Catherine Blanchan

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Catherine DuBois (Blanchan)

Also Known As: "Catherine Blanchin", "Catherine Blanshan", "Catherine Cottin"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg, Deutschland
Death: Died in Esopus, (Kingston), Ulster, New York
Place of Burial: Kingston, Ulster, New York
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Matthew LeRoy Blanchan, de Noeville, Bourgeois de Mannheim; Mathese Blanchan and Madeline Joire / Magdalena Jorisse
Wife of Louis "The Walloon" DuBois and Jean Cottin
Mother of Elizabeth Marie Mersereau; Abraham DuBois; Isaac DuBois; Anna Marie Du Bois; Jacob Dubois and 8 others
Sister of Elizabeth Blanchan; Maximillian Blanchan; Madeleine Blanchan; Maria Blanchan; Anna Blanchan and 1 other

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Catherine Blanchan

  • Catherine Blanchan
  • F, #69398, b. 17 October 1627, d. 18 October 1713
  • Father Matthys Blanchan b. c 1600, d. 30 Apr 1688
  • Mother Magdalena Jorrisse Jorrison d. c 1688
  • Catherine Blanchan was born on 17 October 1627 at Mannheim, Baden, Germany. She married Louis DuBois, son of Christian DuBois and Jeanne Masic Brunel, on 10 October 1655 at Mannheim, Baden, Germany. Catherine Blanchan died on 18 October 1713 at Kingston, Ulster, NY, at age 86.
  • Family Louis DuBois b. 27 Oct 1627, d. 23 Jun 1696
  • Child
    • David DuBois+ b. 13 Mar 1667, d. c 1714
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p2309.htm#i69398

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  • Catherine Blanchan DuBois
  • Birth: Oct. 17, 1629 Wicres, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • Death: Oct. 18, 1713 Kingston, Ulster County, New York, USA
  • Catherine Blanchan was Baptized: November 13 1626 in the Parish Church at Wicres in Lille, France.
  • Louis and Catherine were married: October 10 1655 in the French Protestant Church at Mannheim, in the Pfalz, German Palatinate.
  • On June 10 1663, Hurley and part of Kingston were burned by the Indians. The wife of Louis DuBois and three of their children were among those who were captured. Three months after the capture, an expedition under Captain Krieger was sent from New York to recover the captives from the Indian fort near the Hogabergh in Shawangunk.
  • "The Story", of the rescue of the Indian captives, which is dear to the Huguenot heart of New Paltz says; when Captain Krieger and his company attacked the savages at their place of refuge near the Shawangunk Kill, the Indians were about to burn one or more captives at the stake, the women began singing the 137th Psalm, which so pleased the red men that they deferred the proposed death by torture.
  • Captain Krieger's band, with Louis DuBois and others, arrived and rescued the captives from a horrible death.
  • Louis DuBois is reported to have killed with his sword an Indian, who was in advance of the rest, before the alarm could be raised. Captain Krieger's report says nothing of this. However, as the tradition contains nothing irreconcilable with the Captain's report which deals mainly with the fighting done by his soldiers, it is interesting to keep the tradition alive as it deals more upon the condition of the captives.
  • The papers relating to the Paltz Patent are among the most cherished possessions of the Huguenot Historical Society of New Paltz, Ulster County, New York. They are written in Dutch and present a unique example of fair dealing between red men and white.
  • Family links:
  • Spouse:
  • Louis DuBois (1626 - 1696)
  • Children:
    • Abraham DuBois (1657 - 1731)*
    • Isaac Dubois (1659 - 1690)*
    • Isaac DuBois (1660 - 1690)*
    • Jacob DuBois (1661 - 1745)*
    • Sarah DuBois Van Meteren (1664 - 1726)*
    • David DuBois (1667 - 1714)*
    • Solomon Dubois (1669 - 1759)*
    • Louis Dubois (1677 - 1729)*
    • Matheus DuBois (1678 - 1748)*
  • Burial: Old Dutch Churchyard, Kingston, Ulster County, New York, USA
  • Find A Grave Memorial# 30587171
  • From: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=30587171

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  • A Genealogy of the Duke-Shepherd-Van Metre Family: From Civil, Military ... edited by Samuel Gordon Smyth
  • https://books.google.com/books?id=JXdIAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA23&lpg=PA23&dq=Chretien+Maximilian+Dubois+de+Fiennes&source=bl&ots=qg7xEVbYyS&sig=5MGylYaW3dZnjZj75yso5hNR97A&hl=en&ei=r9kdS6_jItPTlAfa0KH5Cw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CBcQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q&f=false
  • https://archive.org/details/genealogyofdukes02smyt
  • https://archive.org/stream/genealogyofdukes02smyt#page/23/mode/1up
  • The line of descent from Charles du Bois and Claude de Lannoy was:
  • 1st generation: Eustache, Seigneur des Querder and de Fiennes, m. 1st Gille de Renel ; m. 2d Jeanne St. Ol.
  • 2d generation : Guislain des Fiennes, Count de Clarmont, who m. Jeanne de Longueville.
  • 3d generation : Marc de Fiennes, Seigneur des Querder, m. Madelaine d'Ognies.
  • 4th generation: Maximillian de Fiennes, Seigneur des Querder, m. Catharine Cecil Germand.
  • 5th generation: Maximillian des Fiennes, m. Louise Charlotte d' E'tamps.
  • 6th generation: Chas. Maximillian des Fiennes, m. Henrietta de Reignier de Boisleau.
  • 7th generation : Chrétien Maximillian des Fiennes, m. ____ ____ (not on record, but a Huguenot, as supposed by M. Le Turcq — record erased).
  • 8th generation: Louis du Bois de Fiennes, b. Oct., 1626, who evidently took refuge from religious persecution in Mannheim, Germany, where he m. Catharine Blanchan in 1655. Their two eldest children were born in Mannheim, and in 1660 the family came to America.
  • The du Bois des Fiennes appear to have been a military family and to have furnished to France some able soldiers. The first Maximillian beside being a Count was "Marischall des camps et des armées du roi." His son Maximillian was lieutenant-general "du armées du roi." Chrétian Maximillian, Marquis des Fiennes, was captain of cavalry in his father's regiment.
  • The erasure of the record of Chrétien's marriage and family, the Chrétien known to have been the father of Louis du Bois, makes a break in Louis' line of descent and it was done, obviously, to destroy official record of his ancestry because of his being a "heretic"; to prevent him or any of his descendants from ever afterward establishing a claim to the title and estates. But in this connection, continues Mrs. Thompson, "certainly there were not two branches after the resumption of the title of Marquis des Fiennes. It does not seem that Louis could belong to the line des Fiennes, as the writer of 'The Du Bois Family' says he does,
  • https://archive.org/stream/genealogyofdukes02smyt#page/24/mode/1up
  • and be other than the son of Chrétien Maximillian, Marquis de Fiennes."
  • Louis du Bois emigrated from Manheim to America with his family circa 1660 and eventually settled at New Village (now Hurley], near Kingston, Ulster County, N. Y., where he rapidly rose to prominence in the civil and religious affairs of the settlement. He was one of the twelve original patentees of New Paltz, a village next to Hurley ; he later became one of the magistrates of the jurisdiction comprising the villages of New Paltz and Hurley. Before this period, however, the settlement had been attacked by Indians who burned Hurley ; they killed and injured many of the inhabitants and carried into captivity all the family of Louis du Bois, the wife and three children of Jan Joosten Van Metern and others, all of whom were carried off to the fastnesses of the Catskill Mountains. This event, which occurred 7th June, 1663, was known in history as the Second Esopus War. Captain Martin Krieger, an old Dutch soldier and a familiar figure in the earlier Dutch settlements on the Delaware, organized, and, with Louis du Bois, headed an expedition to rescue the captives and chastise the Indians. After three months of ineffectual warfare they finally rounded up the savages on September 3, 1663, defeated the Indians and restored the captive women and children to their homes. In connection with these tragic experiences. Professor Obenchain, of Ogden College, Bowling Green, Ky., sends me the following relation :
  • " About ten weeks after the capture the Indians decided to celebrate their escape from pursuit by burning one of their captives. For their victim they selected Catharine du Bois and her baby, Sara, who afterward married Joost Janse Van Veteren. A cubical pile of logs was arranged and the mother and child were placed upon it ; when the Indians were about to apply the torch, Catharine began to sing a Huguenot hymn she had learned in earlier days in France. The Indians withheld the fire and listened. When she finished they demanded another song and then another. Before the last hymn was finished Dutch Soldiers arrived, the captives were all rescued and the Indians terribly punished."
  • Again, in 1670, when the Indians were on the warpath, Louis du Bois served in the colonial forces against them. He is credited with being the founder and first elder of the French Reformed Church at New Paltz. He left a family, a widow, who afterward m. Jean Cotton, and ten children, and their descendants are numerous, prominent and influential throughout the country, one of whom was Garrett A. Hobart, Vice-President of the United States during the first term of President McKinley's administration.

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  • Bi-centenary reunion of the descendants of Louis and Jacques Du Bois (emigrants to America, 1660 and 1675), at New Paltz, New York, 1875 .. (1876)
  • http://www.archive.org/details/bicentenaryreuni00dubo
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/bicentenaryreuni00dubo#page/17/mode/1up
  • Louis was married at Manheim, in October, 1655, and Jacques at Leyden, in April, 1663. The marriage record of Jacques, at Leyden, says that he was from the vicinity of LaBassee, which was in the province of Artois.
  • Jacques, however, did not arrive at Esopus till some fifteen years after Louis was settled there. The letters of church-membership, or letters of dismissal from the church of the Walloons, at Leyden, which he took with him on leaving that city, are dated 15th April, 1675, as is evidenced by the church records still extant. He must have died at Esopus, the same or the succeeding year, as in the old records of Ulster county there is still preserved a document by which it appears that his widow, Pieronne Bentyn, was married again to a John Pietersy, who, as such husband, and for a small consideration to himself personally, in December, 1677, contracts with Matthew Blanshan (who was the father-in-law of Louis DuBois) to pledge to him the lands belonging to Jacques Du Bois, in Ryssel, Flanders, as also the rents which the said lands had earned, for the fulfilment of the conditions of a contract which said Jacques DuBois, in his life-time, had made with said Blanshan. The nature or object of the contract does not in this document appear, but as Pieronne Bentyn is described in her marriage record with Jacques DuBois, at Leyden, as of Lisle (which is the same as Ryssel in Flanders), it may be that the lands referred to were held partly or altogether in right of the wife. Else there would seem to be no good reason why Pietersy should be called upon to confirm DuBois's contract with Blanshan.
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/bicentenaryreuni00dubo#page/29/mode/1up
  • The father of Louis Du Bois, as before remarked, was Chretien Du Bois. He is designated in the record of his son's marriage, at Manheim, October 10th, 1655, as the deceased Chretien Du Bois, resident of Wicres.
  • The records of this latter place have been examined, and I regret to say that, from age and bad ink and mutilation, the register is almost illegible.
  • The baptismal record shows that Chretien Du Bois had three children baptized at Wicres. The dates made out are the 18th June, 1622, the 13th November, 1625, and the 21st October, 1626. The names are illegible, and seem to have been intentionally obliterated. These researches were made by archivists under the direction of the consul for the United States at Lille, Mons. C. DuBois Gregoire. In his letter of 15th July, 1875, he writes that he had visited the canton of La Bassee several times, where there are very old records, but could make nothing out, as, where the Christian names occurred, the paper was torn or cut out. He further states that the registers in the village of Wicres were also in many places illegible from age, bad ink, and from being torn and worm-eaten. He says Wicres has a population of three hundred inhabitants, and that many farmers in the vicinity had pointed out to him the farm which the tradition of the country recognizes to have belonged to the Du Bois.

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  • Colonial Men and Times: Containing the Journal of Col. Daniel Trabue, Some ... By Daniel Trabue
  • https://books.google.com/books?id=a-xDAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA561&lpg=PA561&dq=cornelius+nieukirk+1715&source=bl&ots=HIrHKHL4K_&sig=a2-LOTbQaara_AiC-XIC_VDs8cY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CEgQ6AEwCWoVChMIzL6fy43oyAIVQ-RjCh2uQgww#v=onepage&q=cornelius%20nieukirk%201715&f=false
  • Pg.557
  • "Biographical History of the First Congressional District of New Jersey" Bol. 1. p. 32.
  • "Louis Du Bois married, Katryn, written Catryn and Catherine Blanshan. Katryn was daughter of Matthys and Madeline Jorisen, of Artois, France. Louis and Katryn were married at Mannheim, Germany Oct. 10, 1655. They and their children came to America in 1660, in the "Gilded Otter," and settled at Esopus, Ulster Co., New York. Louis and Catherine had ten children. Louis Du Bois Died in 1696.
    • "DU BOIS," FRENCH HUGUENOTS.
  • Chrétien or Christian Du Bois, of Artois, France, had
  • Louis Du Bois, "The Walloon," born 28th. of October 1626. Married Sun, Oct. 10th. 1655 Catherin Blancon, daughter of Matthe Blanshan.
  • Chrétien Du Bois is deceased at the time of his son Louis' marriage at Manheim. He has after his name "resident of Wicres," a place of 300 inhabitants in 1875.
  • "Louis du Bois and his 2 sons Isaac and Abraham were Patentees for the town of New Paltz in New York opposite Poughkeepsie, in 1677."
  • .... etc.
  • Pg.559
  • Louis Du Bois, or in French Louys du bois, was born October 28, 1626. Married Catherine Blancon, who was born and married at Manheim, Germany, They were married Sunday Oct. 10th, 1655. It was a Huguenot custom to be married on Sunday, after the communion service.
  • Catherine Blancon lived about ten years longer than her husband Louis Du Bois.
  • .... etc.
  • 1st Gen. Louis Du Bois died aged about 66 yrs. and no doubt was buried in the ground of the Dutch church at Kingston, N. Y. His will was proved 23rd of June 1696.
  • .... etc.
  • After the fifteen years that he had spent in New Palz he returned to Kingston, N. Y. The will of Louis Du Bois was proved 23rd June 1696 and was divided into eight equal parts. It mentions son 1. Abraham Du Bois, 2. Jacob Du Bois, 3. David Du Bois, 4. Solomon Du Bois, 5. Louis Du Bois, 6. Matthew Du Bois, 7 children of Isaac, deceased, 8. children of Sarah, deceased.
  • Louis Du Bois had 1. Abraham Du Bois, b. 1661. b. Artois, France, 2. Isaac Du Bois b. 1658. Died 1690. b. Manheim, Germany 3. Jacob Du Bois, b. Ulster Co. N. Y. 1661. 4 Sarah Du Bois, 5. David Du Bois, (married 1689) 6. Solomon Du Bois, b. 1669. D. 1759. 7. Rabecca Du Bois, b. 1671. 8, Rachel Du Bois, b.1675. 9. Louis Du Bois, b. 1677. 10. Matthew Du Bois, b. 1679.
  • .... etc.

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  • The New York genealogical and biographical record by Greene, Richard Henry
  • https://archive.org/details/newyorkgenealogi1897gree
  • https://archive.org/stream/newyorkgenealogi1897gree#page/13/mode/1up
  • (Continued from Vol. XXVII., p. 194, of THE RECORD.)
  • Louis Du Bois remained in New Paltz during the first ten years of its existence, returning to Kingston with his wife in 1686, where he purchased a residence on what is now the northwest corner of East Front and John Streets, and here, surrounded by old neighbors and friends, he passed the closing years of his life. He died in June, 1696, his last will being dated on the 23d of that month. He left a considerable estate, which he divided equally among his children after making a liberal provision for his widow, who survived him ten years. From the time of his arrival in Esopus to his death, Louis Du Bois was the chief of the Huguenot settlers, in all their trials they looked to him as their adviser and head, and among them his word was law. During his residence at Hurley he was an overseer and a justice of the peace, and he, with Cornelis Barents Slecht and Albert Heymans Roosa, was prominent in the "mutiny at Esopus" against the tyranny of Captain Brodhead, which resulted in the suspension of that doughty warrior from his command.
  • The descendants of Louis Du Bois far outnumber those of Jacques, as he left seven sons to perpetuate his name, while Jacques had but three, and only two of those are known with certainty to have been married. The names and fortunes of those families are inseparably welded with the making of New York, and no history of that commonwealth can be complete, that omits mention of the early influences for piety, industry, and valor, and the later sacrifices on the altar of patriotism, of Louis and Jacques Du Bois and their descendants.
  • Louis Du Bois and Catharine Blanchan, his wife, had the following children :
    • 2. i. Abraham2, born at Mannheim, in the Palatinate, December 26, 1657 ; married at Kingston, March 6, 1681, Margriet, the youngest of the five children of Christian Deyo.
    • 3. ii. Isaac, born Mannheim, 1659; married at Kingston in June, 1683, Maria Hasbrouck. He settled at New Paltz, and died June 28, 1690.
    • 4. iii. Jacob2, baptized October 9, 1661 ; married, March 8, 1689, Lysbeth Varnoye ; died 1745.
    • 5. iv. Sarah2, baptized September 14, 1664 ; married, December 12, 1682, Joost Janz, of Marbletown.
    • 6. v. David2, baptized March 13, 1667 ; married, March 8, 1689, Cornelia Varnoye.
    • 7. vi. Solomon2, born at Hurley, 1670; married, 1692, Trintje Gerritsen.
    • 8. vii. Rebecca2, baptized June 18, 1671 ; died young.
    • 9. viii. Ragel2 , baptized April, 1675 ; died young.
    • 10. ix. Louis2, born 1677 ; married, January 19, 1701, Rachael Hasbrouck.
    • 11. x. Matthew2, born January 3, 1679, at Hurley; married, January 17, 1697, Sara Matthyssen.
  • .... etc.

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One of the captives of the Indians at the burning of Hurley.

Data Conflict:

First Name: Catherine or Catharine

Last Name: Du Bois or Blanshan

Maiden name: Blanchan or Blanshan

Birth Date: 10/17/1627 or 1629

Birth Place: Baden-Wurttenberg, Germany or Pas-de-Calaise, Artois, France

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Catarinen [Catherine] Blanchan [Blanjean] was apparently born in the Province of Artois, France, the oldest child of Mattheu Blanchan and Magdalena Jorisse, who left France to escape persecution of Huguenots before 1647. Catarinen died 1713 in Kingston, Ulster County, N.Y. She married Louis du Bois 10 Oct. 1655 in Mannheim, Germany. They had 12 children. Catarinen was captured by Esopus Indians on 7 June 1663, along with three of her children, her sister Maria, Maria's child and other women and children of New Village (now Hurley, N.Y.). They were rescued three months later. Catarinen married second about 1698 to Jean Cottin. She moved to Kingston after second marriage.

from: http://home.earthlink.net/~kseitz/hugim.html

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http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=ilenemc&id=I2249

http://www.dbfa.org/family_history.htm

The DuBoises, and other Huguenot families of New Paltz, were slave owners. Louis purchased two slaves at public auction in Kingston 1674. The 1755 census shows Solomon DuBois as owning seven slaves.

 The DuBois family takes some small comfort that Catherine DuBois Cottin (Louis DuBois widow) made specific mention in her 1712 will that a manumission letter written for her slave girl Rachel in 1709 shall "remain in force and be properly observed".

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http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/m/a/n/Dennis-L-Maness/GENE39-0021.html Notes for Catherine Blanchan: On 7 June, 1663, Louis du Bois headed an expedition against the Minnisink Indians. This was latter known as the Eusopus War. "It was organized at the time the settlement was attacked by the Minnisinks, who burned Hurley, killed and injured some of the settlers, and carried away as prisoners, the wife of Louis du Bois, his three children, and at least two of Jan Joosten van Meterens'. These were taken to the fastnesses of the Catskill Mountains and there remained in captivity for months, but were rescued on the eve of torture by du Bois and Captain Martin Kreiger's company of Manhattan soldiers; the trainband finally rounded up the Indians and defeated them on September 3, 1663. In connection with this tragic experience the following statement is quoted: "About ten weeks after the capture of the women and children, the Indians decided to celebrate their own escape from pursuit by burning some of their victims and the ones selected were Catherine du Bois, and her baby Sara, who afterward married her companion in captivity, John Van Metre. A cubical pile of logs was arranged and the mother and child placed thereon; when the Indians were about to apply the torch, Catherine began to sing the 137th Psalm as a death chant. The Indians withheld the fire and gave her respite while they listened; when she had finished they demanded more, and before she had finished the last one her husband and the Dutch soldiers from New Amsterdam arrived and surrounded the savages, killed and captured some, and otherwise inflicted terrible punishment upon them, and released the prisoners." "Some time after her husband's death, and when she was about 63 years of age, Louis' widow married Jean Cottin, a very worthy Huguenot, who kept a store at Kingston and had been previously the schoolmaster at New Paltz. In the year 1703 we find recorded in the church book at Kingston the following interesting entry in the list of baptisms, under date of September 5th: "Rachel - after profession of her faith she received the sacrament of holy baptism, aged 17 years. Besides the points required of her in the formula of baptism she also promised the congregation to serve her mistress Catharine Cottyn faithfully and diligently until the death of her mistress and after that to serve her master Jan Cottyn and after that she shall be at liberty and free." The old Dutch dominie, who recorded all this in the church book, performed a valuable deed for history and for the descendants of Louis DuBois, the Patentee. Usually the church record contained simply the name of the child baptized, the parents, and sponsors; but here we have the evidence that the woman who, in her early married years, saved her life by singing a psalm, while the savages were preparing to burn her at the stake, now in her old age manumitted her negro woman. This is perhaps the very first recorded instance in this country of the freeing of a slave." From [IT:History of New Paltz:IT] by Ralph Le Fevre.

Other sources show her born 1633 in Artois, France http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~walkersj/Blanchan.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nm1g8FFRArc&feature=related''' Psalm 137 (King James Version) Psalm 137 1By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. 2We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof. 3For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song; and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion. 4How shall we sing the LORD's song in a strange land? 5If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning. 6If I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy. 7Remember, O LORD, the children of Edom in the day of Jerusalem; who said, Rase it, rase it, even to the foundation thereof. 8O daughter of Babylon, who art to be destroyed; happy shall he be, that rewardeth thee as thou has

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She was also said to have been born ca. 1635 in Artois, Franch Flanders and died 1713 in Kingston, NY. 1704

"Now that we know her parents were married in 1633, she was probably born at the earliest in 1634. Also, Catherine was married in 1655. If she was at least 18, then she was born at the latest in 1637. Catherine was the oldest based on order in Mathieu's will. Her parents were married in Armentieres and they bap. Maximilliam there in 1642. So, my best guess is that Catherine was born there, too. I checked the microfilm (#1133312) of the Catholic Church in Armentieres (the same one Max was bap. in and her parents were married in) and did not see her baptism. There were only a few records between May and Sep 1634. 9 mos after her parents marriage would be July 1634; so maybe she was bap. during that semi-gap in the records." 1728

"The wife of Louis du Bois and their three children were taken captive by the Indians in 1663 and they were rescued only just in time to save their lives. The prisoners had succeeded in delaying their executions by pleasing the savages with songs. One entitled 'The Babylonish Captives' was, appropriately, the song which Catherine du Bois and her children were singing at the moment of their deliverers' arrival." 1727

"On June 7th, 1663, an Indian war party raided the settlement, taking Catherine, three of their children, and others as prisoners. Louis, with Captain Martin Kreiger and a party of thirty men set out in pursuit of the Indians and their captives. They surprised and killed one of the Indian's rear guard, and took another captive. From him they learned the whereabouts of the main party, and on the second day found them. The Indians had bound the captives ot trees, in preparation for torture and death, but Catherine led the group in singing the 137th Psalm, which laments the affliction of the Israelites as they sat by Babylon's stream. So sweet was the sound of this soung that the savages hesitated. Louis and his party also heard them, surprised the Indians, and set the prisoners free." 1739

"In the Second Esopus war, 1663, among the captives taken by the Minnisink Indians into the Catskill Mts., when they burned the village of Hurley, June 7, were Catharine du Bois and Macyken Van Meteren with some of their children. After ten weeks the Indians decided to celebrate their repeated escape from pursuit, by burning one of their prisoners. Catharine and her baby Sara (who afterwards became the wife of Joost Janse Van Meteren) were placed upon a pile of logs. The Hugunot mother began to sing a hymn learned in France. The charmed Indians withheld the torch and listened, demanding another and another song. Before the last hymn was finished, her husband Louis du Bois, with the Dutch soldiers and capt. Krieger arrived, and this time were successful in saving all the captives and punishing the Indians." 1703

"A touching story is told of the almost miraculous escape of Catharine Du Bois from burning at the hands of the Indians. (Letters of Rev. Allen H. Brown, 1899.) " 1680

"Upon the death of Louis, and at the age of 63, Catherine was a wealthy woman for those days. In his will Louis had made an unusual bequest bestowing on her the full half of the property in case she should marry again. Catherine's father, Matthew Blanchan, was a very rich man. Probably much of the property in the family had come from him. No record has been found showing the marriage date of Jean Cottin, a merchant of Kingston who had previously been schoolmaster at New Paltz, and Catherine. The first record bearing on this point is in the baptismal record of Old Dutch Church, Kingston: "#1421, 5 September 1703: Rachel After profession of her faith she received the Sacrement of Holy Baptism, aged 17 years. Besides the points required of her in the formula of baptism, she also promised the congregation to serve her mistress, Catherine Cottyn, faithfully and diligently until the death of her mistress, and after that to serve her master, Jan Cottyn, and afterwards she 'shall be at liberty and free'." "Jan Cottyn, when he died left much property to the church. The families of Catherine's seven sons, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, David, Solomon, Louis Jr. and Matthew were living at New Paltz, Rochester, Hurley and Kingston, but it was to none of these that her negro girl should go as a slave. Mrs. Cottyn was an old woman. It was not to be supposed, in the course of nature, that she or her husband would live many years. In all probability by the time the negro girl reached the age of 25 she became a free woman by the act of her mistress." 1730

Catherine died at Kingston in 1713. The Ulster County Surrogate's Record, Liber BB, p. 323 records her will dated 23 July 1712 and proved 10 December 1713, translated from the French as follows: "Our help is in the name of the Lord who made heaven and earth, Amen. I, Catherine Cottin being very sound of mind and memory and having for my husband Jean Cottin, merchant living at Kingston in the County of Ulster, Province of New York, considering that the hour of death is unknown to all human creatures, and having recommended my sould to my creator, the omnipotent God and to my Savior and Redeemer and by the merit of His son Jesus Christ I believe I will be saved and have remission of my sins and hope for the resurrection of the Just by this virtue of the passion of our Lord Jesus Christ to attain the Kingdom of Heaven prepared by His Spirit, of my following words it is my Testament and my last Will for that which concerns the temporal goods which it has pleased my God by His Grace and Benediction to give me during all the time I have Lived and resided with my husband Jean Cottin (to the effect) that I would have the third part of the profit which God has given us together by his bounty, with my said husband Jean Cottin since the hour of our marriage up to the first trespass, therefore, I wish and it is my Will, very justly, that the franchise dated 22 September 1702 which I gave to Rachel, which is her name after having been baptized, shall be observed and shall be of full force and virtue from the first word of the page to the last word, and the said Rachel shall have and take after my death, my said third part of the profit, 30 pieces of Eight, and the other things which are stated in the said indenture, and she shall take before my children can divide my third part of the profit and also, I wish and it is my Will, being very just, that the indenture dated 17 August 1709 which I gave to our negress Dina shall be observed and guarded in full force and virtue, and also I wish and it is my very just Will that the donations dated 10 March 1697 which I made to my daughter Sarah for all my clothing, one chest, shall be observed and guarded in full force and virtue. Also I give to the Walloon Church of Kingston, 20 pieces of Eight which to take after my death in my said third part of the profit and this to aid in assisting the poor, and for all that which concerns my third part of the profit, it shall be to Abraham DuBois and Jacob DuBois and David DuBois and Matthew DuBois, and the two sons of Isaac DuBois, to them together I give them which they take after my death in my said third part of the profit, one fourth part, and to my said daughter I give to take after my death the two other fourt parts of my said third part of the profit to her alone, and for their inheritance of my said third part of the profit, all these children shall take in good merchandise and trade goods, each in proportion to their part, for this effect I have chosen my husband Jean Cottin whom I hereby constitute Executor of my present Testament and last Will who shall be bound by the above conditions and who shall render account six weeks after my death and deliver to each his part as is specified hereabove, and it is my last Will, and I have hereby signed, sealed, and delivered this present in my proper hand in presence of two witnesses, made at Kingston, 23 July 1712. Cattolon Cottin (Seal) "Witnesses: Cornelis Swart, Mattys Paors, Carol Barwoon "A True copy: W. Nottingham, Clark" The Ulster County Surrogate's Record follows her will with the following document: "This indenture made this 20th day of January in the 12th yeare of the reigne of our Soueraigne Lady Anne, by the Grace of God, Queen of Great Brittain, France & Ireland, defender of the faith &c., Seaventh part, BETWEEN Abraham Dubois of the New Paltz in the County of Ulster of the first part, Jacob DuBois of Hurley in the Said County of the Second part, David DuBois of Rochester the Said County of the third part, Solomon DuBois of the New Paltz, aforesaid, of the fourth part, Louis DuBois of the New Paltz aforesaid of the fifth part, Matteiu DuBois of the Corporation of Kingston in said County of the Sixth part, & Daniel Dubois of the New Paltz aforesaid, of the Seaventh part, the heirs of Cathrine Cottin, deceased, late wife of Mr. Jean Cottin of Kingston, aforesaid, & formerly wife of Louis DuBois, late of Kingston, aforesaid, deceased. WHEREAS the said Cathrine Cottin did make her Last Will and Testament bearing the date the 23rd day of July Anno Dom. 1712 which last Will & Testament is not value or Authentick in the Law and the heirs being willing to settle the promisses in good order now this Indenture wittnesseth that the partys above named in the ... are fully agreed that the said Last Will and Testament of the said deceased Cathrine Cottin is and shall be null and void and of none effect and that no notice shall be taken of the same as if it had never been and it is further agreed and concluded upon that the partys above mentioned together with Sara Van Meteren, daughter of said Cathrine Cottin, deceased , shall equally divide and share the whole estate of the said Cathrine Cottin, deceased both of whatever nature or quality wahtever and that share and share alike, provided that the said Sara Van Metteren is only to have the use, issues and proffits of said share of said Estate during the Terme of her natural life and after her decease it shall return to her children to be equally divided and shared among them share and share alike. "In witness whereof the said partys above named to share p'Gent Indenture, have hereunto putt theire hands & Seals the day and yeare first above. Abraham Dubois (S) Jacob Dubois (S) David Dubois (S) Solomon Dubois (S) Louis DuBois (S) Matteiu dubois (S) Daniel dubois (S) "Sealed and delivered in presence of us: Stephen Gasherie, Cornelis Eltinge, W. Nottingham. "In the presence of me, Mattys Jansen, Justice of the Peace. "A true Copy: W. Nottingham, Clark." 1730

"Catherine, born at Artois, France in 1629, married Louis DuBois at Mannheim, Germany on 10 October 1655, married (2) Jean Cottin at Kingston, Ulster County, New York, died at Kingston in 1713; "1730

"The first-named punitive expedition of June 7, 1663, was known in the New York history as the Eusopus War. It was organized at the time the settlement was attacked by the Minnisinks, who burned Hurley, killed and injured some of the settlers, and carried away as prisoners, the wife of Louis du Bois, his three children, and at least two of Jan Joosten's. These were taken to the fastnesses of the Catskill Mountains and there remained in captivity for months, but were rescued on the eve of torture by du Bois and Captain Martin Kreiger's company of Manhattan soldiers; the trainband finally rounded up the Indians and defeated them on September 3, 1663. In connection with this tragic experience the following statement is quoted: ' About ten weeks after the capture of the women and children, the Indians decided to celebrate their own escape from pursuit by burning some of their victims and the ones selected were Catherine du Bois, and her baby Sara, who afterward married her companion in captivity, John Van Metre. A cubical pile of logs was arranged and the mother and child placed thereon; when the Indians were about to apply the torch, Catherine began to sing the 137th Psalm as a death chant. The Indians withheld the fire and gave her respite while they listened; when she had finished they demanded more, and before she had finished the last one her husband and the Dutch soldiers from New Amsterdam arrived and surrounded the savages, killed and captured some, and otherwise inflicted terrible punishment upon them, and released the prisoners.' "1679

"Some time after her husband's death,and when she was about 63 years of age, Louis' widow married Jean Cottin, a very worthy Huguenot, who kept a store at Kingston and had been previously the schoolmaster at New Paltz. In the year 1703 we find recorded in the church book at Kingston the following interesting entry int he list of baptisms, under date of September 5th: 'Rachel ____ after profession of her faith she received the sacrament of holy baptism, aged 17 years. Besides the points require of her in the formula of baptism she also promised the congregation to serve her mistress catherine Cottyn faithfully and diligently until the death of her mistress and after that to serve her master Jan Cottyn and after that she shall be at liberty and free.' The old Dutch dominie, who recorded all this in the church book, performed a valuable deed for history and for the descendants of Louis DuBois, the Patentee. Usually the church record contained simply the name of the child baptised, the parents, and sponsors; but here wer have the evidence that the woman who, in her early married years, saved her life by singing a psalm, while the savages were preparing to burn her at the stake, now in her old age manumitted her negro woman. This is perhaps the very first recorded instance in this country of the freeing of a slave." 1738

"In looking over the settlement of the estate of Catherine du Bois widow of Louis, the Hugenot emigrant of Kingston, 1696, a statement is found to the effect that one of the divisions of her estate falls 'to the heirs of Sara, deceased.' In the genealogy of the Du Bois family it is expressly stated that Sara, the daughter of Louis and Catherine du Bois, married Joost Janz van Meteren! Now in the face of the above assertoion [sic] how are we to account for the fact that in 1715 Jooste Jans and his wife Sara du Bois were sponsors at the baptism of sara, the daughter of Cornelis and Rebecca (van Metere) Elting, at Kingston? Either, that by one of those remarkable coincidences that sometimes occur, Jooste Jan married another Sara du Bois after the death of the first, or, that the two Jooste Janz were not identical, or, that some one has made an error in the records." 1678

"The DuBoises, and other Huguenot families of New Paltz, were slave owners. Louis purchased two slaves at public auction in Kingston 1674. . . The DuBois family takes some small comfort that Catherine DuBois Cottin (Louis DuBois widow) made specific mention in her 1712 will that a manumission letter written for her slave girl Rachel in 1709 shall 'remain in force and be properly observed'." 1726

"It seems pretty certain that Catharine survived her husband about ten years, as in April, 1706, the heirs completed the partition or the estate, by executing certain releases according to the tenor of the codicil, Matthias Blancon (or Blanshan, as he wrote) was no doubt her brother. He settled at Hurley, and left four daughters and a son.--[SENIOR ED]"1743

"The widow of Louis du Bois was a wealthy woman for those days. In his Will Louis had made an unusual bequest bestowing on her the full half of the property in case she should marry again. Mrs. du Bois' father, Matthew Blanchan, was a very rich man. Probably much of the property in the family had come from him. No record showing the marriage date of Jean Cottin and Catherine, widow of Lous the Patentee, has been found. The first record bearing on this point is in the baptismal record of Old Dutch Church, Kingston: '#1421, September 5, 1703: Rachel 'After profession of her faith she received the Sacrement of Holy Baptism, aged 17 years. Besides the points required of her in the formula of baptism, she also promised the congregation to serve her mistress, Catherine Cottyn, faithfully and diligently until the death of her mistress, and after that to serve her master, Jan Cottyn, and afterwards she 'shall be at liberty and free'."1704

"We find the Will of Cataherine Cottin in the Ulster County Surrogate's Record, Liber BB, p. 323 written in French. The Will was dated 7-23-1712 and proved 12-10-1713: 'Our help is in the name of the Lord who made heaven and earth, Amen. I, Catherine Cottin being very sound of mind and memory and having for my husband Jean Cottin, merchant living at Kingston in the County of Ulster, Province of New York, . . . I wish and it is my Will, very justly, that the franchise dated September 22, 1702, which I gave to Rachel, which is her name after having been baptized, shall be observed and shall be of full force and virtue from the first word of the page to the last word, and the said Rachel shall have and take after my death, my said third part of the profit, thirty pieces of eight, and the other things which are stated in the said indenture, and she shall take before my children can divide my third part of the profit and also, I wish and it is my Will, being very just, that the indenture dated August 17, 1709, which I gave to our negress Dina shall be observed and guarded in full force and virtue, and also I wish and it is my very just Will that the donations dated March 10, 1697, which I made to my daugther Sarah for all my clothing, one chest, shall be observed and guarded in full force and virtue. . . and to my said daughter I give to take after my death the two other fourth parts of my said third part of the profit to her alone, and for their inheritance of my said third part of the profit, all these children shall take in good merchandise and trade goods, each in proportion to their part . . Kingston July 23, 1712. Cattolon Cottin (seal) Witnesses: Cornelis, Swart, Mattys Paors, Carol Barwoon A true copy: W. Nottingham, Clerk" 1704

"Liber BB, pp. 325-326: 'This indenture made this 20th day of January in the 12th yeare of the reigne of our Soueraigne Lady Anne, by the Grace of God . . . the heirs of cathrine Cottin, deceased, late wife of Mr. Jean Cottin of Kingston, aforesaid, & formerly wife of Louis DuBois, late of Kingston, aforesaid, deceased. WHEREAS the said Cathrine Cottin did make her Last Will and Testament bearing date of 23rd day of July Anno Dom. 1712 which last Will & Testament is not value or Authentick in the Law and the heirs being willing to settle the promisses in good order now this Indenture wittnesseth that the partys above named in the . .. are fully agreed that the said Last Will and testament of the said deceased Cathrine Cottin is and shall be null and void and of none effect and that no notice shall be taken of the same as if it had never been and it is further agreed and concluded upon that the partys above mentioned together with Sara Van Meteren, daughter of said Cathrine Cottin, deceased, shall equally divide and share the whole estate of the said Cathrine Cottin, deceased both of whatever nature or quality whatever and that share and share alike, provided that the said Sara Van Metteren is only to have the use, issues and proffits of said share of said Estate during the Terme of her natural life and after her decease it shall return to her children to be equally divided and shared among them share and share alike. . . . "1704

Text of will of Cottin, Catherine, of Kingston dated July 23, 1712 and written in French thttp://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~barbpretz/PS05/PS05_068.HTMo be entered. 1719

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http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Blanchan-1

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http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bobbistockton/van2.html

In the fall of 1662 Jan Joosten Van Meteren settled in Wildwych (now Kingston, Ulster County, New Jersey) and dwelt many years in that vicinity, which included the towns of Hurley, Middletown, and Esoppus. He is not noted in the activities of that community until the seventh of June, 1663, the date when the Minnisink Indians made an attack on the village and its vicinity raiding and burning the settlement of Hurley and Kingston and carrying away women and children in captivity.

Among the latter were Jan;s wife and children, Jooste Jans being one of them s well as Catherine DuBois, the wife of Louis DuBois, and their daughter Sarah. whom Jooste Jans Van Metern later married. These were taken to the fastness of Catskill Mountains and remained in captivity for months, but were rescued on the eve of torture by DuBois, and Captain Martin Kreiger's company of Manhattan soldiers; the trainband finally rounded up the Indians and defeated them on September 3, 1663.

In connection with this tragic experience the following statements is quoted:" About ten weeks after the captive of the women and children, the Indians decided to celebrate their own escape from pursuit by burning some of their victims and the ones selected were Catherine DuBois, and her baby Sara. A cubical pile of logs was arranged and the mother and child placed thereon: when the Indians were about to apply the torch, Catherine began to sing the 137th Psalm as a death chant. The Indians withheld the fire and gave her respite while they listened; when she had finished they demanded more, and before she finished the last one her husband and the Dutch soldier's from Amsterdam arrivesd and surrounded the savages, killed and captured some, and otherwise inflicted terrible punishment upon them, and released the prisoners.

Captain Kreiger's Journal which gives a general account of the expeition of rescue, unfortunately does not mane him, but it is elsewhere stated that it was due to Jooste Jan's three months' association with the Indians, during his captivity, that gave him the knowledge of their habits, trails, plans and war feuds with other tribes, and so impressed him with a desire for their adventurous life.

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"Only a year after arriving in America little Joost Jansen Van Meteren had an adventure which set the pattern for his whole life and planted the pioneering seed which flowered in succeeding generations. He was captured by the Indians. On June 7, 1663 while the men were away working in the fields when the Minnisink Indians entered several villages under the pretext of selling vegetables and suddenly began murdering their unarmed victims. They took all they could find of value, set the villages on fire and took about 45 women and children captives. Among them were Jan Joosten's wife Maycke and son Joost from Wiltwyck and Louis DuBois' wife Catherine Blanchan and baby daughter Sarah from Esopus. Joost and Sarah were later to be married. For three months the men searched the Catskills, but had no success until on Sept. 3rd, a friendly Indian gave a clue to the location of the captives. A rescue party was formed led by Louis DuBois and Capt. Kreiger whose journal relates this event. Meanwhile, since the Indians were running short of food and winter was not far off they had decided to burn some of their Captives. Catherine DuBois and her baby Sarah were selected to be first. When the Indians were about to put the torch to her pyre she began to sing the words of the 137th Psalm. Enchanted by her voice they demanded that she continue to sing, of course, she did. The approaching rescuers heard her, were guided to the spot, attacked the Indians and released all the prisoners. Little Joost, too young to be much affected by the horrors of captivity, thoroughly enjoyed his three months of Indian life. Later as an adult he frequently left home to spend many weeks at a time with various tribes. In this way he was among the first whites to explore the wilderness areas to the west of the coastal settlements. He was particularly impressed by the beauty of the Valley of Virginia and urged his sons to settle there, which they eventually did. Thus began the pioneering spirit of the Van Meters who for the next 200 years were among the first settlers and participants in the key events which shaped the nation as it thrust evermore westward.

A brief account such as this must skip entirely over most branches of the family and even neglect the details of the particular branch of interest. Much of the past still has not been retrieved, but an amazing amount of information is nevertheless available, patiently collected, studied and pieced together from deeds, wills, court and church records, family Bibles, local histories, census records, genealogical publications and correspondence by dedicated family historians over a period of a great many years. Readers who wish to learn more than this brief sketch provides are most welcome to direct their inquiries to:

James T. Van Meter 1201 Yale Place Unit 208 Minneapolis, MN 55403-1955 Phone:612-349-4681"

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http://www.watermelon-kid.com/family/bios/dubois.htm

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Catherine Blanchan's Timeline

1627
October 17, 1627
Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg, Deutschland
1627
Normandy, France OR Pont-l'Eveque, Lisieux, Normandie, France
1629
1629
Age 1
Artois, Pas-DE-Calais, Normandy, France
1629
Age 1
ARTOIS, PAS DE CALAIS, NORMANDY, FR
1643
1643
Age 15
France
1657
December 26, 1657
Age 30
Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg, Deutschland
1659
May 14, 1659
Age 31
Mannheim, Baden, Paltz, Germany
1660
1660
Age 32
Emigrant in 1660 with husband and two children
1661
October 9, 1661
Age 33
Kingston, Ulster Co., New York