Brevet Brig. Gen. Henry Livermore Abbott (USA)

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Brevet Brig. Gen. Henry Livermore Abbott (USA)'s Geni Profile

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Henry Livermore Abbott

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States
Death: Died in Virginia, United States
Cause of death: Killed in the Battle of the Wilderness
Immediate Family:

Son of Josiah G. Abbott, U.S. Congress and Caroline Abbott
Brother of Caroline Mercy Derby; Maj. Edward G. Abbott (USA); Capt. Fletcher Abbott (USA); William Stackpole Abbott; Samuel Appleton Abbott and 5 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Brevet Brig. Gen. Henry Livermore Abbott (USA)

Civil War Union Brevet Brigadier General.

A Harvard law student when the Civil War broke out, he joined the 4th Battalion of the Massachusetts Militia after the Confederates fired on Fort Sumter, South Carolina.

However, in August 1861, at the age of 19, he was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, which was known as the "Harvard Regiment" because most of its officers were either students or graduates of Harvard. The regiment became one of the better known units in the Union Army, and contained such luminaries as future Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., future Union General William F. Bartlett, and future Union Brevet Generals Paul J. Revere, George N. Macy, Henry Patten, Francis Palfrey and William R. Lee. Henry L. Abbott saw action in every battle the regiment participated in up to the 1864 Battle of the Wilderness.

He fought at the October 1861 debacle at Balls Bluff, Virginia, in the Spring 1862 Peninsular Campaign, the bloodshed at Antietam (where the 20th Massachusetts lost 124 men in the disaster that befell General John Sedgwick's Division in the West Woods) and at Fredericksburg in December 1862. 

In the Battle of Fredericksburg, he commanded a portion of his unit that crossed the river on pontoons the day before the main battle, and became embroiled in brutal street fighting along Caroline Street, where they stood heroically under fire and battled the Mississippians of General William Barksdale's Brigade, who were charged with defending the town.

His bravery that day won particular praise from his comrades and commanding officers. I

In the July 1863 Battle of Gettysburg, his regiment took part in the repulse of Pickett's Charge and he assumed command when Colonel Paul Revere was mortally wounded by an artillery shell and Lieutenant Colonel George Macy was wounded. He was advanced to Major, and remained 2nd in command when Colonel Macy returned from his wounds.

In the 1864 Overland Campaign, he was with the 20th Massachusetts during the third day of the Battle of the Wilderness when they were suddenly taken unaware by the onrush of attacking South Carolina troops. He again assumed command when Colonel Macy was wounded, and refused to lie down in an effort to inspire and steady his men. Soon after he was shot and mortally wounded, with his men dragging him to the rear before they themselves retreated. He lived only a few minutes more before dying, and was specially mentioned and lamented by brigade commander General Alexander Webb, Division commander General John Gibbon and Corps commander General Winfield Scott Hancock in their after battle reports.

His remains were taken back to his hometown of Lowell, Massachusetts.

On March 13, 1865 he received a posthumous brevet promotion to Brigadier General, US Volunteers for "gallant and meritorious services in the battle of the Wilderness".

He was the son of Judge and Congressman Josiah Gardner Abbott. His older brother, Edward "Ned" Abbott, served as a Captain in the 2nd Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, and was killed in the Battle of Cedar Mountain.

In 1991, Major Abbott's letters home were edited by historian Robert Scott Garth and were published as "Fallen Leaves: The Civil War Letters of Major Henry Livermore Abbott". (bio by: Russ Dodge)

Cause of death: Killed in the Battle of the Wilderness


Burial::

Lowell Cemetery

Lowell

Middlesex County

Massachusetts, USA

Plot: Chapel Avenue, Lot 966


Civil War Union Brevet Brigadier General.

A Harvard law student when the Civil War broke out, he joined the 4th Battalion of the Massachusetts Militia after the Confederates fired on Fort Sumter, South Carolina.

However, in August 1861, at the age of 19, he was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, which was known as the "Harvard Regiment" because most of its officers were either students or graduates of Harvard. The regiment became one of the better known units in the Union Army, and contained such luminaries as future Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., future Union General William F. Bartlett, and future Union Brevet Generals Paul J. Revere, George N. Macy, Henry Patten, Francis Palfrey and William R. Lee. Henry L. Abbott saw action in every battle the regiment participated in up to the 1864 Battle of the Wilderness.

He fought at the October 1861 debacle at Balls Bluff, Virginia, in the Spring 1862 Peninsular Campaign, the bloodshed at Antietam (where the 20th Massachusetts lost 124 men in the disaster that befell General John Sedgwick's Division in the West Woods) and at Fredericksburg in December 1862. 

In the Battle of Fredericksburg, he commanded a portion of his unit that crossed the river on pontoons the day before the main battle, and became embroiled in brutal street fighting along Caroline Street, where they stood heroically under fire and battled the Mississippians of General William Barksdale's Brigade, who were charged with defending the town.

His bravery that day won particular praise from his comrades and commanding officers. I

In the July 1863 Battle of Gettysburg, his regiment took part in the repulse of Pickett's Charge and he assumed command when Colonel Paul Revere was mortally wounded by an artillery shell and Lieutenant Colonel George Macy was wounded. He was advanced to Major, and remained 2nd in command when Colonel Macy returned from his wounds.

In the 1864 Overland Campaign, he was with the 20th Massachusetts during the third day of the Battle of the Wilderness when they were suddenly taken unaware by the onrush of attacking South Carolina troops. He again assumed command when Colonel Macy was wounded, and refused to lie down in an effort to inspire and steady his men. Soon after he was shot and mortally wounded, with his men dragging him to the rear before they themselves retreated. He lived only a few minutes more before dying, and was specially mentioned and lamented by brigade commander General Alexander Webb, Division commander General John Gibbon and Corps commander General Winfield Scott Hancock in their after battle reports.

His remains were taken back to his hometown of Lowell, Massachusetts.

On March 13, 1865 he received a posthumous brevet promotion to Brigadier General, US Volunteers for "gallant and meritorious services in the battle of the Wilderness".

He was the son of Judge and Congressman Josiah Gardner Abbott. His older brother, Edward "Ned" Abbott, served as a Captain in the 2nd Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, and was killed in the Battle of Cedar Mountain.

In 1991, Major Abbott's letters home were edited by historian Robert Scott Garth and were published as "Fallen Leaves: The Civil War Letters of Major Henry Livermore Abbott". (bio by: Russ Dodge)

Cause of death: Killed in the Battle of the Wilderness

Burial::

Lowell Cemetery

Lowell

Middlesex County

Massachusetts, USA

Plot: Chapel Avenue, Lot 966


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Livermore_Abbott

Henry Livermore Abbott (January 21, 1842 – May 6, 1864), the son of Josiah Gardner Abbott, a judge and United States congressman, was a brigadier general in the Union army during the American Civil War. A Harvard law student, Abbott joined the Massachusetts militia after the Confederates attacked Fort Sumter.

In August 1861, he was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. Abbott saw action in the Battle of Ball's Bluff, Virginia in 1861, during the 1862 Peninsular Campaign, the Battle of Antietam and the Battle of Fredericksburg. His regiment took part in repelling Pickett's Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg; he assumed command of the regiment when his superior officers were wounded. After the battle, he was promoted to major.

In 1864, during the Battle of the Wilderness, he again assumed command of his regiment after Colonel George Macy was wounded. On the third day of the battle, he was shot and mortally wounded. On March 13, 1865, he received a posthumous brevet promotion to brigadier general.

Abbott was a good friend of Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., who served in the 20th Mass. with him. Holmes deeply admired Abbott for his courage and unruffled calm, and for his determination to do his duty even though he was deeply skeptical of Union war aims, was politically opposed to President Lincoln, and did not support the abolition of slavery. Holmes considered Abbott an ideal soldier, and praised him in a famous 1884 Memorial Day speech.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=6941909&ref=wvr

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Brevet Brig. Gen. Henry Livermore Abbott (USA)'s Timeline

1842
January 21, 1842
Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States
1864
May 6, 1864
Age 22
Virginia, United States