Capt. Raleigh Croshaw, Ancient Planter

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Raleigh Croshaw

Also Known As: "Joseph Crosher / Ralph Croshaw"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Crowshaw, Lancashire, England
Death: Died in Elizabeth City County, Virginia Colony
Immediate Family:

Son of Joseph Crosher and Katherine Croshaw
Husband of Rachel Croshaw and Unity Ursula Croshaw (Daniels)
Father of Katherine Graves; Maj. Joseph Croshaw; Noah Croshaw; Benjamin Croshaw and Captain Richard Croshaw

Occupation: Ancient Planter
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Capt. Raleigh Croshaw, Ancient Planter

Raleigh Croshaw (sometimes spelled Crashaw or Crowshaw) was born in 1584 in Croshaw, Lancashire, England. He was the son of Joseph Croshaw (b.1561).

Raleigh came to Jamestown in the Second Supply the latter part of September 1608, aboard the Mary and Margaret. He has been proven to be a member of the London Company, investing or 'adventuring' 25 pounds in the company.

His wife came over on the "Bona Nova" in 1620 but, as she is not mentioned in 1623 Census or the muster of 1624/5, she was likely either dead by 1623, or returned to England. Three sons have been identified. The eldest, Joseph may have been born in either England or Virginia, but most likely in Virginia. It is most like that he was educated in England. The name of the second son is believed to be Noah, and not much is known about him. The third son was Richard. Both Joseph and Richard can be found in later Virginia records.

Capt. John Smith refers often to Capt. Croshaw in his books about Jamestown. He was a member of the group with Captain John Smith in January 1609, who while attempting to trade for corn with the Indians at Opechancanough's village were almost overcome by surprise. This attack was thwarted in part by Raleigh Croshaw's quick reactions. Raleigh Croshaw then made a night trip back to Jamestown which helped to avoid further treachery. He appears to have been a very skilled Indian fighter.

At the time of the massacre in March of 1622, he was on a trading cruise on the Potomac. According to Captain John Smith's General History, Croshaw challenged the chief Opchanacanough or any of his warriors to fight him naked (without armor), an offer that was not accepted. When Captain John Smith published his General History in 1624, one of the verses in Volume III was written by Croshaw and in his writing, John Smith implies a high opinion of Croshaw's knowledge of Indians and their way of making war.

About 1623 a patent was issued to "Captain Raleigh Croshaw, Gentleman, of Kiccoughtan, 'An Ancient Planter who hath remained in this country 15 years complete and performed many a worthy service to the Colony,' for 500 acres (2 km²) by Old Point Comfort. This was based on his transporting himself, his servant and his wife in addition to adventuring 25 pounds sterling in the Company.After the King dissolved the Virginia Company in 1624 making all the settlements a Crown Colony, Raleigh Croshaw was elected to the House of Burgess for Elizabeth City. In March1624, he was issued a commission to trade with the Indians for corn. On this voyage he purchased a "great canoe" for 10,000 blue beads. The Corporation of Elizabeth City states that “Captain Raleigh Croshaw planted by Patent 500 acres (2 km²) between Fox Hill and the Pamunkey River to establish Elizabeth City.

Captain Croshaw was last referred to on 22 November 1624, and then on 27 December 1624 Captain Francis West was instructed to take an inventory of his estate. The name of his wife does not appear in the estate settlement, hence the belief that she was dead, and not returned to England.

Children of Raleigh Croshaw:

  • Joseph Croshaw -- born in probably 1610-1612, married five times and had six children.
  • Noah Crowshaw -- (1614–1665), married Elinor (?). Researchers debate the first name.
  • Richard Croshaw -- (1618–1667), married Elizabeth

LInks to additional material:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raleigh_Croshaw https://archive.org/stream/generallhistorie01smit#page/292/mode/2up/search/croshaw http://www.jamestowne-wash-nova.org/RaleighCroshaw.htm http://www.ancientplanters.org/list.htm?v=C http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~virginiahuddlestons/captain_john_huddleston_of_the_b.htm

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Captain Raleigh Croshaw (–1624) was an Ancient planter and a representative in the House of Burgesses for Elizabeth City County in the Colony and Dominion of Virginia.

Croshaw is believed to be from the Crashaw family of Crashaw, Lancashire, England; his parentage and date of birth are not known.[1] He arrived in Jamestown, Virginia on the "Mary & Margrett", with the Second Supply in September 1608. His wife came over on the "Bona Nova" in 1620 but, as she is not mentioned in 1623 Census, she was likely dead by 1623. He was a member of the Virginia Company of London in 1609 and was still listed as an adventurer in the Company in both 1618 and 1620. He was one of the authors of the complimentary verses prefixed to "The General History of Virginia, New England, and the Summer Isles" (1624) of John Smith of Jamestown.

Croshaw and his wife had at least two sons, possibly three:[1]

  • Joseph Croshaw (1610–1667), married 1. Unknown; 2. Widow Finch ; 3. Widow Anne Hodges; 4. Widow Margaret Tucker; 5. Widow Mary Bromfield
  • (possibly) Noah Croshaw (1614–1665), married Elinor ________
  • Richard Croshaw (1618–1667), married Elizabeth _________

Raleigh Croshaw was the local official in the Elizabeth City area. This settlement later became known as the Middle Plantation and later Williamsburg, Virginia. His sons were among the first to take advantage of this new settlement. Both Joseph and Richard are mentioned many times in the records. Joseph appears to have led a more public life, having been a member of the House of Burgesses from York as well as having served as a justice and as sheriff for York County, Virginia.

Croshaw was mentioned as being a member of the group with Captain John Smith in January 1609, who while attempting to trade for corn with the Indians at Opechancanough's village were almost overcome by surprise. This attack was thwarted in part by Raleigh Croshaw's quick reactions. Raleigh Croshaw then made a night trip back to Jamestown which helped to avoid further treachery. He appears to have been a very skilled Indian fighter.

At the time of the massacre in March 1622, he was on a trading cruise on the Potomac. According to Captain John Smith's General History, Croshaw challenged the chief Opchanacanough or any of his warriors to fight him naked (without armor), an offer that was not accepted. When Captain John Smith published his General History in 1624, one of the verses in Volume III of the book had been written by Croshaw—and in his writing, John Smith implies a high opinion of Croshaw's knowledge of Indians and their way of making war.

Raleigh Croshaw accompanied Claiborne on his explorations and, with just a few men, successfully defended a remote trading outpost up on the Potomac River in the 1622 attack. Captain Raleigh Croshaw was in the Potomac River trading in a small bark, commanded by Captain Spilman. There an Indian stole aboard and told them of the massacre, (1622) and that Opchanacanough had been practicing with his King and Country to betray them, which they refused to do, but that the Indians of Werowocomoco had undertaken it. Captain Spilman went there, but the Indians after seeing that his men were so vigilant and well armed, suspected that they had been discovered, therefore, to delude him, they gave him such good deals in trade, that his vessel was soon nearly overloaded”.

About 1623 a patent was issued to "Captain Raleigh Croshaw, Gentleman, of Kiccoughtan, “An Ancient Planter who hath remained in this country 15 years complete and performed many a worthy service to the Colony," for 500 acres (2 km²) by Old Point Comfort. This was based on his transporting himself, his servant and his wife in addition to adventuring 25 pounds sterling in the Company.

By the following year he was a burgess for Elizabeth City. In March 1624 he was issued a commission to trade with the Indians for corn. On this voyage he purchased a "great canoe" for 10,000 blue beads. The Corporation of Elizabeth City states that “Captain Raleigh Croshaw planted by Patent 500 acres (2 km²) between Fox Hill and the Pamunkey River to establish Elizabeth City.” Captain Raleigh Croshaw was last referred to on November 22, 1624. On December 27, 1624, Captain Francis West was instructed to take an inventory of his estate.

By 1637 the York County settlers had already begun to breach their own palisade and move into Indian land on the other side. The area between Queens Creek and Ware Creek was called the "Indian Fields." It was a series of vast communal fields the Indians used for planting corn. Again, it was Joseph Croshaw and Richard Croshaw who were the first to move into the area. In 1637 and 1638, they each patented a few thousand acres about where the Camp Peary government center is located today. They controlled most of the land in that area for the next 20–25 years.

Sources

  • Crowshaw, by Martha Woodroof Hiden; William and Mary Qtrly (2), XXI, pp265 70.
  • General Historie, by John Smith, 1624, Vol III, pp 78 81, Vol IV, pp. 151 154.
  • The Complete Works of Captain John Smith, edited by Philip L. Barbour; Vol II, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, NC, 1986.

References

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  • Raleigh Croshaw, Capt., Gentleman1
  • M, #22059, d. between 22 November 1624 and 27 December 1624
  • Raleigh Croshaw, Capt., Gentleman Could be from the Crashaws of Crashaw, Lancashire or their branch family in Yorkshire. He died between 22 November 1624 and 27 December 1624 at Virginia.
  • Family
  • Child
    • Major Joseph Croshaw+ b. c 1612, d. 10 Apr 1667
  • Citations
  • 1.[S3943] Unknown author, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia 1607-1624/5, by Meyer, p. 217.
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p734.htm#i22059

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http://www.jamestowne-wash-nova.org/RaleighCroshaw.htm

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Esquire Capt. Raleigh Croshaw marred Ursula who was born in York Co., VA. He fathered Maj. Joseph Croshaw by her at Burton Parish, York Co., VA.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=83478344

This surname has been spelled variously as Croshaw, Croshawe, Crashaw, Crowshaw and Chroshaw.

Rawleigh was referred to as "Captain Rawleigh Crashaw, of Kequotan, gent., and ancient planter."[1]

NOTE by Chet SNOW: Rawleigh Chroshaw Esq., (AKA Capt. Rawleigh Crashaw), was from an old London merchant family; relatives were in the Virginia Company that founded Jamestown, VA on May 13, 1607. Captain Rawleigh emigrated to Jamestown in 1608 (in his 30s) and was elected to the VA House of Burgesses in 1623 when the colony gave him a grant of 500 acres at "Olde Poynt Comfort" near Kequotan (modern Hampton VA) across the James River. He had two sons: Joseph and Richard. [2]

Hentschel, Inwood, Lucas, Klein, Wheeler Family Tree says:

   •Name: Rawleigh Capt. Chroshaw 
   •Birth: 1574 in England 
   •Death: in York Co, Virginia 
   Marriage 1 Ursula Daniels b: 1576 in York Co, VA [sic = no Englishwoman was born in Virginia before 1610]
   Children: Katherine Chroshaw b: 1586 in Gravesend, Kent, England

Others say that he may have been born in 1569 or 1570; this seems more likely if he had a daughter in 1586.][3]

On March 13, 1625, Captain Francis West was referred to as administrator of Capt. Croshaw, so Croshaw died in November 1624 where he represented Elizabeth City. It was certainly after 1623, when he was given a grant of 500 acres at "Old Poynt Comfort."[4]

Hentschel, Inwood, Lucas, Klein, Wheeler Family Tree says:

   ID: I220555 
   Name: Rawleigh Capt. Chroshaw 
   Sex: M 
   Birth: 1574 in England •Death: in York Co, VA USA 
   Reference Number: 220555 

Marriage 1 Ursula Daniels b: 1576 [?] in York Co, VA [NOTE by Chet Snow: She may have been an English-born widow of _____ Daniels; see ref. below that claims Ursula was a Native American of Chief Powhatan's family][5]

Children: Katherine Chroshaw b: 1586 in Gravesend, Kent, England

[Note by Chet Snow: others say 1569 or 1570; this seems more likely if he had a daughter in 1586. Other sources say he was born in Lancashire - more research in England is needed to resolve his birth-place and parents.][6]

NOTE by Chet SNOW: Rawleigh Chroshaw Esq., (AKA Capt. Rawleigh Crashaw), was from an old London merchant family; relatives were in the Virginia Company that founded Jamestown, VA on May 13, 1607. Captain Rawleigh emigrated to Jamestown in 1608 (in his 30s) and was elected to the VA House of Burgesses in 1623 for Elizabeth City when the colony gave him a grant of 500 acres at "Olde Poynt Comfort" near Kequotan (modern Hampton VA. The name "Kequotan" referred to the Native American tribe living there; modern translated spelling is "Kecoughtan," now the name of a local high school.) across the James River. He had two sons: Joseph and Richard. [7]

http://genforum.genealogy.com/croshaw/messages/196.html

Re: Captain Raleigh Croshaw

Posted by: shirley Raymond (ID *****5471) Date: February 08, 2012

In Reply to: Captain Raleigh Croshaw by Sandra Sleeth Adams, 1999

"I descend from Raleigh Croshaw born 1570 England died 1624 Elizabeth River, Norfolk, Virginia; he married his 2nd wife Ursula Unity Patawomeck, daughter of great chief Patawomeck and her mother was possibly a sister to [Great Chief] Powhatan.

They had at least 5 children named Richard, Joseph, Benjamin, Noah, and Ursala Unity (notice difference in the spelling of Ursala for her mother Ursula).

Ursala Unity Croshaw married 1st Robert Blackwell; their son James Blackwell born 1647 York Co., Virginia died 1717 New Kent, Virginia, he married Lydia Turner born England, their daughter Lucie Blackwell born 1685 New Kent, Virginia (is my ancestor);Lucie died 1750 Hanover, Virginia.

Lucie Blackwell married Benjamin II Goodman/Goodwin they had 3 sons : Samuel,Robert and Benjamin III Goodman.

Robert Goodman born 1703 Isle Wright, Virginia, he died 1759 Hanover, Virginia; he married Mary (LNU); their son Bartelott Goodman born 1731 Hanover, Virginia died 1800 Iredell, North Carolina, he married Tabitha Gibson of Louisa, Virginia. They had at least 2 children: Ansel G.Goodman and John James Goodman.

John James Goodman born 1758 in Botetourt Co, Virginia died after 1800 in Greene co, Tennessee, he married Epharilla Thorpe, they had 9 children, their daughter Mary Sallie Goodman born 1779 in Botetourt Co, Virginia died 1855 in Wayne co, Tennessee she married Archibald Henry Lamb they had at least 8 children all of whom married into the Qualls and Austin families.

This is my direct line, I am looking for information on the great chief Patawomeck and who his wife was and a list of his daughter Ursula Unity Patawomeck and her siblings.

Shirley Raymond shirley778446@yahoo.com 918-962-3479

http://genforum.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/pageload.cgi?raleigh::croshaw::89.html

   "Upon the Mary and Margaret, a part of the Second Supply, traveled 38 year old Captain Raleigh Croshaw, Esq. from Crashaw, Lancashire, England, who later through his early experiences in protecting the young colony against the natives, achieved a reputation as a skilled Indian fighter, and is listed as an adventurer in the Virginia Company, 1618, 1620. When the massacre of 1622/3 occurred, Croshaw was on a trading cruise on the Potomac and at once challenged any of his men to fight him naked but the offer was not accepted. Raleigh Croshaw was elected to the House of Burgess for Elizabeth City in 1624 and died that same year. According to Land Office Patents and Grants in Virginia, Raleigh purchased 500 acres of land, but no date or county location was given. It was Raleigh’s granddaughter, UI, who tied the history of this remarkable man to the Blackwell lineage." by A J Searle in 2002. 

Sources

   ↑ #S43 Pages 278-279
   ↑ #S43 Pages 278-279. The name "Kequotan" referred to the Native American tribe living there; the modern translated spelling is "Kecoughtan," now the name of a local high school.
   ↑ Chet SNOW, 4 Feb 2014
   ↑ #S43 Pages 278-279
   ↑ Chet SNOW, March 23, 2014
   ↑ Chet Snow, 4 Feb 2014 & May 12, 2014
   ↑ http://books.google.fr/books?id=f8kWVOafFtQC&pg=PA611
   Source S43 William Glover Stanard, editor. The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. Volume 30. Virginia Historical Society, 1922. [1] 
   http://www.jamestowne-wash-nova.org/RaleighCroshaw.htm 
   Washington & Northern Virginia Company -- Biographies of Ancestors of Members - Raleigh Cro(w)shaw [Amos Eagle Elliston <private> Elliston (Sher)] 
   Second Supply List[Mike Shaw Elliston <private>] 
   The Banner-Lillis Family Tree [ Loh <private> Loh] 

THE FIRST SEVENTEEN YEARS Virginia, 1607-1624, by Charles E. Hatch, Jr. - Violet Kawai Leung

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Capt. Raleigh Croshaw, Ancient Planter's Timeline

1584
1584
Crowshaw, Lancashire, England
1586
1586
Age 2
Gravesend, Kent, England, (Present UK)
1610
1610
Age 26
Bruton Parish, York County, VA
1612
1612
Age 28
1614
1614
Age 30
Lancashire, England
1621
1621
Age 37
York County, VA, USA
1624
1624
Age 40
Elizabeth City, Virginia
1667
April 10, 1667
Age 83
Elizabeth City County, Virginia Colony