Herleva of Falaise

Falaise, Calvados, Lower Normandy (now Normandy), France

Herleva of Falaise's Geni Profile

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Herleva

French: Arlette
Also Known As: "Arletta", "Arlette", "Arlotta", "Arlotte", "Erleve", "Harlena", "Harlette", "Herlette", "Herleve", "Herlève", "Herlotte"
Birthdate: (47)
Birthplace: Falaise, Calvados, Lower Normandy, France
Death: circa 1050 (39-55)
Eure, Upper Normandy, France
Place of Burial: (near Fatouville-Grestain), Eure, Upper Normandy, France
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Fulbert of Falaise and Doda of Falaise
Wife of Herluin, Count of Conteville
Partner of Robert I "the Magnificent", Duke of Normandy
Mother of Robert de Mortagne, Earl of Cornwall; Jeanne de Conteville; Rohesia De Conteville; Muriel de Conteville; Isabella de Conteville and 4 others
Sister of Beatrice de Falaise; Lord Reynald de Falaise, Lord of Croy; Osbern, Steward of Normandy; Walter, Chamberlain of Normandy and Muriel de Normandie

Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
Last Updated:

About Herleva of Falaise

family

  • Parents: Fulbert de Falaise and Doda
  • Mistress of Robert 'le Magnifique':
  • Child: Guillaume 'le Conquérant' (William Conqueror), King of England
  • Spouse: Herluin de Conteville

Children:

  • Odo of Bayeux and
  • Robert, Comte de Mortain (Mourtaigne)

Herlève should not be confused with Herlève de Rouen who was married to Robert d'Evreux, archbishop of Rouen.

MEDIEVAL LANDS

ROBERT (-Nikaia 22 Jul 1035, bur Nikaia basilica St Mary, transferred [1187] to Apulia). Guillaume de Jumièges names (in order) "Richard, Robert et Guillaume" as the three sons of Duke Richard II and Judith[186]. Ademar names Robert as brother of Richard[187]. Guillaume de Jumièges records that he rebelled against his brother Duke Richard III from his stronghold at Falaise[188]. He succeeded his brother in 1027 as ROBERT II "le Diable" Duke of Normandy. "Rotbertus Normannorum dux, Ricardi filio" founded the abbey of Sainte-Trinité at Rouen in 1030[189]. He gave shelter to Henri, son of Robert II King of France, during his dispute with his mother Queen Constance, the king granting le Vexin to Robert after his accession to the French throne in 1031[190]. William of Malmesbury records that Robert went on pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1035[191]. Orderic Vitalis dates his departure to "after seven and a half years", but it is unclear from the context whether this is calculated based on his accession or his father's death[192]. The date of Robert´s departure can be estimated more precisely from his charter dated 13 Jan 1035 which announces his forthcoming departure for Jerusalem[193]. Guillaume de Jumièges records the death of Duke Robert 2 Jul 1035 at Nikea on his return from a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and his burial in the basilica of St Mary at Nikaia[194]. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, he died while on pilgrimage in 1031[195]. Orderic Vitalis specifies that Duke Robert died "in the city of Nicæa in Bythinia"[196]. William of Malmesbury recounts that his remains were disinterred from Nikaia on the orders of his son, but interred in Apulia on their way back to France after the messenger learnt of the death of William I King of England[197].

Mistress (1): ---. Robert de Torigny names "Aeliz" as daughter of Duke Robert II "de alia concubina" from Herleve[198]. The name of Duke Robert's first mistress is not known.

Mistress (2): HERLEVE [Arlette], daughter of FULBERT [de Falaise] & his wife Doda [Duwa] ---. Guillaume de Jumièges names "Herlève fille le Fulbert valet de chamber du duc" as mother of Duke Guillaume II, recording that "un certain Herluin, brave chevalier, prit Herlève pour femme" after the death of Duke Robert[199]. Orderic Vitalis calls her "Duke Robert's concubine", and records her marriage, referring to her husband as stepfather to Duke Guillaume[200]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the mother of Duke Guillaume as "filia…Herbertus pelliparius et uxor eius Doda sive Duwa", specifying that they were from Chaumont in the diocese of Liège but moved to Falaise but that others said they were from Huy, and refers to her marriage to "Herlewino de Vado comitis"[201].

She married Herluin de Conteville.

Duke Robert II had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):

a) ADELAIS (-[1081/84]). Robert de Torigny names "Aeliz" as the daughter of Duke Robert II "de alia concubina" from Herleve[202]. She retained the title Comtesse d'Aumâle after her first marriage. The foundation charter of Saint-Martin d´Auchy names “Engueranni consulis qui filius fuit Berte supradicti Guerinfridi filie et Adelidis comitisse uxoris sue sororis…Willelmi Regis Anglorum”[203]. Her second marriage is deduced from the same charter of Saint-Martin d´Auchy which also names “Judita comitissa domine supradicte filia”[204]. Orderic Vitalis calls her "the king's sister" when referring to her marriage to Eudes Comte de Troyes[205].

m firstly ENGUERRAND [II] Comte de Montreuil, son of HUGUES de Ponthieu Comte de Montreuil & his wife Berthe d'Aumâle (-killed in battle Château d'Arques 25 Oct 1053).

m secondly ([1053/54]) LAMBERT de Boulogne Comte de Lens, son of EUSTACHE [I] Comte de Boulogne & his wife Mathilde de Louvain (-killed in battle Phalampin 1054).

m thirdly ([1060]) EUDES III Comte de Troyes et d'Aumâle, son of ETIENNE I Comte de Troyes [Blois] & his wife Adela --- (-after 1118).

Duke Robert II had one illegitimate child by Mistress (2):

b) GUILLAUME (Château de Falaise, Normandy [1027/28]-Rouen, Prioré de Saint-Gervais 9 Sep 1087, bur Caen, Abbé de Saint-Etienne).

His birth date is estimated from William of Malmesbury, according to whom Guillaume was born of a concubine and was seven years old when his father left for Jerusalem[206], and Orderic Vitalis, who states that he was eight years old at the time[207]. Deville suggests that Guillaume´s birthdate can be fixed more precisely to [mid-1027], taking into account that his father Robert occupied Falaise immediately after the death of his father Duke Richard II (23 Aug 1026), not wishing to accept the authority of his older brother Duke Richard III, but that Robert´s stay was short as the two brothers were reconciled soon after, it being reasonable to suppose that Robert´s relationship with Guillaume´s mother occurred soon after his arrival at Falaise[208]. He succeeded his father in 1035 as GUILLAUME II Duke of Normandy.


WIKIPEDIA (Eng)

Family Background

The background of Herleva and the circumstances of William's birth are shrouded in mystery. The written evidence dates from a generation or two later, and is not entirely consistent. The most commonly accepted version says that she was the daughter of a tanner named Fulbert from the small Norman town of Falaise, where they lived. Translation being somewhat uncertain, Fulbert may instead have been a furrier, embalmer, or a person who laid out corpses for burial.

It is argued by some that Herleva's father was not a tanner but rather a member of burgher class. The idea is supported by the fact that her brothers appear in a later document as attestors for an under-age William. Also, the Count of Flanders later accepted Herleva as a proper guardian for his own daughter. Both facts would be nearly impossible if the father (and therefore her brothers) of Herleva was a tanner, little more than a peasant.

Relationship with Robert the Magnificent

According to one legend, still recounted by tour guides at Falaise, it all started when Robert, the young Duke of Normandy saw Herleva from the roof of his castle tower. The walkway on the roof still looks down on the dyeing trenches cut into stone in the courtyard below, which can be seen to this day from the tower ramparts above. The traditional way of dyeing leather or garments was for individuals to trample barefoot on the garments which were awash in the dyeing liquid in these trenches. Herleva, legend goes, seeing the Duke on his ramparts above, raised her skirts perhaps a bit more than necessary in order to attract the Duke's eye. The latter was immediately smitten and ordered her brought in (as was customary for any wench that caught the Duke's eye) through the back door. Herleva refused, saying she would only enter the Duke's castle on horseback through the front gate. The Duke, filled with lust, could only agree. In a few days, Herleva, dressed in the finest her father could provide, and sitting on a white horse, rode proudly through the front gate, her head held high. This gave Herleva a semi-official status as the Duke's mistress.[citation needed]

She later gave birth to his son, William, in 1027 or 1028, and probably a daughter, Adelaide, in 1030.

Marriage to Herluin de Conteville

The love affair of Robert and Herleva didn't last; the Duke lost his romantic interest in her. However, her "official" liaison with the Duke had elevated her from a commoner status. With the Duke's consent Herleva later married Herluin de Conteville in 1031. Some accounts however, maintain that Robert always loved her, but the gap in their social status made marriage impossible, so, to give her a good life, he married her off to one of his favourite noblemen.

From her marriage to Herluin she had two sons: Odo, who later became Bishop of Bayeux, and Robert who became Count of Mortain. Both became prominent during William's reign. They also had at least one daughter, who married William, lord of La Ferté-Macé.

Herleva probably died around 1050, in her forties.

Notes

  1. ^ McLynn, Frank. 1066: The Year of the Three Battles. pp. 21-23 (1999) ISBN 0-7126-6672-9

References

   * David C. Douglas, William the Conqueror (1964); see especially Appendix A, "The birth of William the Conqueror, and the connexions of Herleve"
   * Elisabeth M. C. van Houts, 'The Origins of Herleva, Mother of William the Conqueror', English Historical Review, vol. 101, pp. 309-404 (1986)

FURTHER SOURCES

     Title: The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant
     Author: Editor: G.E. Cokayne, with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden
     Publication: St. Catherine Press, 29 Great Queen St, Kingsway, W.C. 1959
     Page: III:164, III:427 

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=aet-t&id=I72100

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10217.htm


Herleva (c. 1003 – c. 1050) also known as Herleve,[1] Arlette,[2] Arletta[3] and Arlotte,[4] was the mother of William I of England. She had two other sons, Odo of Bayeux and Robert, Count of Mortain, who became prominent in William's realm.

Family background

The background of Herleva and the circumstances of William's birth are shrouded in mystery. The written evidence dates from a generation or two later, and is not entirely consistent. The most commonly accepted version says that she was the daughter of a tanner named Fulbert from the town of Falaise, in Normandy. Translation being somewhat uncertain, Fulbert may instead have been a furrier, embalmer, apothecary, or a person who laid out corpses for burial.[5]

It is argued by some that Herleva's father was not a tanner but rather a member of the burgher class.[6] The idea is supported by the fact that her brothers appear in a later document as attestors for an under-age William. Also, the Count of Flanders later accepted Herleva as a proper guardian for his own daughter. Both facts would be nearly impossible if Herleva's father (and therefore her brothers) was a tanner, which would place his standing as little more than a peasant.

Orderic Vitalis described Herleva's father Fulbert as being the Duke's Chamberlain (cubicularii ducis).

Relationship with Robert the Magnificent

According to one legend, still recounted by tour guides at Falaise, it all started when Robert, the young Duke of Normandy saw Herleva from the roof of his castle tower. The walkway on the roof still looks down on the dyeing trenches cut into stone in the courtyard below, which can be seen to this day from the tower ramparts above. The traditional way of dyeing leather or garments was for individuals to trample barefoot on the garments which were awash in the dyeing liquid in these trenches. Herleva, legend goes, seeing the Duke on his ramparts above, raised her skirts perhaps a bit more than necessary in order to attract the Duke's eye. The latter was immediately smitten and ordered her brought in (as was customary for any woman that caught the Duke's eye) through the back door. Herleva refused, saying she would only enter the Duke's castle on horseback through the front gate, and not as an ordinary commoner. The Duke, filled with lust, could only agree. In a few days, Herleva, dressed in the finest her father could provide, and sitting on a white horse, rode proudly through the front gate, her head held high. This gave Herleva a semi-official status as the Duke's mistress.[citation needed]

She later gave birth to his son, William, in 1027 or 1028, and probably a daughter, Adelaide, in 1030.

Marriage to Herluin de Conteville

Herleva later married Herluin de Conteville in 1031. Some accounts however, maintain that Robert always loved her, but the gap in their social status made marriage impossible, so, to give her a good life, he married her off to one of his favourite noblemen.[citation needed]

Another source suggests that Herleva did not marry Herluin until after Robert died because there is no record of Robert ensuing another relationship, whereas Herluin married another woman, Fredesendis, by the time he founded the abbey of Grestain.[9]

From her marriage to Herluin she had two sons: Odo, who later became Bishop of Bayeux, and Robert, who became Count of Mortain. Both became prominent during William's reign. They also had at least two daughters, Emma, who married Richard LeGoz (de Averanches), and a daughter of unknown name who married William, lord of la Ferté-Macé.[10]

Death

According to Robert of Torigni, Herleva was buried at the abbey of Grestain, which was founded by Herluin and their son Robert around 1050. This would put Herleva in her forties around the time of her death. However, David C. Douglas suggests that Herleva probably died before Herluin founded the abbey because her name does not appear on the list of benefactors, whereas the name of Herluin's second wife, Fredesendis, does


'Daughter of Fulbert "The Tanner" Thordilsson De Falaise & Doda Mac Alpon Princess Of Scotland.
Herleva (c. 1003 – c. 1050) also known as Herleve, Arlette Arletta and Arlotte, had three sons - William I of England, who was fathered by Robert I, Duke of Normandy, and Odo of Bayeux and Robert, Count of Mortain, who were both fathered by Herluin de Conteville. All became prominent in William's realm. The background of Herleva and the circumstances of William's birth are shrouded in mystery. The written evidence dates from a generation or two later, and is not entirely consistent, but of all the Norman chroniclers only the Tours chronicler asserts that the two were joined in marriage The most commonly accepted version says that she was the daughter of a tanner named Fulbert from the town of Falaise, in Normandy. Translation of filia pelletarii burgensis being somewhat uncertain, Fulbert may instead have been a furrier, embalmer, apothecary, or a person who laid out corpses for burial. It is argued by some that Herleva's father was not a tanner but rather a member of the burgher class. The idea is supported by the fact that her brothers appear in a later document as attestors for an under-age William. Also, the Count of Flanders later accepted Herleva as a proper guardian for his own daughter. Both facts would be nearly impossible if Herleva's father (and therefore her brothers) was a tanner, which would place his standing as little more than a peasant. Orderic Vitalis described Herleva's father Fulbert as being the Duke's Chamberlain. According to one legend, still recounted by tour guides at Falaise, it all started when Robert, the young Duke of Normandy saw Herleva from the roof of his castle tower. The walkway on the roof still looks down on the dyeing trenches cut into stone in the courtyard below, which can be seen to this day from the tower ramparts above. The traditional way of dyeing leather or garments was for individuals to trample barefoot on the garments which were awash in the dyeing liquid in these trenches. Herleva, legend goes, seeing the Duke on his ramparts above, raised her skirts perhaps a bit more than necessary in order to attract the Duke's eye. The latter was immediately smitten and ordered her brought in (as was customary for any woman that caught the Duke's eye) through the back door. Herleva refused, saying she would only enter the Duke's castle on horseback through the front gate, and not as an ordinary commoner. The Duke, filled with lust, could only agree. In a few days, Herleva, dressed in the finest her father could provide, and sitting on a white horse, rode proudly through the front gate, her head held high. This gave Herleva a semi-official status as the Duke's mistress. She later gave birth to his son, William, in 1027 or 1028. Herleva later married Herluin de Conteville in 1031. Some accounts however, maintain that Robert always loved her, but the gap in their social status made marriage impossible, so, to give her a good life, he married her off to one of his favourite noblemen. Another source suggests that Herleva did not marry Herluin until after Robert died because there is no record of Robert ensuing another relationship, whereas Herluin married another woman, Fredesendis, by the time he founded the abbey of Grestain. From her marriage to Herluin she had two sons: Odo, who later became Bishop of Bayeux, and Robert, who became Count of Mortain. Both became prominent during William's reign. They also had at least two daughters, Emma, who married Richard LeGoz or Richard Goz (count or viscount of Avranches), and a daughter of unknown name who married William, lord of la Ferté-Macé. According to Robert of Torigni, Herleva was buried at the abbey of Grestain, which was founded by Herluin and their son Robert around 1050. This would put Herleva in her forties around the time of her death. However, David C. Douglas suggests that Herleva probably died before Herluin founded the abbey because her name does not appear on the list of benefactors, whereas the name of Herluin's second wife, Fredesendis, does
Children: 1. **William I "the Conqueror" b: 1028 in Falaise, Normandy, France 2. **Adeliza of Normandy b: 1029 in Falais, Calvados, France 3. **Felicia b: 1017 4. **Ralph Auberee b: 0978 in Ivry, France 5. **Godiva of Normandy b: 1076


by his mistress Herleva of Falaise, Robert fathered William the Conqueror




Sources 1.[S265] Colquoun_Cunningham.ged, Jamie Vans

2.[S280] Stirnet Genealogy, Peter Barns-Graham

3.[S370] Kings & Queens, Neil Grant, (pub 2003 by HarperCollinsPublishers Hammersmith London W6 8JB), p96 (Reliability: 3)

4.[S280] Stirnet Genealogy, Peter Barns-Graham, Normans1 (Reliability: 3)

5.[S280] Stirnet Genealogy, Peter Barns-Graham, Burgh1 (Reliability: 3)


Herleva (c. 1003 – c. 1050) also known as Herleve,[1] Arlette,[2] Arletta[3] and Arlotte,[4] and Harlette had three sons – William I of England, who was fathered by Robert I, Duke of Normandy, and Odo of Bayeux and Robert, Count of Mortain, who were both fathered by Herluin de Conteville. All became prominent in William's realm.

The background of Herleva and the circumstances of William's birth are shrouded in mystery. The written evidence dates from a generation or two later, and is not entirely consistent, but of all the Norman chroniclers only the Tours chronicler asserts that William's parents were subsequently joined in marriage.[5] The most commonly accepted version says that she was the daughter of a tanner named Fulbert from the town of Falaise, in Normandy. The meaning of filia pelletarii burgensis[6] is somewhat uncertain, and Fulbert may instead have been a furrier, embalmer, apothecary, or a person who laid out corpses for burial.[7]

Some argue that Herleva's father was not a tanner but rather a member of the burgher class.[8] The idea is supported by the appearance of her brothers in a later document as attestors for an under-age William. Also, the Count of Flanders later accepted Herleva as a proper guardian for his own daughter. Both of these would be nearly impossible if Herleva's father was (and therefore her brothers were[citation needed]) a tanner, which would place his standing as little more than a peasant.

Orderic Vitalis described Herleva's father Fulbert as the Duke's Chamberlain (cubicularii ducis).[9]

Relationship with Robert the Magnificent

From: "The Normans, From Raiders To Kings" by Lars Brownworth, Chapter 4.

According to one legend, still recounted by tour guides at Falaise, it all started when Robert, the young Duke of Normandy, saw Herleva from the roof of his castle tower. The walkway on the roof still looks down on the dyeing trenches cut into stone in the courtyard below, which can be seen to this day from the tower ramparts above. The traditional way of dyeing leather or garments was to trample barefoot on the garments which were awash in the liquid dye in these trenches. Herleva, legend goes, seeing the Duke on his ramparts above, raised her skirts perhaps a bit more than necessary in order to attract the Duke's eye. The latter was immediately smitten and ordered her brought in (as was customary for any woman that caught the Duke's eye) through the back door. Herleva refused, saying she would only enter the Duke's castle on horseback through the front gate, and not as an ordinary commoner. The Duke, filled with lust, could only agree. In a few days, Herleva, dressed in the finest her father could provide, and sitting on a white horse, rode proudly through the front gate, her head held high. This gave Herleva a semi-official status as the Duke's mistress.[citation needed]

She later gave birth to his son, William, in 1027 or 1028.

Marriage to Herluin de Conteville

Herleva later married Herluin de Conteville in 1031. Some accounts maintain that Robert always loved her, but the gap in their social status made marriage impossible, so, to give her a good life, he married her off to one of his favourite noblemen.[citation needed]

Another source suggests that Herleva did not marry Herluin until after Robert died, because there is no record of Robert entering another relationship, whereas Herluin married another woman, Fredesendis, by the time he founded the abbey of Grestain.[a]

From her marriage to Herluin she had two sons: Odo, who later became Bishop of Bayeux, and Robert, who became Count of Mortain. Both became prominent during William's reign. They also had at least two daughters: Emma, who married Richard LeGoz or Richard Goz (count or viscount of Avranches), and a daughter of unknown name who married William, lord of la Ferté-Macé.[10]

notes

Viscountess Consort of Conteville?

links

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herleva

Herleva[a] (c. 1003 – c. 1050) had three sons – William I of England, who was fathered by Robert I, Duke of Normandy, and Odo of Bayeux and Robert, Count of Mortain, who were both fathered by Herluin de Conteville. All became prominent in William's realm.


https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Falaise-2

Name •Herleve[1] : Herlava; Arlette (c.1003- c.1050)[2][3] •Arlette [1]

Parents

Herleve's father was Fulbert de Falaise. [4][5]

Herleve's mother was named Doda or Duwa. [5] [6]

Bree Ogle | Mar 2014 WikiTree -- The earliest accounts of Herleva come from Orderic Vitalis (1075 – c. 1142).[7] They were not written down until 80 years after she met Robert the Magnificent. It was only through Wace and Benoit in the 12th century, and later 17th century writings, that she became known as a the daughter of tanner.[8]

Scholarship discounts this based on examination of the original source, the context of the public heckling of Duke William, and the Latin and French words later chroniclers had trouble translating.[8]

According to van Houts (1986), Fulbert was probably a mortician. He is described as, "a person who laid out corpses," and "might have embalmed bodies." As Chamberlain of the ducal court, this was one of Fulbert's duties.[8]

The Legend of Robert and Herleve

According to one legend, still recounted by tour guides at Falaise, it all started when Robert, the young Duke of Normandy saw Herleva from the roof of his castle tower. The walkway on the roof still looks down on the dyeing trenches cut into stone in the courtyard below, which can be seen to this day from the tower ramparts above. The traditional way of dyeing leather or garments was for individuals to trample barefoot on the garments which were awash in the dyeing liquid in these trenches. Herleva, legend goes, seeing the Duke on his ramparts above, raised her skirts perhaps a bit more than necessary in order to attract the Duke's eye. The latter was immediately smitten and ordered her brought in (as was customary for any woman that caught the Duke's eye) through the back door. Herleva refused, saying she would only enter the Duke's castle on horseback through the front gate, and not as an ordinary commoner. The Duke, filled with lust, could only agree. In a few days, Herleva, dressed in the finest her father could provide, and sitting on a white horse, rode proudly through the front gate, her head held high. This gave Herleva a semi-official status as the Duke's mistress. [9]

1027 Robert I and William the Bastard

There is some controversy as to whether Herleve married Robert. Freeman reports their relationship as a marriage: "Herleve married first Robert, Duke of Normandy. Issue: William the Conqueror [10]

There is also the possibility that they were married according to "More danico", the "Danish Way". [11] She was referred to in the Grestain abbey as "a legitimate wife according to old Norman traditions." [12]

At the same time, up-and-coming reformists like pope Gregory VII (Hildebrand of Sovana) hoped to ban these customs and establish authoritarian rule. As a "concubine" through this lens, a "frilla" like Herleve is a glance at the long process of the Christianization of Europe, and the outing of indigenous culture.[13][14]

Still struggling for power and legitimacy, the seat of Rome had barely cleaned up its own house, before it got caught between the Roman aristocracy, and the slaughter of the Saracens and unstoppable Norman "barbarians." Unable to maintain its own security, the papacy cut a deal with the devil, and asked for the backing of the Norman military. It worked, but Rome paid a fateful price before it was able to achieve absolute rule.[14]

So at this juncture, the lack of a wedding sanctioned by the Roman church was no threat to the rank or inheritance of England's future Norman king.[15] And by the time the Conqueror was on the throne, the papacy was lucky to have any influence on him at all.[16] Incidentally, William was born around c.1028 in Falaise, Normandy.[17]

Nevertheless, contemporary genealogists such as Douglas Richardson state that "she became the mistress of Robert I, Duke of Normandy, and by him had one illegitimate son, William the Conqueror, King of England, Duke of Normandy."[1]

It should also be noted that while William was never known as "the Conqueror" during his life time, he was often referred to as "William the Bastard." [18]

1030 Marriage of Herleve and Herluin

About 1030 Herleve married Herluin de Conteville, Vicomte, seigneur of Conteville. [1] Some writers assume that the marriage to Herluin occurred only after Robert's death.

Herleve and Herluin had two sons, and one daughter:[1] 1.Eudes or Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, Earl of Kent, died Jan 1097 [1] 2.Robert de Mortain, Count of Mortain, [1] born after 1040 - d. 8 Dec 1090. 3.Muriel. [1]

1050 Grestain Abbey: ✝ Abbey Notre Dame de Grestain ✝

Herluin founded Grestain Abbey i Normandy about 1050. He and his wife renounced their claim to the tithe of Toutainville and to the vill called Mesnil-Dastin to Preaux Abbey. [1][19]

At some point, Herlave's second husband supposedly had leprosy.[20] This is said to have inspired the couple to found the Abbey Notre-Dame de Grestain in 1050,[20] but other sources state Herleva had no part in it.[21] It's assumed Herlave is buried there or Mortain, Haute-Normandie.[22]

1050 Death

Herluin's wife, Herleve, is thought to have been living in 1050-51, but died soon afterwards. [1]

Herluin and his first wife, Arlette, were buried in Grestain Abbey. [1]

Remarriage of Husband

Herluin married, 2nd, Fredesende. They had two sons, Jean, who appears to have died young, and Raoul Fitz Herluin (or de Conteville), seigneur of Corneville-sur-Risle and Martainville-en-Lieuvin, presumably Domesday tenant of Chapel Allerton, Huish (in Burnham), Adber (in Trent) and Brent, Somerset. Herluin de Conteville died about 1066. [1]

His widow, Fredesende, granted part of dower lands at Le Neubourg, Cantelou, and Honnaville, to Grestain Abbey. [1]

Issue
Documented Children

Herleve had children by both Robert and Herluin. Herleve and Herluin had two sons, and one daughter:[1] 1.Guillaume de Normandie or William of Normandy, son of Herleve and Robert of Normandy, born at Falaise Castle in Normandy in 1027. 2.Eudes or Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, Earl of Kent. [1], born 1030, died 1097. 3.Robert de Mortain, Count of Mortain, [1] born after 1040 - d. 8 Dec 1090. 4.Muriel. [1]

Other Children Attributed to Herleve

1.An uncertain daughter married Guillaume de la Ferté-Macé. She might have been the dau. of Frendesendis [23] 2.Adelais de Lens, born 1035 in Falaise Castle. [24] 3.Emma d'Avranches born April 30, 1039 in Conteville, Calvados


Filha de Fulberto de Falaise (Falaise, 976 - 1017) e de Doue ou Doda

Com a idade de 16 anos, Herleva já tinha um filho com o conde Gilberto de Brionne, que é conhecido como Ricardo de Bienfaite e Ricardo Fitz-Gilbert, pouco antes de se tornar amante de Roberto I da Normandia, "o Magnífico", (1010 - 3 de Julho de 1035), foi duque de Normandia desde Agosto de 1027.

Relações familiares:

foi . Das suas relações amorosas teve vários filhos, assim, com o duque da Normandia Roberto I da Normandia, "o Magnífico" (1010 - 3 de Julho de 1035), teve :

Guilherme I de Inglaterra, "o Conquistador" (c. 1027 - 1087), duque da Normandia e rei da Inglaterra. Com Herluino de Conteville  (1001 - c. 1066):

Roberto de Mortain (? - c. 1090), Conde de Mortain e Cornualha, companheiro do seu meio irmão Guilherme I de Inglaterra na Batalha de Hastings ;

Odo de Bayeux (entre 1030 e 1035 – Palermo, 6 de janeiro de 1097), bispo de Bayeux, Conde de Kent, companheiro do seu meio irmão Guilherme I de Inglaterra na Batalha de Hastings ;

Filha de nome incerto que foi casada com Guilherme de La Ferté-Mace, senhor de La Ferté-Mace. Com Herluino teve:

Adelaide da Normandia (1026 - 1090), condessa de Aumale;

https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roberto_I_da_Normandia

Über Herleva of Falaise (Deutsch)

War die Mutter des späteren Englischen Königs Wilhelm l.

  • Aus einer Friedelehe mit dem normannischen herzog Robert l.gingen zwei Kinder hervor, Wilhelm und Adelheid.
  • Herleva und ihre Familie gelangten durch die Verbindung mit Robert zu Ansehen und Reichtum. Kurtz nach der Geburt des zweiten kindes wurde sie 1031 mit Roberts Freund und Lehensmann, Graf Herluin von Conteville, verheiratet.
  • Ihm gebar sie vier Töchter und Zwei Söhne.

Om Herleva of Falaise (Norsk)

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GScid=2354713&GRid=90987094&

Herleva av Falaise (ca. 1003 - ca. 1050), også kjent som Herleve, Arlette, Arletta og Arlotte

Hun var mor til Vilhelm I av England. Hun hadde i tillegg to andre sønner I føge turistguidene i Falaise, startet det hele da den unge hertug Robert I av Normandie også kalt for «den praktfulle», så Herleva fra taket av sitt borgtårn. Gangvegen den dag i dag ser fortsatt ned på fargernes huller som er skåret inn i borggården nedenfor. Den tradisjonelle måten lær og tøy ble farget var at man tråkket dem i farget væske med bare føtter. Herleva skal etter sigende å ha sett hertugen på festningsvoll overfor, og løftet skjørtene nok opp til at hun tiltrakk seg hertugens oppmerksomhet. Hertug Robert beordret henne ført inn bakvegen, men Herleva nektet og sa at hun ville kun komme inn i hertugens borg på hesteryggen gjennom hovedporten og ikke som en vanlig borger. Da hertugen var mer enn ivrig etter å møte den unge kvinnen gikk han med på det. I løpet av noen dager var Herleva kledd i de fineste klær hennes far kunne skaffe og red stolt gjennom hovedporten på en hvit hest med høyt hevet. Således ble hun etter sigende hertugens elskerinne. Hun fødte senere en sønn, Vilhelm, enten i 1027 eller året etter, og antagelig også en datter, Adelaide av Normandie|Adelaide, i 1030. Herleva giftet seg senere med Herluin de Conteville i 1031, en mann som vi ellers vet lite om. En del skrifter har hevdet at hertug Robert alltid elsket henne, men var forhindret fra å gifte seg med henne på grunn av klasseforskjellen. Han ga en uansett et godt gifte til en av sine egne menn. Andre kilder hevder at Herleva ikke giftet seg med Herluin før etter at Robert døde i 1035. Ettersom det ikke finnes nedtegnelser av at Robert skaffet seg andre forhold, mens Herluin giftet seg med en annen kvinne, Fredesendis, på den tid da han grunnla klosteret i Grestain Fra hennes ekteskap med Herluin fikk hun to sønner; Odo av Bayeuks som senere ble biskop av Bayeux og Robert Greve av Montain . Begge ble framtredende figurer under Vilhelms regime. De fikk også minst to døtre, Emma, som ble gift med Richard LeGoz (de Averanches), og en som navnet er ukjent på som ble gift med William eller Guillaume, herre av la Ferté-Macé. I henhold til Robert av Torigni, en normannisk munk og krønikeskribent, ble Herleva gravlagt ved klosteret Grestain som hennes ektemann hadde grunnlagt sammen med deres sønn Robert en gang rundt 1050. Det vil si at Herleva var i førtiårene da hun døde, men David C. Douglas har antydet at Herleva antagelig døde før ektemannen hadde grunnlagt klosteret ettersom hennes navn ikke er oppført blant klosterets velyndere, noe Herlueins andre hustru, Fredesendis, gjør.

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Herleva of Falaise's Timeline

1003
1003
Falaise, Calvados, Lower Normandy, France
1024
October 14, 1024
Age 21
Château de Falaise, Falaise, Basse-Normandie, France
1029
1029
Age 26
Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
1031
1031
Age 28
Mortagne-sur-Sèvre, Pays de la Loire, France
1041
1041
Age 38