Adam Shafer, Jr

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Adam Shafer, Jr

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Hagerstown, Wayne County, Indiana, United States
Death: May 22, 1902 (68)
New Lisbon, Henry County, Indiana, United States
Place of Burial: Hagerstown, Wayne County, Indiana, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Adam Shafer and Rebecca Shafer
Husband of Rachel Shafer
Father of Mary Ellen Hoover; Edna Frances Graver; Rachel Rebecca Wantz; Charles E. Shafer; Dora Elizabeth Rhoades and 5 others
Brother of John Shafer; Elizabeth Cromley; William Shafer and Isaac Shafer

Occupation: farmer
Managed by: Jim Wile
Last Updated:

About Adam Shafer, Jr

The Daily Courier - New Castle, IN May 22, 1902

One of the saddest and most awful accidents which has occurred here in years happened this morning about 8 o'clock. As the 8:10 Panhandle train was coming in from Richmond, running at about forty miles an hour. It struck and killed Adam Shaffer and his wife, an aged and respected couple, living about three miles northeast of New Lisbon. They were driving to New Castle and had reached what is known as Stout's crossing, nearly two miles from town, where the train struck them. The train struck them when they were directly across the track. The old gentleman, sitting on the right side, seemed to have been struck first, though both were hit in the head. The bones of both were broken and shattered in many parts of the body and the foot of the man was crushed. The entire right side of horse was torn away and the shattered fragments of the buggy were strewn for a good distance along the track. The bodies of both the people and the horse were hurdled over the train, the horse being thrown about fifty feet and the couple, it is estimated, about 100 yards. They fell on one side of the track and the horse on the opposite side. It seems they were driving towards town and had nearly reached the crossing when the train whistled, but whipped the horse and attempted to cross, miscalculating the speed of the train. The train stopped at once and backed to the place where they were lying. They were placed in the baggage car and brought to town. The man, however, died before the train had gone more than a half mile. The woman was still breathing when they reached here but did not live more than a few minutes. F. A. Kroeff, a traveling man, who was on the train, says the whistles were sounded as a warning as well as the usual crossing whistle. He looked out the car window and saw the engine strike the buggy and occupants, which were thrown high in the air. The train was stopped as quickly as possible and the man and woman taken on the train. Both were then alive but, of course unconscious. When the train reached town the bodies in charge by Johnson & Stanley, who took them to the morgue under J. C. Livesey's store, where they were prepared for the coroner. Mr Shaffer's legs were broken as was also his neck. The skulls of both were fractured and in all probably neither knew anything after they were struck. The engineer, when interviewed, said that after he whistled for the people he thought they had stopped. As he was on the opposite side of the train and the track was at an angle, he could not see them as he approached nearer the crossing, and supposing them to have stopped, did not decrease the speed of the train. Eye witnesses said that the splinters and pieces of the buggy were scattered through the air like hail. George Wilkinson, who was plowing in a field nearby, saw the whole accident. He said that the engineer whistled several times and that the noise frightened his own horse. He said that Mr. Shaffer was almost seventy-five yards from the track when the train first whistled and then began to whip the horse in order to get across. As soon as the accident happened Mr. Wilkinson started to run toward the crossing and at the same time cried out. M. S. Hoover was attracted by the cries of Mr. Wilkinson and also ran to the scene of the accident. Vern Stout saw the affair and corroborates the statement of Mr. Wilkinson. The old man and lady were both very deaf and as the back and side curtains of the buggy were up, it may have had something to do with the accident, though in view of the fact that they whipped the horse to get across, it is scarcely probable that they were ignorant of the train's near approach. Mr. and Mrs. Shaffer were among the best known people of Liberty township. They lived on the Hagerstown road between Millville and Hagerstown. Mr. Shaffer was a prosperous farmer and owned a large amount of property, his farms amounting to about 1200 acres. He had a large family, consisting of nine girls and two boys. The youngest boy, Will, lived at home with his father. All the rest are married and live in Henry and Wayne counties. His other son, Charles, lives on a farm near his father's home. His daughters, Ellie, Rebecca, Susan, Malinda, Lydia, Emma, Arvie, Dora and Edna, are respectively wives of Rudolph Hoover; Dan Waltz; Horace Hoover; Mr. Barch; Dan Hoover; Charles Hutchins; John Hagner; Harry Rhodes; and Christley Graver, all well known citizens. The untimely mishap was a great blow to the many relatives and friends of the old people, and will be felt for a long time. The blame for the accident, however, cannot be attached to the railroad employees.

The Daily Courier - Saturday, May 24, 1902  p3

Nice Burial Outfit The two burial caskets for Mr. and Mrs. Adam Shaffer were about the finest seen here in a long time. They are black davenport couches, with satin hand-tufted interior, and imported broadcloth covering on the outside. The shells are of cedar three inches thick, and the handle are of full extension oxidized silver. Each is the exact counterpart of the other, with the exception that on each is a large silver plate, on one; "father", on the other, "mother". The outfits are complete when enclosed in heavy metal vaults.

The Daily Courier - Monday, May 26,1902 p3

Over Three Thousand People Pay Last Respects Probably the largest funeral ever held in Eastern Indiana was that of Adam Shaffer and his wife, who were killed by a Pennsylvania train last Thursday. The sad funeral occurred at the big brick church west of Hagerstown Sunday. Rev. Warbington of Hagerstown preaching the discourse. There were several times as many on the outside of the church as were on the inside and when friends were given an opportunity to view the remains over three thousand persons, by actual count, passed by to see the faces of the dead and it took an hour and a half to conclude that part of the sad service.. When the procession was formed from the home to the cemetery, there were seven hundred and forty vehicles in line. The remains were interred in the cemetery near the church.

Memoirs of Wayne County pg. 807

The Daily Courier - New Castle, IN May 22, 1902

One of the saddest and most awful accidents which has occurred here in years happened this morning about 8 o'clock. As the 8:10 Panhandle train was coming in from Richmond, running at about forty miles an hour. It struck and killed Adam Shaffer and his wife, an aged and respected couple, living about three miles northeast of New Lisbon. They were driving to New Castle and had reached what is known as Stout's crossing, nearly two miles from town, where the train struck them. The train struck them when they were directly across the track. The old gentleman, sitting on the right side, seemed to have been struck first, though both were hit in the head. The bones of both were broken and shattered in many parts of the body and the foot of the man was crushed. The entire right side of horse was torn away and the shattered fragments of the buggy were strewn for a good distance along the track. The bodies of both the people and the horse were hurdled over the train, the horse being thrown about fifty feet and the couple, it is estimated, about 100 yards. They fell on one side of the track and the horse on the opposite side. It seems they were driving towards town and had nearly reached the crossing when the train whistled, but whipped the horse and attempted to cross, miscalculating the speed of the train. The train stopped at once and backed to the place where they were lying. They were placed in the baggage car and brought to town. The man, however, died before the train had gone more than a half mile. The woman was still breathing when they reached here but did not live more than a few minutes. F. A. Kroeff, a traveling man, who was on the train, says the whistles were sounded as a warning as well as the usual crossing whistle. He looked out the car window and saw the engine strike the buggy and occupants, which were thrown high in the air. The train was stopped as quickly as possible and the man and woman taken on the train. Both were then alive but, of course unconscious. When the train reached town the bodies in charge by Johnson & Stanley, who took them to the morgue under J. C. Livesey's store, where they were prepared for the coroner. Mr Shaffer's legs were broken as was also his neck. The skulls of both were fractured and in all probably neither knew anything after they were struck. The engineer, when interviewed, said that after he whistled for the people he thought they had stopped. As he was on the opposite side of the train and the track was at an angle, he could not see them as he approached nearer the crossing, and supposing them to have stopped, did not decrease the speed of the train. Eye witnesses said that the splinters and pieces of the buggy were scattered through the air like hail. George Wilkinson, who was plowing in a field nearby, saw the whole accident. He said that the engineer whistled several times and that the noise frightened his own horse. He said that Mr. Shaffer was almost seventy-five yards from the track when the train first whistled and then began to whip the horse in order to get across. As soon as the accident happened Mr. Wilkinson started to run toward the crossing and at the same time cried out. M. S. Hoover was attracted by the cries of Mr. Wilkinson and also ran to the scene of the accident. Vern Stout saw the affair and corroborates the statement of Mr. Wilkinson. The old man and lady were both very deaf and as the back and side curtains of the buggy were up, it may have had something to do with the accident, though in view of the fact that they whipped the horse to get across, it is scarcely probable that they were ignorant of the train's near approach. Mr. and Mrs. Shaffer were among the best known people of Liberty township. They lived on the Hagerstown road between Millville and Hagerstown. Mr. Shaffer was a prosperous farmer and owned a large amount of property, his farms amounting to about 1200 acres. He had a large family, consisting of nine girls and two boys. The youngest boy, Will, lived at home with his father. All the rest are married and live in Henry and Wayne counties. His other son, Charles, lives on a farm near his father's home. His daughters, Ellie, Rebecca, Susan, Malinda, Lydia, Emma, Arvie, Dora and Edna, are respectively wives of Rudolph Hoover; Dan Waltz; Horace Hoover; Mr. Barch; Dan Hoover; Charles Hutchins; John Hagner; Harry Rhodes; and Christley Graver, all well known citizens. The untimely mishap was a great blow to the many relatives and friends of the old people, and will be felt for a long time. The blame for the accident, however, cannot be attached to the railroad employees.

The Daily Courier - Saturday, May 24, 1902  p3

Nice Burial Outfit The two burial caskets for Mr. and Mrs. Adam Shaffer were about the finest seen here in a long time. They are black davenport couches, with satin hand-tufted interior, and imported broadcloth covering on the outside. The shells are of cedar three inches thick, and the handle are of full extension oxidized silver. Each is the exact counterpart of the other, with the exception that on each is a large silver plate, on one; "father", on the other, "mother". The outfits are complete when enclosed in heavy metal vaults.

The Daily Courier - Monday, May 26,1902 p3

Over Three Thousand People Pay Last Respects Probably the largest funeral ever held in Eastern Indiana was that of Adam Shaffer and his wife, who were killed by a Pennsylvania train last Thursday. The sad funeral occurred at the big brick church west of Hagerstown Sunday. Rev. Warbington of Hagerstown preaching the discourse. There were several times as many on the outside of the church as were on the inside and when friends were given an opportunity to view the remains over three thousand persons, by actual count, passed by to see the faces of the dead and it took an hour and a half to conclude that part of the sad service.. When the procession was formed from the home to the cemetery, there were seven hundred and forty vehicles in line. The remains were interred in the cemetery near the church.

Memoirs of Wayne County pg. 807

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Adam Shafer, Jr's Timeline

1834
May 20, 1834
Hagerstown, Wayne County, Indiana, United States
1855
August 12, 1855
Jackson Township, Wayne County, Indiana, United States
1857
June 17, 1857
Wayne County, Indiana, United States
1859
May 25, 1859
1861
February 1861
Miami, Miami County, Indiana, United States
1865
April 1, 1865
1867
1867
1870
December 16, 1870
1872
April 3, 1872
Jackson Township, Wayne County, Indiana, United States
1875
September 9, 1875
Jackson Township, Wayne County, Indiana, United States