Bryan Hill Osborn

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Bryan Hill Osborn

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Franklin, PA, USA
Death:
Immediate Family:

Son of David Cuvier Osborn and Arvilla Maria Osborn
Husband of Stella V Osborn
Father of Geraldine Studebaker
Brother of David Winthrope Osborn; Cyrus Clark Osborn; Mary Olive Osborn and Donald Platt Osborn

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About Bryan Hill Osborn

Bryan Hill Osborne, born at Franklin, Pa., Aug. 10, 1858, began his education in the public schools there and attended high school at Cleveland, Ohio, where he fitted for college. He studied at Ohio Wesleyan University as a member of the class of 1880, but did not take the full course. He began the study of law in the office of McCalmont & Osborne at Franklin, and was admitted to the bar in 1881, entering upon active practice immediately. His law office has since been maintained at Franklin, and he has attained high distinction in his profession, at the same time filling various offices of trust with which he has been honored, in connection with the administration of the city government. For several terms he was a member of the council, was mayor in 1896, and in 1903, 1905 and 1906 represented his district in the State Legislature, running on the Republican ticket; in 1916 was one of the presidential electors who supported Hon. Charles E. Hughes. Mr. Osborne's business connections include association with the First National Bank of Franklin, of which he is a director; Sibley Soap Company; S. T. Karns' Sons Company and West End Water Company—director of all these and secretary of the Water Company; and he is financially interested in various other enterprises in the vicinity. He has co-operated in the promotion of many projects appealing to men of public spirit in Franklin; is president of the board of trustees of the Franklin Hospital; and a trustee of the State Hospital for the Insane at Warren, Pa. His religious connection is with St. John's Protestant Episcopal Church at Franklin, which he served as vestryman for some years.

On Dec. u, 1889, Mr. Osborne married Stella V. Mitchell, daughter of Forster W. and Laura M. (Wilson) Mitchell, of Franklin. Pa. They have but one child. Geraldine, born at Franklin, who was married June 16, 1917, to Frederick Studebaker Fish, of South Bend, Indiana.

copied from:

VENANGO COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA HER PIONEERS AND PEOPLE Embracing a General History of the County

PREPARED BY CHARLES A. BABCOCK, A. M., LL. B. f of Oil City, Pennsylvania

Venango County, Pennsylvania, Her Pioneers and People, Chicago, J.H. Beers & Co., 1919. Vol. I, page 480.

BRYAN HILL OSBORNE, of Franklin, is a lawyer and business man of versatile talents, well exemplified in the success which has accompanied his various undertakings, of whatever character. In more than thirty-five years of practice at the Venango county bar he has won distinction in the legal profession, and at the same time has carried extensive and important responsibilities in the field of business, has devoted a considerable thought to vital public questions, and has spent much time in the service of his fellow citizens, attempting to realize some of his cherished ideals in that line. With a mind alert to perceive the best possibilities of whatever interests him and the requisite mental and physical energy to follow his conclusions with action, he has accomplished much of value to the community besides handling his own affairs capably.

Mr. Osborne is the first of his family to make a permanent home in Pennsylvania, though his father, Dr. David Cuvier Osborne, is very well remembered in this section, where he was established for several years in the course of a long and fruitful ministry in the Methodist Church. The Osbornes are of old New England stock, thre having been several families of the name in New Haven, Conn., among the early settlers.

Thomas Osborne, from Mardstone, England, the pioneer ancestor of the branch of the family in which we are interested, removed in 1650 to Easthampton, L.I., and was a land owner there. In 1687 he conveyed all his remaining lands to his son Benjamin and returned to his old home at New Haven, where he died. By occupation he was a tanner. His children were Benjamin, Thomas (mentioned below), John and Jeremiah.

Richard Osborne, brother of Thomas, came from England to Hingham, Mass., thence to New Haven; he served in the Pequot war. He was a tanner by trade. Afterward he lived at Fairfield, Conn., and Newtown, L.I. The children of Richard Osborne were: John, Elizabeth, Priscilla and David.

John Osborne, another early settler of New Haven, removed to Fairfield with his father Richard; he married Sarah Bennett and had children: Samuel, John, David, Joseph and Elizabeth.

Jeremiah Osborne, perhaps a brother of Richard, settled in New Haven, was a tanner; served as deputy to the General Court, 1672-74. By his wife Mary he had children: Rebecca, Increase, Benjamin, Jeremiah, Mary, Elizabeth, Jeremiah(2), Joanna, Thomas and Elizabeth(2). Similarity among the names of the children of Richard, Jeremiah and Thomas would indicate that they were brothers.

Thomas Osborne (2), son of Thomas above, was born in England in 1622 and came to this country with the family. He removed from New Haven, Conn., to Easthampton, L.I., with his father, and died at Easthampton in 1712, aged ninety years. Among his children was Daniel. (III) Daniel Osborne, son of Thomas(2), born in 1666 at Easthampton, L.I., died there Jan. 6, 1713. His branch of the family located in the lower part of Main steet, Easthampton, and from that fact came to be known in later years as the "Down Street Osbornes." The old homestead of Daniel Osborne was owned in recent years by Daniel E. Osborne.

Daniel Osborne married Elizabeth Hedges, daughter or granddaughter of William Hedges, immigrant ancestor of the Hedges family of New York. Children: Daniel, Thomas, Abigail, Rebecca and Mary. These were born at Easthampton.

Daniel Osborne(2), born about 1690 at Easthampton, died there May 18, 1757. On June 10, 1713 he married Elizabeth Austin. Children: Elizabeth, Daniel, Rebecca, Jonathan, Hannah and David.

David Osborne, son of Daniel(2), born May 11, 1720, at Easthampton, L.I., died Dec. 4, 1792. To his marriage with Mary Hunting were born five children, the sons being Daniel and David.

David Osborne(2), born in Easthampton, Aug. 22, 1761, died Feb. 16, 1813, at Kingsbury, Washington Co., N.Y. On Nov. 20, 1788, he was married at Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y., to Lucretia Harris, who was born at Cornwall, Litchfield Co., Conn., July 30, 1768, and died at Kingsbury, Jan. 30, 1811. Children: Cornelia, born Oct. 2, 1789, died Dec. 23, 1821. Maria, born April 5, 1791, died the same day. John Huntting, born in November, 1792, died Aug. 13, 1794. Sophronia Lucretia, born April 5, 1795, died Aug. 3, 1830. Platt Smith, Harriet Munro, born April 13, 1800, died June 5, 1829. Harris Burnett, born Jan. 12, 1803, died in 1889. Morris Dickson, born Dec. 29, 1805, died July 26, 1808. Cynthia Ann, born Oct. 29, 1807, died Feb. 4, 1864.

Platt Smith Osborne, born March 26, 1798, died at Sherman, N.Y., April 20, 1887. He married Mary A. Platt, daughter of Nehemiah and Anna Platt, and they had children as follows, born at Ripley, N.Y.: Sophia Lucretia, born June 14, 1829, married Dr. Graves. David Cuvier, Platt Smith, Jr., was born April 27, 1834. Harriet, born Jan. 20, 1836, married Samuel P. McCalmont., Cynthia Ann, born April 3, 1838, married Dr. Samuel McNair. Isadore was born Dec. 12, 1839. Harris Burnett was born Aug. 11, 1841. James Whitehill was born Feb. 10, 1843. Mary Ann, born July 15, 1845, married Stephen Benedict.

REV. DAVID CUVIER OSBORNE was born Aug. 3, 1830, and was reared under primitive conditions, his father having taken up a farm from the government in 1820 in an undeveloped section of New York State. The father was a tanner, following the calling of many of his ancestors. The boy was given the best possible education under the circumstances, attending the local public schools and Westfield Academy, and made such good progress that at sixteen he was engaged to teach the village school at Sherman, where the family then resided. All the Osbornes were fond of music and talented in that line, and David was especially gifted. He cultivated his musical skill, spending two years in New York City studying with the best instructors of the time and later teaching music, both vocal and instrumental. For two and a half years he studied law in Panama, N.Y., in the office of Hon. Abner Lewis. But the course he had laid out for himself was changed on New Year's Eve, 1850, when he formally embraced Christianity while attending evangelistic services, and not long afterward he united with the Methodist Episcopal Church. He had already shown such promise as a public speaker that his friends saw a useful career for him in the ministry, which he soon decided to adopt, and in 1853 he was admitted to the Erie Conference to preach the gospel. The early predictions of his admirers were more than fulfilled.

He became one of the leading ministers of the Methodist denomination, setting a standard of earnest and effective work in every pastorate and leaving substantial evidences of the vigorous spirit which animated him in every enterprise. His love for music led him to give it an important place in the church services, and he himself would organize and drill church choirs and labor zealously to provide musical facilities, pipe organs having been installed in many of the churches which he served through his influence. The young were always the special objects of his care and attention. It was not only his idea to make the church and its activities attractive to them, but he planned to make them take the serious responsibilities of maintaining the church organization, and met with great success in this field, no doubt attributable to the never fading youthfulness of his own spirit. He believed that the church should lead in social regeneration, and the famous "Akron Plan," originally used in the First Church, Akron, Ohio, he worked out while pastor of that church in collaboration with Louis Miller, superintendent of the Sunday school and financier of the enterprise, and Jacob Snyder, the architect. They usually met in Dr. Osborne's study to discuss their ideas, which had such wonderful fruit. These progressive souls were anxious to provide a building especially adapted to the needs of Sunday school and church social activities, and it proved so successful at Akron that it was adopted by other congregations with similar problems all over the country.

Dr. Osborne was also called upon to help plan the Chautauqua movement, Dr. John H. Vincent asking counsel of him in arranging for and conducting the Chautauqua assemblies. While on the Barnesville district (1893-98) he was superintendent and instructor in the Epworth League Assembly of Bethesda, Ohio, and those who appeared on the program of that assembly in those years were guests at his cottage. A number of ambitious church building enterprises were carried to completion by his energy, his pastorates in every church having been periods of memorable activity. Yet with all the success he had in a material way, he never sacrificed the spiritual to that end -- it was rather that he raised the spiritual to a vigor and intensity which made many things possible. His eloquence was appealing, and a number of laymen who proved highly useful to the denomination were brought in under his preaching, notably the late President William McKinley. His pastorates were as follows: Randolph, 1853; Wattsburg, 1854; Dunkirk, 1855-56; Warren, 1857; Franklin, 1858-59; New Castle, 1860-61; Erie, First Church, 1862-64; Akron, 1865-67; Erie Street Church, Cleveland, 1868-70; Titusville, 1871-72; Cleveland district as superintendent, 1873-76; Steubenville Kramer Church, 1877-78; Massillon, 1879-80; First Church, Canton, 1881-83; First Church, Youngstown, 1884-86; Painesville, 1887-89; Conneaut, 1890-92; Barnesville district as superintendent, 1893-98; Niles, 1899-1900; Madison, 1901; superannuated, 1902; moved to Kalamazoo, Mich., where he died Oct. 26, 1912.While there he supplied a pulpit at Comstock, Mich., 1904-07.

On October 23, 1856, Dr. Osborne married Arvilla Maria Hill, eldest daughter of Rev. Bryan S. and Mary E. (Sanborn) Hill and they had children as follows:

Bryan Hill

David Winthrope, born at New Castle, Pa., March 16, 1861, died at Kalamazoo, Mich., Nov. 14, 1917;

Cyrus Clarke, born at Akron, Ohio, Oct. 19, 1865, married Oct. 12, 1893 to Myra Fay Mackey, of Franklin, Pa., is now residing at Havana, Cuba;

Mary, born at Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 21, 1869, died at Kalamazoo, Mich., Nov. 10, 1904;

Donald Platt, born at Steubenville, Ohio, Oct. 28, 1878, married May 15, 1918 to Mrs. Mabel H. Boudeman, is now residing at Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Mrs. Arvilla Maria (Hill) Osborne, born Dec. 29, 1837, at Sheridan, N.Y., daughter of Rev. Bryan S. and Mary E. (Sanborn) Hill, died Oct. 18, 1913, at Kalamazoo, Mich., was the eldest of their family, the others being:

(2) Robert Allen, born March 23, 1839, died April 29, 1858.

(3) Mary E., born Oct. 3, 1840, died April 23, 1859.

(4) Adeline, born Aug. 20, 1842, married Nov. 17, 1864, George M. Permer, who died in the spring of 1918.

(5) Julia, born Dec. 20, 1844, married Oct. 26, 1865, Daniel B. Foote.

(6) Emily, born Jan. 17, 1847, married Sept. 3, 1870, Dr. S.F. Chapin.

(7) Stella was born June 8, 1849.

(8) Eva Marila, born Feb. 12, 1852, married June 28, 1881, John C. Comopton.

(9) Moses Simpson, born Feb. 18, 1854, died Oct. 1, 1857.

(10) John Sanborn, born July 26, 1856, died July 16, 1886, married Nov. 9, 1881, Minnie H. Fritts.

(11) Johanna Stewart, born July 26, 1856, died April 28, 1899, married June 28, 1882, Joseph R. Allen, and (second) in January, 1892, George Sammons.

Bryan Hill Osborne, born at Franklin, Pa., Aug. 10, 1858, began his education in the public schools there and attended high school at Cleveland, Ohio, where he fitted for college. He studied at Ohio Wesleyan University as a member of the class of 1880, but did not take the full course. He began the study of law in the office of McCalmont & Osborne at Franklin, and was admitted to the bar in 1881, entering upon active practice immediately.

His law office has since been maintained at Franklin, and he has attained high distinction in his profession, at the same time filling various offices of trust with which he has been honored, in connection with the administration of the city government. For several terms he was a member of the council, was mayor in 1896, and in 1903, 1905 and 1906 represented his district in the State Legislature, running on the Republican ticket; in 1916 was one of the presidential electors who supported Hon. Charles E. Hughes.

Mr. Osborne's business connections include association with the First National Bank of Franklin, of which he is a director; Sibley Soap Company; S.T. Karns' Sons Company and West End Water Company -- director of all these and secretary of the Water Company; and he is financially interested in various other enterprises in the vicinity. He has co-operated in the promotion of many projects appealing to men of public spirit in Franklin; is president of the board of trustees of the Franklin Hospital for the Insane at Warren, Pa. His religious connection is with St. John's Protestant Episcopal Church at Franklin, which he has served as vestryman for some years.

On Dec. 11, 1889, Mr. Osborne married Stella V. Mitchell, daughter of Forster W. and Laura M. (Wilson) Mitchell, of Franklin, Pa. They have but one child, Geraldine, born at Franklin, who was married June 16, 1917, to Frederick Studebaker Fish, of South Bend, Indiana.

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Genealogical and Personal History of the Allegheny Valley Pennsylvania By John W. Jordan, LL.D. – Volume I - 1913

Bryan Hill, son of Rev. David Cuvier Osborne, was born at Franklin, Pennsylvania, August 10, 1858. He attended the public school of his native town and the high school at Cleveland, Ohio, where he fitted for college. He entered Ohio Wesleyan University, class of 1880, but did not graduate. He began to study his profession in the law office of McCalmont & Osborne at Franklin, and in 1881 was admitted to the bar. He immediately entered upon the practice of law and has continued to the present time with office at Franklin.

In his profession he has attained high distinction. He has also been honored with various offices of trust in the city. For several terms he was a member of the city council, and in 1896 he was mayor of the city. In 1903, 1905 and 1906 he represented his district in the state legislature. In politics he is a Republican. He is also a trustee of the State Hospital for the Insane at Warren, Pennsylvania: president of the board of trustees of the Franklin Hospital; director of the First National Bank of Franklin and of the Union Heat and Light Company, S. T. Karns Sons Company; secretary and director of the West End Water Company, and other companies. In religion he is an Episcopalian and for some years has been vestryman of St. John's Protestant Episcopal Church of Franklin. He is financially interested in various other enterprises in this vicinity and has lent his aid in co-operation in many projects appealing to the men of public spirit in this city.

He married, December 11, 1889, Stella M., daughter of Forster W. and Laura M. (Wilson) Mitchell (see Mitchell III). They have one child, Geraldine, born at Franklin, Pennsylvania.

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Bryan Hill Osborn's Timeline

1858
August 10, 1858
Franklin, PA, USA
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Franklin, PA, USA
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