily and brother-in-law Rev Robert James Bateman and to carry out missionary work in that area. She left her adult sons behind in England. After the disaster Ada remarried to William R. Perine and apparently lived a very happy life. She was a devout Christian woman who was known for her kindness and generosity to all she met. She later moved to Pittsfield, Massachusetts and died, on 01 October 1967 in Cockeysville, Maryland. Cause of death was leukemia. She was buried at Oak Lawn Cemetery in Baltimore, Maryland.I have included a poem by the Poet - Algernon Charles Swinburne whose surname was used to name the street where Ada once lived. The poem simply titled Sorrow, a feeling that would have been felt by Ada after her night on the Titanic. By: Algernon Charles Swinburne (1873-1909)

Sorrow

Sorrow, on wing through the world for ever, Here and there for awhile would borrow Rest, if rest might haply deliver Sorrow.

One thought lies close in her heart gnawn thorough With pain, a weed in a dried-up river, A rust-red share in an empty furrow.

Hearts that strain at her chain would sever The link where yesterday frets tomorrow: All things pass in the world, but never Sorrow.

BOAT NO. 10.* British Report (p. 38) says third at 1.20. I think No. 6 went later, though Buley (Am. Inq., p. 604) claims No. 10 as the last lifeboat lowered.

No male passengers in this boat.

Passengers: First cabin. Miss Andrews, Miss Longley, Mrs. Hogeboom. Second cabin, Mrs. Parrish, Mrs. Shelley. 41 women, 7 children. Crew: Seamen: Buley (in charge), Evans; Fireman Rice ; Stewards Burke and one other.

Stowaway: i Japanese.

Jumped from A Deck into boat being lowered: I Armenian.

Total: 55

INCIDENTS

Edward J. Buley, A. B. (Am. Inq., p. 604).

Chief Officer Wilde said: See if you can find another seaman to give you a hand, and jump in." I found Evans, my mate, the able-bodied seaman, and we both got in the boat.

Much of Seaman Buley's and of Steward Burke's testimony is a repetition of that of Seaman Evans, so I cite the latter only:

F. O. Evans, A. B. (Am. Inq., p. 675).

I went up (on the Boat Deck) with the remain- der of the crew and uncovered all of the port boats. Then to the starboard side and lowered the boats there with the assistance of the Boat- swain of the ship, A. Nichol. I went next (after No. 12) to No. 10. Mr. Murdoch was standing there. I lowered the boat with the assistance of a steward. The chief officer said: "Get into that boat. I got into the bows. A young ship's baker (J. Joughin) was getting the children and chucking them into the boat. Mr. Murdoch and the baker made the women jump across into the boat about two feet and a half. "He threw them on to the women and he was catching children by their dresses and chucking them in.'* One woman in a black dress slipped and fell. She seemed nervous and did not like to jump at first. When she did jump she did not go far enough, but fell between the ship and the boat. She was pulled in by some men on the deck below, went up to the Boat Deck again, took another jump, and landed safely in the boat. There were none of the children hurt. The only accident was with this woman. The only man passenger was a for- eigner, up forward. He, as the boat was being lowered, jumped from A Deck into the boat — deliberately jumped across and saved himself.

When we got to the water it was impossible to get to the tripper underneath the thwart on account of women being packed so tight. We had to lift the fall up off the hook by hand to release the spring to get the block and fall away from it. We pushed off from the ship and rowed away about 200 yards. We tied up to three other boats. We gave the man our painter and made fast to No. 12. We stopped there about an hour, and Officer Lowe came over with his boat No. 14 and said: *'You seamen will have to distribute these passengers among these boats. Tie them together and come into my boat to go over to the wreckage and pick up anyone that is alive there."

Witness testified that the larger lifeboats would hold sixty people.

Senator Smith: Do you wish to be understood that each lifeboat like Nos. 12 and 14 and 10 could be filled to its fullest capacity and lowered to the water with safety?

Mr. Evans : Yes, because we did it then, sir.

Senator Smith : That is a pretty good answer.

Mr. Evans : It was my first experience in seeing a boat loaded like that, sir.

The stern of the ship, after plunging forward, remained floating in a perpendicular position about four or five minutes.

W. Burke, dining-room steward (Am. Inq., p. 822).

I went to my station and found that my boat, No. I, had gone. Then to the port side and assisted with No. 8 boat and saw her lowered. Then I passed to No. 10. The officer said, '*Get right in there," and pushed me toward the boat, and I got in. When there were no women to be had around the deck the officer gave the order for the boat to be lowered. After the two seamen (Buley and Evans) were transferred to boat No. 14, some of the women forward said to me: *'There are two men down here in the bottom of the boat." I got hold of them and pulled one out. He apparently was a Japanese and could not speak English. I put him at an oar. The other appeared to be an Italian. I tried to speak to him but he said: "Armenian." I also put him at an oar. I afterwards made fast to an officer's boat — I think it was Mr. Lightoller's (i. e., No. 12).

Mrs. Imanita Shelley's affidavit (Am. Inq., p. 1146).

Mrs. Shelley with her mother, Mrs. L. D. Par- rish, were second cabin passengers. Mrs. Shelley had been sick and it was with difficulty that she reached the deck, where she was assisted to a chair. After some time a sailor ran to her and implored her to get in the lifeboat that was then being launched — one of the last on the ship. Pushing her mother toward the sailor, Mrs. Shelley made for the davits where the boat hung.

There was a space of between four or five feet between the edge of the deck and the suspended boat. The sailor picked up Mrs. Parrish and threw her bodily into the boat. Mrs. Shelley jumped and landed safely. There were a fireman and a ship's baker among the crew at the time of launching. The boat was filled with women and children, as many as could get in without overcrowding. There was trouble with the tackle and the ropes had to be cut.

Just as they reached the water, a crazed Italian jumped from the deck into the lifeboat, landing on Mrs. Parrish, severely bruising her right side and leg.

Orders had been given to keep in sight of the ship's boat which had been sent out ahead to look for help. Throughout the entire period, from the time of the collision and taking to the boats, the ship's crew behaved in an ideal manner. Not a man tried to get into a boat unless ordered to, and many were seen to strip off their clothing and wrap it around the women and children, who came up half-clad from their beds. Mrs. Shelley says that no crew could have behaved in a more perfect manner.

J. Joughin, head baker (Br. Inq.)

Chief Officer Wilde shouted to the stewards to keep the men passengers back, but there was no necessity for the order as they were keeping back. The order was splendid. The stewards, firemen and sailors got in line and passed the ladies in; and then we had difficulty to find ladies to go into the boat. No distinction at all as to class was made. I saw a number of third-class women with their bags, which they would not let go.

The boat was let down and the women were forcibly drawn into it. The boat was a yard and a half from the ship's side. There was a slight list and we had to drop them in. The officer ordered two sailors and a steward to get in.

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Ada Elizabeth Ball's Timeline

1875
May 9, 1875
Bromley, Kent,England
1897
September 6, 1897
Age 22
1899
May 4, 1899
Age 23
1967
October 1, 1967
Age 92
Cockeysville, Maryland,USA
????
Oak Lawn Cemetery, Eastpoint, Baltimore County, Maryland, USA