Anund Algotsson (Sture/Sjöblad)

public profile

Is your surname Algotsson (Sture/Sjöblad)?

Research the Algotsson (Sture/Sjöblad) family

Anund Algotsson (Sture/Sjöblad)'s Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Anund Algotsson (Sture/Sjöblad)

Birthdate:
Death: September 21, 1434
Rydboholm, Ö. Ryds förs, Uppland
Immediate Family:

Son of Algot Magnusson Sture, till Rävsnäs and Märta Bosdotter (Natt och Dag)
Husband of Cristina Anundsdotter Lejonansikte
Father of Gustaf Anundsson Sture (Sjöblad)
Brother of Gustaf Magnusson Sture; Katarina Algotsdotter (Sture/sjöblad); Gustav Algotsson (Sture/sjöblad) and Märta Algotsdotter (Sture/sjöblad)

Occupation: Riddare, riksråd
Managed by: Sara Torvalds
Last Updated:

About Anund Algotsson (Sture/Sjöblad)

Anund Algotsson (Sture/Sjöblad)

  • Son of Algot Magnusson (Sture/sjöblad) and Märta Bosdotter (Natt och Dag)

Anund Sture , also called Sture Algotsson (son of Algot Magnusson, tab. 3). Mentioned for the first time on 20.9 1407 and was probably already knight, which he probably was 31.8 1409. Was probably council 12.4 1413. Was still living in June 1434 and was buried 21.9 1434. Written in 1419 to Grönskog in Fliseryds sn in Handburds hd in Småland.

Married

  • Married (1) before 2.3 1424 and probably before 31.8 1409 with Kristina Anundsdotter, daughter of the Lawman of Öland, the National Council and the knight Anund Jonsson ( Lion's face, Hemming Ödgislason's family ) and his former wife Ramborg Israelsdotter ( Finstaätten )
  • Married (2) Agneta ( single wife ) probably by the Nipertz family ). Mrs. Kristina was still alive on October 21, 1440, but was dead in 1441.

Children

  • Gustav Sture, 1438, died 1444, knight and council. Gustav Sture (son of Anund Sture, tab. 5). Mentioned at the earliest 1438. Appears as a national council from the same year. Became a knight between 8.7 1441 and 5.1 1442, ie at King Kristofer's coronation 14.9 1441. Was the high priest at Älvsborg 7.9 1441. Was 3.4 1443 as well as at his death the high captain in Kalmar. Lived 2,1 1444 but died 29.1 pp. Died probably 26.1 1444. Married before 29.8 1438 to Birgitta Stensdotter , daughter of the Swedish Council Sten Turesson ( Bielke ) and Margareta Karlsdotter ( Sparre av Tofta ). Before 12 February 1447, Mrs. Birgitta was remarried to the knight and later the Swedish National Council and the Chief Justice of Uppland Gustav Karlsson ( Gumsehuvud ). - https://www.adelsvapen.com/genealogi/Sture#TAB_5

Band 34 (2013-2019), page 68.

Biography

Sture . During the first half of the 1300s, the coat-of-arms with three beam-arranged sea leaves could have been coated for Anund S (d. 1360 or 1361) and for the Swedish National Council Gustaf Tunason (Ving family), of which the former sealed two letters in 1350. The nickname S was used at this time. also by a Rörik S (d earliest in 1357) whose coat of arms was an eraser head, to which Anund S sealed a letter in 1343. The name indicates that this Rörik S was a descendant of the knight Rörik S (d earliest in 1312), which in 1310 occurs among the dukes Erik's lifters. It seems likely that Anund S on the ancestor belonged to the same genus as Rörik S and acquired the sea-leaf weapon from the Ving family, from which he may have descended on the mother (Carlsson).

Anund S has at the earliest been able to be settled at the settlement between King Birger and his brothers in Helsingborg in 1310, in which he is mentioned among the numerous pledges of the former. Thereafter he did not appear in known records until 1321, when he was given land in Dalsland by Duke Eric's widow Ingeborg (bd 20) for faithful service and was among the ten persons she stated as his advice when she was at Bohus with Prince Henrik of Mecklenburg agreed on future marriages between his daughter Euphemia (bd 14) and his son Albrekt. After the breakup between Ingeborg and the guardianship of her son King Magnus, S has not been able to be elected as a national council until in a note from the 1600s (Gillingstam 1948) on the issuers of a no longer preserved letter from 1328 on the reconstruction of Hunehal's castle. In 1326 or 1327 he had been called a knight, possibly at Ingeborg's wedding with Knut Porse (bd 29) last year. In 1328, S brought to the port city of Lödöse with an escort of 40 armed riders without financial compensation the six-year measure collected by the papal nunties, which, due to unrest, could no longer be brought to Riseberga monastery. In 1333 he and the knight Ulf Filipsson (Ulv) were King Magnus governors in Skåne, when they examined the accounts of the customs in Skanör and Falsterbo (Sjöstedt, p. 227). The S Council is mentioned later in the King's confirmation of Lübeck's privileges in 1344, in the King's will 1346 and among the guarantors for the King's large loan from Pope 1351. During the King's son Eric's rebellion against his father, he remained loyal to the father. In addition to the Dallandian goods S 1321 received by King Magnus's mother, and which he sold as early as 1325, he owned land in Västergötland, Närke and Östergötland. In Gäsene heralded in the former landscape he was governor in 1347, and in 1349 a part of Kinne hered in the same landscape was granted to him. S was married to Katarina, probably sister (Carlsson, p. 92, note 3) to Marshal Erengisle Näskonungsson (bd 14).

His son Magnus S (d earliest in 1391) was knight already when he began to appear in now known records in 1356 and belonged to his father King Magnus's followers during the conflict with his son Erik. In the Edsviken in Sollentuna snow in Uppland, the cease-fire treaty dated 1371 dated, on the one hand, King Albrek's followers, on the other King Magnus and his son Håkans he is mentioned among the 29 representatives of the latter. Subsequently, S appears to have been active in Magnus and Håkan's West Swedish part.

In his marriage to Karin, daughter of the knight Algot Magnusson (the family of the Algot Sons), whose widow remarried to the aforementioned Gustaf Tunason, S became the father of Algot Magnusson(d 1426). This man, who was apparently named after his probable grandfather before his birth, married some of the years 1374–81 to Märta Bosdotter, daughter of Bo Jonsson's (Grip; bd 5) uncle Bo Bosson (Night and Day; bd 26, p. 408 fo 411) and appears early in other neighborhoods than his father, earliest with his mother's half-sister Bengta Gustafsdotter (Ving family) and her husband Heyne Snakenborg (bd 32). In Bo Jonsson's will in 1384, A is mentioned as an alternate for one of his ten will executors, the holy Birgitta's son Birger Ulfsson (Ulvåsa family, vol. 4), and in 1385 he calls himself "capitaneus" (chief white man) at the western Gothic castle Öresten in Marks hierad , which castle according to the will was pledged to Bo Jonsson. On January 5, 1388, he declared himself to have the Earl and the same to Bo Jonsson pledged the castle Opensten along with Marks and Kinds herald as county by Queen Margareta. This happened a couple of months before most of Bo Jonsson's wills paid tribute to Margareta, and A was thus the first Swede to be credited with her. In connection with King Albrekt's defeat and capture in 1389, he must have, according to a certificate from 1460 (B l6), besieged the aforementioned Heyne Snakenborg belonging to Vädersholm in Södra Vings sn in Västergötland. The unique task (Ericus Olai), that A together with Abraham Brodersson (bd 1) would have commanded the troops with which Queen Margareta at the beginning of the 1390s let Sthlm occupy, is suspected (Erslev) to be misplaced. In the letters from the negotiations in Lindholmen and Helsingborg in 1395 he is mentioned among numerous Nordic great men, but only in the Nyköpings agreement 1396 can he safely be placed among the "national advisers in Sweden". A was then a knight, which he must have been on the tribute of King Erik to Mora stones that year. In 1396, he was mentioned as chief white man in Uppland, which was combined (Fritz) with a letter from 1395 (BSH) about fighting against the vitalists in Sthlm and considered to mean "a management assignment of a distinct military nature". In 1397 A was present at the union meeting in Kalmar, and at Sven S's (see below) settlement with Queen Margareta in 1398 he got together with Nils Svarte Skåning on behalf of the Queen Faxeholm with Hälsingland and half Medelpad. In the fall of 1403 he was, together with the aforementioned Abraham Brodersson, according to the annotated commander of the one with whom the queen in vain sought to conquer Gotland, and he is mentioned mainly in the arrest treaty which in the spring of 1404 was concluded in Slite with the commanders of the German Order troops. As a salary for his services, A 1405 received from King Erik and Queen Margareta the castle of Styresholm with Ångermanland, which he still held in 1419, when he is mentioned among the sealers of the covenant treaty between King Erik and Poland-Lithuania. According to this treaty he also held Gripsholm and Rävsnäs in Södermanland, but according to the 1423 federal treaty between Erik and his Hanseatic cities, Gripsholm had another holder (cf. bd 12, p. 25 f), while A is stated to hold Nyköping instead. In 1409 he was present at the Räfsting in Södermanland. In 1416 and 1417, A participated in King Erik's war in Schleswig (Carlsson 1965, p. 33). On several occasions during the years 1411-16 (SD 1467, 1888 and 2204), he was accused of wrongfully acquiring land. A and his wife Märta were buried in Vadstena Monastery, where their tombstone is preserved.

Their son Gustaf Algotsson(d. 1448), which, like his father, could not have been called S, appears in the now known records at the earliest 1401 and was already knight (Nye Danske Magazin). Like his father, he sealed in 1402 in Sölvesborg the certificate of Queen Margaret's son Olof's death and burial with an invitation to the German words to extradite the man who falsely claimed to be Olof. No later than 1409 (Gillingstam 1952–53) G married the deceased national council Arvid Bengtsson's (Oxenstierna; vol. 28, p. 468) only daughter Elin. When he, like his father, sealed King Erik's covenant with Poland-Lithuania in 1419, he wrote to Ängsö in Västmanland, which had previously belonged to the father-in-law. By 1422 (Gillingstam 1952–53, p. 92), Elin was thought to have died childless, but her mother Birgitta Magnusdotter (Porse; vol. 29, p. 412) announced in 1445 that G would keep Ängsö as long as he lived. As early as 1425, he had married Märta Ulfsdotter, sister of later the councils of Sigge, Gustaf and Father Ulfssöner (Sparre av Hjulsta and Ängsö; bd 32), of whom it later, through his marriage to Elin Nilsdotter (Natt and Dag), cousin's daughter to Birgitta Magnusdotter, came to be one of her heirs and at the succession after her 1453 inherited Ängsö. In 1430–40 G can be deposed as a county governor in Oppunda, here in Södermanland, where he, through his second marriage, came into possession of Lagmansö in Vadsbro sn (Gillingstam 1952–53, p. 497). He is mentioned among the national councils and men at the earliest at the meeting in Arboga in Jan 1435 (Carlsson 1936, p. 26 f, cf. Schück 2005, p. 111). Later, G was among those who in Uppsala June 6 of the same year entered into a confederation against King Erik on the occasion of the preliminary settlement treaty with him in Halmstad last month and renewed this confederation at Långholmen at Sthlm a few months later. He also appears in the conciliation treaty with Erik in Sthlm in the fall of that year, and in January 1436 he was one of the nine Saviors who, along with three bishops in Arboga, Jan 11, the following year, wrote a conditional letter of resignation to the King. At the meeting in Söderköping in the autumn of 1436, G was among the 50 national councils and men who issued letters of privilege to the Swedish church and among the 66 issuers of the antedated letter of privilege for Sthlm. He was also among the 95 aristocrats who, on the gentlemen's day in (South) Tälje late summer 1438, entered into a confederation to protect Sweden's law and law, freedom and privileges. In the standstill treaty in Arkösund 1439 between King Erik's followers and the governor of the state Karl Knutsson (bd 20), G is mentioned among the latter's seven men of promise. In 1441 he was one of the four worldly envoys representing Sweden in negotiations in Lödöse with the Norwegians. G can be elected as a national council in 1445. He was buried in the cathedral in Strängnäs, where his tombstone is preserved, and one of his widow's brothers became bishop a few months later. However, G's end son is unmarried. Of his two daughters, Elin Gustafsdotter was first married to Karl Knutsson's half-brother the upland batsman Knut Stensson (Bielke; bd. 4, p. 152) and then to the Deputy Governor Erik Axelsson (Tott), and Birgitta Gustafsdotter first married to the Swedish National Council David Bengtsson (Oxenstierna, bd 28 p. 468) and then with the national council Knut Posse (vol. 29). In the standstill treaty in Arkösund 1439 between King Erik's followers and the governor of the state Karl Knutsson (bd 20), G is mentioned among the latter's seven men of promise. In 1441 he was one of the four worldly envoys representing Sweden in negotiations in Lödöse with the Norwegians. G can be elected as a national council in 1445. He was buried in the cathedral in Strängnäs, where his tombstone is preserved, and one of his widow's brothers became bishop a few months later. However, G's end son is unmarried. Of his two daughters, Elin Gustafsdotter was first married to Karl Knutsson's half-brother the upland batsman Knut Stensson (Bielke; bd. 4, p. 152) and then to the Deputy Governor Erik Axelsson (Tott), and Birgitta Gustafsdotter first married to the Swedish National Council David Bengtsson (Oxenstierna, bd 28 p. 468) and then with the national council Knut Posse (vol. 29). In the standstill treaty in Arkösund 1439 between King Erik's followers and the governor of the state Karl Knutsson (bd 20), G is mentioned among the latter's seven men of promise. In 1441 he was one of the four worldly envoys representing Sweden in negotiations in Lödöse with the Norwegians. G can be elected as a national council in 1445. He was buried in the cathedral in Strängnäs, where his tombstone is preserved, and one of his widow's brothers became bishop a few months later. However, G's end son is unmarried. Of his two daughters, Elin Gustafsdotter was first married to Karl Knutsson's half-brother the upland batsman Knut Stensson (Bielke; bd. 4, p. 152) and then to the Deputy Governor Erik Axelsson (Tott), and Birgitta Gustafsdotter first married to the Swedish National Council David Bengtsson (Oxenstierna, bd 28 p. 468) and then with the national council Knut Posse (vol. 29). In 1441 he was one of the four worldly envoys representing Sweden in negotiations in Lödöse with the Norwegians. G can be elected as a national council in 1445. He was buried in the cathedral in Strängnäs, where his tombstone is preserved, and one of his widow's brothers became bishop a few months later. However, G's end son is unmarried. Of his two daughters, Elin Gustafsdotter was first married to Karl Knutsson's half-brother the upland batsman Knut Stensson (Bielke; bd. 4, p. 152) and then to the governor-general Erik Axelsson (Tott), and Birgitta Gustafsdotter first married to the national council David Bengtsson (Oxenstierna, bd 28 p. 468) and then with the national council Knut Posse (vol. 29). In 1441 he was one of the four worldly envoys representing Sweden in negotiations in Lödöse with the Norwegians. G can be elected as a national council in 1445. He was buried in the cathedral in Strängnäs, where his tombstone is preserved, and one of his widow's brothers became bishop a few months later. However, G's end son is unmarried. Of his two daughters, Elin Gustafsdotter was first married to Karl Knutsson's half-brother the upland batsman Knut Stensson (Bielke; bd. 4, p. 152) and then to the Deputy Governor Erik Axelsson (Tott), and Birgitta Gustafsdotter first married to the Swedish National Council David Bengtsson (Oxenstierna, bd 28 p. 468) and then with the national council Knut Posse (vol. 29). and a few months later one of his widow's brothers became bishop. However, G's end son is unmarried. Of his two daughters, Elin Gustafsdotter was first married to Karl Knutsson's half-brother the upland batsman Knut Stensson (Bielke; bd. 4, p. 152) and then to the Deputy Governor Erik Axelsson (Tott), and Birgitta Gustafsdotter first married to the Swedish National Council David Bengtsson (Oxenstierna, bd 28 p. 468) and then with the national council Knut Posse (vol. 29). and a few months later one of his widow's brothers became bishop. However, G's end son is unmarried. Of his two daughters, Elin Gustafsdotter was first married to Karl Knutsson's half-brother the upland batsman Knut Stensson (Bielke; bd. 4, p. 152) and then to the Deputy Governor Erik Axelsson (Tott), and Birgitta Gustafsdotter first married to the Swedish National Council David Bengtsson (Oxenstierna, bd 28 p. 468) and then with the national council Knut Posse (vol. 29).

G's younger brother Anund S (d 1434) is called at least as often as S Algotsson and in a letter 1424 Anund S Algotsson(Carlsson 1920, s 103 f, note 2); the name difference between the brothers may perhaps indicate that S was named after their paternal grandfather in terms of both first and last name, since their father was named after their grandfather in respect of both (cf. Hildebrand 1961). Anund S became a knight some of the years 1407–1409 (Carlsson 1920, p. 103, note 1) and is mentioned as national council 1413–30 (Gillingstam 2009). When in 1419 he, like his father and brother, sealed King Erik's aforementioned covenant with Poland-Lithuania, he wrote to Grönnskog in Fliseryds sn in Småland, from which farm he came into possession through his marriage to the islander, Anund Jonsson's (Lion's face; bd 2). DMS 4: 2, s 59 f).

Their son Gustaf S(d 1444) is mentioned in 1441 and 1445 as Gustaf Anundsson "calls S" and "who was called S". In Vadstenadiariet's note on his funeral, he is named Gustaf Sturesson, which is linked to his father being so often called Sture Algotsson. He has at the earliest been placed in the conditional letter of resignation that three bishops and nine saviors, including his uncle Gustaf Algotsson 11 Jan 1436 in Arboga wrote to King Erik. On Lord's Day in Söderköping that same year, S, like the uncle, was among the 50 national councils and men who issued the privilege letter for the Swedish church on October 25 and among the 66 issuers of the antedated privilege letter for Sthlm. Both were also among the 95 aristocrats who on the gentlemen's day in (South) Tälje late summer 1438 entered the aforementioned confederation. By the same year he had married his half-sister Birgitta Stensdotter (Bielke; bd 4, s 152); he had been among the fasters in his morning gift letter, when he later remarried after becoming a widow after her cousin Birgitta Turesdotter (Bielke; vol. 4, p. 150). In 1441, the Archbishop of Lund testified that a shipload destined for him from Holland was brought by S, who was annexed at Älvsborg. This had been defended in 1439 against a Norwegian attack by Karl Knutsson's half-brother, the landowner Ture Stensson (Bielke; vol. 4, p. 151), Birgitta Stensdotter's brother, who died the same year. Thus S, by his brother-in-law Karl Knutsson, must have been made to Ture Stensson's successor at Älvsborg. Like Karl Knutsson, he was among the 76 who, according to Vadstenadiariet, was dubbed a knight at King Kristoffer's coronation in Uppsala Cathedral on 14 September 1441. In the conciliation letter between Karl Knutsson and Cristiern Nilsson (Vaasa) a few weeks later, S is mentioned among the former six lifters. In 1443 he was involved in the attempt of the Pomeranian Duke Barnim to mediate between kings Erik and Kristofer. S was then chief of the Kalmar, which he still held at his death the following year. The Lundian Archbishop's aforementioned complaint against him in 1441 is not the only evidence of violent tendencies in him. Another complaint is in Bishop Tomas's letter to Karl Knutsson 1436 (Bring). Son of S was Another complaint is in Bishop Tomas's letter to Karl Knutsson 1436 (Bring). Son of S was Another complaint is in Bishop Tomas's letter to Karl Knutsson 1436 (Bring). Son of S wasSten Sture (the elder) (below) , with whom this genus S died on the male side. Her only sister, Birgitta Gustafsdotter, became the grandmother of King Gustav I.

Except for Sten Sture's paternal grandfather, another Magnus S (d some of the years 1416-19) appears from the last decades of the 1300s. Because his coat of arms was an eraser head and he had a grandson with the unusual name Rörik S(d not later than 1419), it seems clear that he belonged to the same family as the Rörik S to which Anund S sealed a letter in 1343, probably Anund S's ancestral lineage. This Magnus S was among six people who were banned in 1392 for having long before gone astray on the property of Strängnäs Cathedral (cf. Vol. 27, p. 60). Like his aforementioned kinsman Algot Magnusson, he was probably among the 36 people who, according to a letter to the Prussian cities, were dubbed a knight by King Eric's tribute to Mora stones July 23, 1396. Like Algot Magnusson, he was also among the numerous aristocrats mentioned in the letters from the negotiations in Lindholmen and Helsingborg in 1395 and in the Nyköpings agreement 1396. In the stoppage treaty on Gotland in the spring of 1404 with the commanders of the troops of the German order, S is mentioned most closely after Algot Magnusson, Queen Margaret's commander. Magnus S was married to Iliana Arvidsdotter, daughter of Arvid Bengtsson (Lion's Face; vol. 22, p. 514), who was the subordinate in Tiohärad and the district governor in Uppvidinge herd in Småland. He himself was in 1402 royal domicile in Konga, and in 1414 one of the royal judges at a raffle event in Värnamo and Växjö. His family branch could not be located on the man's side later than 1434, but his granddaughters, his sisters Katarina, Ingeborg and Sigrid Karlsdotter, got married to the governor Nils Jönsson (Oxenstierna; bd 28), the national council Magnus Gren (bd 17) and the chief Peter Borgh Smoking (vol. 31, p. 133). He himself was in 1402 royal domicile in Konga, and in 1414 one of the royal judges at a raffle event in Värnamo and Växjö. His family branch could not be located on the mans side later than 1434, but his granddaughters, his sisters Katarina, Ingeborg and Sigrid Karlsdotter, got married to the governor Nils Jönsson (Oxenstierna; bd 28), the national council Magnus Gren (bd 17) and the chief Peter Borgh Smoking (vol. 31, p. 133). He himself was in 1402 royal domicile in Konga, and in 1414 one of the royal judges at a raffle event in Värnamo and Växjö. His family branch could not be located on the mans side later than 1434, but his granddaughters, his sisters Katarina, Ingeborg and Sigrid Karlsdotter, got married to the governor Nils Jönsson (Oxenstierna; bd 28), the national council Magnus Gren (bd 17) and the chief Peter Borgh Smoking (vol. 31, p. 133).

Author Hans Gillingstam

Source Sture (the sea leaf species), related - https://sok.riksarkivet.se/sbl/Presentation.aspx?id=34621

Sources

  • If you want to refer to the web version you have to make a link to the current page so that it is clear that it is the web version you are referring to. An example of a reference to this article is:

Sture (sjöbladsätten), genus, https://sok.riksarkivet.se/sbl/artikel/34621, Swedish biographical lexicon (art by Hans Gillingstam ), retrieved 2020-06-14.

  • URN number which is: urn: sbl: 34621,URN stands for Uniform Resource Name and is a logical identifier for this article, unlike its link, which is a physical identifier . This means that a reference to the article's URN will always be valid, regardless of any future changes to this site. Such a reference may look as follows: Sture (the sea leaf species), genus, urn: sbl: 34621, Swedish biographical lexicon (art by Hans Gillingstam ), retrieved 2020-06-14.
  • Anund S (S Algotsson): Bishop Hans Brask's family book; BSH 2, inl, s 93;
  • G Carlsson, The Beginning Stage of the Engelbrecht Uprising (HT 1934), pp. 244–251; Medieval Sweden, 1: 3, 1: 7, 4: 2 and 4: 4 (1982–99); DN 6: 2 (1864)
  • FMU 2; Gillingstam, aa: n 1952–53, 1985 and 1996; its, the Middle Ages Slaweka (PHT 1947); its, the National Council "Hasse Tuveson" (PHT 1996)
  • D Harrison, Karl Knutsson (2002); B Hildebrand, aa; its, Medieval Times Bralstorp (PHT 1930), p 20; its, The Handbook of Family and Personal Research (1961), pp. 212, 216 and 361; Karlsson, aa 1890, p 66; Blade track o Schlegel, aa; Cumlin, aa; J Liedgren.
  • The Concepts of the Sacred Birgitta's Family (PHT 1983); Lindblom, aa, s 79; Lovén, aa; Lundholm, aa 1956; Mattisson, aa; Olesen, aa; Palm, aa; Rosén, aa 1950, s 190; Rosman, aa 1923–27; Schück, aa 1985, s 138 fo 141; SD 1-3; Sjögren, aa: n; SMR; ST 3; Stiff, aa;
  • Sweden's medieval personal name, 1, sp 117; Diarium Vadstenense; Wichman, aa, s 211 o 221 f.

Om Anund Algotsson (Sture/Sjöblad) (svenska)

Anund Algotsson (Sture/Sjöblad)

Reste de första timrade bostadshusen på Rydboholm på 1430-talet

Från Wikipedia

Anund Algotsson Sture, även kallad Sture Algotsson, riddare i Grönskog, Fliseryd, riksråd, son till Algot Magnusson (Sture) och Märta Bosdotter, dotter till Bo Bosson (Natt och Dag).

Gift med Kristina Jonsson (Lejonansikte)

Barn:

  1. Gustav Anundsson Sture, född cirka 1410, död cirka 1444.
view all

Anund Algotsson (Sture/Sjöblad)'s Timeline

1407
September 20, 1407
1410
1410
Ravsnäs, Toresund, Södermanland, Sweden
1427
1427
Age 19
1434
September 21, 1434
Age 27
Rydboholm, Ö. Ryds förs, Uppland
????