Capt. John "Old Trooper" Rush

Is your surname Rush?

Research the Rush family

Capt. John "Old Trooper" Rush's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

John 'Old Trooper' Rush, II

Also Known As: "Old Trooper", "Capt. "Old Trooper""
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Old Rectory, Boreham, Essex, England
Death: Died in Byberry Township, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Place of Burial: Crestmont Farms, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Russ, III and Thomasine Massey
Husband of Susanna Rush, of Broughton & Byberry
Father of William Rush, of Byberry; Thomas Rush; Elizabeth Collett; Susannah Rush; John Rush, Jr. and 6 others
Brother of Lieut-Col. Thomas Rush IV; Frances Rush; Jane Rush; Anthoney Russ; Thomasine Rush and 3 others

Occupation: Captain, Commanded a troop of horses in Cromwell's army
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Capt. John "Old Trooper" Rush

John Rush commanded a troop of horses in Cromwell's army. He embraced the principals of the Quakers in 1660 and came to Pennsylvania in 1683 with seven children and several grandchildren. He settled at Byberry, thirteen miles from Philadelphia. In 1691, he and his whole family became Keithians, and by 1697, most of them had become Baptists.

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL ACCOUNT OF THE RUSH FAMILY, by Sylvester R. Rush, 1925.

The first of the American English Quaker Colonists was Captain John Rush of French ancestry and the family name was originally Roix, but was changed to the English RUSH when the English king gave a French knight, Siour de la Roix, a fief of land in the Saxon stronghold for his heroic service in his effort to gain possession of the Holy Sepulchre during the Crusade against the Moslems. [John Levi Rush p.20]

During the English Civil War, Oliver Cromwell fought to assert the power of parliament as opposed to the absolute power of the king. Born of country gentry, he succeeded in persuading many of England's greatest families to follow him. His reign (1649-1659), however, was characterized by the support of a strong strain of religious Dissenters which included zealous Puritan elements. The Rushes were Separatists who supported Cromwell while in England and the cause of independence here in America. Capt. John Rush commanded a horse troop in the Puritan army under Cromwell. Family legend indicates that Cromwell judged him among his best officers and he was given the name 'Old Trooper'. After the war John began farming and rearing a family. In about 1660 he became a Quaker, holding that persuasion throughout the Restoration, a harsh time for those who refused to conform to the Church of England. When William Penn opened his 'holy experiment' for settlement, the Old Trooper, then age sixty three, sold all his holdings. Like a second Noah, he and his wife, Susanna, gathered together their many grown children and grandchildren, and in 1683 boarded the ship, WELCOME, for America. They settled northeast of Philadelphia in the Quaker community of Byberry, founded by William Penn as sanctuary for this persecuted religious minority. The number of Quakers grew rapidly and included many of the higher classes, including ministers of the Established Church, army officers and justices. Most notable were Robert Barclay and William Penn. In 1682 Penn created an asylum for this group in the colony of Pennsylvania and thousands of Quakers quickly settled there. Rush arrived in Byberry just a year later. By 1697, however, the family had become Baptist. Their 500-acre farm in Byberry Township was located twelve miles up the Delaware River from Philadelphia on Poquessing Creek. This was to become the family home for the next five generations. John was a member of a separatist group of Friends known as the 'Christian Quakers,' at a time when the Quakers faced much persecution for not joining the Church of England, and (after reaching America) from the Puritans.

Gr.-Gr.-Grandson, Benjamin Rush later wrote 'it is sufficient gratification to me to know that he fought for liberty, and migrated into a remote wilderness in the evening of his life in order to enjoy the priviledge of worshiping God according to the dictates of his own conscience.'


Captain in Oliver Cromwell's Army

Nicknamed "The Old Trooper"


http://www.rootsweb.com/~wvmarsha/rushfam.htm

Captain John Rush who was a soldier in Cromwell’s Army later became a Quaker. In 1683 Captain Rush, his wife, Susanna Lucas, several children and grandchildren emigrated to America with William Penn and settled at Byberry near Philadelphia. Later most of the family following the lead of one of the sons-in-law, Rev. John Hart, became Keithians and still later Baptists. Some of the descendants moved across the river into New Jersey. About 1773 some fifteen or twenty families more or less related by marriage moved from New Jersey to Lower Turkeyfoot Township, Somerset County, Pennsylvania and founded what came to be known as the Jersey Settlement. In 1775 they formed the Jersey Baptist Church near the present village of Ursina. Among these were the families of William Rush, a descendant of Captain John Rush, Nathaniel Skinner, Senior, Robert Colborn, William Tissue, David King, Oliver Drake, Andrew Ream, Joseph Lanning, William Lanning, William Brooks, Obediah Reed and others. Jacob Rush, a son of William Rush, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and left many descendants, a considerable number of whom still live in western Pennsylvania and many others have been traced to other states as far west as California. Others of the New Jersey Rush tribe, Michael, William, Peter, and Jacob Rush, all nephews of William Rush of Lower Turkeyfoot moved to Washington and Greene Counties, Pennsylvania. Descendants still live in that region. Sylvester R. Rush, a lawyer of Omaha, Nebraska, a descendant of Michael Rush, in 1916 published a genealogical account of his branch of the Rush family.” (From: Rush and Skinner Families of Lower Turkeyfoot by Harry Speer Rush. 1943)


Baptism: 1620,Old Rectory, Boreham, Essex, England.

Marriage: 8 Jun 1648, Horton, Oxfordshire, England.

Immigration: 1683, in William Penn's Colony, Pennsylvania. He and his whole family came on the ship "Welcome."

Working backwards (would be mother or father of each line in succession): Richard S. Crowell > Mary Kathrine Crowell > William Riley Shelmire > William H. Shelmire > Joseph Hart Shelmire > Sarah Hart > Josiah Hart > Joseph (Colonel) Hart > John Hart Jr > John Hart married Susanna Rush > {John Hart > Christopher Hart > John Hart} -- {Susanna Rush > John "Old Trooper" Rush > John (Captain) Rush}. For more information see Rootweb and Sundheim.

The following information came February 4, 1997 from Luther Olson, Lyndhurst, Ohio from his website on the Internet: 'During the English Civil War, Oliver Cromwell fought to assert the power of Parliament as opposed to the absolute power of the king. Born of country gentry, he succeeded in persuading many of England's greatest families to follow him. His reign (1649-1659), however, was characterized by the support of a strong strain of religious dissenters which included zealous Puritan elements.' 'The Rushes were Seperatists who supported Cromwell while in England and the cause of independence here in America. Captain John Rush commanded a horse troop in the Puritan army under Cromwell. Family legend indicates that Cromwell judged him among his best officers and he was given the name 'Old Trooper.'

'After the war John Rush began farming and rearing a family. In about 1660 he became a Quaker, holding that persuasion throughout the Restoration, a harsh time for those who refused to conform to the Church of England. When William Penn opened his 'holy experiment' for settlement, the 'Old Trooper,' then age sixty-three, sold all his holdings.' 'Like a second Noah, he and his wife, Susanna, gathered together their many grown children and grandchildren, and in 1683 boarded the ship 'WELCOME' for America. They settled northeast of Philadelphia in the Quaker community of Byberry, founded by William Penn as sanctuary for this persecuted religious minority.'

'The number of Quakers grew rapidly and included many of the higher classes, including ministers of the Established Church, army officers, and justices. Most notable were Robert Barclay and William Penn. In 1682 Penn created an asylum for this group in the colony of Pennsylvania and thousands of Quakers quickly settled there. Rush arrived in Byberry just a year later. By 1697, however, the family had become Baptist.' 'Their 500-acre farm in Byberry Township was located twelve miles up the Delaware River from Philadelphia on Poquessing Creek. This was to become the family home for the next five generations. John Rush was was a member of a separatist group of Friends known as the 'Christian Quakers,' at a time when the Quakers faced much persecution for not joining the Church of England, and (after reaching America) from the Puritans.' 'Great-Great Grandson Benjamin Rush later wrote 'It is sufficient gratification to me to know that he fought for liberty, and migrated into a remote wilderness in the evening of his life in order to enjoy the priviledge of worshipping God according to the dictates of his own conscience.' (I have been told that the Quaker meetings in Philadelphia County were called 'Byberrys.')

Fact 1: Commanded a 'troop of horse' in Oliver Cromwell's army in England.

Fact 2: June 08, 1648, Married Susanna Lucas at the close of the war.

Fact 3: 1660, He embraced the principles of the Quakers.

Fact 4: 1683, Came to Pennsylvania with 7 children and several grandchildren.

Fact 5: 1683, Settled in Byberry, 13 miles from Philadelphia.

Fact 6: 1691, He and his whole family became Keithians.

Fact 7: 1697, Most of his family then became Baptists.

Fact 8: 1699, Died at Byberry


The following information came February 4, 1997 from Luther Olson, Lyndhurst, Ohio from his website on the Internet:

"During the English Civil War, Oliver Cromwell fought to assert the power of Parliament as opposed to the absolute power of the king. Born of country gentry, he succeeded in persuading many of England's greatest families to follow him. His reign (1649-1659), however, was characterized by the support of a strong strain of religious dissenters which included zealous Puritan elements."

"The Rushes were Separatists who supported Cromwell while in England and the cause of independence here in America. Captain John Rush commanded a horse troop in the Puritan army under Cromwell. Family legend indicates that Cromwell judged him among his best officers and he was given the name "Old Trooper."

"After the war John Rush began farming and rearing a family. In about 1660 he became a Quaker, holding that persuasion throughout the Restoration, a harsh time for those who refused to conform to the Church of England. When William Penn opened his "holy experiment" for settlement, the "Old Trooper," then age sixty-three, sold all his holdings."

"Like a second Noah, he and his wife, Susanna, gathered together their many grown children and grandchildren, and in 1683 boarded the ship "WELCOME" for America. They settled northeast of Philadelphia in the Quaker community of Byberry, founded by William Penn as sanctuary for this persecuted religious minority."

"The number of Quakers grew rapidly and included many of the higher classes, including ministers of the Established Church, army officers, and justices. Most notable were Robert Barclay and William Penn. In 1682 Penn created an asylum for this group in the colony of Pennsylvania and thousands of Quakers quickly settled there. Rush arrived in Byberry just a year later. By 1697, however, the family had become Baptist."

"Their 500-acre farm in Byberry Township was located twelve miles up the Delaware River from Philadelphia on Poquessing Creek. This was to become the family home for the next five generations. John Rush was was a member of a separatist group of Friends known as the "Christian Quakers," at a time when the Quakers faced much persecution for not joining the Church of England, and (after reaching America) from the Puritans."

"Great-Great Grandson Benjamin Rush later wrote "It is sufficient gratification to me to know that he fought for liberty, and migrated into a remote wilderness in the evening of his life in order to enjoy the privilege of worshipping God according to the dictates of his own conscience."

(I have been told that the Quaker meetings in Philadelphia County were called "Byberrys.")

[v55t2482.FTW]

Had 10 children.

IMMIGRATION: Came to Penn in 1683 with 7 children & several grandchildren. Sailed on the "WELCOME". Settled in Penn's Quaker community of Byberry. "Their 500 acre farm in Byberry Township was located twelve miles up the Delaware River from Philadelphia on Poquessing Creek. This was to become the family home for the next five generations.

RELIGION: Quakers - 1691 Keithians, 1698 Baptists.

Facts about this person:

Military service

English Civil War./

[v71t0778.ged]

John Rush commanded a troop of horses in Cromwell's army. At the close of the war he married Susanna Lucas, at Hortun, in Oxfordshire, June 8, 1648. He embraced the principles of the Quakers in 1660, and came to Pennsylvania in 1683, with seven children and several grandchildren, and settled at Byberry, thirteen miles from Philadelphia. In 1691 he and his whole family became Keithians, and in 1697 most of them became Baptists. He died at Byberry in May, 1699. His sword is in the possession of Jacob Rush, and his watch now belongs to General William Darke, of Virginia. He had issue (as appears by a record in his own handwriting now in possession of Dr. Benjamin Rush).

"Captain John Rush who was a soldier in Cromwell's Army and later became a Quaker. In 1683 Captain Rush, his wife, Susanna Lucas, several children and grand children emigrated to America with William Penn and settled at Byberry near Philadelphia. Later most of the family following the lead of the son-in-law, Rev. John Hart, became Keithians and still later Baptists. Some of the descendants moved across the river into New Jersey. About 1773 some fifteen or twenty families more or less related by marriage moved from New Jersey to Turkeyfoot Township, Somerset County, Pennsylvania and founded what came to be known as the Jersey Settlement. In 1775 they formed the Jersey Baptist Church near the present village of Ursina. Among these were the families of WILLIAM RUSH, a descendant of Captain John Rush, Nathaniel Skinner, Sr., Robert COLBORN, WILLIAM TISSUE, David King, Oliver Drake, Andrew REAM, Joseph Lanning, William Lanning, William Brooks, Obediah Reed and others. JACOB RUSH, a son of WILLIAM RUSH, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and left many descendants, a considerable number of whom still live in western Pennsylvania and many others have been traced to other states as far west as California.


John commanded a "troop of horse" in Cromwell's Army, a calvery officer in Oliver Cromwells army. He was a personal friend of Cromwell. Cromwell said of Rush, "I had no better officer in the army." This was after his horse came back without John on it. According to a letter from Dr. Benjamin Rush to John Adams. John, wife, six sons and three dau. moved to Pennsylvania with William Penn in 1683.


*Extensive notation for Captain John Rush, courtesy of original Researcher responsible for the substantial body of work on the Copeland family group. See: assets.luginbuel.com. Also see: Genealogy Report: Ancestor's of Guy William Johnson, Jr. located at Genealogy.com Compiled by Maryann Johnson. Editing and reformatting executed by me: Joachim hawn

  • Notes for Capt. John Rush:

AFN:4BF9-Q6

FTM Family Archives, Vol 6, # 3646: Commanded a "Troop of Horse" in Oliver Cromwell's Army

  • June 8, 1648,
  • Married Susanna Lucas at the close of the war

1660

  • Embraced the principles of the Quakers.

1683

  • Came to Pennsylvania with 7 children and several grandchildren

Settled in Byberry, 13 miles from Philadelphia 1691

  • He and his whole family became Keithians.

1697

  • Most of his family then became Baptists

1699

  • Died at Byberry, He was "aged about 80 years"

FTM Family Archives, Vol 10, # 3956:

  • According to a letter from Dr. Benjamin Rush to John Adams, John, wife, six sons and three daughters moved to Pennsylvania with William Penn in 1683.

FTM Famiy Archives, Vol 5, # 1662: "The Kith & Kin of the DARKE-DARK Clan in AMERICA1680-1873"

  • Complied & edited by Mary Gugenia DeGroat, 1974.
  • Reformatted and final editing by Joachim Hawn, profile manager 2015

  • "Captain Peter Rush of PA., and His Descendants, with notes on Dr. Benjamin Rush - Signer of the Declaration of Independence and Other Notes on Rush Americana."
  • "History of the Early American Descendants of Capt. John Rush" by John Levi Rush of Uniontown, PA.
  • Capt. John Rush commanded a troop of horse in Cromwell's army, and was personally known to him. After the close of the war he married Susannah Lucas, 8 Jun 1648, Hortun(Oxfordshire)England. Who his father was, we do not know. The emigrant is said to have come from Oxfordshire, and according to his family Bible, his 6th child, James, died at Banbury--which is in that county, in 1671.But, according to the same record, his 3rd child, Thomas, died in London in 1676.So, London may have been Capt. Rush's home. All we know of the emigrant ancestor, we obtain from the most famous of his descendants. Dr. Benjamin Rush, who has left an outline pedigree of the Rush family in his own handwriting. Capt John embraced the principle of the Quakers in 1660, and he with his wife and large family of children and grandchildren came over with the William Penn colonists who settled Pennsylvania and West Jersey in 1682-3.

The Rush family settled on Poquessing Creek in Byberry Township, 13 miles from Philadelphia (now inside that city), In 1691, he and his whole family left the Quakers and became Keitians. In 1697 most of them became Baptists. He died at Byberry 1699 aged 80.According to the Pennypack Baptist Church, the oldest of this denomination in PA, Susannah (Lucas) Rush was Baptized into this faith on 5 July 1707, when she was about 80 years old. His sword is in the possession of Jacob Rush, and his watch now belongs to General William Darke, of Virginia. FTM Family Archives, Vol 1, # 5458:

  • Captain John Rush was the founder of the Rush family in North America. He was to have commanded one of Cromwell's horse troops in the militia army. After he married Susannah Lucas, they emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1683 and settled near Philadelphia.
  • From Family Tree Maker Home Page of David L. Paal:

"The following information came February 4, 1997 courtesy of Luther Olson, Lyndhurst, Ohio from his web site of the Internet:

  • "During the English Civil War, Oliver Cromwell fought to assert the power of Parliament as opposed to the absolute power of the king. Born of country gentry, he succeeded in persuading many of England's greatest families to follow him. His reign (1649-1659), however, was characterized by the support of a strong strain of religious dissenters which included zealous Puritan elements."

"The Rushes were Separatists who supported Cromwell while in England and the cause of independence here in America. Captain John Rush commanded a horse troop in the Puritan army under Cromwell. Family legend indicates that Cromwell judged him among his best officers and he was given the name "Old Trooper." "After the war John Rush began farming and rearing a family. In about 1660 he became a Quaker, holding that persuasion throughout the Restoration, a harsh time for those who refused to conform to the Church of England. When William Penn opened his "holy experiment" for settlement, the "Old Trooper," then age sixty-three, sold all his holdings." "Like a second Noah, he and his wife, Susanna, gathered together their many grown children and grandchildren, and in 1683 boarded the ship "WELCOME" for America. They settled northeast of Philadelphia in the Quaker community of Byberry, founded by William Penn as sanctuary for this persecuted religious minority."

"The number of Quakers grew rapidly and included many of the higher classes, including ministers of the Established Church, army officers, and justices. Most notable were Robert Barclay and William Penn. In 1682 Penn created as asylum for this group in the colony of Pennsylvania and thousands of Quakers quickly settled there. Rush arrived in Byberry just a year later. By 1697, however, the family had become Baptist." "Their 500-acres farm in Byberry Township was located twelve miles up the Delaware River from Philadelphia on Poquessing Creek. This was to become the family home for the next five generations. John Rush was a member of a separatist group of Friends known as the "Christian Quakers", at a time when the Quakers faced much persecution for not joining the Church of England, and (after reaching America) from the Puritans." "(I have been told that the Quaker meetings in Philadelphia County were called "Byberrys".)" The following information came to me via e-mails from Craig Scott in Maidenhead, England, about 30 miles from London, on January 11-12, 1998:

"This week we tracked down the register of Banbury Friends Meeting - the actual book, not a transcript - in which John Rush and Susanna Lucas's wedding the children's birth were recorded (Albeit retrospectively) in about 1675.All but one event happened in Hornton, a village near Banbury in north Oxfordshire. The other happened in nearby Broughton, where Susanna Lucas probably came from. All the dates tally."

  • "Originally, one of my cousins had found information on the Sir Thomas Russhe line, suggesting that John Rush's birthplace was the village of Boreham, outside Chelmsford in Essex, and Sarah and I had decided to check it out. We were standing in the churchyard admiring this Tudor house across the street when one of the churchwardens walked up the path. We chatted her up, told her we were looking for Rushes, and she said "Oh, yes, you want to talk to Rev. Smith." He turned out to be a character right out of Jane Austen, the retired vicor of the parish and a formidable local historian. He had been one of the main sources for the article by AR Rush, a member of the Northamptonshire Rushes, who had been researching the line in the 1970's but is, alas, now dead. It turned out that the Tudor house we'd been admiring had been the Rush family home for a hundred years or so, and was John Rush's birthplace."

"We've been going through boxes of musters and accounts from the English Civil War in the Public Records Office (PRO), trying to verify the story that John Rush met Susanna Lucas as a result of being quartered with her Roundhead family (note: In the English Civil War, the King's supporters were popularly known as Cavaliers and the Parliamentarians known as Roundheads; supposedly because they kept their hair Puritan-short...but take a look at Oliver Cromwell).Certainly there was a John Rush in a Calvary troop which was part of the garrison at Warwick Castle, one of the main Parliamentary strongholds. Though they don't seem to have been involved in too many set-piece battles, the troop seems to have been the garrison's "rapid deployment force," spending a lot of their time raiding, skirmishing, and foraging a fair bit in the immediate area of Hornton and Broughton. It couldn't be said, however, that this troop was part of the New Model Army proper, and there's no evidence they were at the battle of Naseby. This was the main action in which the NWA fought and for which they were quartered at Guilsborough. By mid-1646, this John Rush was a corporal in charge of a squadron of 15-20 men. We're still trying to track him after that. He might have been given a command of his own between then and mid-1648 when he got married. We have found a few Lucas’ mentioned in the area, but nothing definitive, though we still haven't found the accounts for Broughton (these include the individual compensation claims for the populace for having troops quartered, sheep stolen, and all the other depredations of war)."

The following narrative is taken from A. R. Rush's "Benjamin Rush, M. D. 1745-1813: His Origins and Ancestry," pp. 25-28.The entire text was sent to me from Craig Scott, Maidenhead, England on January 23, 1998: "According to the reference in his father's will, John was a younger son and was in fact the youngest surviving child of his father's family. If his father may be regarded as the last of the line in the English branch of the Rush family, then John who migrated to the New World must surely be the first in the line of the American branch." "The records of the parish church show that he was baptized at Boreham on May 22, 1623, but from that time until the year 1683 when he migrated to America, very little is known of his doings. By Dr. Benjamin's own statement, John Rush became a member of the Society of Friends (Quakers), and if it be correct, as the Doctor asserts, that his ancestor quitted England in a spirit of bitterness, then it is possible that John has suffered persecution; at least he would have known about it at first hand.

After the Restoration in 1660, Royalist Oxford carried its revenge on non-conformists to extremes. There are several accounts of the malicious treatment of Quakers - frequently women - who suffered from mob violence to be found in the "Thomason Tracts," and they make shameful reading." "Almost from the beginning of his reign, Charles II, himself a Roman Catholic, inaugurated an era of religious oppression. The Acts, all aimed at non-conformists directly or indirectly, produced a rising tide of popular indignation over the years. Here are some of them:

  • "The Act of Uniformity (1662) threw out some thousands of Puritan clergy from the Episcopalian Church of England; some of them were men of piety and learning. The use of the Prayer Book was forced on them against their principles; in a more favourable atmosphere that might have been swallowed, but when their whole status as ministers was denied except they had been duly consecrated by a bishop, a breaking point had been reached. Moreover, any absence from Church worship in their parish church could cause them to be brought before the arch deacon who could inflict penalties."
  • "The Conventicle Act (1664) punished with fine, imprisonment, and all transportation after a third offence, all persons who met in greater number than five for any religious worship save for that of Common Prayer."
  • "Next came the Five Mile Act (1665), which called upon all those non-conformist ministers who had been driven out, to swear an oath that it was unlawful in any circumstances to take up arms against the King, or to endeavor any alteration of government in church and state. In the event of a refusal, the unhappy minister was forbidden to go within five miles of any place where he had been accustomed to minister. The humiliation of non-conformists could scarcely go much further."
  • "From 1660 until 1685, when Charles died, the story was one of increasing religious oppression combined with political turbulence; The struggle between a king (known to his intimates to be a Roman Catholic) opposed by a Protestant nation fearful at the prospect of another Romanist Stuart to succeed him. John Rush undoubtedly knew the state of things around him, and when in 1682 the Quaker William Penn founded Pennsylvania, the prospect of a new land free from religious and political pressures must have sounded inviting, a god-sent and welcome haven of refuge. In the absence of any documentary proof otherwise, it is no wild guess that William Penn inspired in John Rush the decision to uproot and emigrate. Indeed one may be almost permitted to wonder why he delayed so long."
  • "From his father's will, John Rush was to receive legacies for his maintenance during childhood and youth, together with a lump sum of L. 200 payable on his twenty-first birthday. There was also the reversion of income derived from a property styled "the parsonage' held by John's father under lease from the Chapter of St. Paul's Cathedral; this income was willed first to the mother Thomasine, next to Thomas the elder son, and after the death of these two, to John. Unfortunately he never inherited it, for we learn from the 'Autobiography" of Sir John Bramston (Knight of the Order of the Bath) that John's elder brother sold the lease to one Moundeford Bramston, and so it passed out of the possession of the Rush family altogether."
  • "From the will of Thomas Rush senior, who died in 1635, it is plain that the 'Lord Chiefe Justice' Bramston, who is named as a trustee in it, was the father of Sir John Bramston K. B. The Lord Chief Justice was also a knight - Sir John Bramston - and his brother was the William Bramston who is also named as trustee in the will."
  • "The Old Rectory at Boreham, the birthplace of John Rush, who was baptized in the parish church there on May 22, 1623; this is undoubtedly "the parsonage" which figures so prominently in the will of Thomas Rush, who lived there. Exactly how and why Thomas sold the lease of "the parsonage" is not clear, but almost certainly the transaction must have had John's approval, because of his re-vIsionary interest already mentioned. Quite possibly the matter was a family arrangement, and John's share of the proceeds may have helped to pay the considerable transport costs when he emigrated with his whole family to Philadelphia."

From "The Autobiography of Benjamin Rush:

  • *"Travels through Life" together with his "Commonplace Book for 1789-1813":
  • "John Rush and Susanna Rush his wife arrived in Pennsylvania from England in the year 1683 with eight children and several grandchildren. Their names and ages may be seen in a list of his descendants, preserved with sundry letters, notes, etc. of his family in my box of private papers. He had commanded a troop of horse in Cromwell's army and was personally known to, and respected by Cromwell, as an active and intelligent officer. One of his grandsons Thomas Rush who used to visit me about the year 1770 and 1771, and who was then about 84 years of age, passed the first 13 or 14 years with him, and received from him many details of his battles and skirmished one of which was as follows:

-He was once ordered out with a command of a reconnitering party. Soon afterwards his mare came into camp without him. Cromwell saw her and said "Poor Captain Rush is no more. He has not left a better officer in my army. "Soon afterwards he came in, covered with mud, and was received with great joy by all his brother officers. In a retreat his mare had fallen into a ditch, and had thrown him off. The enemy thought him dead, and pursued his mare. After they had left the ditch, he rose and came into camp. The mare he rode was a grey colour. In honor of this event, Thomas Rush his grandson always rode a grey mare. I know nothing of his family in the part of England (Hortun, Oxfordshire) from which he came. The name of Rush is an ancient one in that County, and very common in the two adjoining counties of Leicester and Bershire. It is a sufficient gratification to me to know that he fought for liberty, and migrated into a remote wilderness in the evening of his life in order to enjoy the privilege of worshiping God according to the dictates of his own conscience. He with his whole family were Quakers when they arrived. They afterwards joined the society of George Keith..." "I am the eldest son of the 5th generation descended from him. The names of the intermediate links of the family are William, James and John. William died in his 38th year at Byberry; his eldest son James died at about 47 upon his farm on Pequistian (Poguessing) Creek in Byberry, near the Bristal Road...My father succeeded him to business, which was that of a gunsmith, and to his farm, on which he lived for many years. He removed to Philadelphia to a house in Front Street which belonged to his mother, where he followed his trade with great industry and success for a few years. He was a very ingenious man, and so strictly that one of his neighbours used to say of him, that "the highest character that could be given to a man was to say he was as honest as John Rush."


  • More About Capt. John Rush:

Immigration: 1683, On ship "Welcome"


Great-grandfather of Dr. Benjamin Rush, signer of the Declaration, John Rush was a Captain of the troop serving under Oliver Cromwell

view all 25

Capt. John "Old Trooper" Rush's Timeline

1620
May 22, 1620
Old Rectory, Boreham, Essex, England
1623
May 20, 1623
Age 2
Boreham, Oxfordshire, Eng.
May 22, 1623
Age 3
Boreham, Essex, UK
1649
June 16, 1649
Age 29
Hornton, Oxfordshire, , England
1652
July 21, 1652
Age 32
Hornton, Oxfordshire, England
1654
November 7, 1654
Age 34
Hornton, Oxfordshire, England
1656
December 26, 1656
Age 36
Horton, Oxfordshire, England
1660
March 1, 1660
Age 39
Hornton, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom