Anne Neville, the elder

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About Anne Neville, the elder

ANNE NEVILLE DID NOT MARRY ROBERT LE STRANGE, SHE HAD A YOUNGER HALF SISTER, ANNE (NEVILLE) STAFFORD-BLOUNT, BY HER FATHER'S 2ND WIFE JOAN (BEAUFORT) DE FERRERS

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  • Anne Neville1,2,3,4,5,6
  • F, #57956
  • Father Sir Ralph Neville, 1st Earl Westmoreland, 4th Baron Neville1,2,3,7,5,8 b. bt 1364 - 1367, d. 21 Oct 1425
  • Mother Margaret Stafford1,2,3,7,5,8 b. b 1364, d. 9 Jun 1396
  • Anne Neville married Sir Gilbert de Umfreville, Marshal of France, Captain of Caen, Gournay, Pontoise, Eu, & Neufchatel, Captain-General of Melun, son of Sir Thomas Umfraville, 5th Lord Umfraville, Sheriff of Northumberland, Captain of Roxburgh Castle and Agnes Grey, before 3 February 1413; Date of Papal Dispensation. No issue.1,2,3,4,5,6
  • Family Sir Gilbert de Umfreville, Marshal of France, Captain of Caen, Gournay, Pontoise, Eu, & Neufchatel, Captain-General of Melun b. 18 Oct 1390, d. 22 Mar 1421
  • Citations
  • [S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. I, p. 151-2.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 540-544.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 119.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 248.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 18.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 236.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 246-247.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 232.
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p1929.htm#i57956

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  • Lady Anne de Neville1
  • F, #9284
  • Last Edited=18 Jan 2011
  • Consanguinity Index=1.32%
  • Lady Anne de Neville was the daughter of Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland and Lady Margaret de Stafford.1 She married Sir Gilbert de Umfreville, son of Sir Thomas de Umfreville and Agnes (?), before 3 February 1412/13.1
  • From before 3 February 1412/13, her married name became de Umfreville.1
  • Citations
  • [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 152. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  • From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p929.htm#i9284

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  • Anne NEVILLE
  • Born: ABT 1394, Raby, Durham, England
  • Father: Ralph NEVILLE (1° E. Westmoreland)
  • Mother: Margaret STAFFORD (C. Westmoreland)
  • Married 1: Gilbert De UMFREVILLE (E. Kyme) BEF 3 Feb 1412, Harbottle, Northumberland, England
  • From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/NEVILLE2.htm#Anne NEVILLE1

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  • Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 40
  • Neville, Ralph (1364-1425) by James Tait
  • NEVILLE, RALPH, sixth Baron Neville of Raby and first Earl of Westmorland (1364–1425), was the eldest son of John de Neville, fifth baron Neville of Raby [q. v.], by his first wife, Maud, daughter of Henry, lord Percy (d. 1352) [q. v.], and aunt of the first earl of Northumberland (Swallow, De Nova Villa, p. 34; Dugdale, Baronage, i. 297). He first saw service in the French expedition of July 1380 .... etc.
  • The Nevilles were a prolific race, but Westmorland surpassed them all. He had no less than twenty-three children by his two wives—nine by the first, and fourteen by the second. The children of the first marriage, seven of whom were females, were thrown into the shade by the offspring of his more splendid second alliance which brought royal blood into the family. Westmorland devoted himself indefatigably to found the fortunes of his second family by a series of great matches, and a good half of the old Neville patrimony, the Yorkshire estates, was ultimately diverted to the younger branch. Thus the later earls of Westmorland had a landed position inferior to that of their ancestors, who were simple barons, and the real headship of the Neville house passed to the eldest son of the second family. Westmorland's children by his first wife were: (1) John, who fought in France and on the Scottish borders, and died before his father (1423); he married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Holland, earl of Kent, and their son Ralph succeeded his grandfather as second Earl of Westmorland in 1425 (see below). (2) Ralph of Oversley, near Alcester, in Warwickshire, in right of his wife Mary (b. 1393), daughter and coheiress of Robert, baron Ferrers of Wem in Shropshire. (3) Mathilda married Peter, lord Mauley (d. 1414). (4) Philippa married Thomas, lord Dacre of Gillsland (d. 1457). (5) Alice married, first, Sir Thomas Grey of Heton; and, secondly, Sir Gilbert Lancaster. (6) Elizabeth, who became a nun in the Minories. (7) Anne, who married Sir Gilbert Umfreville of Kyme. (8) Margaret, who married, first, Richard, lord le Scrope of Bolton in Wensleydale (d. 1420), and, secondly, William Cressener, dying in 1463; and (9) Anastasia.
  • By his second wife Neville had nine sons and five daughters: (1) Richard Neville, earl of Salisbury [q. v.] (2) William, baron Fauconberg [q. v.] (3) George, summoned to parliament as Baron Latimer, 1432–69, his father having transferred to him that barony which he had bought from his childless half-brother John, who inherited it from his mother [see under Neville, John, d. 1388)]. George Neville's male descendants held the barony of Latimer till 1577, when it fell into abeyance [see Neville, John, third Baron Latimer]. (5) Robert [q. v.], bishop successively of Salisbury and Durham. (6) Edward, baron of Bergavenny [q. v.] (7–9) Three sons who died young. (10) Joan, a nun. (11) Catherine, married, first, John Mowbray, second duke of Norfolk [q. v.]; secondly, Thomas Strangways; thirdly, Viscount Beaumont (d. 1460); and, fourthly, John Wydeville, brother-in-law of Edward IV. (12) Anne, married, first, Humphrey, first duke of Buckingham (d. 1460) [q. v.]; and, secondly, Walter Blount, first baron Mountjoy (d. 1474). (13) Eleanor, married, first, Richard, lord le Despenser (d. 1414); and, secondly, Henry Percy, second earl of Northumberland (d. 1455). (14) Cicely, who married Richard Plantagenet, duke of York, and was mother of Edward IV.
  • .... etc.
  • From: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Neville,_Ralph_(1364-1425)_(DNB00)
  • https://archive.org/stream/dictionaryofnati40stepuoft#page/273/mode/1up to https://archive.org/stream/dictionaryofnati40stepuoft#page/277/mode/1up

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  • Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 58
  • Umfraville, Gilbert de (1390-1421) by Thomas Frederick Tout
  • UMFRAVILLE, GILBERT de (1390–1421), popularly styled the ‘Earl of Kyme,’ was the son of Sir Thomas de Umfraville (1362–1391) [see under Umfraville, Gilbert de, Earl of Angus]. He was born about the end of July 1390, and was only twenty-eight weeks old when his father's death on 12 Feb. 1391 put him in possession of Harbottle and Redesdale, and such of the Umfraville estates as were included in the entail of 1378. He was a royal ward (Hardyng, p. 365), and Ralph Neville (afterwards first Earl of Westmorland) [q. v.] received from Richard II the governorship of Harbottle Castle during his minority. The chief care for the youth devolved, however, upon his uncle, Robert Umfraville, whose martial exploits against the Scots did much to restore the waning fortunes of the house of Umfraville. After the Lancastrian revolution, to which Robert Umfraville early adhered, Henry Percy, called Hotspur, became guardian of young Gilbert's lands. The Umfravilles and the Percys were closely related, the Earl of Northumberland's second wife being the widow of the Earl Gilbert of Angus who died in 1381, who was Robert's uncle of the half-blood. Prudhoe Castle, an old Umfraville property, was already in Northumberland's hands. In 1400 Robert Umfraville was actually in command at Harbottle (Ord. Privy Council, i. 125), where on 29 Sept. he signally routed a Scottish force. In 1403 the wardship of the young heir was transferred, after the Percys' fall, to George Dunbar, earl of March (Fœdera, viii. 323); while in 1405 Warkworth was transferred from the rebel house to Robert Umfraville, who in 1408 became knight of the Garter (Beltz, Memorials of the Garter, p. clvii). Trained from infancy in the rude school of border warfare, Gilbert entered early on his career of arms. About 1409 he distinguished himself in a tournament at Arras (Hardyng, p. 365), and on 10 Jan. 1410 he had livery of his lands and was soon afterwards knighted. He now took an active share in his uncle's plundering forays against the Scots (Hardyng, p. 367), though apparently not participating in Robert's destruction of Scottish shipping in the Forth early in 1411. In the autumn of 1411 Gilbert accompanied his uncle on the expedition sent under Thomas Fitzalan, earl of Arundel (1381–1415) [q. v.], to help Philip of Burgundy against the Armagnacs. Hardyng, the rhyming chronicler, who after 1403 transferred his services from the Percys to Robert Umfraville, is careful in chronicling the exploits of his lord and lord's nephew, giving them perhaps a larger share of the glory of the expedition than is allowed by more sober historians. Both took part in the capture of Saint-Cloud on 8 Nov., and, according to Hardyng, gave voice to the English protest against the massacre and torture of the prisoners (p. 368; cf., however, Wylie's Henry IV, iv. 62–3). Hardyng also says that after the battle of Saint-Cloud Gilbert ‘proclaimed was Earl of Kyme’ (p. 367). This certainly does not mean that he was formally created an English earl. Neither he nor his uncle after him received a summons, even as a baron, to the House of Lords. The title may have been simply a mere popular recognition of his descent from earls, though he was not famous enough as a soldier to extort any special popular acclamation. It is not quite impossible, as Sir James Ramsay suggests (Lancaster and York, i. 131), that he received a grant of this title from his French allies. Nevertheless all similar titles given in France were, like the Greys' county of Tancarville, derived from French places and represented existing French dignities. Hardyng's authority, moreover, is of little weight, and the French writers, who mainly use the title, are so ignorant as to confuse him with the Earl of Kent. His designation in English official documents is ‘G. de Umfraville miles’ (Testamenta Vetusta, p. 20), or at most ‘dominus de Kyme’ (Puiseux, Siège de Rouen, p. 86; cf. Gesta Henrici V, p. 280). When asked his name by the Rouennais in 1412, he answered that he was a knight and named Umfraville (Puiseux, p. 253).
  • .... etc.
  • On 28 March 1419 Umfraville was made member of an embassy accredited to the French king, and on 8 May was put on the commission empowered to negotiate for the marriage of Henry V with Catharine, and to arrange for an interview between the two kings (Fœdera, ix. 747–50). The negotiations at first were hollow, and on their way to Provins, where Charles VI was, the ambassadors were attacked by Tanneguy Duchâtel, the Armagnac, at Chaumes in Brie (Monstrelet, iii. 313; J. Le Févre, i. 359). After the murder of the Duke of Burgundy at Montereau, Umfraville helped to arrange the Anglo-Burgundian alliance. On 24 Oct. he was authorised to declare that Henry would accept the hand of Catharine with the reversion of the French crown as the price of his alliance. He accompanied Henry on his march to Troyes in the spring of 1420 (Monstrelet, iii. 388; Chastelain, i. 130). He took a conspicuous part in the great tournaments with which Henry celebrated Christmas in 1420 at Paris (ib. p. 380). On Henry's return to England Umfraville remained in France, being constituted captain of Melun by the king (Hardyng, p. 379; J. Le Févre, ii. 27, 379). In January 1421 he was made marshal of France (ib. p. 383). He joined the expedition of Clarence to Anjou against his old enemies, the Scots, accompanied, if Hardyng can be trusted, with ten men only. Hardyng (pp. 384–5) tells a long story how Umfraville, seeing that the army was not ready, urged Clarence to delay fighting until holy week was over; and how Clarence, who envied his fame, reproached him with cloaking cowardice under religious scruples. Against his advice Clarence fought at Baugé on 22 March (Easter Eve), but the Scotto-Armagnac host was two to one, and he suffered a complete defeat. Umfraville, like Clarence, fell on the field. His body was recovered and taken to England to be buried (Hardyng, p. 385).
  • Umfraville is described by his panegyrist, Hardyng, as of ‘goodly port, full gentle,’ while the Burgundian Chastellain calls him ‘vaillant chevalier et bien à douter’ (i. 225). He married Anne Neville, seventh child of his old protector, Ralph Neville, first earl of Westmorland (Surtees, Durham, iv. 159; G. E. C[okayne], Complete Peerage, i. 95, says that he died unmarried). He left no issue, so that while his uncle Robert succeeded under the entail to Harbottle and Redesdale—and also apparently to Kyme—his personal representatives were his five sisters, between whose descendants the Umfraville barony, according to later legal doctrine, would still remain in abeyance.
  • Robert de Umfraville (d. 1436) now became lord of Redesdale and Kyme. Apart from his possible share in the 1415 campaign, he remained under Henry V, as under Henry IV, mainly occupied on Scottish affairs. The Scots called him Robin Mendmarket, because of his burning Peebles on market day (Hardyng, p. 366). He was sheriff of Northumberland, vice-admiral of the north, chamberlain of Berwick, warden of Roxburgh Castle, and finally of Berwick; and in 1417 helped in checking the Scots while Henry fought the French (cf. Redman, in Memorials of Henry V, p. 38). He was one of the commissioners who concluded the seven years' truce of Durham. In 1429 he founded a chantry at Farnacres in Durham (Surtees, Durham, iv. 243). His last appointment was on a commission, dated 5 Feb. 1435, to negotiate a truce with the Scots (Fœdera, x. 629). He died on 29 Jan. 1436, and was buried at Newminster. Hardyng, who served him till his death as constable of Kyme Castle, has left a touching picture of his brave, simple, and honourable character (pp. ix–xi). He celebrates his valour, ‘sapience,’ his gentleness that would not even reprove his servants before others, and his justice that made many of his Scots enemies go to Berwick to submit their disputes to his arbitration. When made knight of the Garter he was but a poor man, whose estate was worth only a hundred marks a year. He was the last male representative of the Umfravilles that held Redesdale under the entail of 1378. The estates thus settled now passed away from his nieces to the Talboys—Sir Walter Talboys (d. 1444), the grandson of Sir Walter Talboys (d. 1418), who was the son of Eleanor Borrodon and Henry Talboys. Their son was Sir William Talboys (d. 1464) [q. v.], who was, with strange persistence, still styled Earl of Kyme.
  • [Hardyng's Chronicle, ed. Ellis; Gesta Henrici V (Engl. Hist. Soc.); Memorials of Henry V (Rolls Ser.); Walsingham (Rolls Ser.); Rymer's Fœdera, vols. viii. and ix.; Nicolas's Proceedings and Ordinances of the Privy Council; Monstrelet, ed. Douet d'Arcq; J. Le Févre, Seigneur de Saint-Remy (the last two in Soc. de l'Histoire de France); Chastellain, ed. Kervyn de Lettenhove; Dugdale's Baronage, i. 508; G. E. C[okayne]'s Complete Peerage, i. 95, iv. 425; Doyle's Official Baronage, ii. 303–4; Ramsay's Lancaster and York, vol. i.; Wylie's Hist. of Henry IV; Sir H. Nicolas's Battle of Agincourt; Puiseux's Siège de Rouen par les Anglais; Surtees's Durham; Hodgson's Northumberland, I. ii. 48–55 for Robert, 55–60 for Gilbert.]
  • From: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Umfraville,_Gilbert_de_(1390-1421)_(DNB00)

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  • Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, 4th Baron Neville de Raby,[a] Earl Marshal, KG, PC (c. 1364 – 21 October 1425), was an English nobleman of the House of Neville.
  • Ralph Neville was born about 1364, the son of John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby, and The Hon Maud Percy (d. before 18 February 1379), daughter of Henry de Percy, 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick, Northumberland, by Idoine de Clifford, daughter of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford.[1] .... etc.
  • Neville married firstly, Margaret Stafford (d. 9 June 1396), the eldest daughter of Hugh Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford, and Philippa Beauchamp, the daughter of Thomas Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, by Katherine Mortimer, the daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March.[14] They had two sons and six daughters:
    • Sir John Neville (c.1387 – before 20 May 1420), who married Elizabeth Holland, fifth daughter of Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, and Alice FitzAlan, and by her had three sons, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland, John Neville, Baron Neville, and Sir Thomas Neville, and a daughter, Margaret Neville.[15]
    • Sir Ralph Neville (d. 25 Feb 1458), who married, before 1411, his stepsister, Mary Ferrers, daughter of Robert Ferrers, 2nd Baron Ferrers, and Joan Beaufort.[16]
    • Maud Neville (d. October 1438), who married Peter de Mauley, 5th Baron Mauley.[15]
    • Alice Neville, who married firstly Sir Thomas Grey, beheaded 2 August 1415 for his part in the Southampton Plot, and secondly Sir Gilbert Lancaster.[17]
    • Philippa Neville, who married, before 20 July 1399, Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland (d. 5 January 1458).[18]
    • Elizabeth Neville, who became a nun.
    • Anne Neville (b. circa 1384), who married, before 3 February 1413, Sir Gilbert Umfraville, son of Sir Thomas Umfreville (d. 12 February 1391) and Agnes Grey (d. 25 October 1420), daughter of Sir Thomas Grey of Heaton (d. before 22 October 1369). He was slain at the Battle of Baugé in Anjou on 22 March 1421.[19]
    • Margaret Neville (d. 1463/4), who married firstly, before 31 December 1413, Richard Scrope, 3rd Baron Scrope of Bolton, and secondly, William Cressener, esquire.[20]
  • Neville married secondly, before 29 November 1396, at Château de Beaufort, Maine-et-Loire, Anjou, Joan Beaufort, the widow of Robert Ferrers, 2nd Baron Ferrers.[21] Joan was the legitimated daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, by his mistress and later third wife, Katherine Swynford. They had nine sons and five daughters:[22]
    • Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury (1400–1460), married Alice Montacute, 5th Countess of Salisbury. Their son was Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick (1428–1471), 'The Kingmaker'.
    • Henry Neville.
    • Thomas Neville.
    • Cuthbert Neville.
    • Robert Neville, Bishop of Salisbury and Durham.
    • William Neville, 1st Earl of Kent.
    • John Neville.
    • George Neville, 1st Baron Latimer.
    • Edward Neville, 3rd Baron Bergavenny.
    • Joan Neville, who became a nun.
    • Katherine Neville, married firstly, on 12 January 1411 to John Mowbray, 2nd Duke of Norfolk, secondly to Sir Thomas Strangways, thirdly to John Beaumont, 1st Viscount Beaumont, fourthly to Sir John Woodville (d. 12 August 1469).
    • Eleanor Neville (1398–1472), married firstly to Richard le Despencer, 4th Baron Burghersh, secondly to Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland.
    • Anne Neville (1414–1480), married firstly to Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham, secondly to Walter Blount, 1st Baron Mountjoy.
    • Cecily Neville (1415–1495), married to Richard, 3rd Duke of York. She was the mother of King Edward IV and King Richard III.
  • Westmorland died on 21 October 1425. He was buried in the choir of his collegiate church of St. Mary at Staindrop. The magnificent alabaster tomb with effigies of himself and his two wives there has been termed the finest sepulchral monument in the north of England.[1] Neither of his wives is buried with him. His first wife, Margaret Stafford, was buried at Brancepeth, Durham, while his second wife, Joan Beaufort, was buried with her mother under a carved stone canopy in the sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral.[23]
  • Westmorland was predeceased by his eldest son, Sir John Neville, and was succeeded in the title by his grandson, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland.[24]
  • .... etc.
  • From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Neville,_1st_Earl_of_Westmorland

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  • Margaret Stafford (died 9 June 1396) was the daughter of Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford, and Philippa de Beauchamp. She was the first wife of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, and the grandmother of the 2nd Earl.
  • Margaret Stafford was the eldest daughter of Hugh Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford, and Philippa Beauchamp, the daughter of Thomas Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, by Katherine Mortimer, the daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March.[1]
  • .... etc.
  • Margaret Stafford was the first wife of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland.[3] They had two sons and six daughters:
    • Sir John Neville (c.1387 – before 20 May 1420), who married Elizabeth Holland, fifth daughter of Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, and Alice FitzAlan, and by her had three sons, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland, John Neville, Baron Neville, and Sir Thomas Neville, and a daughter, Margaret Neville.[4]
    • Sir Ralph Neville (d. 25 Feb 1458), who married, before 1411, his stepsister, Mary Ferrers, daughter of Robert Ferrers, 2nd Baron Ferrers, and Joan Beaufort.[5]
    • Maud Neville (d. October 1438), who married Peter de Mauley, 5th Baron Mauley.[6]
    • Alice Neville, who married firstly Sir Thomas Grey, beheaded 2 August 1415 for his part in the Southampton Plot, and secondly Sir Gilbert Lancaster.[7]
    • Philippa Neville, who married, before 20 July 1399, Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland (d. 5 January 1458).[8]
    • Elizabeth Neville, who became a nun.
    • Anne Neville (b. circa 1384), who married, before 3 February 1413, Sir Gilbert Umfraville, son of Sir Thomas Umfreville (d. 12 February 1391) and Agnes Grey (d. 25 October 1420), daughter of Sir Thomas Grey of Heaton (d. before 22 October 1369). He was slain at the Battle of Baugé in Anjou on 22 March 1421.[9]
    • Margaret Neville (d. 1463/4), who married firstly, before 31 December 1413, Richard Scrope, 3rd Baron Scrope of Bolton, and secondly, William Cressener, esquire.[10]
  • Margaret Stafford died 9 June 1396, and was buried at Brancepeth, Durham.[11]
  • After Margaret Stafford's death, Westmorland married, before 29 November 1396, Joan Beaufort, the widow of Robert Ferrers, 2nd Baron Ferrers.[12] Joan was the legitimated daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, by his mistress and later third wife, Katherine Swynford. By his second marriage Westmorland had nine sons and five daughters.[13]
  • From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_de_Stafford

__________________

  • .... etc.
  • a) Sir THOMAS de Umfreville of Harbottle (1360-12 February or 8 March 1391). m AGNES GREY (b.abt 1365 d.25 October 1420), daughter of Thomas de Grey and Margaret de Pressene--. Sir Thomas & his wife had six children:
    • i) Sir GILBERT de Umfreville of Harbottle (Harbottle Castle 18 October 1390-killed in battle Baugé, Anjou 22 March 1421). m (before 3 February 1413) ANNE Neville, daughter of RALPH Neville 1st Earl of Westmoreland & his first wife Margaret Stafford of Stafford.
    • .... etc.
  • From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umfraville

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  • Sir Ralph de Neville
  • Birth: 1364 Staindrop, County Durham, England
  • Death: Oct. 24, 1425 Staindrop, County Durham, England
  • English nobility. A supporter of Henry IV against Richard II. He later married the King's half-sister, Joan Beaufort.
  • Bio supplied by Anne Shurtleff Stevens:
  • "4th Lord Neville of Raby/Earl of Salisbury. 1st Earl Westmorland, and Lord of Richmond. Knight of the Garter, of Raby, Brancepeth and Staindrop, Durham, of Middleham Yorkshire. Joint Keeper of the castle and city of Carlisle, Joint Warden of the West March towards Scotland, Joint Surveyor of Fortifications in the Marches, Keeper of the Forest beyond Trent, Constable of the Tower of London, Marshal of England, Privy Councillor, Keeper of Roxburgh Castle, Warden of Berwick and the East March, Warden of Carlisle and the West March, founder of the Collegiate Church at Staindrop, Durham.
  • Son and heir to Sir John de Neville and Maude de Percy; grandson of Sir Ralph de Neville and Alice de Audley.
  • Husband of Margaret Stafford, daughter of Sir Hugh de Stafford, descendant of King Henry II and Philippe Beauchamp, daughter of Thomas, Earl of Warwick. They married by papal dispensation dated 19 June 1382, being related in the 3rd degree. They had two sons and six daughters; Sir John, Sir Ralph, Maud, wife of Peter de Mauley VIII, Alice, Philippe, Elizabeth, Minoress nun, Anne, wife of Sir Gilbert Umfreville, Margaret.
  • Secondly, husband of Joan de Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt and Katherine Roet, widow of Sir Robert de Ferrers. They married before 29 Nov 1396 and had nine sons and five daughters; Richard, Henry, Thomas, Cuthbert, Robert, Bishop of Salisbury, Sir William Lord Fauconberge, SJohn, Sir George Lord Latimer, Sir Edward Lord Bergavenny, Joan, Katherine, Eleanor, Anne and Cecily.
  • Ralph was summoned to Parliament from 1389 to 1396 and was continually employed on the borders negotiating peace with Scotland until 1424. Ralph played a prominent part with his brother in King Richard II's abdication and the installation of the exiled Duke of Hereford, his wife's brother, to the throne as King Henry IV, and carried the scepter at Henry's coronation."
  • Ralph died at Raby Castle.
  • Family links:
  • Parents:
  • John de Neville (1328 - 1388)
  • Maud de Percy Neville (1335 - 1379)
  • Spouses:
  • Joan Beaufort Neville (1375 - 1440)
  • Margaret de Stafford Neville (1364 - 1396)*
  • Children:
    • Phillippa Neville Dacre*
    • William de Neville (____ - 1463)*
    • John de Neville (1387 - 1420)*
    • Ralph De Neville (1392 - 1458)*
    • Margaret Neville Scrope (1396 - 1463)*
    • Katherine Neville Mowbray Strangeways Beaumont Woodville (1397 - ____)*
    • Eleanor de Neville de Percy (1398 - 1472)*
    • Richard Neville (1400 - 1460)*
    • Richard Neville (1400 - 1460)*
    • Robert de Neville (1404 - 1457)*
    • George Neville, Lord Latimer (1407 - 1469)*
    • George de Neville (1407 - 1469)*
    • Anne de Neville Stafford (1411 - 1480)*
    • Edward Neville (1412 - 1476)*
    • Cecily de Neville Plantagenet (1415 - 1495)*
  • Siblings:
  • Thomas De Neville (1362 - 1406)*
  • Ralph de Neville (1364 - 1425)
  • John Neville (1382 - 1430)**
  • *Calculated relationship
  • **Half-sibling
  • Burial: St Mary Churchyard, Staindrop, Durham Unitary Authority, County Durham, England
  • Plot: memorial in the church
  • Find A Grave Memorial# 17955897
  • From: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=17955897

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view all

Anne Neville, the elder's Timeline

1384
1384
Probably Raby, County Durham, England
1931
January 27, 1931
Age 547
January 30, 1931
Age 547
1941
January 20, 1941
Age 557
????
Raby Castle,Durham,England