Brigadier General James Wellborn

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Brig. General James B. Wellborn

Also Known As: "Wellborne"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Randolph County, North Carolina
Death: December 04, 1854 (87)
Wilkesboro, Wilkes County, North Carolina, United States
Place of Burial: Wellborn Cemetery, Wilkesboro, Wilkes County, North Carolina, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of William Wellborn, Jr and Hepzibah Welborn (Stearns)
Husband of Rebecca Valerie Wellborn
Father of Nancy Matilda Wellborn; William Wilkes Wellborn; Rebecca Meriah Franklin; Lucy Barton Calhoun; Catherine Sloan Wellborn and 6 others
Brother of Isaac Starnes Wellborn; Elias Wellborn and Claranna Denman (Welborn)

Occupation: US Senator 27 years
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Brigadier General James Wellborn

Biography

[https://www.ncpedia.org/biography/wellborn-welborn-james] James Wellborn, an army officer, legislator and was born in that part of Rowan County that first became Surry County and then Wilkes County in 1778. Here he made his home during a long life, holding public office and operating a large plantation on land that his wife had inherited some two miles from the county seat town of Wilkesboro. In 1800 Wellborn owned 12,321 acres of land and seventy-five slaves. Willie P. Mangum, who visited Wellborn in the spring of 1820, praised the beauty of the Wilkes County area. He further commented: "I have seen in one stock at Col. Welbourn's [sic ] 340 Cattle, & 70 or 80 of them that are fattening are in better order than I ever saw any animal of that description. They are raised without expense by sending them into the inexhaustible range of the mountains in the warm season of the year."



Wellborn married Rebecca Montgomery, the daughter of Colonel Hugh Montgomery, of Salisbury, a native of England. Her twin sister, Rachel, married Governor Montfort Stokes. The two sisters inherited large tracts of land from their father and, with their husbands, donated land for the town of Wilkesborough. Wellborn and his wife were the parents of several children, but his eighteen-year-old son, James, Jr., died in November 1827.


In a journal kept by Elisha Mitchell in 1827–28 on a journey to the mountains when he called on James Wellborn, he wrote: "What Wellborn's real character is I cannot make out. He has been a member of the Baptist church and will not allow of no swearing about him. He left the church under the idea that he was unfit to remain in it. He seems to have a religious paroxysm." An obituary in an Asheville newspaper noted he was "highly esteemed for his strict integrity, great liberality, and sterling patriotism." Wellborn died at his residence in Wilkes County and was buried in a nearby family cemetery enclosed by a stone wall. In 1992 Wendell H. Edgerton, of Wilkesboro, the owner of a new factory nearby, pleading ignorance, had the cemetery bulldozed and the site leveled.


Credit: Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, 6 volumes, edited by William S. Powell ~North Carolina - The War of 1812~

  • Most North Carolinians were folded into the US Army's 10th Regiment under Colonel James Welborn of Wilkes County, who resigned his commission as a general in the North Carolina Militia in order to join the regulars.

The main body of North Carolina troops destined for the Canadian front, the 10th Regiment under Colonel Wellborn, never took part in the fighting because the war came to an end while they were en route. Although not many Tar Heels engaged in military combat, those who did make excellent records of themselves. The total number of North Carolinians killed in combat was eighteen (18).* [http://www.carolana.com/NC/1800s/antebellum/war_of_1812_military_un...] The son of William Wellborn and Hepzibah Stearns. Husband of Rebecca Montgomery, the daughter of Hugh Montgomery and Catherine Sloan. Married 60 years.



The U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Name: James Wellborn Gender: Male Birth Place: NC Birth Year: 1767 Spouse Name: Rebecca Montgomery Spouse Birth Place: NC Spouse Birth Year: 1772 Marriage Year: 1794 Number Pages: 1


"James Wellborn and Rebecca Montgomery were married February 13, 1794, in Wilkes County, NC"

BRIG. GENERAL JAMES WELLBORN

In his day General James Wellborn was probably the most prominent man in the county. He married Rebecca Montgomery, one of the two heirs to the large tracts of land known as the Moravian surveys.

James Wellborn was appointed General of the militia about the close of the Revolutionary War. From the year 1796 to 1835 General Wellborn served in the State Senate thirty years. He served in succession from 1796 to 1811, from 1817 to 1821, in 1823 and 1824, from 1828 to 1829, in 1832 and in 1834 and 1835. Prior to 1835 members of the General Assembly were elected each year, so Wellborn was elected thirty times in 39 years. The fact that a man can stand so popular for 39 years is honor enough for one man. I doubt if the world can furnish a like example.

During his terms in the Senate General Wellborn made strenuous efforts to have the State build a turnpike road from the mountains to the sea, but he failed. That was before any railroads were built in North Carolina and the turnpike would have been a great thing for the people of the west, but east had the majority and they knew that the people of the west had to come to them for their necessities turnpike or no turnpike, and they were not willing to be taxed to build the road for the accommodation of the people of the west.

It was largely through the efforts of General Wellborn that his brother-in-law Montfort Stokes, was twice elected to the United States Senate and once elected to Governor of the State.

He was buried in his family cemetery on his plantation "The Bends" about 3 miles west of Wilkesboro.







General James Wellborn served 27 years as North Carolina State Senator; he was in the War of 1812 and Delegate to The Convention, 1835. He rose to the rank of Brigadier General. With his wife, Rebecca Wellborn (Montgomery) inherited a large Plantation of over 12,000 acres.

Brig. General James B. Wellborn was born on November 29, 1767, in Randolph County, North Carolina. His parents were William Welborn, Jr and Hepzibah Welborn (Stearns). He was a US Senator 27 years.

James married Rebecca Wellborn (Montgomery). Together they had the following children:

  1. Nancy Matilda Starnes (Wellborn);
  2. Elizabeth "Betsy" Adaline Ledbetter (Wellborn);
  3. Rebecca Meriah Franklin;
  4. William Wilkes Wellborn;
  5. Lucy Barton Wellborn;
  6. Catherine Sloan Wellborn;
  7. James Johnson Wellborn;
  8. Hepsabah Mary Wellborn;
  9. Samuel Chapley Wellborn;
  10. Hugh Montgomery Wellborn;
  11. Rachel Starnes Cannon.

He died on December 4, 1854, in Wilkesboro, Wilkes County, North Carolina, United States, and was buried in Wellborn Cemetery, Wilkesboro, Wilkes County, North Carolina, USA. [https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/86254712/james-b_-wellborn]












References [https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/86254712/james-b_-wellborn]

[https://www.ncpedia.org/biography/wellborn-welborn-james]

James Wellborn, army officer and legislator, was born in that part of Rowan County that first became Surry County and then Wilkes County in 1778. Here he made his home during a long life, holding public office and operating a large plantation on land that his wife had inherited some two miles from the county seat town of Wilkesboro. In 1800 Wellborn owned 12,321 acres of land and seventy-five slaves. Willie P. Mangum, who visited Wellborn in the spring of 1820, praised the beauty of the Wilkes County area. He further commented: "I have seen in one stock at Col. Welbourn's [sic ] 340 Cattle, & 70 or 80 of them that are fattening are in better order than I ever saw any animal of that description. They are raised without expense by sending them into the inexhaustible range of the mountains in the warm season of the year."

Wellborn married Rebecca Montgomery, the daughter of Colonel Hugh Montgomery, of Salisbury, a native of England. Her twin sister, Rachel, married Governor Montfort Stokes. The two sisters inherited large tracts of land from their father and, with their husbands, donated land for the town of Wilkesborough. Wellborn and his wife were the parents of several children, but his eighteen-year-old son, James, Jr., died in November 1827.

In a journal kept by Elisha Mitchell in 1827–28 on a journey to the mountains when he called on James Wellborn, he wrote: "What Wellborn's real character is I cannot make out. He has been a member of the Baptist church and will not allow of no swearing about him. He left the church under the idea that he was unfit to remain in it. He seems to have a religious paroxysm." An obituary in an Asheville newspaper noted the he was "highly esteemed for his strict integrity, great liberality and sterling patriotism." Wellborn died at his residence in Wilkes County and was buried in a nearby family cemetery enclosed by a stone wall. In 1992 Wendell H. Edgerton, of Wilkesboro, the owner of a new factory nearby, pleading ignorance, had the cemetery bulldozed and the site leveled.

Credit: Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, 6 volumes, edited by William S. Powell

~North Carolina - The War of 1812~

  • Most North Carolinians were folded into the US Army's 10th Regiment under Colonel James Welborn of Wilkes County, who resigned his commission as a general in the North Carolina Militia in order to join the regulars.

Wellborn had risen to the rank of brigadier general in the North Carolina militia by 1812,

The son of William Wellborn and Hepzibah Stearns. Husband of Rebecca Montgomery, the daughter of Hugh Montgomery and Catherine Sloan. Married 60 years.

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Name: James Wellborn Gender: Male Birth Place: NC Birth Year: 1767 Spouse Name: Rebecca Montgomery Spouse Birth Place: NC Spouse Birth Year: 1772 Marriage Year: 1794 Number Pages: 1

"James Wellborn and Rebecca Montgomery were married February 13, 1794 in Wilkes County, NC"

1850 Census Value of real estate owned: $11,890.

BRIG. GENERAL JAMES WELLBORN

In his day General James Wellborn was probably the most prominent man in the county. He married Rebecca Montgomery, one of the two heirs to the large tracts of land known as the Moravian surveys.

James Wellborn was appointed General of the militia about the close of the Revolutionary War. From the year 1796 to 1835 General Wellborn served in the State Senate thirty years. He served in succession from 1796 to 1811, from 1817 to 1821, in 1823 and 1824, in 1828 to 1829, in 1832 and in 1834 and 1835. Prior to 1835 members of the General Assembly were elected each year, so Wellborn was elected thirty times in 39 years. The fact that a men can stand so popular for 39 years is honor enough for one man. I doubt if the world can furnish a like example.

During his terms in the Senate General Wellborn made strenuous efforts to have the State build a turnpike road from the mountains to the sea, but he failed. That was before any railroads were built in North Carolina and the turnpike would have been a great thing for the people of the west, but east had the majority and they knew that the people of the west had to come to them for their necessities turnpike or no turnpike, and they were not willing to be taxed to build the road for accommodation of the people of the west.

It was largely through the efforts of General Wellborn that his brother-in-law Montfort Stokes, was twice elected to the United States Senate and once elected to Governor of the State.

He was buried in his family cemetery on his plantation "The Bends" about 3 miles west of Wilkesboro.

References

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/11867571

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Wilborn-31

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Welborn-98

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Welborn-96

American State Papers: Military Affairs, vol. 1 (1832).

J. Jay Anderson, Wilkes County Sketches (1976).

Asheville News, 15 Feb. 1855.

John W. Clauser, Jr., and Stephen R. Claggett, Investigation of the Wellborn Cemetery, Wilkes County, North Carolina (1992).

Adelaide L. Fries, ed., Records of the Moravians in North Carolina, vol. 6–7 (1943–47).

Johnson J. Hayes, The Land of Wilkes (1962).

Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register and Dictionary of the U.S. Army, vol. 1 (1903).

T. Felix Hickerson, Happy Valley: History and Genealogy (1940).

Sarah M. Lemmon, Frustrated Patriots: North Carolina and the War of 1812 (1973).

William H. Powell, comp., List of Officers of the Army of the United States from 1779 to 1900 (1900).

Marvin L. Skaggs, North Carolina Boundary Disputes Involving Her Southern Line (1941).

John H. Wheeler, ed., Reminiscences and Memoirs of North Carolina and Eminent North Carolinians (1884).


James Wellborn, army officer and legislator, was born in that part of Rowan County that first became Surry County and then Wilkes County in 1778. Here he made his home during a long life, holding public office and operating a large plantation on land that his wife had inherited some two miles from the county seat town of Wilkesboro. In 1800 Wellborn owned 12,321 acres of land and seventy-five slaves. Willie P. Mangum, who visited Wellborn in the spring of 1820, praised the beauty of the Wilkes County area. He further commented: "I have seen in one stock at Col. Welbourns [sic ] 340 Cattle, & 70 or 80 of them that are fattening are in better order than I ever saw any animal of that description. They are raised without expense by sending them into the inexhaustible range of the mountains in the warm season of the year."

Wellborn married Rebecca Montgomery, the daughter of Colonel Hugh Montgomery, of Salisbury, a native of England. Her twin sister, Rachel, married Governor Montfort Stokes. The two sisters inherited large tracts of land from their father and, with their husbands, donated land for the town of Wilkesborough. Wellborn and his wife were the parents of several children, but his eighteen-year-old son, James, Jr., died in November 1827.

In a journal kept by Elisha Mitchell in 1827–28 on a journey to the mountains when he called on James Wellborn, he wrote: "What Wellborn's real character is I cannot make out. He has been a member of the Baptist church and will not allow of no swearing about him. He left the church under the idea that he was unfit to remain in it. He seems to have a religious paroxysm." An obituary in an Asheville newspaper noted the he was "highly esteemed for his strict integrity, great liberality and sterling patriotism." Wellborn died at his residence in Wilkes County and was buried in a nearby family cemetery enclosed by a stone wall. In 1992 Wendell H. Edgerton, of Wilkesboro, the owner of a new factory nearby, pleading ignorance, had the cemetery bulldozed and the site leveled.

Credit: Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, 6 volumes, edited by William S. Powell

~North Carolina - The War of 1812~

  • Most North Carolinians were folded into the US Army's 10th Regiment under Colonel James Welborn of Wilkes County, who resigned his commission as a general in the North Carolina Militia in order to join the regulars.

The main body of North Carolina troops destined for the Canadian front, the 10th Regiment under Colonel Wellborn, never took part in the fighting because the war came to an end while they were en route. Although not many Tar Heels engaged in military combat, those who did made excellent records of themselves. The total number of North Carolinians killed in combat was eighteen (18).*

The son of William Wellborn and Hepzibah Stearns. Husband of Rebecca Montgomery, the daughter of Hugh Montgomery and Catherine Sloan. Married 60 years.

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Name: James Wellborn Gender: Male Birth Place: NC Birth Year: 1767 Spouse Name: Rebecca Montgomery Spouse Birth Place: NC Spouse Birth Year: 1772 Marriage Year: 1794 Number Pages: 1

"James Wellborn and Rebecca Montgomery were married February 13, 1794 in Wilkes County, NC" (Info received from a 3rd gr-granddaughter on 5 Oct 2012)

James Wellborn and Rebecca Montgomery Wellborn were the parents of eleven known children:

Rachel Starnes Wellborn (Cannon) 1795–1841 Nancy Matilda Wellborn (Starnes) 1797-1842 William Wilkes Wellborn 1799-1864 Lucy Barton Wellborn 1801-1810 Rebecca Mariah Wellborn (Franklin) 1804-1878 Catherine Sloan Wellborn (Parks) 1806-1829 James Johnson Wellborn 1808-1828 Eliza Adeline Wellborn (Ledbetter) 1809- Hepzibah Mary Wellborn 1812- Hugh Montgomery Wellborn 1816-1865 Samuel Chapley Wellborn 1816-1856

The children of James Wellborn and Rebecca Montgomery are: Rachel Stearns Wellborn 11 October 1795 Nancy Matilda Wellborn 1 May 1797 William Wilkes Wellborn 8 November 1799 Rebecca Moriah Wellborn 4 November 1801 Lucy Barton Wellborn 10 June 1804 Catherine Sloan Wellborn 18 March 1806 James Johnson Wellborn 17 March 1808 Elizabeth Adeline Wellborn 14 December 1809 Hepzabeth Mary Wellborn 14 July 1812 Hugh Montgomery Wellborn 10 August 1816 Samuel Chapley Wellborn 10 August 1816" (Info received from a 3rd gr-granddaughter on 5 Oct 2012)

1850 Census Value of real estate owned: $11,890.

GENERAL JAMES WELLBORN

In his day General James Wellborn was probably the most prominent man in the county. He married Rebecca Montgomery, one of the two heirs to the large tracts of land known as the Moravian surveys.

James Wellborn was appointed General of the militia about the close of the Revolutionary War. From the year 1796 to 1835 General Wellborn served in the State Senate thirty years. He served in succession from 1796 to 1811, from 1817 to 1821, in 1823 and 1824, in 1828 to 1829, in 1832 and in 1834 and 1835. Prior to 1835 members of the General Assembly were elected each year, so Wellborn was elected thirty times in 39 years. The fact that a men can stand so popular for 39 years is honor enough for one man. I doubt if the world can furnish a like example.

During his terms in the Senate General Wellborn made strenuous efforts to have the State build a turnpike road from the mountains to the sea, but he failed. That was before any railroads were built in North Carolina and the turnpike would have been a great thing for the people of the west, but east had the majority and they knew that the people of the west had to come to them for their necessities turnpike or no turnpike, and they were not willing to be taxed to build the road for accomodation of the people of the west.

It was largely through the efforts of General Wellborn that his brother-in-law Montfort Stokes, was twice elected to the United States Senate and once elected to Governor of the State.

He was buried in his family cemetery on his plantation "The Bends" about 3 miles west of Wilkesboro.* Reference: Find A Grave Memorial - SmartCopy: Feb 5 2020, 0:28:53 UTC

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Brigadier General James Wellborn's Timeline

1767
November 29, 1767
Randolph County, North Carolina
1795
November 11, 1795
Wilkes County, North Carolina, United States
1797
May 1, 1797
WilkesCo, North Carolina, United States, Wilkes County, North Carolina, United States
1799
November 8, 1799
Wilkesboro, Wilkes County, NC, United States
1801
November 4, 1801
Wilkes, North Carolina, United States
1803
April 8, 1803
Wilkesboro, Wilkes, North Carolina, USA
1806
March 18, 1806
Wilkesboro, Wilkes, North Carolina, USA
1808
March 17, 1808
Wilkesboro, Wilkes County, North Carolina, USA, Wilkesboro, Wilkes County, United States
1809
December 14, 1809
Wilksboro, Wilkes County, United States