Anthony Trabue, Sr.

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Anthony Trabue, Sr.

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Montauban, (Present Tarn-et-Garrone Departement), Quercy Province, France
Death: Died in Manakin Town, King William Parish, Henrico County (Present Powhatan County), Province of Virginia
Immediate Family:

Son of Pierre Antoine Trabue and Bernarde Trabue
Husband of Katherine Trabue; Magdelaine Flournoy and Mary Magdalene Verueil
Father of Jacob Trabue; John James Trabue; Anthony Trabue, Jr. (not III) and Judith Watkins

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Anthony Trabue, Sr.

Date of birth has also been (erroneously?) reported to be September 21, 1669.

Antoine, along with other Huguenot refugees, was brought to a spot fifteen miles up the James River from what is now Richmond, Virginia. There a colony was formed on a grant of ten thousand acres of land, stretching for five miles along the south side of the river, and centering on the abandoned settlement of the Monacan Indians. In order to further aid these Manakin Town Huguenots, on Dec 5, 1700 the Virginia House passed an act making the French refugee inhabitants at Manikin town and the parts adjacent a distinct parish by themselves, and exempted them from the payment of public and county levies for seven years. This act, declaring that the parish would be called King William Parish, did much to encourage the Huguenots to establish a permanent settlement, for it allowed them to collect parish titles, which they could use to support their church and other community needs. The religious and political refugees who had sacrificed and endured so much to gain freedom of worship lost no time in establishing their own church. In early 1701 they built the first Huguenot church in Manakin Town. Antoine served on the church vestry and was made a church Ward in 1708. Probably the most authentic picture we have of this community of pioneers is that painted in the vernacular of Daniel Trabue in his journal (19).

It was a Desireable tract of Rich and furtail land. They went Emediately to hard work, building houses and clereing and tilling the earth. ... Some of these people fetched some little mony with them but the most of them was poor people. Their industery and hard work soon got them to live very well. The nearest mill they had was at Col. Bird's, who lived at the falls of James River which was 15 Miles. So some of them made use of hand mills. I think they brought some hand mills with them from Ingland. Their was a great many wild Deer in the woods but as these French men was not accumtomed to hunting they did not attempt it or but very little but soon Raised cattle and hogs a plenty. ... ... This Col. Bird was a great man in those Days and laid off these Frenchman's land and furnished Corn, etc., and Regesterd all their names. And some of the French names appeard so strange to Col. Bird he altered some of them, and their land titles or grants was according to the way that Col. Bird spelt them. My Grand Father's name was Anthony Straboo but Col. Bird set in (it) Down Anthony Trabue and so we write our names to this Day. My Grandfather brought a certificate with him wrote on parchment from France that was spelt Straboo as well as I can recolect. (13)

Other research suggests Trabec


Antoine fled from France to Lausanne, September 15, 1687, with other Huguenots, and spent several years in Holland, then came via England, to Virginia, settling in Manikin Town in 1700. In 1699 Sieur Antoine Strabo married, Magdelaine La Flournoy, in Holland, the year before they came to America. She was also a French Huguenot. In 1700 King William of England offered to the French refugees not only free passage to America, but also the promise of a grant of land and freedom of worship to all who accepted his offer.


I understood that my Grandfather Anthony [Antoine] Trabue had an estate but concluded he would leave it if he possibly could make his escape. He was a young man and he and a another young man took a cart and loaded it with wine and went on to sell it to the furthermost Guard. And when night came they left their horses and Cart and made their escape to an Inglish ship who took them in. And they went over to ingland, leaving their estates and native country, their relations and every other thing for the sake of Jesus who Died for them. (Daniel Trabue journal)

Beginning in the spring of 1700, four ships carrying approximately two hundred passengers each, embarked at intervals of several months from England with a destination of the new colonies in America. The Marqis de la Muce was designated as the official leader of the expedition and with them were three ministers of the gospel and two physicians. The name of Antoine Trabuc does not appear on any of the published ship lists, so it is assumed that he arrived in Virginia aboard the third ship for which there are no exact records. Antoine, along with other Huguenot refugees, was brought to a spot fifteen miles up the James River from what is now Richmond, Virginia. There a colony was formed on a grant of ten thousand acres of land, stretching for five miles along the south side of the river, and centering on the abandoned settlement of the Monacan Indians. In order to further aid these Manakin Town Huguenots, on Dec 5, 1700 the Virginia House passed an act making the French refugee inhabitants at Manikin town and the parts adjacent a distinct parish by themselves, and exempted them from the payment of public and county levies for seven years. This act, declaring that the parish would be called King William Parish, did much to encourage the Huguenots to establish a permanent settlement, for it allowed them to collect parish titles, which they could use to support their church and other community needs. The religious and political refugees who had sacrificed and endured so much to gain freedom of worship lost no time in establishing their own church. In early 1701 they built the first Huguenot church in Manakin Town. Antoine served on the church vestry and was made a church Ward in 1708.

It was a Desireable tract of Rich and furtail land. They went Emediately to hard work, building houses and clereing and tilling the earth. ... Some of these people fetched some little mony with them but the most of them was poor people. Their industery and hard work soon got them to live very well. The nearest mill they had was at Col. Bird's, who lived at the falls of James River which was 15 Miles. So some of them made use of hand mills. I think they brought some hand mills with them from Ingland. Their was a great many wild Deer in the woods but as these French men was not accumtomed to hunting they did not attempt it or but very little but soon Raised cattle and hogs a plenty. ... ... This Col. Bird was a great man in those Days and laid off these Frenchman's land and furnished Corn, etc., and Regesterd all their names. And some of the French names appeard so strange to Col. Bird he altered some of them, and their land titles or grants was according to the way that Col. Bird spelt them. My Grand Father's name was Anthony Straboo but Col. Bird set in (it) Down Anthony Trabue and so we write our names to this Day. My Grandfather brought a certificate with him wrote on parchment from France that was spelt Straboo as well as I can recolect. (13)

Although the parentage of Antoine Trabue is uncertain, it is almost certain that the original name in France was Trabuc, not Straboo, a name, which is not even French. Experts from the book, Histoire de la Ville Montauban by Abbe’ le Bret, translated by George Trabue, are further verification of this fact. The names of Trabuc and Trabue have the same pronunciations, as the final “c” is silent in the French language, and it is understandable that Col. Byrd registered the name as Trabue on Antoine’s arrival in Virginia. (19) Daniel Trabue is said to have written his journal in the 1820’s, while living in the house he built in Columbia, Kentucky, the town he founded. He was in his sixties at the time. When Daniel was born in 1760, his grandfather Antoine had been dead for thirty-six years. His father, John James Trabue, died in 1775 when Daniel was fifteen years old, considering all factors, it is not unreasonable that his “recollection” could be faulty

Other sources suggest Trabuc

Date of death has also been (erroneously?) reported to be January 28, 1723.

-----------------------------------

The children of Antoine Trabue and Magdalene Verrueil (those who lived to maturity) are listed as follows:

   Jacob (about 1705) and died about Sep 1767.  In 1731/32 he married Mary Wooldridge (1712-1789), daughter of John Woodridge (1678-1757) and his wife, Martha:  Joseph, John, David, William, Elizabeth, Marie, Joshua and Daniel.  Jacob built Trabue Tavern in 1730 (later Trabue Plantation), an historic landmark now located at 11940 Old Buckingham Road in Midlothian, Chesterfield County, Virginia.  Descendants of Jacob owned and occupied the home for more than two centuries before it was sold out of the Trabue family in 1956.
   Anthony (Jr.) (1708/9-1743) married Clark [surname unknown] (Vermeil?)[12] in 1736.  Children: Anne Caroline and John.  After Anthony’s death, Clark had three more children with James Bryant: Marie, Thomas and Martha.
   Magdalene (1715-1787) married (1st) Pierre Guerrant (1697-1750), son of Daniel Guerrant and Marie L’Orange. Children of Magdalene and Pierre: John, Esther, Peter, Magdalene, Jane, Judith and Daniel.  In 1756 she married (2nd) Thomas Smith.  Children of Magdalene and Thomas: James and Martha.
   Judith, (1717/8-1809) married (1st) Stephen Watkins, son of Henry and Mary Watkins.  Children: Marie, Judith, Joseph, Benjamin, John and David.  Judith married (2nd) [given name unknown] Dupuy (no children from this marriage).
   John James Trabue, see below.

John James Trabue, born in 1722 and died in 1775[13], both in Chesterfield County, Virginia. His father, Antoine, died when he was two years old, and his mother died when he was nine years old. We have no record of who raised him between about 1731 and the date of his marriage. In 1744 in Chesterfield County, he married Olympia Dupuy, who was born 12 Nov 1729 and died in 1822 at Woodford, Kentucky at the home of their son, Edward Trabue. She is the daughter of James Dupuy and Susanna Levilain. After the death of her husband, Olympia and quite a number of the large Trabue and Dupuy families moved from Chesterfield County, Virginia, to Kentucky.

The children of John James Trabue and Olympia Dupuy are listed as follows[14] (all born in Chesterfield County, Virginia):

   James, born 29 Jan 1746 and died 23 Dec 1803 in Kentucky.  In 1782 he married Jane Porter.  According to family tradition, James was a surveyor with Daniel Boone[15].  He later served in Lord Dunmore’s War[16] as a Lieutenant under Col. George Rogers Clark[17] (the brother of William Clark of the “Lewis & Clark Expedition” of 1803-06).  In Jun 1780, he was captured when Ruddles Fort was taken by the English and Indians under Colonel Byrd, and according to family legend, he was imprisoned by the British at Montreal, but afterwards made his escape.  James Trabue and Jane Porter had six children: Robert, James, Elizabeth, Martha, Mary and Judith.
   Magdelene (1748-1815) married Edward Clay, who was uncle of Henry Clay.  They moved to North Carolina, where Edward was a large landowner and owned a considerable number of slaves.  In North Carolina, Edward Clay served in the legislature, but was expelled for a crime for which he may have been “framed”.  Children: Sarah, John, Samuel, Mary, Phoebe, Edward, Judith, Frances, Martha and James.
   Phoebe Trabue (1750-1767)
   Jane (1752-1802) married Joseph Minter (1754-1814).  14 children: James (died young), Nancy, Elizabeth, Judith, Jane, Sarah, John, William, Martha, Joseph, Tabitha, Anthony, James and Jeremiah.
   John (1754-1780) married Margaret Pierce.  John served in the Revolutionary War and was a deputy surveyor of Kentucky lands under John May.  He died of an illness at Logan’s Fort, now Stanford, Lincoln County, Kentucky.  They had no children.
   William (1756-86) married Elizabeth Haskins (1759-1825).  He served in the Revolutionary War as a Sergeant in the Virginia Line and was captured at Charleston, South Carolina, but escaped.  Children: Nancy Ann and Phoebe.
   Mary (1758-1792) married Lewis Sublett (III).  Lewis served in the Revolutionary War and was at the siege of Yorktown and the surrender of Lord Cornwallis.  Lewis and Mary moved to Fayette (now Woodford) County, Kentucky in 1783.  Shortly after their arrival, he, with thirty other men, went to the relief of the inmates of Bryant’s Station[18], which was attacked by the Indians.  On their arrival the Indians had retreated, whom they pursued, and gaining the first sight of them on the opposite bank of Licking River, they crossed the stream, dismounted and attacked them, but were badly defeated.  In their flight they lost their horses, several officers and a number of men.  Their children were William, James, Lewis (IV), John T. and Frances.  All four sons served in the War of 1812, and the youngest, John, died in battle.  After Mary died, Lewis married Sarah Samuel (1794) was had four more children: Abraham, Ann Maria and Elizabeth and Samuel.
   Daniel (1760-1840) married Mary (“Polly”) Haskins.  As a result of his journal[19], his life and times are probably familiar to a larger number of Trabues than any other member of the clan.  Daniel served in the Kentucky expedition under Col. George Rogers Clark (see footnote under the heading of his brother James (above).  At only seventeen years of age, he joined the Virginia militia commanded by Col. George Rogers Clark and joined an expedition to capture the British fort, Kaskaskia, on the Mississippi River.  After that, Daniel served in units commanded by Col. Robert Haskins[20] and Gen Lafayette.  Daniel was at the surrender of Yorktown on 19 Oct 1781 and gives a graphic account of the battle and surrender, together with a description of the fort there, in his journal (discussed above).  After the Revolution, in 1785, Daniel moved his family to Kentucky, where he settled on Greer’s Creek, Fayette County.  Children: Robert, John, Sallie, Mary (“Polly”), Judith, Daniel, James, Martha and Presley.
   Edward (1762-1814) married (1st) Martha (“Patsy”) Haskins (children: Mary, Elizabeth, Nancy and George Washington) and (2nd) Jane E. Clay (children: Charles Clay, John E., Martha Green, Jane E., Cynthia Ann, Matilda Olymphia, Prince Edward and Susanna Dupuy).  He enlisted at the age of sixteen and was a soldier in the Revolution.  He fought at the battle of Guilford Court House in North Carolina.  After the war, he and his wife relocated from Virginia to Kentucky, and they there built for themselves a handsome home in Woodford County, near the Kentucky River, which still stands.  Edward’s mother, Olympia, died there at the age of 93 years.
   Martha (“Patsy”) (1764) married Josiah Woolridge.  Children: Samuel, Mary (“Polly”), Martha (“Patsy”), Daniel, Seth, Levi, Claiborne, Chastain, Edward, Josiah, Stephen and Livingston.
   Stephen (1766-1833) married Jane Haskins (1767-1833).  Children: Rebecca, Haskins Dupuy, Aaron, William, Chastain Haskins, Edward, Frances, Elizabeth and John James.
   Elizabeth (1768-1835) married Fenelon Willson (1768-1838).  Children: John Slater, Leatilia and Olympia.
   Judith (1769-1817) married John Major (Jr.) (1764-1821).  The descendants of Judith and John (Jr.) moved to Illinois.  Children: William, John, Joseph, Benjamin, Chastine and Elizabeth Ann.
   Samuel (1770-77)
   Susanna Trabue (1772-1862) married Oliver Thomas Major; 3 children (see below).

The children of Oliver Thomas Major and Susanna Trabue are listed as follows:

   Oline T. Major (1794-1846)
   John J. Major (1795-1876)
   Margaret Major (1798- )
   Elizabeth Redd Major (1802-1821)

http://hylbom.com/family/paternal-lines/paternal-to-to-vi/trabue-716/

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Anthony Trabue, Sr.'s Timeline

1667
July 5, 1667
Montauban, (Present Tarn-et-Garrone Departement), Quercy Province, France
1705
1705
Age 37
Manakintown, Goochland County, Province of Virginia
1709
1709
Age 41
Manakin, Powhatan County? (now Goochland County), Virginia
1712
1712
Age 44
Manakin, Powhatan County? (now Goochland County), Virginia
1722
1722
Age 54
Manakin Town, Henrico County (Present Powhatan County, Province of Virginia
1724
January 29, 1724
Age 56
Manakin Town, King William Parish, Henrico County (Present Powhatan County), Province of Virginia
2000
April 7, 2000
Age 56
2003
March 6, 2003
Age 56