Amram Chasida Rosenbaum

Is your surname Rosenbaum?

Research the Rosenbaum family

Amram Chasida Rosenbaum's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Amram Hassida Rosenbaum

Hebrew: ר' עמרם חסידא הירש)-ראזענבוים)
Also Known As: "Amram Chasida"
Birthdate:
Death: Died in Safed
Place of Burial: Old Cemetery, Safed
Immediate Family:

Son of Moshe Nachum Rosenbaum and Rachel
Husband of Hanna Rosenbaum
Father of (Elazar's mother) HELLER SINGER; Avital Nechama Deutsch; Moshe Nahum Rosenbaum; Mordehai Rosenbaum; Yaaqov Rosenbaum and 1 other
Brother of Avraham Israel Bezalel Rosenbaum; Tzvi Hirsch Rosenbaum; Hanna ROSENBAUM; Sara Rivka Rosenbaum; Yisrael Nahshon and 4 others

Occupation: אב"ד מאדע
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Amram Chasida Rosenbaum

R' Amram was born in Hungary in 1790, and, already as a child, he yearned to settle in Eretz Yisrael. Once, when he was seven, his family noticed that he was nowhere to be seen and that his hat was missing. Setting out to find him, his father (R' Moshe Nachum) encountered a peasant who said that a young boy had passed by shortly before and asked for directions to Eretz Yisrael. When the boy's father finally caught up with him, young Amram burst into tears. "But I am on my way to Eretz Yisrael! Why are you taking me home?"

As an adult, R' Amram served as rabbi of Mad, Hungary. Not until he was 36 did he actually reach Eretz Yisrael. Settling in Tzefat, he devoted himself to developing the community there (which numbered 1,000 Jews). However, R' Amram lived in Eretz Yisrael for only four years, and passed away in 1830.

In his eulogy for R' Amram, the Chatam Sofer said:

He was the master of Eretz Yisrael, who took his soul in his hands and traveled with his family to the Holy Land. His desire was to settle in the holy city, Yersushalayim, but for various reasons, he was delayed in Tzefat. He wrote to me last year that he was headed to Yerushalayim, but only half of his prayers were answered [i.e., he reached the Holy Land, but not Yerushalayim].

After he taught and disseminated Torah in Tzefat for four years, he was called to the Heavenly yeshiva. The Rabbis of Eretz Yisrael wrote that he literally died from grief over the exile of the Shechinah - woe to that day. Not only was he a great person, a Torah sage and a tzaddik even when he was in the Diaspora, but in Eretz Yisrael he became as great as two of us.

He died at age 40.

R' Amram's daughter was among the 500 Tzefat residents killed by an earthquake in 1832. The prominent Hungarian rabbis R' Moshe Gruenwald (the "Arugat Ha'bosem") and R' Eliezer David Gruenwald (the "Keren Le'David") were R' Amram's grandnephews. (Sources: Gedolei Hadorot 510; Melizei Esh, 7 Av)

(http://www.mogen-david.org/forums/index.php?s=cb082bb81e981a5d526d659843e788a8&showtopic=52)


R' Amram was born in Hungary in 1790, and, already as a child, he yearned to settle in Eretz Yisrael. Once, when he was seven, his family noticed that he was nowhere to be seen and that his hat was missing. Setting out to find him, his father (R' Moshe Nachum) encountered a peasant who said that a young boy had passed by shortly before and asked for directions to Eretz Yisrael. When the boy's father finally caught up with him, young Amram burst into tears. "But I am on my way to Eretz Yisrael! Why are you taking me home?"

As an adult, R' Amram served as rabbi of Mad, Hungary. Not until he was 36 did he actually reach Eretz Yisrael. Settling in Tzefat, he devoted himself to developing the community there (which numbered 1,000 Jews). However, R' Amram lived in Eretz Yisrael for only four years, and passed away in 1830.

In his eulogy for R' Amram, the Chatam Sofer said:

He was the master of Eretz Yisrael, who took his soul in his hands and traveled with his family to the Holy Land. His desire was to settle in the holy city, Yersushalayim, but for various reasons, he was delayed in Tzefat. He wrote to me last year that he was headed to Yerushalayim, but only half of his prayers were answered [i.e., he reached the Holy Land, but not Yerushalayim].

After he taught and disseminated Torah in Tzefat for four years, he was called to the Heavenly yeshiva. The Rabbis of Eretz Yisrael wrote that he literally died from grief over the exile of the Shechinah - woe to that day. Not only was he a great person, a Torah sage and a tzaddik even when he was in the Diaspora, but in Eretz Yisrael he became as great as two of us.

He died at age 40.

R' Amram's daughter was among the 500 Tzefat residents killed by an earthquake in 1832. The prominent Hungarian rabbis R' Moshe Gruenwald (the "Arugat Ha'bosem") and R' Eliezer David Gruenwald (the "Keren Le'David") were R' Amram's grandnephews. (Sources: Gedolei Hadorot 510; Melizei Esh, 7 Av)

Web Source: http://www.mogen-david.org/forums/index.php?s=cb082bb81e981a5d526d659843e788a8&showtopic=52