Casimir II the Just, High Duke of Poland

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Prince of Krakow Kazimierz II The Just Piast

Lithuanian: Krokuvos Kunigaikštis Kazimieras II Teisingasis Piast, Polish: Książę Krakowski Kazimierz II Sprawiedliwy Piast, Russian: Князь Краковский Казимир II Справедливый Пяст, Czech: Kníže krakovský Kazimír II Spravedlivý Piast
Also Known As: "Kazimierz II. Starszy"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Kraków, Kraków County, Lesser Poland Voivodeship, Poland
Death: May 05, 1194
Cracow, Poland
Place of Burial: Duke Of Krakow
Immediate Family:

Son of Boleslaus III the "Wry-mouthed" and Salomea of Berg
Husband of High Duchess consort of Poland, Helena - princess of the Znojmo Appanage, Rostislavna Znojmo
Father of princess Maria Anastasia Piast; Leshek "the White", King of Poland; Konrad I of Masovia; Odon; Adelajda Kazimierzówna and 2 others
Brother of Leszek Bolesławowic; NN Bolesławówna; Bolesław IV the Curly, High Duke of Poland; Gertruda Bolesławówna; Mieszko III the Old, High Duke of Poland and 7 others
Half brother of Duchess Ryksa of Novogrod; Władysław II the Exile, High Duke of Poland and Judith? of Poland

Occupation: Prince of Sandomierz, Prins i Sandomir och Krakow 1177, prins i Kujawia och Masowia 1186, greve i Polen 1177-94, короля Польши, князь вислицкий (1166—1173), сандомирский с 1173 года, краковский с 117
Managed by: Henn Sarv
Last Updated:

About Casimir II the Just, High Duke of Poland

Kazimierz II Sprawiedliwy (ur. 1138, zapewne przed 28 października, zm. 5 maja 1194 w Krakowie) – książę wiślicki w latach 1166-1173, książę sandomierski od 1173, od 1177 książę krakowski (z włączonym do księstwa do 1182 Kaliszem i Gnieznem), od 1186 książę mazowiecki i kujawski (możliwe, że Kujawy otrzymał dopiero syn Kazimierza – Leszek Biały w 1199). Syn Bolesława III Krzywoustego z rodu Piastów. Przydomek Sprawiedliwy nie był mu współczesny, pojawił się w XVI wieku. http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kazimierz_II_Sprawiedliwy

Casimir II, Duke of Cracow (1) M, #114594, b. 1138, d. 1194 Last Edited=30 Jul 2005

    Casimir II, Duke of Cracow was born in 1138. (1) He was the son of Boleslaw III, Duke of Poland and Salome von Berg. (1) He married Helen of Kiev, daughter of Rostislav, Grand Duke of Kiev, circa 1185. (1) 

He died in 1194. (1)

    Casimir II, Duke of Cracow also went by the nick-name of Casimir 'the Just' (?). (2) He was a member of the House of Piast. (2) He succeeded to the title of Duke of Cracow in 1177. (1)

Children of Casimir II, Duke of Cracow and Helen of Kiev -1. Leszek I, Duke of Cracow+ b. bt 1186 - 1187, d. 1227 (3) -2. Conrad, Duke of Mazovia+ b. bt 1187 - 1188, d. 1247 (3)

Forrás Source: http://thepeerage.com/p11460.htm#i114594


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casimir_II_the_Just

Casimir II the Just

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Casimir II the Just (Polish: Kazimierz II Sprawiedliwy; b. 1138 – d. 5 May 1194), was a Duke of Wiślica during 1166-1173, Duke of Sandomierz since 1173 and Duke of Kraków and High Duke of Poland (see Seniorate Province) from 1177 until his death. The surname "the Just" wasn't contemporary; this only appears in the 16th century. He was the youngest son of Bolesław III Wrymouth, Duke of Poland, by his second wife Salome, daughter of Henry, Count of Berg-Schelklingen.

Life

[edit]Early Years Casimir, the sixth but fourth surviving son of the Ducal couple, was born in 1138, shortly before his father's death, but also is possible that he born shortly after, and in consequence, was posthumous. Maybe this was the reason that in the Bolesław III's Testament, he was omitted and left without any land. During his first years, Casimir and his sister Agnes (born in 1137) lived with their mother Salome in her widow land, Łęczyca. There, the young prince remained far away from the struggles of his older brothers Bolesław IV the Curly and Mieszko III the Old with their older half-brother Władysław II, who tried to reunificate all Poland under his rule. Salome of Berg died in 1144. Casimir and Agnes were cared by his older brother Bolesław IV and, although under his tutelage he could feel safe, he had any guarantee to receive part of the paternal inheritance in the future. When in 1154 he reached the proper age (according to the standars of that time), to take control over the lands of the family, he remainded with nothing. Even whorse, three years later (1157) his fate was decided in the succesfully campaign of the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa. As a part of the treaty between Bolesław and Barbarossa, Casimir was sent to Germany as a hostage in order to secure the loyalty of his brother to the Emperor. It's unknown the fate of Casimir in the Imperial court. He returned to Poland certainly before 21 May 1161, because that day he appears in a document with two of his brothers, Bolesław IV and Henry of Sandomierz. The former opposition of his brothers caused that Casimir remained without lands. [edit]Duke of Wiślica The situation changed in 1166, when his brother Henry was killed in battle during the crusade against the Prussians; whithout issue, in his will he named Casimir the only heir of Sandomierz. However, Bolesław IV decided to divided the Duchy in three parts: the largest (who included the capital, Sandomierz) to him; the second (whithout any name) to Mieszko III and the third part, the district of Wiślica, was given to Casimir. Angry and dissapointed with the decision of the High Duke, Casimir rebelled against him, with the support of by his brother Mieszko III the Old, the magnate Jaksa of Miechów and Sviatoslav, son of Piotr Włostowic, as well as Jan I, Archbishop of Gniezno and Gedko, Bishop of Kraków; also, almost all Lesser Poland was on his side. The quick actions of the High Duke finally stopped the rebellion. At the end, Casimir retain only Wiślica. In 1172 Mieszko III rebelled against the High Duke, and tried to persuaded his younger brother to join him. For unknown reasons, Casimir refused to participate. Bolesław IV died in 1173 and was succeeded by Mieszko III as High Duke. He decided to gave the rest of Sandomierz to Casimir, then his only surviving brother, who finally could take the Ducal title after the illegal usurpation of the late High Duke. [edit]Revolt against the rule of High Duke Mieszko III The strong and dictatorial of the new High Duke caused a deep disaffection among the nobility. This time the new revolt prepared in 1177 had a real chance of victory. The rebellion, apart of the Lesser Poland nobility, count with the support of Gedko, Bishop of Krakow, Mieszko's eldest son Odon, Bolesław I the Tall and Casimir. The reasons about his inclusion in the revolt, after being reconciled with Mieszko, are unknown. The battle for the supreme power had a quite strange course: Mieszko, completely surprised by the rebels in Greater Poland, withdrew to Poznan, where he stay for almost two years going heavy fighting with his son Odon. Finally, he was defeated and was forced to escape. Bolesław the Tall failed in conquest Krakow and with this the Seniorate, because he was busy fighting against his brother Mieszko I Tanglefoot and his own son Jarosław; soon defeated, he asked Casimir for help. After a succesfully action in Silesia, he marched to Kraków, who was quickly conquest. Casimir, now Duke of Kraków, decided to conclude a treaty under which the Bolesław the Tall obtain the full authority over the Lower Silesia, in return for what Casimir granted to the then deposed Mieszko Tanglefoot the Lesser Poland districts of Bytom and Oświęcim, who formerly were a gift for Casimir's godson and namesake: Casimir, the only son of Mieszko Tanglefoot). [edit]Casimir II, High Duke of Poland The rebellion against Mieszko III in 1177 ended in a full success to Casimir, which not only conquest Kraków (including the districts of Sieradz and Łęczyca) -and with this the title of High Duke-, but also managed to extend his sovereignty over Silesia (then divided between four princes: Bolesław the Tall, Mieszko I Tanglefoot, Konrad Spindleshanks and Jarosław of Opole), Greater Poland (ruled by Odon), Masovia and Kuyavia (ruled by Leszek the White, then a minor and under the tutelage of his mother and the voivode Żyrona, one of his followers) and Gdańsk Pomerania (ruled by the Duke Sambor I as a vassal). However, Mieszko III worked intensively for their return, firstly in Bohemia, then in Germany and Pomerania. To achieve his ambitious of made hereditary the throne of Kraków (and with this the Seniorate) on his descendants, Casimir called an assembly of nobles at Łęczyca in 1180. He granted privileges to the nobles and the Church, lifting a tax on the profits of the clergy and relinquishing his rights over the lands of deceased bishops. By these acts, he won acceptance of the principle of hereditary succession to Kraków, though it would take more than a century to restore the Polish Kingship. In less than a year after the assembly of Łęczyca (first half of 1181), Mieszko III, with the assistance of Mestwin I of Pomerania conquest the Eastern greater Poland (including Gniezno and Kalisz) and managed to persuade his son Odon to submit (according to some historians, was there when Odon received from his father Poznań as a Duchy, on the borders of the Obra River). At the same time, Leszek of Masovia decided to escape from the influence of Casimir and named Mieszko the Younger (Mieszko III's son), as a governor of Masovia and Kuyavia, and with this, a tacit promise of succession over that lands. [edit]Foreign Politics. Relations with Kiev and the Succession of Halych For unknown reasons, Casimir didn't react to these events and decided only secure his authority over Lesser Poland. A diplomatic meeting occurred only in 1184 at the court of the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa where Casimir (wanting to neutralize the actions of Mieszko III and retain the power over the country), paid homage to Barbarossa and give to him a high tribute. The most important issue during the reign of Casimir, in addition to his relations with his brother Mieszko III, was the issue of the politics towards Russian principalities. The first task before which he became in High Duke was his attempts to create a dipolmatic bonds with the Kievan Russians. The Grand Princes of Kiev were strongly associated with the previous High Dukes through marriages with Kievan princesses (Bolesław IV with Princess Wierzchosławą and Mieszko III with Princess Evdokia). For this purpose, in November 1178 Casimir arranged the marriage of his daughter Maria with Prince Vsevolod IV of Kiev[1]. His first major intervention in the affairs of the Russian princes occurred in 1180, when the beginning of the dispute between Prince Vasilko, Prince of Shumsk and Dorohychyn (also son-in-law of Bolesław IV) and Leszek of Masovia for the region of Wlodzimierz (Duchy of Minsk), as support of the former. The war ended with the success of Casimir, who conquest Wlodimierz and Brest, while Wasylko remained in Drohiczyn. The war has not definitively settled about the matter of the property of Brest, which was granted as a vassal state to Prince Sviatoslav, Vasilko's cousin and also Casimir's nephew (son of his sister Agnes). In 1182 was a new revolt against Svyatoslav's rule. Thanks to Casimir's intervention, Sviatoslav was restored in the throne. Nevertless, shortly after Casimir saw that the situation was unstable and finally decided to give the power to Sviatoslav's brother, Roman. In 1187 Prince Yaroslav Osmomysl of Halych died, and began a long struggle for his succession. Initially, the authority over the principality was taken by his younger son, Oleg, but soon he was murdered by the boyards and Halych was taken by the eldest son of Yaroslav, Vladimirko. Vladimirko's reign was also far from stability, a situation used by Prince Roman of Brest, who, with the help of his uncle Casimir, deposed him and take full control over Halych. The deposed Vladimirko escape to Hungary under the protection of King Béla III (his relative; Vladimirko's paternal grandmother was an Hungarian princess), who decided to send his army to Halych. After his defeat, Roman escape to Kraków and Vladimirko, as act of revenge, invaded the Lesser Poland. However, soon Béla III decided to join Halych to Hungary, and deposed Vladimirko, who was placed as Prince of Halych by the King's second son, Andrew. The war continue until two years later, when Casimir, after follow the instructions of Emperor Frederick, who decided to help Vladimirko after he declared himself his subject, restored his authority over Halych. [edit]Internal Politics. Brief Restoration of Mieszko III and the Succession over Masovia and Kuyavia In 1186 Leszek, Duke of Masovia and Kuyavia died. Before his death the sickly Duke decided to give all his lands to Casimir. Previously, Leszek had promise the inheritance to his older uncle Mieszko III, but his dictatorial proceedings had changed his mind and decided in Casimir's favor. Shortly after Leszek's death, Mieszko occuped Kuyavia, and Casimir only could take possesion over Masovia. However, thanks to Masovian inheritance, Casimir became in the most powerful ruler of Poland. The involvement of Casimir in the Russian affairs was used in 1191 by Mieszko III, who could take control over Wawel and with this, the title of High Duke and the control over the Seniorate. Inmediately, he declared Kraków an hereditary fief to his descendants, leaving his son Mieszko the Younger as a governor. The conflict was finally ended peacefully, as Casimir -after his return from Russia- regained the capital without fight, after Mieszko escape at the side of his father. He planned to found a University in Kraków, he had already started to build the building, but his sudden death balked Casimir II's plans. The university was later established by Casimir III. The last goal of Casimir's reign was at the beginning of 1194, when he organized an expedition against the Yotvingians. The expedition ended with a full success, and Casimir had a triumphant return to Kraków. After a banquet made to celebrate his return, Casimir died unexpectedly, on 5 May 1194. Some historians believed that he was poisoned. [edit]Relations with the Church During his reign, Casimir was very generous to the Church, especially with the Cistercians monasteries of Wąchocku, Jędrzejow, Koprzywnicy and Sulejów; with the Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Miechów and Regular Canonry of Czerwińsk nad Wisłą and Trzemeszno and the Order of the Knights Hospitaller in Zagość. He also tried to expand the cult of Saint Floriana, whose remains were brought to Kraków by Bishop Gedko. [edit]Marriage and Issue

Around 1163, Casimir married with Helena (b. ca. 1140/42 - d. ca. 1202/06), daughter of Conrad II, Duke of Znaim, member of the Premyslid dinasty of Bohemia.[2][3][4]. They had seven children:[5][6] Maria (b. 1164 - d. 1194), married in November 1178 to Prince Vsevolod IV of Kiev. Casimir (b. ca. 1165? - d. 1 March 1167). Bolesław (b. ca. 1168/71 - d. 16 April 1182). He died accidentally, after falling from a tree. Odon, died in infancy. Only named in the Polish Wikipedia Biography of Casimir II the Just Adelaide (b. ca. 1177/84 - d. 8 December 1211), foundress of the convent of St. Jakob in Sandomierz. Only named in the Polish Wikipedia Biography of Casimir II the Just Leszek the White (b. ca. 1186/87 - d. Marcinkow, 23 November 1227). Konrad (b. ca. 1187/88 - d. 31 August 1247). [edit]References

^ Through this union, Casimir was a direct ancestor of the last Premyslids Kings of Bohemia and the Holy Roman Emperors of the House of Luxemburg. ^ http://homepage.mac.com/crowns/pl/avtxt.html ^ Complete Genealogy of the Premyslids ^ RUSSIA, Rurik. The Ipatiewskaia Chronicle records that Prince Mstislav was the first cousin of Leszek the White, son of Helena. In consequence, and after a genealogical reconstruction, the wife of Casimir maybe was Yelena Rostislavna of Kiev. But, according to Europäische Stammtafeln, Helena of Znaim was the only wife of Casimir the Just. ^ Complete Genealogy of the House of Piast ^ POLAND


Casimir II, called the Just (Polish: Kazimierz II Sprawiedliwy; 1138 – 5 May 1194), of the Piast Dynasty, was the youngest son of Boleslaus III by Salome von Berg-Schelklingen, daughter of Henry, Duke of Berg (of Wuerttemberg). He reigned as Duke of Kraków and senior prince of Poland (see Seniorate) from 1177 until his death.

Born shortly before or after his father's death, and omitted (possibly for that reason) from Boleslaus' will dividing the kingdom among Casimir's four elder brothers, he set about securing the basis for a claim to power. In 1167, he inherited from his brother Henry the dukedom of Wiślica, and in 1173 he obtained that of Sandomierz.

In 1177, a rebellion by the barons of Lesser Poland against Mieszko III the Old led to the elevation of Casimir to the ducal throne of Kraków. In order to end internal conflicts within the decentralised Polish state, Casimir distributed lands to his nephews: Poznań to Otto, son of Mieszko the Old; Kuyavia to Leszek; Silesia to Boleslaus the Tall; Bytom, Racibórz, Oświęcim, and Siewierz to Mieszko; and Głogów to Conrad. Mieszko the Old was forced to give up Greater Poland to Otto.

In 1180, Casimir called an assembly of nobles at Łęczyca. He granted privileges to the nobles and the Church, lifting a tax on the profits of the clergy and relinquishing his rights over the lands of deceased bishops. By these acts, he won acceptance of the principle of hereditary succession to Kraków, though it would take more than a century to restore the Polish kingship.

Casimir died unexpectedly at a banquet, probably of poisoning. He was succeeded in Kraków by his son Leszek the White. He left another son, Conrad.


Książę sandomierski i krakowski od 1177r. Książę mazowiecki i kujawski od 1186r

O Knížovi krakovskému Kazimírovi IIovi Spravedlivému Piastovi (čeština)

Kazimierz II Sprawiedliwy (ur. 1138, zapewne przed 28 października, zm. 5 maja 1194 w Krakowie) – książę wiślicki w latach 1166-1173, książę sandomierski od 1173, od 1177 książę krakowski (z włączonym do księstwa do 1182 Kaliszem i Gnieznem), od 1186 książę mazowiecki i kujawski (możliwe, że Kujawy otrzymał dopiero syn Kazimierza – Leszek Biały w 1199). Syn Bolesława III Krzywoustego z rodu Piastów. Przydomek Sprawiedliwy nie był mu współczesny, pojawił się w XVI wieku. http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kazimierz_II_Sprawiedliwy

Casimir II, Duke of Cracow (1) M, #114594, b. 1138, d. 1194 Last Edited=30 Jul 2005

    Casimir II, Duke of Cracow was born in 1138. (1) He was the son of Boleslaw III, Duke of Poland and Salome von Berg. (1) He married Helen of Kiev, daughter of Rostislav, Grand Duke of Kiev, circa 1185. (1) 

He died in 1194. (1)

    Casimir II, Duke of Cracow also went by the nick-name of Casimir 'the Just' (?). (2) He was a member of the House of Piast. (2) He succeeded to the title of Duke of Cracow in 1177. (1)

Children of Casimir II, Duke of Cracow and Helen of Kiev -1. Leszek I, Duke of Cracow+ b. bt 1186 - 1187, d. 1227 (3) -2. Conrad, Duke of Mazovia+ b. bt 1187 - 1188, d. 1247 (3)

Forrás Source: http://thepeerage.com/p11460.htm#i114594


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casimir_II_the_Just

Casimir II the Just

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Casimir II the Just (Polish: Kazimierz II Sprawiedliwy; b. 1138 – d. 5 May 1194), was a Duke of Wiślica during 1166-1173, Duke of Sandomierz since 1173 and Duke of Kraków and High Duke of Poland (see Seniorate Province) from 1177 until his death. The surname "the Just" wasn't contemporary; this only appears in the 16th century. He was the youngest son of Bolesław III Wrymouth, Duke of Poland, by his second wife Salome, daughter of Henry, Count of Berg-Schelklingen.

Life

[edit]Early Years Casimir, the sixth but fourth surviving son of the Ducal couple, was born in 1138, shortly before his father's death, but also is possible that he born shortly after, and in consequence, was posthumous. Maybe this was the reason that in the Bolesław III's Testament, he was omitted and left without any land. During his first years, Casimir and his sister Agnes (born in 1137) lived with their mother Salome in her widow land, Łęczyca. There, the young prince remained far away from the struggles of his older brothers Bolesław IV the Curly and Mieszko III the Old with their older half-brother Władysław II, who tried to reunificate all Poland under his rule. Salome of Berg died in 1144. Casimir and Agnes were cared by his older brother Bolesław IV and, although under his tutelage he could feel safe, he had any guarantee to receive part of the paternal inheritance in the future. When in 1154 he reached the proper age (according to the standars of that time), to take control over the lands of the family, he remainded with nothing. Even whorse, three years later (1157) his fate was decided in the succesfully campaign of the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa. As a part of the treaty between Bolesław and Barbarossa, Casimir was sent to Germany as a hostage in order to secure the loyalty of his brother to the Emperor. It's unknown the fate of Casimir in the Imperial court. He returned to Poland certainly before 21 May 1161, because that day he appears in a document with two of his brothers, Bolesław IV and Henry of Sandomierz. The former opposition of his brothers caused that Casimir remained without lands. [edit]Duke of Wiślica The situation changed in 1166, when his brother Henry was killed in battle during the crusade against the Prussians; whithout issue, in his will he named Casimir the only heir of Sandomierz. However, Bolesław IV decided to divided the Duchy in three parts: the largest (who included the capital, Sandomierz) to him; the second (whithout any name) to Mieszko III and the third part, the district of Wiślica, was given to Casimir. Angry and dissapointed with the decision of the High Duke, Casimir rebelled against him, with the support of by his brother Mieszko III the Old, the magnate Jaksa of Miechów and Sviatoslav, son of Piotr Włostowic, as well as Jan I, Archbishop of Gniezno and Gedko, Bishop of Kraków; also, almost all Lesser Poland was on his side. The quick actions of the High Duke finally stopped the rebellion. At the end, Casimir retain only Wiślica. In 1172 Mieszko III rebelled against the High Duke, and tried to persuaded his younger brother to join him. For unknown reasons, Casimir refused to participate. Bolesław IV died in 1173 and was succeeded by Mieszko III as High Duke. He decided to gave the rest of Sandomierz to Casimir, then his only surviving brother, who finally could take the Ducal title after the illegal usurpation of the late High Duke. [edit]Revolt against the rule of High Duke Mieszko III The strong and dictatorial of the new High Duke caused a deep disaffection among the nobility. This time the new revolt prepared in 1177 had a real chance of victory. The rebellion, apart of the Lesser Poland nobility, count with the support of Gedko, Bishop of Krakow, Mieszko's eldest son Odon, Bolesław I the Tall and Casimir. The reasons about his inclusion in the revolt, after being reconciled with Mieszko, are unknown. The battle for the supreme power had a quite strange course: Mieszko, completely surprised by the rebels in Greater Poland, withdrew to Poznan, where he stay for almost two years going heavy fighting with his son Odon. Finally, he was defeated and was forced to escape. Bolesław the Tall failed in conquest Krakow and with this the Seniorate, because he was busy fighting against his brother Mieszko I Tanglefoot and his own son Jarosław; soon defeated, he asked Casimir for help. After a succesfully action in Silesia, he marched to Kraków, who was quickly conquest. Casimir, now Duke of Kraków, decided to conclude a treaty under which the Bolesław the Tall obtain the full authority over the Lower Silesia, in return for what Casimir granted to the then deposed Mieszko Tanglefoot the Lesser Poland districts of Bytom and Oświęcim, who formerly were a gift for Casimir's godson and namesake: Casimir, the only son of Mieszko Tanglefoot). [edit]Casimir II, High Duke of Poland The rebellion against Mieszko III in 1177 ended in a full success to Casimir, which not only conquest Kraków (including the districts of Sieradz and Łęczyca) -and with this the title of High Duke-, but also managed to extend his sovereignty over Silesia (then divided between four princes: Bolesław the Tall, Mieszko I Tanglefoot, Konrad Spindleshanks and Jarosław of Opole), Greater Poland (ruled by Odon), Masovia and Kuyavia (ruled by Leszek the White, then a minor and under the tutelage of his mother and the voivode Żyrona, one of his followers) and Gdańsk Pomerania (ruled by the Duke Sambor I as a vassal). However, Mieszko III worked intensively for their return, firstly in Bohemia, then in Germany and Pomerania. To achieve his ambitious of made hereditary the throne of Kraków (and with this the Seniorate) on his descendants, Casimir called an assembly of nobles at Łęczyca in 1180. He granted privileges to the nobles and the Church, lifting a tax on the profits of the clergy and relinquishing his rights over the lands of deceased bishops. By these acts, he won acceptance of the principle of hereditary succession to Kraków, though it would take more than a century to restore the Polish Kingship. In less than a year after the assembly of Łęczyca (first half of 1181), Mieszko III, with the assistance of Mestwin I of Pomerania conquest the Eastern greater Poland (including Gniezno and Kalisz) and managed to persuade his son Odon to submit (according to some historians, was there when Odon received from his father Poznań as a Duchy, on the borders of the Obra River). At the same time, Leszek of Masovia decided to escape from the influence of Casimir and named Mieszko the Younger (Mieszko III's son), as a governor of Masovia and Kuyavia, and with this, a tacit promise of succession over that lands. [edit]Foreign Politics. Relations with Kiev and the Succession of Halych For unknown reasons, Casimir didn't react to these events and decided only secure his authority over Lesser Poland. A diplomatic meeting occurred only in 1184 at the court of the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa where Casimir (wanting to neutralize the actions of Mieszko III and retain the power over the country), paid homage to Barbarossa and give to him a high tribute. The most important issue during the reign of Casimir, in addition to his relations with his brother Mieszko III, was the issue of the politics towards Russian principalities. The first task before which he became in High Duke was his attempts to create a dipolmatic bonds with the Kievan Russians. The Grand Princes of Kiev were strongly associated with the previous High Dukes through marriages with Kievan princesses (Bolesław IV with Princess Wierzchosławą and Mieszko III with Princess Evdokia). For this purpose, in November 1178 Casimir arranged the marriage of his daughter Maria with Prince Vsevolod IV of Kiev[1]. His first major intervention in the affairs of the Russian princes occurred in 1180, when the beginning of the dispute between Prince Vasilko, Prince of Shumsk and Dorohychyn (also son-in-law of Bolesław IV) and Leszek of Masovia for the region of Wlodzimierz (Duchy of Minsk), as support of the former. The war ended with the success of Casimir, who conquest Wlodimierz and Brest, while Wasylko remained in Drohiczyn. The war has not definitively settled about the matter of the property of Brest, which was granted as a vassal state to Prince Sviatoslav, Vasilko's cousin and also Casimir's nephew (son of his sister Agnes). In 1182 was a new revolt against Svyatoslav's rule. Thanks to Casimir's intervention, Sviatoslav was restored in the throne. Nevertless, shortly after Casimir saw that the situation was unstable and finally decided to give the power to Sviatoslav's brother, Roman. In 1187 Prince Yaroslav Osmomysl of Halych died, and began a long struggle for his succession. Initially, the authority over the principality was taken by his younger son, Oleg, but soon he was murdered by the boyards and Halych was taken by the eldest son of Yaroslav, Vladimirko. Vladimirko's reign was also far from stability, a situation used by Prince Roman of Brest, who, with the help of his uncle Casimir, deposed him and take full control over Halych. The deposed Vladimirko escape to Hungary under the protection of King Béla III (his relative; Vladimirko's paternal grandmother was an Hungarian princess), who decided to send his army to Halych. After his defeat, Roman escape to Kraków and Vladimirko, as act of revenge, invaded the Lesser Poland. However, soon Béla III decided to join Halych to Hungary, and deposed Vladimirko, who was placed as Prince of Halych by the King's second son, Andrew. The war continue until two years later, when Casimir, after follow the instructions of Emperor Frederick, who decided to help Vladimirko after he declared himself his subject, restored his authority over Halych. [edit]Internal Politics. Brief Restoration of Mieszko III and the Succession over Masovia and Kuyavia In 1186 Leszek, Duke of Masovia and Kuyavia died. Before his death the sickly Duke decided to give all his lands to Casimir. Previously, Leszek had promise the inheritance to his older uncle Mieszko III, but his dictatorial proceedings had changed his mind and decided in Casimir's favor. Shortly after Leszek's death, Mieszko occuped Kuyavia, and Casimir only could take possesion over Masovia. However, thanks to Masovian inheritance, Casimir became in the most powerful ruler of Poland. The involvement of Casimir in the Russian affairs was used in 1191 by Mieszko III, who could take control over Wawel and with this, the title of High Duke and the control over the Seniorate. Inmediately, he declared Kraków an hereditary fief to his descendants, leaving his son Mieszko the Younger as a governor. The conflict was finally ended peacefully, as Casimir -after his return from Russia- regained the capital without fight, after Mieszko escape at the side of his father. He planned to found a University in Kraków, he had already started to build the building, but his sudden death balked Casimir II's plans. The university was later established by Casimir III. The last goal of Casimir's reign was at the beginning of 1194, when he organized an expedition against the Yotvingians. The expedition ended with a full success, and Casimir had a triumphant return to Kraków. After a banquet made to celebrate his return, Casimir died unexpectedly, on 5 May 1194. Some historians believed that he was poisoned. [edit]Relations with the Church During his reign, Casimir was very generous to the Church, especially with the Cistercians monasteries of Wąchocku, Jędrzejow, Koprzywnicy and Sulejów; with the Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Miechów and Regular Canonry of Czerwińsk nad Wisłą and Trzemeszno and the Order of the Knights Hospitaller in Zagość. He also tried to expand the cult of Saint Floriana, whose remains were brought to Kraków by Bishop Gedko. [edit]Marriage and Issue

Around 1163, Casimir married with Helena (b. ca. 1140/42 - d. ca. 1202/06), daughter of Conrad II, Duke of Znaim, member of the Premyslid dinasty of Bohemia.[2][3][4]. They had seven children:[5][6] Maria (b. 1164 - d. 1194), married in November 1178 to Prince Vsevolod IV of Kiev. Casimir (b. ca. 1165? - d. 1 March 1167). Bolesław (b. ca. 1168/71 - d. 16 April 1182). He died accidentally, after falling from a tree. Odon, died in infancy. Only named in the Polish Wikipedia Biography of Casimir II the Just Adelaide (b. ca. 1177/84 - d. 8 December 1211), foundress of the convent of St. Jakob in Sandomierz. Only named in the Polish Wikipedia Biography of Casimir II the Just Leszek the White (b. ca. 1186/87 - d. Marcinkow, 23 November 1227). Konrad (b. ca. 1187/88 - d. 31 August 1247). [edit]References

^ Through this union, Casimir was a direct ancestor of the last Premyslids Kings of Bohemia and the Holy Roman Emperors of the House of Luxemburg. ^ http://homepage.mac.com/crowns/pl/avtxt.html ^ Complete Genealogy of the Premyslids ^ RUSSIA, Rurik. The Ipatiewskaia Chronicle records that Prince Mstislav was the first cousin of Leszek the White, son of Helena. In consequence, and after a genealogical reconstruction, the wife of Casimir maybe was Yelena Rostislavna of Kiev. But, according to Europäische Stammtafeln, Helena of Znaim was the only wife of Casimir the Just. ^ Complete Genealogy of the House of Piast ^ POLAND


Casimir II, called the Just (Polish: Kazimierz II Sprawiedliwy; 1138 – 5 May 1194), of the Piast Dynasty, was the youngest son of Boleslaus III by Salome von Berg-Schelklingen, daughter of Henry, Duke of Berg (of Wuerttemberg). He reigned as Duke of Kraków and senior prince of Poland (see Seniorate) from 1177 until his death.

Born shortly before or after his father's death, and omitted (possibly for that reason) from Boleslaus' will dividing the kingdom among Casimir's four elder brothers, he set about securing the basis for a claim to power. In 1167, he inherited from his brother Henry the dukedom of Wiślica, and in 1173 he obtained that of Sandomierz.

In 1177, a rebellion by the barons of Lesser Poland against Mieszko III the Old led to the elevation of Casimir to the ducal throne of Kraków. In order to end internal conflicts within the decentralised Polish state, Casimir distributed lands to his nephews: Poznań to Otto, son of Mieszko the Old; Kuyavia to Leszek; Silesia to Boleslaus the Tall; Bytom, Racibórz, Oświęcim, and Siewierz to Mieszko; and Głogów to Conrad. Mieszko the Old was forced to give up Greater Poland to Otto.

In 1180, Casimir called an assembly of nobles at Łęczyca. He granted privileges to the nobles and the Church, lifting a tax on the profits of the clergy and relinquishing his rights over the lands of deceased bishops. By these acts, he won acceptance of the principle of hereditary succession to Kraków, though it would take more than a century to restore the Polish kingship.

Casimir died unexpectedly at a banquet, probably of poisoning. He was succeeded in Kraków by his son Leszek the White. He left another son, Conrad.


Książę sandomierski i krakowski od 1177r. Książę mazowiecki i kujawski od 1186r


Držba 1177–1191 1191–1194 Předchůdce Mieszko III. Starý Nástupce Leszek já bílý Vévoda z Masovie Držba 1186–1194 Předchůdce Leszek Nástupce Leszek já bílý narozený 28. října 1138 Zemřel 5. května 1194 (ve věku 55) Krakov Pohřbení Katedrála Wawel , Krakov Manželka Helena Znojemská Vydat více ... Adelaide Leszek I the White Konrad I of Masovia Dům Piastova dynastie Otec Bolesław III Wrymouth Matka Salomea z Bergu Náboženství římský katolík Casimir II the Just ( polsky : Kazimierz II Sprawiedliwy ;

28. října 1138 - 5. května 1194) byl malopolský vévoda z Wiślica v letech 1166–1173 a Sandomierz po roce 1173. Stal se vládcem polské seniorské provincie v Krakově a tím i vysokého Vévoda z Polska v roce 1177; tuto pozici zastával až do své smrti, i když ji jednou přerušil jeho starší bratr a předchůdce Mieszko III . V roce 1186 zdědil Kažimír vévodství Masovia od svého synovce Leszeka , který se stal předkem masovské větve královské dynastie Piastů a pradědečkem pozdějšího polského krále Vladislava I. Lokta . Honorární titul „Spravedlivý“ nebyl současný a poprvé se objevil v 16. století. Časný život Kažimír , šestý, ale čtvrtý přeživší syn Boleslava III. Wrymoutha , vévody z Polska, se svou druhou manželkou Salomeou , dcerou hraběte Jindřicha z Bergu, se narodil v roce 1138, po otcově smrti, ale téhož dne.

V důsledku toho nebyl uveden ve vůli svého otce , a tak zůstal bez jakékoli země. Během prvních let žil Casimir a jeho sestra Agnes (narozená v roce 1137) se svou matkou Salomeou ve své vdovské zemi Łęczyca . Mladý princ tam zůstal daleko od bojů svých bratrů Bolesława IV. Curlyho a Mieszka III. Olda se svým starším nevlastním bratrem, vévodou Władysławem II. , Který se pod jeho vládou pokusil sjednotit celé Polsko (na rozdíl od jeho zesnulého otce závěť) a byl nakonec vyloučen v roce 1146. Salomea z Bergu zemřela v roce 1144. O Casimira a Agnes se staral jejich starší bratr Bolesław IV., Který o dva roky později převzal vysoký vévodský titul. Ačkoli se mladý princ mohl pod jeho vedením cítit v bezpečí, neměl žádnou záruku, že v budoucnu získá část otcovského dědictví. Když v roce 1151 dosáhl správného věku (v té době 13 let), aby převzal kontrolu nad některými rodinami, zůstal s ničím. O tři roky později (1157) se jeho situace zhoršila v důsledku úspěšného polského tažení císaře Fredericka Barbarossy , který přišel na pomoc Vladimira II. A jeho synů. Jako součást smlouvy, kterou musel uzavřít Bolesław IV s Barbarossou, byl Kazimír poslán do Německa jako rukojmí, aby si zajistil loajalitu svého bratra k císaři. Osud Kazimíra u císařského dvora není znám. Do Polska se vrátil jistě před 21. květnem 1161, protože v ten den je v dokumentu zmíněn spolu se dvěma svými bratry Boleslavem IV. A Jindřichem ze Sandomierzu . Casimir II Just - https://cs.abcdef.wiki/wiki/Casimir_II_the_Just

Apie Krokuvos Kunigaikštis Kazimieras II Teisingasis Piast (Lietuvių)

Kazimieras II Teisingasis (1138 m. – 1194 m. gegužės 5 d.) – Lenkijos kunigaikštis (1177–1194).

Biografija

Piastų dinastijos atstovas. Boleslovo III Kreivaburnio sūnus, Boleslovo IV Garbaniaus ir Meško III Senojo brolis, Lešeko Baltojo ir Konrado I Mazoviečio tėvas. 1157–1163 m. gyveno Vokietijoje kaip taikos sutarties įkaitas. Nuo 1166 m. Višlicos, nuo 1173 m. Sandomiero kunigaikštis. 1177 m. Mažosios Lenkijos bajorų pakviestas tapo Krokuvos kunigaikščiu. Valdymas

Derybomis ir nuolaidomis pasiekė, kad jo vyresnybę pripažintų sūnėnai ir vyskupas. 1180 m. Lęczycos suvažiavime suteikė privilegiją dvasininkams. 1184 m. pripažino Šv. Romos imperatoriaus siuzerenitetą. 1189 m. tapo Kujavijos ir Mazovijos kunigaikščiu. 1189 m. kariavo Haliče, sugrąžino į sostą nuverstą kunigaikštį Vladimirą Jaroslavičių. 1192–1193 m. kariavo su prūsais ir jotvingiais.[1] Šeima ir vaikai

Maždaug 1163 metais Kazimieras vedė Eleną Znojemską. Jie turėjo septynis vaikus:

   Marija (1164—1194), ištekėjo už Kijevo kunigaikščio Vsevolodo Sviatoslavičiaus
   Kazimieras (1165—1167)
   Boleslovas (1168/1171 — 1182), mirė iškritęs iš medžio
   Odonas, mirė kūdikystėje
   Adelaida (1177/1184 — 1211)
   Lešekas Baltasis (1184—1227)
   Konradas (1187—1247)
view all 11

Casimir II the Just, High Duke of Poland's Timeline

1138
October 28, 1138
Kraków, Kraków County, Lesser Poland Voivodeship, Poland
1164
1164
Sandomierz, Sandomierz County, Swietokrzyskie, Poland
1166
1166
1168
1168
1180
1180
1184
1184
Cracow, Poland
1187
1187
Kraków, Małopolskie, Poland
1194
May 5, 1194
Age 55
Cracow, Poland
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