General Hamilton Prioleau Bee

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General Hamilton Prioleau Bee

Birthdate: (75)
Birthplace: South Carolina, USA
Death: October 3, 1897 (75)
San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas, USA
Place of Burial: San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Barnard E. Bee, Sr.; Barnard Elliott Bee; Ann Wragg Bee and Ann Wragg Bee
Husband of Mildred Mary Tarver Bee and María Andrea Martínez Bee
Father of Clement Stevens Bee; Barnard Elliott Bee; Hamilton Prioleau Bee, Jr; John Tarver Bee; Forbes Britton Bee and 9 others
Brother of Brig. General Barnard Bee, Jr. (CSA); Ann Stevens; Susan Bee; Mattie Bee; Emma Bee and 5 others

Occupation: Soldier
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About General Hamilton Prioleau Bee

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamilton_P._Bee

Hamilton Prioleau Bee (July 22, 1822 – October 3, 1897) was an American politician in early Texas who served one term as Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives and later was a Confederate States Army general during the American Civil War.


Early life


Bee was born in Charleston, South Carolina, to Ann Wragg Fayssoux and Barnard E. Bee, Sr. His family moved to Texas when he was 14. At age 17, Bee served as secretary for the commission that determined the border between the United States and the Republic of Texas. Sam Houston sent Bee, Joseph C. Eldridge, and Thomas S. Torrey to open negotiations with the Comanches in 1843, which eventually resulted in the Treaty of Tehuacana Creek. Bee was secretary of the Texas Senate in the First Texas Legislature in 1846.


During the Mexican-American War, Bee served under Benjamin McCulloch's Company A of Col. Jack Hays's 1st Regiment of Texas Mounted Volunteers for a time, but then transferred to Mirabeau B. Lamar's Texas cavalry company as a second lieutenant. Bee signed up for a second term in 1847—this time as first lieutenant—in Lamar's Company, which was by then a component of Col. Peter Hansborough Bell's regiment of Texas volunteers.


Bee moved to Laredo after the war and ran for a seat in the Texas House of Representatives for the Third Texas Legislature in 1849. He served through the end of the Seventh Legislature for a total of ten years in the House. In the Sixth Legislature, Bee was decisively elected Speaker of the House with 78 votes, to 1 vote each for N. B. Charlton and Pleasant Williams Kittrell.


Civil War


In 1861, Bee was elected brigadier general of the Texas militia and appointed as a brigadier general in the Confederate Army on March 4, 1862. Bee commanded the brigade that consisted of Carl Buchel's First, Nicholas C. Gould's Twenty-third, Xavier Blanchard Debray's Twenty-sixth, James B. Likin's Thirty-fifth, Peter Cavanaugh Woods's Thirty-sixth, and Alexander Watkins Terrell's Texas cavalry regiments.


Bee was headquartered in Brownsville and facilitated the trade of cotton for munitions through Mexico. On November 4, 1863, he was forced to abandon Brownsville in the face of a Union expeditionary force under Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks. Bee was transferred to a field command in 1864 under Lt. Gen. Richard Taylor in the Red River Campaign. In the Battle of Pleasant Hill, Bee had two different horses shot out from under him during a cavalry charge, but was only slightly wounded. One of Bee's brigade commanders at this time was Arthur P. Bagby, Jr., who later replaced him in command. Later, despite intense criticism of his handling of his troops, Bee was given command of Thomas Green's division in Maj. Gen. John A. Wharton's cavalry corps in February 1865. After that time, he commanded an infantry brigade in Gen. Samuel B. Maxey's division.


Postbellum


After the war, Bee lived in a self-imposed exile in Mexico until 1876. He returned to live in San Antonio, where he died. He is buried there in the Confederate Cemetery. Bee married Mildred Tarver on May 21, 1854, and together they had six children.


He was the older brother of Barnard Elliott Bee, Jr., also a Confederate Army general. Their father, Barnard Elliott Bee, Sr., a leader in the Texas Revolution, was the namesake of Beeville and Bee County, Texas.


Politician, Confederate Civil War Brigadier General. Born in Charleston, South Carolina to a prominent family of English ancestry, he moved with his family to Pendleton, South Carolina in 1833. In 1836, when he was 14 years old, his family moved to Texas where his father was a leader in the Texas Revolution against Mexico. At age 17, he was appointed as secretary for the commission that determined the border between the US and the Republic of Texas. In 1843, Texas President Sam Houston sent him along with Joseph C. Eldridge and Thomas S. Torrey to open negotiations with the Comanche Native American tribe and they achieved the Treaty of Tehuacana Creek. In 1846 he served as Secretary of the Texas Senate in the First Texas Legislature. After the outbreak of the Mexican-American War in 1846, he served under Benjamin McCulloch's Company A of Col. Jack Hays's 1st Regiment of Texas Mounted Volunteers for a time before transferring to Mirabeau B. Lamar's Texas cavalry company as a 2nd lieutenant. The following year he signed up for a second term, serving as a first lieutenant in Lamar's Company, which was by then a component of Colonel Peter Hansborough Bell's regiment of Texas volunteers. After the war, he moved to Laredo, Texas and in 1848 he ran and won a seat in the Texas House of Representatives for the 3rd Texas Legislature. He was repeatedly re-elected and served from 1849 through the end of the 7th Legislature, for a total of 10 years in the House of Representatives. In the 6th Legislature, he was elected Speaker of the House. After the outbreak of the American Civil War in April 1861, he was elected brigadier general of the Texas militia and appointed as a brigadier general in the Confederate Army in March 1862 and commanded the brigade that consisted of the 1st, 23rd, 26th, 35th, and 36th cavalry regiments. He was headquartered in Brownsville, Texas where he facilitated the trade of cotton for munitions through Mexico. In November 1863 he abandoned Brownsville in the face of a Union expeditionary force under Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks. In early 1864 he transferred to a field command under Lieutenant General Richard Taylor in the Red River Campaign. On April 9, 1864 at the Battle of Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, he had two different horses shot out from under him during a cavalry charge, but was only slightly wounded. Later, despite intense criticism of his handling of his troops, he was given command of Brigadier General Thomas Green's division in Major General John A. Wharton's cavalry corps in February 1865. After that time he commanded an infantry brigade in General Samuel B. Maxey's division until the end of the Civil War. In 1869 he and his family left Texas and moved to Saltillo, Mexico, in self-imposed exile, before returning to San Antonio, Texas in 1874 and established a law practice. He died in San Antonio at the age of 75. His papers reside at the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas in Austin, Texas. He was the older brother of Barnard Elliott Bee, Jr., who also served as a Confederate Army brigadier general in the American Civil War, and who was killed at the First Battle of Bull Run (also known as the First Battle of Manassas) at Manassas, Virginia in July 1861. (bio by: William Bjornstad)


https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Bee&GScid=647094&GRid=8958&

Politician, Confederate Civil War Brigadier General. Born in Charleston, South Carolina to a prominent family of English ancestry, he moved with his family to Pendleton, South Carolina in 1833. In 1836, when he was 14 years old, his family moved to Texas where his father was a leader in the Texas Revolution against Mexico. At age 17, he was appointed as secretary for the commission that determined the border between the US and the Republic of Texas. In 1843, Texas President Sam Houston sent him along with Joseph C. Eldridge and Thomas S. Torrey to open negotiations with the Comanche Native American tribe and they achieved the Treaty of Tehuacana Creek. In 1846 he served as Secretary of the Texas Senate in the First Texas Legislature.

After the outbreak of the Mexican-American War in 1846, he served under Benjamin McCulloch's Company A of Col. Jack Hays's 1st Regiment of Texas Mounted Volunteers for a time before transferring to Mirabeau B. Lamar's Texas cavalry company as a 2nd lieutenant. The following year he signed up for a second term, serving as a first lieutenant in Lamar's Company, which was by then a component of Colonel Peter Hansborough Bell's regiment of Texas volunteers. After the war, he moved to Laredo, Texas and in 1848 he ran and won a seat in the Texas House of Representatives for the 3rd Texas Legislature. He was repeatedly re-elected and served from 1849 through the end of the 7th Legislature, for a total of 10 years in the House of Representatives. In the 6th Legislature, he was elected Speaker of the House. After the outbreak of the American Civil War in April 1861, he was elected brigadier general of the Texas militia and appointed as a brigadier general in the Confederate Army in March 1862 and commanded the brigade that consisted of the 1st, 23rd, 26th, 35th, and 36th cavalry regiments. He was headquartered in Brownsville, Texas where he facilitated the trade of cotton for munitions through Mexico.

In November 1863 he abandoned Brownsville in the face of a Union expeditionary force under Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks. In early 1864 he transferred to a field command under Lieutenant General Richard Taylor in the Red River Campaign. On April 9, 1864 at the Battle of Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, he had two different horses shot out from under him during a cavalry charge, but was only slightly wounded. Later, despite intense criticism of his handling of his troops, he was given command of Brigadier General Thomas Green's division in Major General John A. Wharton's cavalry corps in February 1865. After that time he commanded an infantry brigade in General Samuel B. Maxey's division until the end of the Civil War. In 1869 he and his family left Texas and moved to Saltillo, Mexico, in self-imposed exile, before returning to San Antonio, Texas in 1874 and established a law practice.

He died in San Antonio at the age of 75. His papers reside at the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas in Austin, Texas. He was the older brother of Barnard Elliott Bee, Jr., who also served as a Confederate Army brigadier general in the American Civil War, and who was killed at the First Battle of Bull Run (also known as the First Battle of Manassas) at Manassas, Virginia in July 1861.


Served as a General in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War.

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General Hamilton Prioleau Bee's Timeline

1822
July 22, 1822
South Carolina, USA
1845
1845
Age 22
1849
February 28, 1849
Age 26
Laredo, Webb County, Texas, USA
1851
July 5, 1851
Age 28
Laredo, Webb County, Texas, United States
1855
November 24, 1855
Age 33
Seguin, Guadalupe County, Texas, United States
1857
February 6, 1857
Age 34
Corpus Christi, Nueces County, Texas, United States
1858
January 12, 1858
Age 35
Texas, United States
1859
August 6, 1859
Age 37
Corpus Christi, Nueces County, Texas, United States
1861
January 12, 1861
Age 38
1862
November 12, 1862
Age 40
Woodstock, Bowie County, Texas, United States