Ann Hupp, Defender of Miller's Blockhouse

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Ann Maria Hupp (Rowe)

Also Known As: "May", "Rowe"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Culpepper County, Province of Virginia, Colonial America
Death: June 26, 1823 (65-66)
Washington County Pennsylvania
Place of Burial: Miller Cemetery, Claysville, Washington County, Pennsylvania, USA
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Adam Rowe and Margaret Rowe
Wife of John C. Hupp, Sr. and John May
Mother of Margaret Titus; Philip (John) Hupp; Mary Smith; John Hupp, Jr.; Elisabeth Rodgers and 3 others
Sister of Unknown Rowe; Jacob Rowe and Daniel Rowe

DAR: A060870
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Ann Hupp, Defender of Miller's Blockhouse

HUPP, ANN

  • Ancestor #: A060870
  • Service: PENNSYLVANIA
  • Rank(s): PATRIOTIC SERVICE
  • Birth: 1757 PENNSYLVANIA
  • Death: 6-23-1823 WASHINGTON CO PENNSYLVANIA
  • Service Description:
  • 1) HELPED TO DEFEND THE FORT
  • 2) MILLER'S BLOCKHOUSE
  • RESIDENCE
  • 1) County: WASHINGTON CO - State: PENNSYLVANIA
  • SPOUSE:
  • 1) JOHN HUPP

In early April 1782, she defended the fort of Miller's Blockhouse, Washington County, Pennsylvania, against a Shawnee Indian Attack,[2] for over 24 hours in 1782 while eight months pregnant,[3] after her husband was murdered and scalped.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=14943261

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Hupp

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nwa/hupp.html

in this crisis of terrible trial, Ann Hupp proved equal to the emergency. Encouraging the trembling Ault and the weeping women with the consoling language of hope--nerving her arm and steeling her heart to the severe duties of the moment, she, with true Spartanism, snatching up a rifle fired at the approaching savages, and then "ran from porthole to porthole," protruding its muzzle in different directions--to convey the idea of great forces in the house--at each presentation causing the savages to cower behind trees or other objects for protection. This happily conceived and promptly executed strategy of this pioneer heroine, without doubt, saved the inmates from what was otherwise inevitable--an immediate and horrible death.

A number of Indians had taken shelter behind a stable that stood not far from the block-house, one of them would occasionally step out to view, holding up before himself as a shield a "clap-board," and then quickly retreat again to his shelter. He at length stepped out boldly into an open space, defiantly stretching his savage frame high in air, at which Ault was prevailed upon to fire; but palpable without doing any harm. This exasperated the savages, causing the assault to become still more terrible.

At this stage of the siege the women saw and recognized three of their men approaching in great haste from the direction of Rice's Fort, when they commenced screaming at the top of their voices, and beckoning the men in the direction they supposed to be the safest point to pass the Indians in gaining the block-house.

While the Indians stood in confusion and wonderment, not comprehending the meaning of the screams, the men rushed forward, passing very near to where some of the savages stood, and before the Indians sufficiently recovered from their surprise to fire upon them, they, with faces red and turgid from the race, bounded into the block-house unscathed.

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Ann Hupp, Defender of Miller's Blockhouse's Timeline

1757
1757
Culpepper County, Province of Virginia, Colonial America
1774
1774
Washington County, Pennsylvania, USA
1776
1776
Washington County, Pennsylvania, USA
1776
Middleburg, Noble, Ohio, USA
1780
July 27, 1780
Donegal, Washington, Pennsylvania
1782
August 1782
Donegal Township, Washington, Pennsylvania, USA
1791
1791
Wash., PA
1793
1793
Wash., PA