Capt. John Coffeen

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John Coffeen

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Topsfield, MA, USA
Death: Died in Cavendish, VT, USA
Place of Burial: Cavendish, VT, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Michael Coffeen I and Lydia Coffeen
Husband of Susannah Goldsmith
Father of Lake Coffeen; John Coffeen; Susanna Baldwin; Michael Coffeen II; Lydia Gilbert and 7 others
Brother of Michael Coffeen; Robert Coffeen; Eleazer Coffeen; Henry Coffeen; Abigail Coffeen and 5 others

Occupation: Grist mill owner
Managed by: Lisa Cunningham
Last Updated:

About Capt. John Coffeen

A Patriot of the American Revolution for VERMONT with the rank of CAPTAIN. DAR Ancestor #: A023800

first settler of the town of Cavendish VT


  • 1751 marriage record: John Coffeen m. Susannah Gould Smith on Nov. 19,1751 at Brookline...Middleton Vital Records from Barbour 1668-1852
  • The Baldwin genealogy from 1500 to 1881 (1881)
Author: Baldwin, C. C. (Charles Candee), 1834-1895
Subject: Baldwin family
Publisher: Cleveland, O, [Leader printing company]
Possible copyright status: NOT_IN_COPYRIGHT

Pg. 707


Abel Baldwin was the leading spirit among them. He was born in the town of Cavendish, Windsor county, Vermont in 1790. His father’s name was Abel and his grandfather’s name was Isaac. His maternal grandfather, Captain John Coffeen, was the first white settler in the town of “Cavendish”. Mr. Baldwin acquired a good education and was successful school teacher. He was in the army in the war of 1812. With his family he left Vermont in October 1836, and came through the state of New York, and by water to Detroit and on to this county by way of White Pigeon and Goshen; his brother, Franklin G. Baldwin, and Joseph Streeter and David Pierce started from Vermont in September and came through in wagons. With them came Newton and Kendall Putnam and their father, who settled across the line in Wells county. Nearly all these family is were related in some way to the Baldwins. The following year the Spauldings came also from Vermont. 

http://boards.ancestry.com/surnames.twibell/22.26.31/mb.ashx

History

Cavendish, VT is located about seven miles east of Vermont's Green Mountains and about 13 miles west of the Connecticut River. The Black River winds through the Township, from west to east.

With evidence of Paleo Indians dating back 11,000 years ago, the Crown Point Road, ran through Cavendish, providing a critical path during the French and Indian War. However, it wasn’t until 1761 that Cavendish, Vermont was incorporated as a town.

Cavendish was originally seven miles square. Hawks Mountain made it difficult for residents on that side of the mountain to communicate with the town office located in what is today Cavendish village. Consequently, the township of Baltimore, was formed in the southeast corner of Cavendish in 1793, reducing the town by 3,000 acres. An additional 2,000 acres of its southern border was lost to the Town of Chester in 1841. Consequently, Cavendish today has 5,000 acres less than in its original charter.

In June of 1769 Captain Coffeen came to Cavendish from Rindge, New Hampshire to become the town's first settler. He established an inn, which doubled as his home, near the Crown Point Road in the northwest part of town, in the hopes of attracting customers. While subsequent settlers wanted to be near the Black River, the earliest ones established their homes in the hills, because it was easier and faster to clear land. Once cleared, the settlers started to raise agricultural crops such as wheat and corn.

Two villages sprang up, Duttonsville (today called Cavendish) started by Salmon Dutton who moved here in 1781 and Proctorsville founded by Leonard Proctor , who came with his family in 1782. These two families would eventually be joined by marriage resulting in three Vermont governors and a United States Senator.

The theme of “sanctuary” runs throughout Cavendish history, from the first settler, John Coffeen and his family looking for a place where they could practice religion as they saw fit, right into the 20th century, when the Soviet dissident and Nobel Laureate in Literature Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn made Cavendish his home (1976-1994).

When Cavendish began, it was a town of family farms-dairy and sheep. Small businesses thrived as they provided services to the farming community. The woolen mills made Cavendish a “company town” for a while, but by the 1950s, they were closing and the family farm was rapidly disappearing. Around this time, many people started looking elsewhere for work.

Today, in many ways, Cavendish has returned to its roots. With the arrival of the Internet, there has been a blossoming of small home-based businesses. While the early settlers produced items that were needed locally and in surrounding towns, thanks to the web, many of our current businesses sell products and services all over the world There is a growing artist community as well as a return to small farming. Once again cows and sheep dot the Cavendish landscape.* http://www.cavendishconnects.com/history/

Thursday, June 26, 2014 Cavendish Historic Timeline 1759-1858 The following timeline for Cavendish, Vermont was initially developed for the town’s 250th anniversary by the Cavendish Historical Society. For more information about the timeline, please call 802-226-7807 or e-mail margoc@tds.net

1759: Crown Point Road is built by the British, linking Fort Number 4 in Charlestown, NH to Fort Crown Point on Lake Champlain. Major John Hawks and 250 rangers cleared a roughhewn road through the forest. A path was cut across the elevation in southeastern Cavendish, now called Hawks Mountain. Soldiers traveling along this section of the road soon complained of its roughness. Another route bypassing Hawks Mountain was laid out during the next spring. An encampment twenty miles from Charlestown on the road gave the tributary of the Black River its present name Twenty Mile Stream.

1761: Cavendish Charter signed by King George III of England on Oct. 12. The area of land includes what is today, Cavendish and Proctorsville villages and Baltimore, VT.

1769: John and Susanna Coffeen and their children are the first settlers in Cavendish. Their home was located on the Cavendish Reading Road, close to Brook Road. Not long after Coffeen settled in Cavendish, he and his wife set out for Charlestown, NH for supplies and grinding their grist. Due to a snow storm, the parents did not return for six weeks. During this time, one of the Coffeen children became ill and died. The other children kept the body in the house until the parents return, at which time, due to heavy snow, the body was buried across the road from the house. Coffeen decided that this would be the family’s cemetery. Coffeens, Baldwins and at least four Revolutionary soldiers are buried there.

1775-1783: American Revolutionary War. In a new settlement like Cavendish, one of the first order of business would be to establish a militia for self-defense. Every able-bodied man would be a member, with one elected as Captain. These groups were also called “training bands.” John Coffeen was captain of the first Cavendish Militia and during the Revolution was at the head of a troop of Rangers.

When the Revolution came, these military companies were called into action. Oliver Tarbell was captain of one of the “train bands” and the company met at the Tarbell farm. In addition there were “alarm-lists,” which enumerated all the men between 14 and 65 years of age, who were liable to be called upon in an emergency. Up until 1847, all able-bodied men between 18 and 45 years of age, by law, were enrolled in the militia and were required to do military duty. Every man was required to keep arms and equipment as needed for actual service, and for so doing, his poll was exempt from taxation.

Susanna Coffeen was the only woman to remain in Cavendish through the entire Revolutionary War period.

http://cavendishhistoricalsocietynews.blogspot.com/2014/06/cavendish-historic-timeline-1759-1858.html

Cavendish Semiquincentennial: First Settlers Below are two accounts of the first settlers in Cavendish:

The first actual settlement in Cavendish was made in June, 1769, when Captain John Coffin located and built a dwelling in the northern part of the town. His hospitable residence during the Revolution afforded thousands of American soldiers shelter and refreshment while passing from Charlestown, NH, to the military posts on Lake Champlain. IN the northwestern part of the town was another stopping place, known as the Twenty-Mile Encampment. Captain Coffin gained his title during the Revolutionary war, being connected with the militia.

The first settlers of Cavendish were mostly from Massachusetts, and in 1771 Noadiah Russell and Thomas Gilbert joined Captain Coffin, sharing with him the hardships and privations attendant on frontier life. The grinding of a grist of corn involved a journey of sixty miles in those days.

The first deed, recorded March 21, 1781, was from Jesse Reed of Lunenburg, Mass, one of the original patentees, to John Coffin. Ebenezer and John Stone and John Russell settled in the town in 1781. …. As seen by the following in the town in early years grew rapidly in population, but has fallen off in this respect in later years 1791 (491 people); 1800 (921); 1830 (1,498); 1850 (1,576) 1870 (1,823), 1880 (1,276). Note that the 2010 Census has a census of 1,367 people. History of Windsor County, Vermont edited by Lewis Cass Aldrich, Frank R. Holmes 1891

On the 10th day of June, 1770 (although some authorities say it was 1769) John Coffeen, with his family, consisting of his wife, eight children, two hired men, )help was plentier than than now), two oxen, two horses and a cow, together with some household effects, arrived in Cavendish and located on what is now E. I. Heald’s farm, on the lot still called the “Coffeen pasture.” The old cellar-hole is still in existence where his first domicile is supposed to have stood. It was some time later that he moved up higher on the hill, nearer the “Ticonderoga Road” to substantially the place where Chas. S. Parker’s house now stands on what is known as the “Gilsonfarm.”

We are told that, owing to high water in the Connecticut river when he arrived at Charlestown, he was compelled to wait some three weeks for the water to subside, but I can not believe that there was a drouth there even then, and I have been much perplexed as to how Coffeen got that wife and eight children across the river. …

For something more than a year Coffeen had no neighbors in town, his nearest neighbors, I think were a family named “Spofford” living near “Greenbush” in Weathersfield, some eight miles distant. It is said that Coffeen, in later years, when joking his wife, who by the way was of very plain features, used to say that “although she was not handsome, still she was once the handsomest woman in town.”

The following year after Coffeen’s coming, Noahdiah Russell settled on what is now known as the “Richard Russell farm” and Thomas Gilbert located on the “Elwin Taylor farm” near Weathersfield line. This brought neighbors within about four and six miles from Coffeen towards Charlestown and life began to be quite social.” “The 150th Anniversary Celebration of Cavendish,” by Chas. R. Cummings; “The Vermonter August-September 1912. Posted by Margo Caulfield at 9:16 AM

http://cavendishhistoricalsocietynews.blogspot.com/2011/02/cavendish-semiquincentennial-first.html


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COFFEEN, JOHN Ancestor #: A023800 Service: VERMONT Rank(s): PATRIOTIC SERVICE, CAPTAIN Birth: 7-28-1727 TOPSFIELD ESSEX CO MASSACHUSETTS Death: 11-29-1802 CAVENDISH WINDSOR CO VERMONT Service Source: GOODRICH, ROLLS OF THE SOLS IN THE REV WAR,1775-1783, PP 421, 442, 825; WALTON, RECS OF THE COUNCIL OF SAFETY & STATE OF VT, VOL 1, PP 54, 55, 63; STATE PAPERS OF VT: PROCEEDINGS OF THE GEN ASSEMBLY, VOL 1, PP 3, 7, 16; VOL 2, P 4 Service Description: 1) CAPTAIN, VT MILITIA 2) DEL CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION, REP VT GEN ASSEMBLY RESIDENCE Created: 2002-03-27 23:23:55.3, Updated: 2003-05-30 09:30:39.0, By: mhall 1) City: CAVENDISH - County: WINDSOR CO - State: VERMONT SPOUSE Number Name


Created: 2002-03-27 23:17:13.16, Updated: 2002-03-27 23:17:13.16, By: Conversion 1) SUSANNAH GOLDSMITH ________________________________________________________________

Grave Marked by Daughters of the American Revolution http://www.newhorizonsgenealogicalservices.com/rev-vt-windsor-buried.htm

ID: I22104 Name: John Coffeen Sex: M Birth: 28 Jul 1727 in Topsfield, Massachusetts Death: 29 Nov 1802 in New Hampshire Note: n 1756, John and his family moved to Watertown, Massachusetts, probably as a result of the reported loss of his sailing vessel on the Connecticut River. This accident and probably some urging from his young pregnant wife, caused him to abandon the sailing profession. It is likely that the young family moved to Watertown to be near Susanna's family for the birth of their third child. Early in 1758, after his father's death, John, Susanna and their three children moved on to Rowley-Canada (Rindge), a town in New Hampshire only about 20 miles across the border from Townsend, to be joined there by brothers Eliezer and Henry. Sister Priscilla may have followed soon after. Rindge is in Cheshire county of which Keene is the county seat.

The town of Rindge was first granted by Massachusetts on February 3, 1737, to inhabitants of Rowley, Massachusetts who were in the Canada expedition and was initially called Rowley-Canada. It was granted again by the Masonian Proprietors on February 14, 1750 to Solomon Stewart and others, and was known as Monadnock # 1 or South Monadnock. The town was incorporated as Rindge on February 11, 1768 in honor of Daniel Rindge. John and his family settled on the farm later owned by Thomas and Charles G. Buswell. A deed in the Cheshire County Courthouse in Keene describes the sale of March 11, 1771 by Aaron Estey To John Busnell for 213 pounds, six shillings and eight pence, of "one centain or parcel of land lying in Rindge being one half of the Lot # 14 in the Third Range, containing by estimation fifty acres".

An "enumeration of the town of Rindge", ordered by the Provincial Legislature in September of 1767, showed a total population of 166 including John and Henry Coffeen as heads of families. Eliezer Coffeen was listed among the unmarried men of the town. In that same year, John Coffeen was licensed as an innkeeper, living in the south part of Rindge. The Coffeen's were active citizens of Rindge. In the town meeting of March 17, 1768, John was elected Tythingman, he was also active as a surveyor and often involved in road building.

Early in 1769, John and his family moved to Cavendish, leaving Eilezer and Henry and his family behind in Rindge. John's property in Rindge was sold to Aaron Esty sometime before 1771. John started to Cavendish with his family of 8 children, two hired men, two horses, a pair of oxen, is household furniture and provisions for one year. Included with the furniture was John's sea chest (which today is in the possession of Mrs. Shirley Moser of Fenton, Michigan, a lineal descendant of Lake Coffeen, John's son.)

John & Susanna probably followed the road which led from Rindge to Jaffrey, then through Marlborough to Keene; from Keene to Marlowe & from there through Acworth to Charlestown # 4 on the Connecticut River. The total journey was about 50 miles and must have consumed about a week in time. The slow pace of the oxen would have limited them to about 10 miles per day or less. When John & his family arrived at # 4, they were unable to cross the Connecticut River. There was a crossing about a mile north of the Fort but no bridge. A crude ferry was the only means for crossing to reach the Crown Point Military Road on the far side. Either ice or flood would have made such a crossing impossible. In any event, John was delayed about three weeks in crossing and it was not until the eighth day of May, 1769 that he arrived at the ten mile encampment on the Crown Point Road, a point near what is now the town of Amsden, Vermont.

Being unable to proceed farther with his teams, he loaded one of his horses with provisions and the other with beds and clothing, and with his wife and eight children proceeded on foot nearly ten miles into a trackless wilderness to the spot which was to be their future residence. Here they arrived about sunset, struck up a fire by the side of a log, near a spring of water, and there passed the first night in Cavendish, with no other shelter than the trees of the forest, and the star-decked heavens. The next day they succeeded in constructing a temporary cabin of poles and bark, and their little dwelling soon began to assume the appearance of comfort. The first summer John cut hay on a nearby wamp and that winter he kept his stock there. The nearest grist mill for grinding grain was 30 miles away.

John's home place was designated as lot # 1 on the original Charter Map for the Town of Cavendish. The original cellar hold can still be seen in the lower half of lot 1, marked by a stone slab at the north side of the road below lot 1. John built his permanent home, barns and tavern in the north half of lot 1 and later deeded the south half to his son Lake. The remainder of John's holdings were also in the northwest corner of Cavendish township.

source: "The Life and Times of Captain John Coffeen" LDS Library on microfilm, roll 1697660, item 13

________________________________ section of Will

excerpt From Capt. John Coffeen's will

Item, I give and bequesthe unto my Heirs & Connections, their Heirs and after Generations, perpetually, a Piece of Land for a Burying Place, it being part of my home farm, bounded as followeth, beginning on the westerly Line of the highway about eighteen feet nortwardly of my new Barn, thence running westerly, five rods a direct Course to a Large Butternut tree to westerly, five rods a direct Course to a Large Butternut tree to a Stake and Stones, Thence turn Northwardly a square Angle, run six rods to a Stake and Stones, thence turn a square Angle running eastwardly five rods towards the highway, thence running in the line of the highway six rods to the first mentioned bounds ____________________________________________

also Cousin line to Joan Nathan: 10th cousin 6 times removed You

  →  Mary Louise Graham 

your mother → Robert Arnold Boyd her father → John Price Boyd his father → Amor Boyd his father → Elizabeth Price Boyd his mother → John Hussey Price her father → Elizabeth Price his mother → John Hussey, III her father → Ann Hussey his mother → Sarah Innskeep her mother → Dr. William Ward her father → Andrew Ward, of Fairfield his father → Sir Richard Ward his father → Margaret Ward his mother → Dr John Hare, DCL her father → Elizabeth Hare his mother → Elizabeth Hare her sister → Agnes Knightley her daughter → Winifred Coke her daughter → Dorothy (Dorothea) UNPROVEN Franklin her daughter → Elizabeth (Franklin) Andrews her daughter → Elizabeth Griffin her daughter → John Griffin her son → Lydia Ford Knowlton his daughter → Lydia Lake her daughter → Lydia Coffeen her daughter → Capt. John Coffeen her son ________________________________________ n 1756, John and his family moved to Watertown, Massachusetts, probably as a result of the reported loss of his sailing vessel on the Connecticut River. This accident and probably some urging from his young pregnant wife, caused him to abandon the sailing profession. It is likely that the young family moved to Watertown to be near Susanna's family for the birth of their third child. Early in 1758, after his father's death, John, Susanna and their three children moved on to Rowley-Canada (Rindge), a town in New Hampshire only about 20 miles across the border from Townsend, to be joined there by brothers Eliezer and Henry. Sister Priscilla may have followed soon after. Rindge is in Cheshire county of which Keene is the county seat.

The town of Rindge was first granted by Massachusetts on February 3, 1737, to inhabitants of Rowley, Massachusetts who were in the Canada expedition and was initially called Rowley-Canada. It was granted again by the Masonian Proprietors on February 14, 1750 to Solomon Stewart and others, and was known as Monadnock # 1 or South Monadnock. The town was incorporated as Rindge on February 11, 1768 in honor of Daniel Rindge. John and his family settled on the farm later owned by Thomas and Charles G. Buswell. A deed in the Cheshire County Courthouse in Keene describes the sale of March 11, 1771 by Aaron Estey To John Busnell for 213 pounds, six shillings and eight pence, of "one centain or parcel of land lying in Rindge being one half of the Lot # 14 in the Third Range, containing by estimation fifty acres".

An "enumeration of the town of Rindge", ordered by the Provincial Legislature in September of 1767, showed a total population of 166 including John and Henry Coffeen as heads of families. Eliezer Coffeen was listed among the unmarried men of the town. In that same year, John Coffeen was licensed as an innkeeper, living in the south part of Rindge. The Coffeen's were active citizens of Rindge. In the town meeting of March 17, 1768, John was elected Tythingman, he was also active as a surveyor and often involved in road building.

Early in 1769, John and his family moved to Cavendish, leaving Eilezer and Henry and his family behind in Rindge. John's property in Rindge was sold to Aaron Esty sometime before 1771. John started to Cavendish with his family of 8 children, two hired men, two horses, a pair of oxen, is household furniture and provisions for one year. Included with the furniture was John's sea chest (which today is in the possession of Mrs. Shirley Moser of Fenton, Michigan, a lineal descendant of Lake Coffeen, John's son.)

John & Susanna probably followed the road which led from Rindge to Jaffrey, then through Marlborough to Keene; from Keene to Marlowe & from there through Acworth to Charlestown # 4 on the Connecticut River. The total journey was about 50 miles and must have consumed about a week in time. The slow pace of the oxen would have limited them to about 10 miles per day or less. When John & his family arrived at # 4, they were unable to cross the Connecticut River. There was a crossing about a mile north of the Fort but no bridge. A crude ferry was the only means for crossing to reach the Crown Point Military Road on the far side. Either ice or flood would have made such a crossing impossible. In any event, John was delayed about three weeks in crossing and it was not until the eighth day of May, 1769 that he arrived at the ten mile encampment on the Crown Point Road, a point near what is now the town of Amsden, Vermont.

Being unable to proceed farther with his teams, he loaded one of his horses with provisions and the other with beds and clothing, and with his wife and eight children proceeded on foot nearly ten miles into a trackless wilderness to the spot which was to be their future residence. Here they arrived about sunset, struck up a fire by the side of a log, near a spring of water, and there passed the first night in Cavendish, with no other shelter than the trees of the forest, and the star-decked heavens. The next day they succeeded in constructing a temporary cabin of poles and bark, and their little dwelling soon began to assume the appearance of comfort. The first summer John cut hay on a nearby wamp and that winter he kept his stock there. The nearest grist mill for grinding grain was 30 miles away.

John's home place was designated as lot # 1 on the original Charter Map for the Town of Cavendish. The original cellar hold can still be seen in the lower half of lot 1, marked by a stone slab at the north side of the road below lot 1. John built his permanent home, barns and tavern in the north half of lot 1 and later deeded the south half to his son Lake. The remainder of John's holdings were also in the northwest corner of Cavendish township.

source: "The Life and Times of Captain John Coffeen" LDS Library on microfilm, roll 1697660, item 13

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=winch&id=I22104

RESIDENCE

During the year 1758 came John Coffeen from Boston,

RINDGE SETTLEMENTS. 69

and his brothers Eleazer and Henry Coffeen from Lunen- burg. The former settled on the farm now of Thomas and Charles G. Buswell. Henry married Lucy Hale soon after his arrival, and located near the Jaffrey line, and not far from the clearing of Abel Platts. Eleazer was not married in 1771, and no reference to his house, if he had one, is found upon the records.

http://www.archive.org/stream/historyoftownofr00stea/historyoftownofr00stea_djvu.txt

RESIDENCE RINDGE

The Inhabitants of said Town of Rindge being met at the meeting house in said Town upon the seventeenth Day of March A.D. 1768 agreeable to the aforegoing Warrant, Proceeded as followeth (viz.)

First Choose Enoch Hale Esq Moderator To Govern said meeting.

Secondly made Choice of Nathaniel Russell for Town Clerk.

Thirdly Choose Nathaniel Russell first Selectman, William Carlton second Selectman, and Henry Goddin third Selectman.

Choose Nathan Hale Constable, and Henry Coffeen Town Treasurer, and Aaron Taylor and John Coffeen Tythingmen, and

12 http://www.archive.org/stream/historyoftownofr00stea/historyoftownofr00stea_djvu.tx

__________________________________

TO THE REVOLUTION. 93

short distance west of Nathaniel ; and Othniel Thomas, who settled near Monomonock Lake upon the farm now of Oilman P. Wellington ; John Emory, who fixed his abode in the southwest corner of the town ; Aaron Easty, who purchased the farm of John Coffeen, and in 1771 sold it to John Buswell, who hailed from Boxford. In addition to these, the town of Topsfield sent Abel and Elisha Perkins, who selected for their future home the farm now of George W. Towne, and Samuel Page, who resided upon the farm now of Willard C. Brigham.

http://www.archive.org/stream/historyoftownofr00stea/historyoftownofr00stea_djvu.txt

06 HISTORY OF RTNDGE.

to present this view of the population as it existed at the commencement of the Revolution, since many of these names will frequently appear in the record of that period.

During the seven years included in this chapter the town lost several valuable citizens. In 1769, John Coffeen emigrated to Cavendish, Vt. ; Jonathan Stanley, Henry Coifeen, Nathaniel Turner, Jonathan Jewett, David Allen, and Jonathan Hopkinson removed to Jaffrey, and the names of Isaac Allen, John Lilly, Aaron Taylor, Silas Dutton, William Stearns, John MacElwain, Joseph Worcester, Samuel Larrabee, Samuel Larrabee, Jr., David Hammond, Samuel and Daniel Harper disappear from the records.


http://www.archive.org/stream/historyoftownofr00stea/historyoftownofr00stea_djvu.txt

ECCLESIATICAL HISTORY

They probably contemplated, at one time, a permanent organization, and perhaps were associated in some bond of union, for they petitioned the proprietors for the privilege of building a meeting-house upon the Common. Their petition was not received until the control of public affairs had passed from that body, and their request was never presented to the town. They were few in numbers, but were men of ability and influence. There are good reasons for supposing that they occasionally had preaching of their own. And perhaps John Coffeen, one of their number, who sometimes preached after his removal from Rindge, officiated in that capacity while a resident of this town. Judging from their creed, public ministrations were not an expensive enjoyment, and may have been maintained for several years.

The creed of the church under Mr. Dean was much more generally accepted, and nearly the entire population ....

The men who settled Rindge never grumbled so long as they were suited ; but whenever there was an occasion, wherever they thought their rights were not properly regarded, their voices were plainly heard. Among the early residents, John Coffeen, Henry Coffeen, Eleazer Coffeen, Stephen Jewett, Jonathan Jewett, Nathaniel Turner, and Joseph Gilson did not join the church, for one reason, at least, that they professed to be Baptists, and consequently were not in sympathy with the doctrines preached. These were soon joined by Ezekiel Jewett and Henry Godding, who recently had been brought under discipline, and soon after were excommunicated from the church for want of sympathy with the creed, and a failure to observe the ordinances, — or in other words

SONS OF IRISH IMMIGRANT

The Coffeens, sons of an Irish emigrant, were born in Massachusetts, and came from Lunenburg to Rindge ;

http://www.archive.org/stream/historyoftownofr00stea/historyoftownofr00stea_djvu.txt

John Coffeen, the eldest son of Michael, was b. in Topsfield. After following the seas for a few years, he md., about 1752, Siasaimah Goldsmith, of Boston, and came to Rindge in 1758, and possibly a year or two earlier. In 1755 he was in Middletown, Conn., but he did not long remain tliere, — nearly a year. He resided upon the farm now of Thomas and Charles G. Buswell, and was an active, enter])rising citizen. In 1769 he removed to Cavendish, Vt., and was the first settler in that town. Mr. Coffeen was subsequently prospered in his worldly estate, and was honored with many promotions in civil affairs. He was the first representative from Cavendish in the Assembly, and held the office several years. There were several children, but the names of only two can be given.

I. JSleazer, bap. in Rindge 1766.

II. Xake, b. in Rindge about 1762. A graduate of

Vide page 358.

http://www.archive.org/stream/historyoftownofr00stea/historyoftownofr00stea_djvu.txt

_______________________

1769: John Coffeen is the first settler in Cavendish. His home was located on the Cav-endish Reading Road, close to Brooke Road. He is buried across the street from the farmhouse in the Coffeen Cemetery.

Cavendish Historical Society Newsletter, Tuesday, February 8, 2011 _____________________

On Oct. 12, 1761, King George III signed the Charter that created Cavendish. In spite of flood damage, Cavendish celebrated with four days of activities. On Oct. 7, local fiddler Bob Naess, brought his dance band Yankee Chank to play contras, squares and Cajun/Zydeco music. Similar to dances attended by the Coffeens in the (Cavendish’s first settlers), people lined the walls to watch the dancers.

http://cavendishhistoricalsocietynews.blogspot.com/2011/11/scribbler-ii-fall-2011-chs-newsletter.html _________________________________

Why Did the Coffeens, Duttons, and Proctors Live so Long? Today’s life expectancy in the United Sates is around 80 years of age. In the late 1700’s it was closer to 35. Yet the founding couples of Cavendish, all managed to equal or exceed 21st century life expectancy, with the one exception of Capt. John Coffeen, who died at 75. His wife Susanna died at 94, while Salmon Dutton was 80, his wife Sarah was 83 and the Proctors were 93, Leonard, and 84 Mary, respectively. With only three hospitals in America by 1791 (Philadelphia, New York City and Williamsburg, VA), there wasn’t a doctor in town until 1787, 18 years after the Coffeens arrived in Cavendish. The women primarily handled health matters, which was probably a good thing as medicine of that era was based on the “four humors” and blood letting was common practice. In “Healthy Communities Promote Longer Lives: One explanation for Life Expectancy Among Early Settlers,” available on-line, at the CHS blog Margo Caulfield, CHS Coordinator and co-director of Chronic Conditions Information Network compared the life of Cavendish’s first couples with the nine characteristics of those living in Blue Zones, those parts of the world where people live the longest.

“The daily life of the early settlers fit very much in line with those living in Blue zones as their day would have naturally included exercise, a sense of belonging, community and purpose; strong family life; faith and a diet of whole foods.” Today, with all of the benefits of electricity and the potential to work around the clock, we have a difficult time ‘down shifting’ our busy lives. Periods of rest were built into the settlers’ lives due to long winters, honoring the Sabbath, and sufficient light to work for extended periods past dusk. “Even though there is considerable discussion about Obama Health care, one can look to our town history to understand that how we live can increase our life expectancy far more than what our health care system provides.”

http://cavendishhistoricalsocietynews.blogspot.com/2012/07/scribbler-ii-summer-2012.html

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Capt. John Coffeen's Timeline

1727
July 25, 1727
Topsfield, MA, USA
1752
November 1, 1752
Age 25
Middletown, CT, USA
1754
September 1, 1754
Age 27
Watertown, Middlesex, MA, USA
1756
July 27, 1756
Age 29
Watertown, Middlesex County, Massachusetts
1758
March 2, 1758
Age 30
Topsfield, MA, USA
1760
1760
Age 32
Rindge, Cheshire, NH, USA
1762
1762
Age 34
Rindge, Cheshire, NH, USA
1764
1764
Age 36
Rindge, Cheshire, NH, USA
1766
April 20, 1766
Age 38
Rindge, Cheshire, NH, USA