Béla I, king of Hungary

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Béla

Also Known As: "Bela I King of Hungary", "Бела I Арпад", "Béla I the Champion or the Bison", "Béla's baptismal name was Adalbert."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Esztergom, Komárom-Esztergom, Hungary
Death: Died in Dömös, Komárom-Esztergom, Hungary
Cause of death: Béla died when his throne's canopy collapsed -comtemporaries suspected that the collapse may not have been an accident-
Place of Burial: Szentséges Megváltó bencés apátság, Szekszárd, Hungary
Immediate Family:

Son of ÁRPÁD(házi) Vazul and N/a (? Concubine) from Tátony gens, Af Bulgarien
Husband of Tuta von Formbach, magyar királyné / Königin von Ungarn; Sofía of Poland; Concubine of Béla I; Eduviges de Polonia and Richeza-Adelaide, Queen of Hungary
Father of ÁRPÁD(házi) Sophia - Szépa; ÁRPÁD(házi) Lampert herceg - Lampert, Duke of Hungary; Geza I, king of Hungary; ÁRPÁD(házi) I. Szent László - St. Ladislaus I, King of Hungary; ÁRPÁD(házi) Euphemia and 6 others
Brother of ÁRPÁD(házi) Levente and ÁRPÁD(házi) I. András - Endre King of Hungary
Half brother of ÁRPÁD(házi) Bogyiszló-Bonuzlo

Occupation: King of Hungary, Konge, Rey de Hungría, Kung av Ungern, KING OF HUNGARY, Roi, de Hongrie, Konge av Ungarn 1061 - 1063, Kung i Ungern 1060-63 Kroatien 1060, Kung i Ungern, Konge av Ungarn 1061 - 1063., król Węgier, Koning van Hongarije
Managed by: FARKAS Mihály László
Last Updated:

About Béla I, king of Hungary

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/HUNGARY.htm#BelaIA

BÉLA I 1060-1063, GÉZA I 1074-1077, LÁSZLÓ I 1077-1095


BÉLA, son of VÁSZOLY [Vazúl] Prince of Hungary, Duke between March and Gran & his wife --- of the Bulgarians (1016-Kanisza creek Dec 1063, bur Szekszárd Abbey). The Chronicon Varadiense names "dux Andreas postea rex, secundus…dux Bella demum rex, tertius dux Levente" as the three sons of "dux Vazul"[460]. The Gesta Hungarorum names (in order) "Andrea, Bela et Luenta, filiis Zarladislai" when recording that King István advised them to flee to Bohemia after the mutilation of Vazúl, the commentary suggesting that their father's name was changed by the compiler of the Gesta to disguise the fact that later Hungarian kings were descended from the blinded Vazúl[461]. In a later passage, the Gesta reports claims that the three brothers were "ex duce Wazul progenitos ex quadam virgine de genere Tatun" rather than legitimate[462]. The Gesta records that the brothers moved from Bohemia to Poland during the second reign of King Péter and that Béla defeated "Pomoramiæ ducem" in single combat and married "filia Miskæ [Polonorum duce]"[463]. He was baptised in [1037/39] at Gnesen [Gniezno] as ADALBERT[464]. Béla returned to Hungary with his brothers in 1046, and was invested as Duke between March and Gran in 1048, but at some stage returned to Poland. When his brother King András crowned his infant son Salamon as associate king in 1057, Béla was provoked into taking action to secure his own rights of succession. He left Poland with his family and in 1060 invaded Hungary with a large force, with Polish support, captured King András who died a few days later, and assumed power as BÉLA I "Benin" King of Hungary, crowned at Székesfehérvár. The Chronicon Posoniense records bitter disputes in 1060 between "Andream et fratrem eius Bela" and that "Andreas rex" died[465], which suggests that the death may have been violent. The Annales of Berthold record that in 1060 "Belo fratrum suum Andream…expulit" in Hungary[466]. The Gesta Hungarorum records the accession of "Benyn Bela", commenting that the Hungarians abandoned the faith and baptism for a year before returning to the faith[467]. Hungarian forces conquered and settled Syrmium in [1060][468]. German forces invaded Hungary in support of ex-King Salamon, but King Béla died soon afterwards in his summer palace of Dömös after his throne toppled on him[469]. The Gesta Hungarorum records the death of King Béla in the third year of his reign and his burial at "monasterio…Sceugzard [Szekszárd]"[470]. The Chronicon Varadiense records the death "III Id Sep" in 1063 of "Bela dictus Belin secundus filius Vazul" and his burial "in suo monasterio Sexardiensi"[471].

m (in Poland [1039/42]) [RYKSA] of Poland, daughter of MIESZKO II LAMBERT King of Poland & his wife Richeza [Ezzonen] ([1018]-after 1059). The Gesta Hungarorum records the marriage of Béla and "filia Miskæ [Polonorum duce]" while he was in exile in Poland but does not name her[472]. The Kronika Węgiersko-Polska records that "Bela" married "rex Polonie filiam"[473]. Ryksa is shown as her possible name in Europäische Stammtafeln[474], but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.

King Béla & his wife had eight children:

  • 1. GÉZA ([in Poland] [1044/45]-25 Apr 1077, bur Vac). ... He succeeded his cousin in 1074 as GÉZA I King of Hungary. - see below.
  • 2. LANKA ([1045]-1095). ... m (before 1064) ROSTISLAV Vladimirovich Prince of Rostov, Novgorod and Vladimir in Volynia, son of VLADIMIR Iaroslavich of Kiev Prince of Novgorod & his wife Oda von Stade ([1045]-3 Feb 1067).
  • 3. SOPHIA ([1045/50]-18 Jun 1095, bur Lüneburg St Michaelis). ... m firstly ([1062/63]) ULRICH I Marchese of Carniola and Istria, son of POPPO I [von Weimar] Marchese of Carniola and Istria & his wife Hadamut of Istria (-6 Mar 1070). m secondly (after 6 Mar 1070) MAGNUS of Saxony, son of ORDULF Duke in Saxony [Billung] & his first wife Wulfhild of Norway (-Erthensburg 25 Aug 1106, bur Lüneburg St Michaelis).
  • 4. LÁSZLÓ (in Poland [1046/50][486]-Nitra 20 Jun 1095, bur Somogyvár, transferred 1192 to Nagyvárad Cathedral[487]). ... He succeeded his brother in 1077 as LÁSZLÓ I King of Hungary. ... m ([1077 or after]) ADELHEID von Rheinfelden, daughter of RUDOLF Graf von Rheinfelden Duke of Swabia [anti-King of Germany] & his second wife Adelaide de Savoie ([1063/65]-3 May 1090, bur St Blasius). ... King László I & his wife had two daughters:
  • 5. LUDMILLA [Euphemia] (-2 Apr 1111). ... m (before 1073) OTTO I "der Schöne" Duke of Brno and Olmütz, son of BŘETISLAV Duke of the Bohemians & his wife Judith von Schweinfurt (-9 Jul [1087], bur Graditz).
  • 6. daughter. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not so far been identified. She adopted the name MARIA in Byzantium. m (1068) ANDRONIKOS Dukas, son of Emperor KONSTANTINOS X & his second wife Evdokia Makrembolitissa ([1057]-after 1081). He was crowned co-Emperor by his brother Emperor Mikhael VII after the latter assumed sole rule in Oct 1071.
  • 7. LAMBERT (after 1050-[1095]). ...
  • 8. ILONA [Lepa] (-before 1095). ... In [1090], she assumed power as ILONA Queen of Croatia. ... m ([1064]) ZVONIMIR DMITAR Ban of Slavonia, son of --- (-after 1089). He was crowned [late 1075/early 1076] as ZVONIMIR DMITAR King of Croatia.

King Béla had one [probably illegitimate] child by [an unknown mistress]:

  • 9. SOPHIA (-after 1116). ... m ([1077/95]) Count LAMBERT, of the Hont-Pázmány family (-1132).

---------------------------------------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A9la_I_of_Hungary

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A9la_I._(Ungarn)

Nachkommen [Bearbeiten]

  • Aus der Ehe mit Ryksa von Polen:
  1. Géza I. (* 1044/45, † 1077), König von Ungarn (1074–77)
  2. Ladislaus I., der Heilige (* 1048, † 1095), König von Ungarn (1077–95)
  3. Maria, ∞ Andronikos Dukas Mitka von Byzanz
  4. Helene (Ilona) († 1095), ∞ König Zvonimir von Kroatien
  5. eine Tochter, ∞ Graf Lambert von Hontpázmány
  6. Euphemia († 1111), ∞ Fürst Otto I. von Mähren
  • Aus der Ehe mit Tuta von Formbach:
  1. Lambert († 1095), Herzog in Südungarn
  2. Sophia († 1095), 1. ∞ Ulrich I., Markgraf von Krain, 2. ∞ Magnus, Herzog von Sachsen

Béla I Arpád, King of Hungary (1) M, #7966, d. December 1063 Last Edited=8 Mar 2007

    Béla I Arpád, King of Hungary was the son of unknown Arpád. He died in December 1063. (1)
    Béla I Arpád, King of Hungary gained the title of King Béla I of Hungary in 1060.
  • Children of Béla I Arpád, King of Hungary
  1. Sophia of Hungary+ d. 1095
  2. Ladislas I 'the Saint' Arpád, King of Hungary+ d. 1095 (1)
  3. Euphemia Arpád d. 1111 (1)
  4. Geisa I Arpád, King of Hungary+ b. c 1044, d. 1077 (1)
  5. Helen Arpád b. b 1063 (1)

Forrás / Source: http://www.thepeerage.com/p797.htm#i7966

--------------------------------

I. Béla A Wikipédiából, a szabad enciklopédiából. I. Béla (* 1016; † 1063. szeptember 11., Dömös) Árpád-házi magyar király 1060-1063 között. I. Béla Magyarország királya Uralkodása 1060-1063 Megkoronázása 1060. december 6-án Székesfehérvár Született 1016 körül ? Elhunyt 1063 Dömös, a trónja halálosan megsebesíti Nyughelye Az általa alapított szekszárdi Szentséges Megváltó bencés apátságban temették el. Elődje I. András Utóda Salamon Felesége Richeza lengyel hercegnő, II. Mieszko Lambert lengyel fejedelem leánya (Piast-ház) Gyermekei

  1. I. Géza magyar király;
  2. I. (Szent) László magyar király;
  3. Lampért herceg;
  4. Zsófia – Weimari Ulrich, isztriai őrgróf majd Magnus szász herceg felesége
  5. Eufémia – I. Ottó morva herceg felesége;
  6. Ilona – Zvonimir horvát király felesége;
  7. Ismeretlen nevű lány

Dinasztia Árpád-ház Édesapja Vazul (Vászoly) Édesanyja Tátony nembeli nő

Forrás: http://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/I._B%C3%A9la


Béla I the Champion or the Bison (Hungarian : I. (Bajnok/Bölény) Béla; c. 1016 – 11 September 1063) was King of Hungary from 1060 until hsi death. He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty and spent seventeen years in exile, probably in the court of the Kings of Poland . He came back to Hungary at the request of his brother, King Andrew I who assigned him the government of one third of the kingdom. However, Béla did not want to accept the hereditary rights of his brother's son, Solomon to the throne and he rebelled against his brother. Although, he managed to ascend to the throne after defeating King Andrew, he could not strengthen his reign and ensure his sons' succession. Early years Béla was the second son of Duke Vazul , a cousin of Stephan I, the first King of Hungary. His mother was probably the concubine (a daughter of a member of the Hungarian gens Tátony) of his father, who still followed pagan customs. In exile After their father's tragic death, the three brothers were obliged to leave the country. Fleeing first to Bohemia, they continued to Poland where Béla settled down, while his brothers, Levente and Andre continued on, settling in Kiev . In Poland, Béla served King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and took part in the king's campaigns against the pagan Pomeran tribes. He became a successful military leader, and the king gave his daughter in marriage to him. He may have been baptized just before his marriage, and his Christian name was Adalbert. After his marriage, he probably lived in Poland even during the time of interregnum when his brother-in-law, King Casimir I of Poland was obliged to leave the country. Some authors claim that during the interregnum in Poland, Béla fled to Bohemia and they identify Béla with "King Stephen 's cousin", mentioned in medieval chronicles, whom the Emperor Henry III , in 1043, assigned to govern the parts of Hungary he had occupied from King Samuel Aba , when the Hungarians refused to accept King Peter 's rule. Duke of Tercia pars Regni In the meantime, after a sanguine pagan revolt which ended the rule of King Peter, Béla's brother ascended the throne in Hungary as King Andrew I . However, his relations with the Holy Roman Empire remained tense, because King Peter had been not only a close ally of the Emperor Henry III, but he also had become a vassal of the Holy Roman Empire. Andrew refused to accept the suzerainty of the Emperor, ruled Hungary independently and prepared for the approaching war. That was the reason he invited his younger brother, the successful military leader, Béla to his court, and Béla accepted his offer. In 1048, Andrew conceded one third of Hungary (Tercia pars Regni ) in appanage to Béla. The two brothers shared power without incident until 1053, when King Andrew fathered a son, Solomon . Thereafter, Andrew became determined to secure the throne for his son and to displace his brother. Andrew, therefore, had his son (Béla's nephew) crowned "junior king" (rex iunior) in 1057, despite an earlier agreement between tha brothers according to which Béla was the heir to András. Hungarian custom would also dictate that the senior male member of the family inherit the kingdom. Following the coronation, Béla left his brother's court. In two years later, according to legend, King Andrew called back Béla to his court, and placed before him a crown and a sword, representing royal and ducal power, respectively, and asked Béla to take his choice. Having been forewarned by a court official that choosing the crown would mean his death, Béla instead selected the sword. Shortly afterwards, Béla fled to Poland where he was received by King Boleslaw II of Poland, nephew of his wife. King of Hungary In 1060, Béla returned to Hungary and defeated King Andrew I to become the new king. After his brother's death and Béla's victory at the Theben Pass, Béla was crowned king on 6 December 1060. During his brief reign he concerned himself with crushing pagan revolts in his kingdom. Hungarian chroniclers praised Béla for introducing new currency, such as the silver denarius, and for his benevolence to the former followers of his nephew, Solomon. Béla died when his throne's canopy collapsed (comtemporaries suspected that the collapse may not have been an accident). After Béla's death, King Henry IV of Germany installed Solomon as the new king and Béla's male progenies had to flee to Poland again. Marriage and children

  • 1039-1043: unknown (b. unknown, d. after 1052), daughter of King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and his wife, Richeza of Lotharingia
  1. King Géza I of Hungary (c. 1044[8] – 25 April 1077)
  2. King Ladislaus I of Hungary (c. 1048 – 29 July 1095)
  3. Duke Lampert of Hungary (after 1050 – c. 1095)
  4. Sophia (after 1050 – 18 June 1095), wife firstly of Markgraf Ulrich I of Carniola, and secondly of Duke Magnus I of Saxony
  5. Euphemia (after 1050 – 2 April 1111), wife of Prince Otto I of Moravia
  6. Ilona (after 1050 – c. 1091), wife of King Dmitar Zvonimir of Croatia
  • Béla I probably had unknown mistress and he had a daughter with her:
  1. Sophia (after 1050 – after 1116), wife of Comes (count) Lampert de genere Hont-Pázmány

Béla I of Hungary From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Béla I the Champion or the Bison (Hungarian: I. (Bajnok/Bölény) Béla, Slovak: Belo I) (c. 1016 – 11 September 1063), King of Hungary (1060-1063). He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty and spent seventeen years in exile, probably in the court of the Kings of Poland. He came back to Hungary at the request of his brother, King Andrew I who assigned him the government of one third of the kingdom. However, Béla did not want to accept the hereditary rights of his brother's son, Solomon to the throne and he rebelled against his brother. Although, he managed to ascend to the throne after defeating King Andrew, he could not strengthen his reign and ensure his sons' succession.

Early years

Béla was the second[1] son of Duke Vazul, a cousin of Stephan I, the first King of Hungary. His mother was probably the concubine (a daughter of a member of the Hungarian gens Tátony) of his father, who still followed pagan customs[2]. On September 2, 1031, King Stephen I's only surviving son Imre was killed by a boar while hunting. King Stephen I wanted to secure the position of the Christianity in his semi-converted kingdom; therefore he was planning to name his sister's son, Peter Urseolo as his successor. However, Duke Vazul, who was suspected to be following pagan customs, took part in a conspiracy aimed at the murder of the king. But the assassination attempt failed and Duke Vazul had is eyes gouged out and molten lead poured in his ears and his three sons were exiled. [edit]In exile

After their father's tragic death, the three brothers were obliged to leave the country. Fleeing first to Bohemia, they continued to Poland where Béla settled down, while his brothers, Levente and Andre continued on, settling in Kiev. In Poland, Béla served King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and took part in the king's campaigns against the pagan Pomeran tribes. He became a successful military leader, and the king gave his daughter[3] in marriage to him. He may have been baptized just before his marriage, and his Christian name was Adalbert. After his marriage, he probably lived in Poland even during the time of interregnum when his brother-in-law, King Casimir I of Poland was obliged to leave the country. Some authors claim that during the interregnum in Poland, Béla fled to Bohemia and they identify Béla with "King Stephen's cousin", mentioned in medieval chronicles [4], whom the Emperor Henry III, in 1043, assigned to govern the parts of Hungary he had occupied from King Samuel Aba, when the Hungarians refused to accept King Peter's rule. [edit]Duke of Tercia pars Regni

In the meantime, after a sanguine pagan revolt which ended the rule of King Peter, Béla's brother ascended the throne in Hungary as King Andrew I. However, his relations with the Holy Roman Empire remained tense, because King Peter had been not only a close ally of the Emperor Henry III, but he also had become a vassal of the Holy Roman Empire. King Andrew sent an embassy to the imperial court and offered to accept the Emperor's supremacy, but Henry III refused the peace; therefore the new King of Hungary had to make preparations for the approaching war. That was the reason he invited his younger brother, the successful military leader, Béla to his court, and Béla accepted his offer. In 1048, Andrew conceded one third of Hungary (Tercia pars Regni) in appanage to Béla.[5]. The two brothers shared power without incident until 1053, when King Andrew fathered a son, Solomon. Thereafter, Andrew became determined to secure the throne for his son and to displace his brother. Andrew, therefore, had his son (Béla's nephew) crowned "junior king" (rex iunior) in 1057. Following the coronation, Béla left his brother's court. In two years later, according to legend, King Andrew called back Béla to his court, and placed before him a crown and a sword, representing royal and ducal power, respectively, and asked Béla to take his choice. Knowing that choosing the crown would mean his life, Béla instead selected the sword. Shortly afterwards, Béla fled to Poland where he was received by King Bolesław II of Poland, nephew of his wife. [edit]King of Hungary

In 1060, Béla returned to Hungary and defeated King Andrew I to become the new king. After his brother's death and Béla's victory at the Theben Pass, Béla was crowned king on December 6, 1060. During his brief reign he concerned himself with crushing pagan revolts in his kingdom. Hungarian chroniclers praised Béla for introducing new currency, such as the silver denarius, and for his benevolence to the former followers of his nephew, Solomon. Béla died in an accident when his throne's canopy collapsed. After Béla's death, King Henry IV of Germany installed Solomon as the new king and Béla's male progenies had to flee to Poland again.

[edit]Marriage and children

  1. 1039-1043: unknown[6] (b. unknown, d. after 1052), daughter of King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and his wife, Richeza of Lotharingia

King Géza I of Hungary (c. 1044[7] – 25 April 1077) King Ladislaus I of Hungary (c. 1048 – 29 July 1095) Duke Lampert of Hungary (after 1050 – c. 1095) Sophia (after 1050 – 18 June 1095), wife firstly of Markgraf Ulrich I of Carniola, and secondly of Duke Magnus I of Saxony Euphemia (after 1050 – 2 April 1111), wife of Prince Otto I of Moravia Ilona (after 1050 – c. 1091), wife of King Dmitar Zvonimir of Croatia Unnamed girl (after 1050 – befor 1132), wife of Comes (count) Lampert de genere Hont-Pázmány [edit]Sources

Engel, Pat. Realm of St. Stephen : A History of Medieval Hungary, 2001 Kosztolnyik, Z.J., Five Eleventh Century Hungarian Kings, 1981 Kristó, Gyula - Makk, Ferenc: Az Árpád-ház uralkodói (IPC Könyvek, 1996) Korai Magyar Történeti Lexikon (9-14. század), főszerkesztő: Kristó, Gyula, szerkesztők: Engel, Pál és Makk, Ferenc (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1994) Magyarország Történeti Kronológiája I. – A kezdetektől 1526-ig, főszerkesztő: Benda, Kálmán (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1981) [edit]References

^ Wincenty Swoboda, Bela I, In: Słownik Starożytności Słowiańskich, vol. 7. ^ Some modern sources claim that duke Vazul married Katun Anastazya of Bulgaria who bore Bela and his brothers, Levente and Andrew. ^ Her name is unknown. Some authors, without sources, gave her name Rixa. Nowadays it is supposed that she was called Adelaide, see K. Jasiński, Rodowód pierwszych Piastów, Wrocław - Warszawa (1992). ^ Annales Altahenses maiores; Annales Hildesheimenses maiores; Hermann of Reichenau: Chronicon de sex ætatibus mundi. ^ Some modern authors claim that Béla was Duke of the alleged Principality of Nitra, but contemporary sources only mentioned "Tercia pars Regni". ^ Kazimierz Jasiński, Rodowód pierwszych Piastów, Wrocław - Warszawa 1992. ^ Włodzimierz Dworzaczek, Genealogia, Warszawa 1959, tabl. 84.


Béla I the Champion or the Bison (Hungarian : I. (Bajnok/Bölény) Béla; c. 1016 – 11 September 1063) was King of Hungary from 1060 until hsi death. He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty and spent seventeen years in exile, probably in the court of the Kings of Poland . He came back to Hungary at the request of his brother, King Andrew I who assigned him the government of one third of the kingdom. However, Béla did not want to accept the hereditary rights of his brother's son, Solomon to the throne and he rebelled against his brother. Although, he managed to ascend to the throne after defeating King Andrew, he could not strengthen his reign and ensure his sons' succession. Early years Béla was the second son of Duke Vazul , a cousin of Stephan I, the first King of Hungary. His mother was probably the concubine (a daughter of a member of the Hungarian gens Tátony) of his father, who still followed pagan customs. In exile After their father's tragic death, the three brothers were obliged to leave the country. Fleeing first to Bohemia, they continued to Poland where Béla settled down, while his brothers, Levente and Andre continued on, settling in Kiev . In Poland, Béla served King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and took part in the king's campaigns against the pagan Pomeran tribes. He became a successful military leader, and the king gave his daughter in marriage to him. He may have been baptized just before his marriage, and his Christian name was Adalbert. After his marriage, he probably lived in Poland even during the time of interregnum when his brother-in-law, King Casimir I of Poland was obliged to leave the country. Some authors claim that during the interregnum in Poland, Béla fled to Bohemia and they identify Béla with "King Stephen 's cousin", mentioned in medieval chronicles, whom the Emperor Henry III , in 1043, assigned to govern the parts of Hungary he had occupied from King Samuel Aba , when the Hungarians refused to accept King Peter 's rule. Duke of Tercia pars Regni In the meantime, after a sanguine pagan revolt which ended the rule of King Peter, Béla's brother ascended the throne in Hungary as King Andrew I . However, his relations with the Holy Roman Empire remained tense, because King Peter had been not only a close ally of the Emperor Henry III, but he also had become a vassal of the Holy Roman Empire. Andrew refused to accept the suzerainty of the Emperor, ruled Hungary independently and prepared for the approaching war. That was the reason he invited his younger brother, the successful military leader, Béla to his court, and Béla accepted his offer. In 1048, Andrew conceded one third of Hungary (Tercia pars Regni ) in appanage to Béla. The two brothers shared power without incident until 1053, when King Andrew fathered a son, Solomon . Thereafter, Andrew became determined to secure the throne for his son and to displace his brother. Andrew, therefore, had his son (Béla's nephew) crowned "junior king" (rex iunior) in 1057, despite an earlier agreement between tha brothers according to which Béla was the heir to András. Hungarian custom would also dictate that the senior male member of the family inherit the kingdom. Following the coronation, Béla left his brother's court. In two years later, according to legend, King Andrew called back Béla to his court, and placed before him a crown and a sword, representing royal and ducal power, respectively, and asked Béla to take his choice. Having been forewarned by a court official that choosing the crown would mean his death, Béla instead selected the sword. Shortly afterwards, Béla fled to Poland where he was received by King Boleslaw II of Poland, nephew of his wife. King of Hungary In 1060, Béla returned to Hungary and defeated King Andrew I to become the new king. After his brother's death and Béla's victory at the Theben Pass, Béla was crowned king on 6 December 1060. During his brief reign he concerned himself with crushing pagan revolts in his kingdom. Hungarian chroniclers praised Béla for introducing new currency, such as the silver denarius, and for his benevolence to the former followers of his nephew, Solomon. Béla died when his throne's canopy collapsed (comtemporaries suspected that the collapse may not have been an accident). After Béla's death, King Henry IV of Germany installed Solomon as the new king and Béla's male progenies had to flee to Poland again. Marriage and children

  1. 1039-1043: unknown (b. unknown, d. after 1052), daughter of King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and his wife, Richeza of Lotharingia

King Géza I of Hungary (c. 1044[8] – 25 April 1077) King Ladislaus I of Hungary (c. 1048 – 29 July 1095) Duke Lampert of Hungary (after 1050 – c. 1095) Sophia (after 1050 – 18 June 1095), wife firstly of Markgraf Ulrich I of Carniola, and secondly of Duke Magnus I of Saxony Euphemia (after 1050 – 2 April 1111), wife of Prince Otto I of Moravia Ilona (after 1050 – c. 1091), wife of King Dmitar Zvonimir of Croatia Béla I probably had unknown mistress and he had a daughter with her: Sophia (after 1050 – after 1116), wife of Comes (count) Lampert de genere Hont-Pázmány


Béla I the Champion or the Bison (Hungarian: I. (Bajnok/Bölény) Béla) (c. 1016 – 11 September 1063), King of Hungary (1060-1063). He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty and spent seventeen years in exile, probably in the court of the Kings of Poland. He came back to Hungary at the request of his brother, King Andrew I who assigned him the government of one third of the kingdom. However, Béla did not want to accept the hereditary rights of his brother's son, Solomon to the throne and he rebelled against his brother. Although, he managed to ascend to the throne after defeating King Andrew, he could not strengthen his reign and ensure his sons' succession. Béla was the second son of Duke Vazul, a cousin of Stephan I, the first King of Hungary. His mother was probably the concubine (a daughter of a member of the Hungarian gens Tátony) of his father, who still followed pagan customs. Marriage and children Richa, daughter of King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and his wife, Richeza of Lotharingia

King Géza I of Hungary (c. 1044[7] – 25 April 1077) King Ladislaus I of Hungary (c. 1048 – 29 July 1095) Duke Lampert of Hungary (after 1050 – c. 1095) Sophia (after 1050 – 18 June 1095), wife firstly of Markgraf Ulrich I of Carniola, and secondly of Duke Magnus I of Saxony Euphemia (after 1050 – 2 April 1111), wife of Prince Otto I of Moravia Ilona (after 1050 – c. 1091), wife of King Dmitar Zvonimir of Croatia Unnamed girl (after 1050 – befor 1132), wife of Comes (count) Lampert de genere Hont-Pázmány


Béla I the Champion or the Bison (Hungarian: I. (Bajnok/Bölény) Béla; c. 1016 – 11 September 1063) was King of Hungary from 1060 until his death. He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty and spent seventeen years in exile, probably in the court of the Kings of Poland. He came back to Hungary at the request of his brother, King Andrew I who assigned him the government of one third of the kingdom. However, Béla did not want to accept the hereditary rights of his brother's son, Solomon to the throne and he rebelled against his brother. Although, he managed to ascend to the throne after defeating King Andrew, he could not strengthen his reign and ensure his sons' succession.

Early years

Béla was the second[1] son of Duke Vazul, a cousin of Stephan I, the first King of Hungary. His mother was probably the concubine (a daughter of a member of the Hungarian gens Tátony) of his father, who still followed pagan customs[2].

In exile

After their father's tragic death, the three brothers were obliged to leave the country. Fleeing first to Bohemia, they continued to Poland where Béla settled down, while his brothers, Levente and Andre continued on, settling in Kiev. In Poland, Béla served King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and took part in the king's campaigns against the pagan Pomeran tribes. He became a successful military leader, and the king gave his daughter[3] in marriage to him. He may have been baptized just before his marriage, and his Christian name was Adalbert. After his marriage, he probably lived in Poland even during the time of interregnum when his brother-in-law, King Casimir I of Poland was obliged to leave the country.

Some authors claim that during the interregnum in Poland, Béla fled to Bohemia and they identify Béla with "King Stephen's cousin", mentioned in medieval chronicles [4], whom the Emperor Henry III, in 1043, assigned to govern the parts of Hungary he had occupied from King Samuel Aba, when the Hungarians refused to accept King Peter's rule.

Duke of Tercia pars Regni

In the meantime, after a sanguine pagan revolt which ended the rule of King Peter, Béla's brother ascended the throne in Hungary as King Andrew I. However, his relations with the Holy Roman Empire remained tense, because King Peter had been not only a close ally of the Emperor Henry III, but he also had become a vassal of the Holy Roman Empire. Andrew refused to accept the suzerainty of the Emperor, ruled Hungary independently and prepared for the approaching war.[5] That was the reason he invited his younger brother, the successful military leader, Béla to his court, and Béla accepted his offer.

In 1048, Andrew conceded one third of Hungary (Tercia pars regni) in appanage to Béla.[6]. The two brothers shared power without incident until 1053, when King Andrew fathered a son, Solomon. Thereafter, Andrew became determined to secure the throne for his son and to displace his brother. Andrew, therefore, had his son (Béla's nephew) crowned "junior king" (rex iunior) in 1057, despite an earlier agreement between tha brothers according to which Béla was the heir to András. Hungarian custom would also dictate that the senior male member of the family inherit the kingdom. Following the coronation, Béla left his brother's court.

In two years later, according to legend, King Andrew called back Béla to his court, and placed before him a crown and a sword, representing royal and ducal power, respectively, and asked Béla to take his choice. Having been forewarned by a court official that choosing the crown would mean his death, Béla instead selected the sword. Shortly afterwards, Béla fled to Poland where he was received by King Bolesław II of Poland, nephew of his wife.

King of Hungary

In 1060, Béla returned to Hungary and defeated King Andrew I to become the new king. After his brother's death and Béla's victory at the Theben Pass, Béla was crowned king on 6 December 1060. During his brief reign he concerned himself with crushing pagan revolts in his kingdom.

Hungarian chroniclers praised Béla for introducing new currency, such as the silver denarius, and for his benevolence to the former followers of his nephew, Solomon.

Béla died when his throne's canopy collapsed (comtemporaries suspected that the collapse may not have been an accident). After Béla's death, King Henry IV of Germany installed Solomon as the new king and Béla's male progenies had to flee to Poland again.

Marriage and children

  1. 1039-1043: unknown[7] (b. unknown, d. after 1052), daughter of King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and his wife, Richeza of Lotharingia

King Géza I of Hungary (c. 1044[8] – 25 April 1077) King Ladislaus I of Hungary (c. 1048 – 29 July 1095) Duke Lampert of Hungary (after 1050 – c. 1095) Sophia (after 1050 – 18 June 1095), wife firstly of Markgraf Ulrich I of Carniola, and secondly of Duke Magnus I of Saxony Euphemia (after 1050 – 2 April 1111), wife of Prince Otto I of Moravia Ilona (after 1050 – c. 1091), wife of King Dmitar Zvonimir of Croatia Béla I probably had unknown mistress and he had a daughter with her:

Sophia (after 1050 – after 1116), wife of Comes (count) Lampert de genere Hont-Pázmány [1] References

^ Wincenty Swoboda, Bela I, In: Słownik Starożytności Słowiańskich, vol. 7. ^ Some modern sources claim that duke Vazul married Katun Anastazya of Bulgaria who bore Bela and his brothers, Levente and Andrew. ^ Her name is unknown. Some authors, without sources, gave her name Rixa. Nowadays it is supposed that she was called Adelaide, see K. Jasiński, Rodowód pierwszych Piastów, Wrocław - Warszawa (1992). ^ Annales Altahenses maiores; Annales Hildesheimenses maiores; Hermann of Reichenau: Chronicon de sex ætatibus mundi. ^ http://megyeszele.cityblog.hu/uploads/megyeszele/2008114.pdf ^ Some modern authors claim that Béla was Duke of the alleged Principality of Nitra, but contemporary sources only mentioned "Tercia pars Regni". ^ Kazimierz Jasiński, Rodowód pierwszych Piastów, Wrocław - Warszawa 1992. ^ Włodzimierz Dworzaczek, Genealogia, Warszawa 1959, tabl. 84. Sources

Engel, Pat. Realm of St. Stephen : A History of Medieval Hungary, 2001 Kosztolnyik, Z.J., Five Eleventh Century Hungarian Kings, 1981 Kristó, Gyula - Makk, Ferenc: Az Árpád-ház uralkodói (IPC Könyvek, 1996) Korai Magyar Történeti Lexikon (9-14. század), főszerkesztő: Kristó, Gyula, szerkesztők: Engel, Pál és Makk, Ferenc (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1994) Magyarország Történeti Kronológiája I. – A kezdetektől 1526-ig, főszerkesztő: Benda, Kálmán (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1981)


Another name for Béla was Béla I Arpád. 

General Notes:

Bela nevnes første gang i 1031 som "parvulus". Han vokste opp i Polen, men vendte tilbake til Ungarn ca. 1050 hvor han ble konge i 1061.

Han minsket skattene, innførte ensartet mål og vekt, og arbeidet for kristendommens utbredelse i sitt land.

Bela falt på sensommeren i 1063 i en krig mot tyskerne.

 

Noted events in his life were:

• Acceded: King of Hungary, 1061.

Béla married Richiza of Poland, daughter of Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and Richeza of Palatine, circa 1040. (Richiza of Poland was born circa 1020 and died after 1052.)


Béla I (rond 1020 - 1063) was koning van Hongarije van 1061 tot 1063 en behoorde tot het huis van Árpád. Hij was een zoon van hertog Vazul van Hongarije en van Katun van Bulgarije en dus een jongere broer van koning Andreas I. Hij versloeg zijn broer in de strijd om de kroon en volgde hem op als koning.

Béla was gehuwd met de Poolse koningsdochter Richezza, dochter van Mieszko II Lambert. Zij hadden volgende kinderen:

Géza I van Hongarije, koning in 1074-1077 Ladislaus I van Hongarije koning in 1077-1095 Lampert, hertog van Nitra in 1077-1095 Sophia (-1095), huwde een eerste maal rond 1062 met Ulrich I van Weimar, markgraaf van Carniola, graaf van Istrië (-1070) en een tweede maal rond 1071 met Magnus van Saksen Euphemia (-1111), huwde met prins Otto I de Schone van Moravië-Olmütz (-1087) Helena, huwde met de koning van Kroatië Dmitar Zvonimir (1075-1089) Maria, (rond 1053/55-); huwde met Andronicus Dukas, medekeizer van Byzantium, zoon van Constantijn X van Byzantium Adelheid (1050-), huwde met Ferderik II van Bogen.


Béla I the Champion or the Bison (Hungarian: I. (Bajnok/Bölény) Béla; c. 1016 – 11 September 1063) was King of Hungary from 1060 until his death. He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty and spent seventeen years in exile, probably in the court of the Kings of Poland. He came back to Hungary at the request of his brother, King Andrew I who assigned him the government of one third of the kingdom. However, Béla did not want to accept the hereditary rights of his brother's son, Solomon to the throne and he rebelled against his brother. Although, he managed to ascend to the throne after defeating King Andrew, he could not strengthen his reign and ensure his sons' succession.

Early years Béla was the second son of Duke Vazul, a cousin of Stephan I, the first King of Hungary. His mother was probably the concubine (a daughter of a member of the Hungarian gens Tátony) of his father, who still followed pagan customs.

In exile After their father's tragic death, the three brothers were obliged to leave the country. Fleeing first to Bohemia, they continued to Poland where Béla settled down, while his brothers, Levente and Andre continued on, settling in Kiev. In Poland, Béla served King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and took part in the king's campaigns against the pagan Pomeran tribes. He became a successful military leader, and the king gave his daughter in marriage to him. He may have been baptized just before his marriage, and his Christian name was Adalbert. After his marriage, he probably lived in Poland even during the time of interregnum when his brother-in-law, King Casimir I of Poland was obliged to leave the country.

Some authors claim that during the interregnum in Poland, Béla fled to Bohemia and they identify Béla with "King Stephen's cousin", mentioned in medieval chronicles , whom the Emperor Henry III, in 1043, assigned to govern the parts of Hungary he had occupied from King Samuel Aba, when the Hungarians refused to accept King Peter's rule.

Duke of Tercia pars Regni In the meantime, after a sanguine pagan revolt which ended the rule of King Peter, Béla's brother ascended the throne in Hungary as King Andrew I. However, his relations with the Holy Roman Empire remained tense, because King Peter had been not only a close ally of the Emperor Henry III, but he also had become a vassal of the Holy Roman Empire. Andrew refused to accept the suzerainty of the Emperor, ruled Hungary independently and prepared for the approaching war. That was the reason he invited his younger brother, the successful military leader, Béla to his court, and Béla accepted his offer.

In 1048, Andrew conceded one third of Hungary (Tercia pars regni) in appanage to Béla. The two brothers shared power without incident until 1053, when King Andrew fathered a son, Solomon. Thereafter, Andrew became determined to secure the throne for his son and to displace his brother. Andrew, therefore, had his son (Béla's nephew) crowned "junior king" (rex iunior) in 1057, despite an earlier agreement between tha brothers according to which Béla was the heir to András. Hungarian custom would also dictate that the senior male member of the family inherit the kingdom. Following the coronation, Béla left his brother's court.

In two years later, according to legend, King Andrew called back Béla to his court, and placed before him a crown and a sword, representing royal and ducal power, respectively, and asked Béla to take his choice. Having been forewarned by a court official that choosing the crown would mean his death, Béla instead selected the sword. Shortly afterwards, Béla fled to Poland where he was received by King Bolesław II of Poland, nephew of his wife.

King of Hungary

In 1060, Béla returned to Hungary and defeated King Andrew I to become the new king. After his brother's death and Béla's victory at the Theben Pass, Béla was crowned king on 6 December 1060. During his brief reign he concerned himself with crushing pagan revolts in his kingdom.

Hungarian chroniclers praised Béla for introducing new currency, such as the silver denarius, and for his benevolence to the former followers of his nephew, Solomon.

Béla died when his throne's canopy collapsed (comtemporaries suspected that the collapse may not have been an accident). After Béla's death, King Henry IV of Germany installed Solomon as the new king and Béla's male progenies had to flee to Poland again.

Marriage and children

  • 1039-1043: Richenza (b. unknown, d. after 1052), daughter of King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and his wife, Richeza of Lotharingia
  1. King Géza I of Hungary (c. 1044[8] – 25 April 1077)
  2. King Ladislaus I of Hungary (c. 1048 – 29 July 1095)
  3. Duke Lampert of Hungary (after 1050 – c. 1095)
  4. Sophia (after 1050 – 18 June 1095), wife firstly of Markgraf Ulrich I of Carniola, and secondly of Duke Magnus I of Saxony
  5. Euphemia (after 1050 – 2 April 1111), wife of Prince Otto I of Moravia
  6. Ilona (after 1050 – c. 1091), wife of King Dmitar Zvonimir of Croatia
  • Béla I probably had unknown mistress and he had a daughter with her:
  1. Sophia (after 1050 – after 1116), wife of Comes (count) Lampert de genere Hont-Pázmány

Béla I the Champion or the Bison (Hungarian : I. (Bajnok/Bölény) Béla; c. 1016 – 11 September 1063) was King of Hungary from 1060 until hsi death. He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty and spent seventeen years in exile, probably in the court of the Kings of Poland . He came back to Hungary at the request of his brother, King Andrew I who assigned him the government of one third of the kingdom. However, Béla did not want to accept the hereditary rights of his brother's son, Solomon to the throne and he rebelled against his brother. Although, he managed to ascend to the throne after defeating King Andrew, he could not strengthen his reign and ensure his sons' succession. Early years Béla was the second son of Duke Vazul , a cousin of Stephan I, the first King of Hungary. His mother was probably the concubine (a daughter of a member of the Hungarian gens Tátony) of his father, who still followed pagan customs. In exile After their father's tragic death, the three brothers were obliged to leave the country. Fleeing first to Bohemia, they continued to Poland where Béla settled down, while his brothers, Levente and Andre continued on, settling in Kiev . In Poland, Béla served King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and took part in the king's campaigns against the pagan Pomeran tribes. He became a successful military leader, and the king gave his daughter in marriage to him. He may have been baptized just before his marriage, and his Christian name was Adalbert. After his marriage, he probably lived in Poland even during the time of interregnum when his brother-in-law, King Casimir I of Poland was obliged to leave the country. Some authors claim that during the interregnum in Poland, Béla fled to Bohemia and they identify Béla with "King Stephen 's cousin", mentioned in medieval chronicles, whom the Emperor Henry III , in 1043, assigned to govern the parts of Hungary he had occupied from King Samuel Aba , when the Hungarians refused to accept King Peter 's rule. Duke of Tercia pars Regni In the meantime, after a sanguine pagan revolt which ended the rule of King Peter, Béla's brother ascended the throne in Hungary as King Andrew I . However, his relations with the Holy Roman Empire remained tense, because King Peter had been not only a close ally of the Emperor Henry III, but he also had become a vassal of the Holy Roman Empire. Andrew refused to accept the suzerainty of the Emperor, ruled Hungary independently and prepared for the approaching war. That was the reason he invited his younger brother, the successful military leader, Béla to his court, and Béla accepted his offer. In 1048, Andrew conceded one third of Hungary (Tercia pars Regni ) in appanage to Béla. The two brothers shared power without incident until 1053, when King Andrew fathered a son, Solomon . Thereafter, Andrew became determined to secure the throne for his son and to displace his brother. Andrew, therefore, had his son (Béla's nephew) crowned "junior king" (rex iunior) in 1057, despite an earlier agreement between tha brothers according to which Béla was the heir to András. Hungarian custom would also dictate that the senior male member of the family inherit the kingdom. Following the coronation, Béla left his brother's court. In two years later, according to legend, King Andrew called back Béla to his court, and placed before him a crown and a sword, representing royal and ducal power, respectively, and asked Béla to take his choice. Having been forewarned by a court official that choosing the crown would mean his death, Béla instead selected the sword. Shortly afterwards, Béla fled to Poland where he was received by King Boleslaw II of Poland, nephew of his wife. King of Hungary In 1060, Béla returned to Hungary and defeated King Andrew I to become the new king. After his brother's death and Béla's victory at the Theben Pass, Béla was crowned king on 6 December 1060. During his brief reign he concerned himself with crushing pagan revolts in his kingdom. Hungarian chroniclers praised Béla for introducing new currency, such as the silver denarius, and for his benevolence to the former followers of his nephew, Solomon. Béla died when his throne's canopy collapsed (comtemporaries suspected that the collapse may not have been an accident). After Béla's death, King Henry IV of Germany installed Solomon as the new king and Béla's male progenies had to flee to Poland again. Marriage and children

  1. 1039-1043: unknown (b. unknown, d. after 1052), daughter of King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and his wife, Richeza of Lotharingia

King Géza I of Hungary (c. 1044[8] – 25 April 1077) King Ladislaus I of Hungary (c. 1048 – 29 July 1095) Duke Lampert of Hungary (after 1050 – c. 1095) Sophia (after 1050 – 18 June 1095), wife firstly of Markgraf Ulrich I of Carniola, and secondly of Duke Magnus I of Saxony Euphemia (after 1050 – 2 April 1111), wife of Prince Otto I of Moravia Ilona (after 1050 – c. 1091), wife of King Dmitar Zvonimir of Croatia Béla I probably had unknown mistress and he had a daughter with her: Sophia (after 1050 – after 1116), wife of Comes (count) Lampert de genere Hont-Pázmány


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A9la_I_of_Hungary#Marriage_and_children Béla I of Hungary From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Béla I Bust of Béla at the National Historical Memorial Park in Ópusztaszer King of Hungary Reign 1060 – 1063 Predecessor Andrew I of Hungary Successor Solomon of Hungary Issue Géza I of Hungary Ladislaus I of Hungary House Árpád dynasty Father Vazul Born 1016 Died 11 September 1063 (aged 46–47)

Béla I the Champion or the Bison (Hungarian: I. (Bajnok/Bölény) Béla; c. 1016 – 11 September 1063) was King of Hungary from 1060 until his death. He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty and spent seventeen years in exile, probably in the court of the Kings of Poland. He came back to Hungary at the request of his brother, King Andrew I who assigned him the government of one third of the kingdom. However, Béla did not want to accept the hereditary rights of his brother's son, Solomon to the throne and he rebelled against his brother. Although, he managed to ascend to the throne after defeating King Andrew, he could not strengthen his reign and ensure his sons' succession. Contents [hide]

   * 1 Early years
   * 2 In exile
   * 3 Duke of Tercia pars Regni
   * 4 King of Hungary
   * 5 Marriage and children
   * 6 References
   * 7 Sources

[edit] Early years

Béla was the second[1] son of Duke Vazul, a cousin of Stephan I, the first King of Hungary. His mother was probably the concubine (a daughter of a member of the Hungarian gens Tátony) of his father, who still followed pagan customs[2]. [edit] In exile

After their father's tragic death, the three brothers were obliged to leave the country. Fleeing first to Bohemia, they continued to Poland where Béla settled down, while his brothers, Levente and Andre continued on, settling in Kiev. In Poland, Béla served King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and took part in the king's campaigns against the pagan Pomeran tribes. He became a successful military leader, and the king gave his daughter[3] in marriage to him. He may have been baptized just before his marriage, and his Christian name was Adalbert. After his marriage, he probably lived in Poland even during the time of interregnum when his brother-in-law, King Casimir I of Poland was obliged to leave the country.

Some authors claim that during the interregnum in Poland, Béla fled to Bohemia and they identify Béla with "King Stephen's cousin", mentioned in medieval chronicles [4], whom the Emperor Henry III, in 1043, assigned to govern the parts of Hungary he had occupied from King Samuel Aba, when the Hungarians refused to accept King Peter's rule. [edit] Duke of Tercia pars Regni

In the meantime, after a sanguine pagan revolt which ended the rule of King Peter, Béla's brother ascended the throne in Hungary as King Andrew I. However, his relations with the Holy Roman Empire remained tense, because King Peter had been not only a close ally of the Emperor Henry III, but he also had become a vassal of the Holy Roman Empire. Andrew refused to accept the suzerainty of the Emperor, ruled Hungary independently and prepared for the approaching war.[5] That was the reason he invited his younger brother, the successful military leader, Béla to his court, and Béla accepted his offer.

In 1048, Andrew conceded one third of Hungary (Tercia pars regni) in appanage to Béla.[6]. The two brothers shared power without incident until 1053, when King Andrew fathered a son, Solomon. Thereafter, Andrew became determined to secure the throne for his son and to displace his brother. Andrew, therefore, had his son (Béla's nephew) crowned "junior king" (rex iunior) in 1057, despite an earlier agreement between tha brothers according to which Béla was the heir to András. Hungarian custom would also dictate that the senior male member of the family inherit the kingdom. Following the coronation, Béla left his brother's court.

In two years later, according to legend, King Andrew called back Béla to his court, and placed before him a crown and a sword, representing royal and ducal power, respectively, and asked Béla to take his choice. Having been forewarned by a court official that choosing the crown would mean his death, Béla instead selected the sword. Shortly afterwards, Béla fled to Poland where he was received by King Bolesław II of Poland, nephew of his wife. [edit] King of Hungary

In 1060, Béla returned to Hungary and defeated King Andrew I to become the new king. After his brother's death and Béla's victory at the Theben Pass, Béla was crowned king on 6 December 1060. During his brief reign he concerned himself with crushing pagan revolts in his kingdom.

Hungarian chroniclers praised Béla for introducing new currency, such as the silver denarius, and for his benevolence to the former followers of his nephew, Solomon.

Béla died when his throne's canopy collapsed (contemporaries suspected that the collapse may not have been an accident). After Béla's death, King Henry IV of Germany installed Solomon as the new king and Béla's male progenies had to flee to Poland again. [edit] Marriage and children

  1. 1039-1043: unknown[7] (b. unknown, d. after 1052), daughter of King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and his wife, Richeza of Lotharingia
   * King Géza I of Hungary (c. 1044[8] – 25 April 1077)
   * King Ladislaus I of Hungary (c. 1048 – 29 July 1095)
   * Duke Lampert of Hungary (after 1050 – c. 1095)
   * Sophia (after 1050 – 18 June 1095), wife firstly of Markgraf Ulrich I of Carniola, and secondly of Duke Magnus I of Saxony
   * Euphemia (after 1050 – 2 April 1111), wife of Prince Otto I of Moravia
   * Ilona (after 1050 – c. 1091), wife of King Dmitar Zvonimir of Croatia
   * Anna Lanke (? – 1095), wife of Rostislav of Tmutarakan[9]

Béla I probably had unknown mistress and he had a daughter with her:

   * Sophia (after 1050 – after 1116), wife of Comes (count) Lampert de genere Hont-Pázmány [1]

[edit] References

  1. ^ Wincenty Swoboda, Bela I, In: Słownik Starożytności Słowiańskich, vol. 7.
  2. ^ Some modern sources claim that duke Vazul married Katun Anastazya of Bulgaria who bore Bela and his brothers, Levente and Andrew.
  3. ^ Her name is unknown. Some authors, without sources, gave her name Rixa. Nowadays it is supposed that she was called Adelaide, see K. Jasiński, Rodowód pierwszych Piastów, Wrocław - Warszawa (1992).
  4. ^ Annales Altahenses maiores; Annales Hildesheimenses maiores; Hermann of Reichenau: Chronicon de sex ætatibus mundi.
  5. ^ http://megyeszele.cityblog.hu/uploads/megyeszele/2008114.pdf
  6. ^ Some modern authors claim that Béla was Duke of the alleged Principality of Nitra, but contemporary sources only mentioned "Tercia pars Regni".
  7. ^ Kazimierz Jasiński, Rodowód pierwszych Piastów, Wrocław - Warszawa 1992.
  8. ^ Włodzimierz Dworzaczek, Genealogia, Warszawa 1959, tabl. 84.
  9. ^ Rostislav of Tmutarakan at hrono.ru (Russian)

[edit] Sources

   * Engel, Pat. Realm of St. Stephen : A History of Medieval Hungary, 2001
   * Kosztolnyik, Z.J., Five Eleventh Century Hungarian Kings, 1981
   * Kristó, Gyula - Makk, Ferenc: Az Árpád-ház uralkodói (IPC Könyvek, 1996)
   * Korai Magyar Történeti Lexikon (9-14. század), főszerkesztő: Kristó, Gyula, szerkesztők: Engel, Pál és Makk, Ferenc (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1994)
   * Magyarország Történeti Kronológiája I. – A kezdetektől 1526-ig, főszerkesztő: Benda, Kálmán (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1981)

Béla I of Hungary House of Árpád Born: c. 1016 Died: 11 September 1063 Regnal titles Preceded by Andrew I King of Hungary 1060–1063 Succeeded by Solomon This page was last modified on 23 July 2010 at 12:26.


Konge av Ungarn 1061 - 1063. Bela nevnes første gang i 1031 som «parvulus». Han vokste opp i Polen, men vendte tilbake til Ungarn ca. 1050 hvor han ble konge i 1061.

Han minsket skattene, innførte ensartet mål og vekt, og arbeidet for kristendommens utbredelse i sitt land.

Bela falt på sensommeren i 1063 i en krig mot tyskerne.

Tekst: Tore Nygaard

Kilder: Erich Brandenburg: Die Nachkommen Karls des Grossen. Leipzig 1935. Mogens Bugge: Våre forfedre, nr. 372. Bent og Vidar Billing Hansen: Rosensverdslektens forfedre, side 19, 32.


Béla I the Champion or the Bison (Hungarian: I. (Bajnok/Bölény) Béla) (c. 1016 – 11 September 1063), King of Hungary (1060-1063). He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty and spent seventeen years in exile, probably in the court of the Kings of Poland. He came back to Hungary at the request of his brother, King Andrew I who assigned him the government of one third of the kingdom. However, Béla did not want to accept the hereditary rights of his brother's son, Solomon to the throne and he rebelled against his brother. Although, he managed to ascend to the throne after defeating King Andrew, he could not strengthen his reign and ensure his sons' succession. Béla was the second son of Duke Vazul, a cousin of Stephan I, the first King of Hungary. His mother was probably the concubine (a daughter of a member of the Hungarian gens Tátony) of his father, who still followed pagan customs. Marriage and children Richa, daughter of King Mieszko II Lambert of Poland and his wife, Richeza of Lotharingia

King Géza I of Hungary (c. 1044[7] – 25 April 1077) King Ladislaus I of Hungary (c. 1048 – 29 July 1095) Duke Lampert of Hungary (after 1050 – c. 1095) Sophia (after 1050 – 18 June 1095), wife firstly of Markgraf Ulrich I of Carniola, and secondly of Duke Magnus I of Saxony Euphemia (after 1050 – 2 April 1111), wife of Prince Otto I of Moravia Ilona (after 1050 – c. 1091), wife of King Dmitar Zvonimir of Croatia Unnamed girl (after 1050 – befor 1132), wife of Comes (count) Lampert de genere Hont-Pázmány


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bela_I_of_Hungary
Béla I era el hijo del noble Vazul (primo de San Esteban I de Hungría), descendiente de la dinastia de Árpád y hermano menor de Andrés I, de quién tomaría el poder, puesto que Salomón, el hijo del fallecido monarca, era aún muy joven para reinar. En 1060 se sucedería la Batalla junto al río Tisza, donde Béla condució tropas polacas de su suegro el Príncipe Miecislao II.

Tras el ataque, Andrés I moriría durante su huida hacia Moson, y Salomón se vería obligado a escapar al Sacro Imperio romano germánico, donde reinaba el hermano de su esposa Judit, Enrique IV. Béla I debería enfrentar alzamientos de paganos conducidos por Juan, el hijo del líder Vata, quien habría impulsado la Revuelta de Vata en 1046. Béla I disiparía la gente reunida frente a la ciudad de Székesfehérvár y luego de ésto no volverían a haber alzamientos paganos en elt erritorio húngaro. En el 1063 regresaría Salomón con ejércitos germánicos y recuperaría el trono de Hungría tras la muerte de Bela I en durante ese mismo acontecimiento.

Existen varias teorías sobre su muerte, pero la tradicional es que murió cuando el respaldar de madera de su trono se derrumbó sobre él en su propia corte, mientras su sobrino Samuel regresaba con las tropas germánicas para recuperar su trono.


A Képes Krónika szerint, a koronázása során a "Esto dominus fratrum Tuorum" ének hangzott (Gerics József szerint ez az ének az Egbert-ordóhoz tartozik, amelyet valószínűleg használtak Salamon koronázásában), és a tolmácsolástól félreértés keletkezett: Béla azt értette, hogy a "Légy ura a testvéreidnek" egyházi ének Salamonra vonatkozott, és ezzel Béla urává válna. Ellenségei azonban elhitették Endrével, hogy Béla a korona után áhítozik. Hűségét és önzetlenségét Endre Várkonyban egy, a költészet által később kiszínezett jelenetben tette próbára. Béla, nem érezvén magát biztonságban, Lengyelországba menekült, hol sógorától, II. Boleszlávtól segélyt kért, 1060-ban[forrás?] seregével Magyarországba tört. Endre a csatában elesett; Béla a csatatérről Székesfehérvárra ment, ahol 1060. december 6-án királlyá választották és megkoronázták.[

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Béla I, king of Hungary's Timeline

1016
1016
Esztergom, Komárom-Esztergom, Hungary
1040
June 27, 1040
Age 24
Krakow, Krakow, Poland
1040
Age 24
1040
Age 24
Krakow, Poland
1044
1044
Age 28
Esztergom, Komárom Esztergom, Magyarország - Hungary
1050
1050
Age 34
Hungary
1050
Age 34
Esztergom, Komarom Esztergom, Hungary
1050
Age 34