Ann (Baldwin) Timmins, Convict "Sydney Cove" 1807

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Ann Timmins (Baldwin)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Halbon, London, England
Death: December 20, 1884 (95-104)
Yarramundi, NSW, Australia
Place of Burial: R/C Windsor Cemetary
Immediate Family:

Daughter of John B Baldwin and Hannah Baldwin
Wife of James (Timmins) Timms, Convict "Friendship" 1800
Mother of Michael Timmins; Mary Ann Keefe / Cafe; William Timmins; Ann Cross; Margaret Timmins and 8 others

Managed by: Susan Mary Rayner (Green) ( Ryan)
Last Updated:

About Ann (Baldwin) Timmins, Convict "Sydney Cove" 1807

Name: Ann Baldwin arrived on the vessel "Sydney Cove" Jam 1807. She was convicted on 30 Oct 1805 Old Bailey.

690. ANN BALDWIN and MARY BALDWIN were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , a shift, value 3 s. a petticoat, value 3 s. a habit-shirt, value 4 s. a pair of shoes, value 2 s. 6 d. two pair of stockings, value 3 s. a comb, value 3 s. a handkerchief, value 6 d. and a piece of cloth, value 1 s. the property of John Turner , and the latter for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

ANN TURNER sworn. - Q. What day did the prisoner at the bar come to you? - A. On the 2d of September.

Q. Did you take her without a character? - A. I took her from her parents; she told me her master was dead; she came to me on the Monday morning and staid till the Sunday following; on Sunday morning I heard the child cry (she had the care of the child) about half after eight o'clock; I went up stairs; I then found she was gone; I missed a petticoat, a shift, a square piece of cotton, two pair of stockings, one pair silk, the other pair was cotton, and a pair of shoes; I had seen them the over-night at twelve o'clock.

Q. Where had they been left? - A. Some of the things were on the line in the kitchen; the comb, which was set in silver was in the table-drawer; I had missed that a day or two before; the shoes were under the drawers. In consequence of information, I saw her on the Sunday following; I found her at her father's; I had a search-warrant and searched the house, and in the front two-pair of stairs room, where this girl lived, I found a bit of cotton; the petticoat had been cut up into an apron; and a pair of stockings, which I did not know I had lost, they were all mine. The constable found some duplicates there, one of them led to my pocket handkerchief.

GEORGE LEE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I live at the corner of Dean-street, Holborn: On the 10th of September, the prisoner Mary Baldwin (she is the youngest, and she is the sister of Ann Baldwin ) pledged two pocket handkerchiefs.

Prosecutrix. I lost but one; this is mine.

Lee. On the 2d of October there was a frock and two habit-shirts pledged by Mary Baldwin.

Prosecutrix. Only one habit-shirt and apron is mine (Ann Baldwin was my servant), the apron is made out of my petticoat, I know it by the tuck that is in it now, the same tuck was in the petticoat, and by the stain of red wine in the front.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - On the 2d of October I went with a search-warrant to the prisoners' mother's house; I found the duplicates which I produce, upon the mother.

Q. You should have indicted the mother, the child appears to be only an instrument in the hands of the mother - why did not you indict the mother? - A. The reason of the mother not being indicted was, she had got a dying infant in her lap; the mother has run away since.

Q. That is no reason you should indict the young girl as a receiver; she is only the instrument of the mother's receiving? - A. We could not tell whether she took the things home; I found a pair of stockings in the room where the bed was.

Prosecutrix. They are my stockings.

Ann Baldwin's defence. My mother asked me how I came by the things; I told her the lady gave them to me.

Ann Baldwin , GUILTY , aged 17,

Transported for seven years .

Mary Baldwin , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

691. ANN BALDWIN was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , a pair of silk gloves, value 1 s. 6 d. a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Charles Walls .

No evidence being adduced against the prisoner on this indictment, she was from this charge.

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

source http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18051030-33&div=t1805...|baldwin#highlight


GEDCOM Note

<p>Ann Baldwin</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>ANNE BALDWIN Anne was charged with stealing from her employer and both her and her sister, Mary (14) were charged with receiving the above goods. They were convicted at the Old Bailey. 30 October 1805,and were both found guilty. Mary was sent to Newgate Prisonfor two months and Anne was sentenced 7 years to transportationto N.S.W.Anne arrived on the "Sydney Cove" in June 1807.</p><p><p>Ann Baldwin (a domestic servant) was tried at the Old Bailey, London on 30 October 1805 for stealing clothing and items from her employer, John Turner; Mary Baldwin was also tried for feloniously receiving these items knowing them to be stolen. Trial record in email.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Ann was one of 113 convicts transported aboard Sydney Cove which sailed from Falmouth, England 11 January 1807 and arrived 18 June 1807.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Shortly after her arrival in the colony she married James Timmins, 30 years her senior. James already owned land at Yarramundi near Richmond, where Ann spent the rest of her life.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Ann lived another 50 years after James' death. Despite the difference in their ages the family history indicates that she loved her husband, and because she was Protestant and he Catholic, for the last fifty years of her life she is reputed to have walked into Richmond to church with a goose under her arm for the priest every week. Her death certificate states she was buried at Windsor by a catholic priest, and the family believes that she must have been successful in her efforts to be buried with her husband.</p><p><p>Name: Ann Baldwin arrived on the vessel "Sydney Cove" January 1807. She was convicted on 30 Oct 1805 Old Bailey.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>690. ANN BALDWIN and MARY BALDWIN were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , a shirt, value 3 s. a petticoat, value 3 s. a habit-shirt, value 4 s. a pair of shoes, value 2 s. 6 d. two pair of stockings, value 3 s. a comb, value 3 s. a handkerchief, value 6 d. and a piece of cloth, value 1 s. the property of John Turner , and the latter for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>ANN TURNER sworn. - Q. What day did the prisoner at the bar come to you? - A. On the 2d of September.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Q. Did you take her without a character? - A. I took her from her parents; she told me her master was dead; she came to me on the Monday morning and said till the Sunday following; on Sunday morning I heard the child cry (she had the care of the child) about half aftereight o'clock; I went up stairs; I then found she was gone; I missed a petticoat, a shift, a square piece of cotton, two pair of stockings, one pair silk, the other pair was cotton, and a pair of shoes; I had seen them the over-night at twelve o'clock.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Q. Where had they been left? - A. Some of the things were on the line in the kitchen; the comb, which was set in silver wasin the table-drawer; I had missed that a day or two before; the shoes were under the drawers. In consequence of information, I saw her on the Sunday following; I found her at her father's; I had a search-warrant and searched the house, and in the front two-pair of stairs room, where this girl lived, I found a bit of cotton; the petticoat had been cut up into an apron; and a pair of stockings, which I did not know I had lost, they were all mine. The constable found some duplicates there, one of them led to my pocket handkerchief.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>GEORGE LEE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I live at the corner of Dean-street, Holborn: On the 10th of September, the prisoner Mary Baldwin (she is the youngest, and she is the sister of Ann Baldwin ) pledged two pocket handkerchiefs.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Prosecutrix. I lost but one; this is mine.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Lee. On the 2d of October there was a frock and two habit-shirts pledged by Mary Baldwin.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Prosecutrix. Only one habit-shirt and apron is mine (Ann Baldwin was my servant), the apron is made out of my petticoat, I know it by the tuck that is in it now, the same tuck was in the petticoat, and by the stain of red wine in the front.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - On the 2d of October I went with a search-warrant to the prisoners' mother's house; I found the duplicates which Iproduce, upon the mother.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Q. You should have indicted the mother, the child appears to be only an instrument in the hands of the mother - why did not you indict the mother? - A. The reason of the mother not being indicted was, she had got a dying infant in her lap; the mother has run away since.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Q. That is no reason you should indict the young girl asa receiver; she is only the instrument of the mother's receiving? - A. We could not tell whether she took the things home; I found a pair of stockings in the room where the bed was.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Prosecutrix. They are my stockings.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Ann Baldwin's defence. My mother asked me how I came by the things; I told her the lady gave them to me.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>AnnBaldwin , GUILTY , aged 17,</p></p><p><p>Transported for seven years .</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Mary Baldwin , NOT GUILTY .</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>691. ANN BALDWIN was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , a pair of silk gloves, value 1 s. 6 d. a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Charles Walls .</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>No evidence being adduced against the prisoner on this indictment, she was from this charge.</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>ACQUITTED .</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Marriage James Timmins - View Family</p></p><p><p>6 September 1807 (Age 19)</p></p><p><p>Sydney Town, Greater Sydney, New South Wales, Australia</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Source: Spurway, John, ed. AustralianBiographical and Genealogical Record. Series 1, 1788-1841, with series 2 supplement, 1842-1899. Sydney: A.B.G.R., 1992</p><p><p>Text: Shortly after her arrival in the colony, Ann, a Protestant, married James Timmins, a Catholic Irish convict some 30 years her senior at St Philips Church of England. James already owned land at Yarramundi near Richmond, where Ann spent the rest of her life. Although there was no alternative to a C of E marriage (at St Philips) James and Ann's children were brought up as Catholics. They were recorded as such in the 1828 census and when priests became available, the children were baptised as Catholics. Ann herself remained Protestant at least until the 1828 census.</p><p><p> Census November 1828 (Age 40)</p></p><p><p>Richmond, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Source: Ancestry.com. 1828 New South Wales, Australia Census (TNA Copy) [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.</p><p><p>Text: Timmins, James, 70, conditional pardon, Friendship, 1800, life, Protestant, farmer, Richmond, 42 and a half acres, 10 horses, 4 horned cattle</p><p><p>Timmins, Ann or Baldwin, 40, free by servitude, Sydney Cove, 1807, 7 years</p></p><p><p>Timmins, Michael 20, born in the colony</p></p><p><p>Timmins, William 17, born in the colony</p></p><p><p>Timmins, Ann 15 born in the colony</p></p><p><p>Timmins, Margaret 14 born in the colony</p></p><p><p>Timmins, John 12 born in the colony</p></p><p><p>Timmins, Catherine 10 born in the colony</p></p><p><p>Timmins, Patrick 8 born in the colony</p></p><p><p>Timmins, Henry 6 born in the colony</p></p><p><p>Timmins, Bridget 4 born in the colony</p></p><p><p>Timmins, Elizabeth 2 born in the colony</p></p><p><p>Death Death 20 December 1884 (Age 96)</p></p><p><p>Richmond, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Source: Spurway, John, ed. Australian Biographical and Genealogical Record. Series 1, 1788-1841, with series 2 supplement, 1842-1899. Sydney: A.B.G.R., 1992</p><p><p>Burial Burial </p></p><p><p>Windsor, Hawkesbury, New South Wales, Australia</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Source: Spurway, John, ed. Australian Biographical and Genealogical Record. Series 1, 1788-1841, with series 2 supplement, 1842-1899. Sydney: A.B.G.R., 1992</p><p>Text: Buried by a priest at the Catholic cemetery at Windsor. She was survived by ten of her thirteen children. Her age at death was variously stated to be between 96 and 100.

view all 20

Ann (Baldwin) Timmins, Convict "Sydney Cove" 1807's Timeline

1784
1784
Halbon, London, England
1806
June 18, 1806
Age 22
Sydney Cove
1808
1808
Yarrmundi, NSW, Australia
1810
1810
Yarrumundu, New South Wales, Australia
1811
1811
Sydney, NSW, Australia
1813
1813
Yarramundi, NSW, Australia
1814
1814
"Yarramundi", Windsor, New South Wales, Australia
1816
1816
"Yarramundi", Windsor, New South Wales, Australia
1820
1820
Sydney, NSW, Australia