Cerbhall mac Dunghal, King of Osraige in Ireland

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Cerbhall mac Dunghal, King of Osraige in Ireland

Norwegian: Cerbhall mac Dúngal, Konge av Osraige, Irland
Also Known As: "Kjarval", "Lord Mac Dunghal King Of Osraige In Ireland"
Birthdate: (88)
Birthplace: Osraige, Ireland
Death: 888 (88)
Ireland
Immediate Family:

Son of Dungal mac Fergail King of Osraige and N.N.
Husband of Maelfebhal (Ailbi) ingen Mael Secnaill
Father of Diarmaid MacCearbhall; Rafertach ingen Cearbhaill; Cellach Mac Cerbaill, King of Osraige; Dugnial mac Cearbhall, King Of Ossory; Fridgerd Kjarvalsdotter and 7 others
Brother of Lann ingen Dúngaile, Queen of Ireland and Riacán mac Dúnlainge

Occupation: King of Ossory, Dublin, Irekonge, Roi, d'Irlande, konge av Ossory og Dublin, Laird de Kirkwall, king of Osraige in south-east Ireland mac Dúnlainge, d'Ossory, de Dublin, крал в Ирландия, в Оссори и Дъблин, King of Ireland
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Cerbhall mac Dunghal, King of Osraige in Ireland

Kjarval konge (Kjarvalr konungr)

Cerball mac Dúnlainge konge av Osraige, Irland fra 842 til 888

  • f. ca 800 i Osraige, Cerball var sønn av Dúngal mac Fergaile og ukjent mor
  • Han var gift med Maelfelbha, de hadde barna Diarmait, Cellach, Bráenán, Rafarta[, Gormlaith, Dunghal , Eithne, Cuilde, Mór og Fridgerd

Han tok over etter sin far og var en av Osraiges mest fremragende konger. Han regjerte i en turbulent periode i irsk historie og med angrep fra vikingene Cerballs første kamp mot vikingene ble rapportert i 846.Han ble også med i alle vikingegruppene da det passet hans politikk. Han ledet Osraige som ble fremtredende i Irlands politikk, og han blir selv militært dominerende over Leath Moga.

Kjarvalr konungr Tilnavn / fordanskning: Kjarval Lokalitet: Dublin, Irland Relationer: Havde sønnen Dufnjal og døtrene Fridgerd, Rafarta og Kormlød. Kilder: Landnamabogen: 2, 175, S217, 321, 348 Noter: Irsk konge, som herskede over Dublin. Ifølge Hermann Pálsson er denne Kjarval identisk med Cerbhall af Osraige (d. 888), som dog aldrig herskede over Dublin.

http://heimskringla.no/wiki/Landnamabogen

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerball_mac_D%C3%BAnlainge

CERBALL MAC DÚNLAINGE (d. 888)

During the reign of Cerball mac Dúnlainge (842–88) the Osraige rose from relative obscurity to become a major player in Irish politics. The most lavish account of his deeds survives in an eleventh-century saga embedded in The Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. This saga appears to have been written under the sponsorship of Cerball’s great-great grandson Donnchad mac GillaPátraic, who ruled Osraige (1003–1039) and Leinster (1033–1039). The exaggerations and anachronisms found in the saga urge a degree of caution in its use as a historical source. Cerball is also mentioned in the Icelandic Landnámabók and later sagas. These demonstrate that a number of prominent Icelandic families claimed descent from Cerball as a figure of legend.

Cerball’s kingdom, Osraige, was strategically placed between the heartlands of Munster and Leinster. At the beginning of Cerball’s reign, Osraige owed allegiance to overkings of Munster. However, in the 850s and 860s the fortunes of Munster declined, a factor that can be seen to aid Cerball’s advancement.

Nevertheless, Cerball also faced dangers from Viking incursions. He is most renowned for his victories over Vikings that are elaborated in The Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. Cerball’s first battle against Vikings is reported in 846. He also allied with some Viking groups when it suited his policies. In the late 850s he joined forces with Ívarr, a king of the “Dark foreigners.” In 859, they raided Southern Uí Néill, thus challenging the power of the Uí Néill overking Máel-Sechnaill mac Máele-Ruanaid. In consequence of this attack, a royal meeting was arranged at Rathugh (Co. Westmeath) in 859. Osraige was formally ceded from Munster control and placed under the authority of Máel-Sechnaill. The event caused Cerball to reject his alliance with Ívarr. Further hostilities against Vikings are recorded for the remainder of Cerball’s reign, although a temporary alliance with one viking group is recorded in 864.

Cerball was able to deal effectively with the threats posed by other Irish kings. Cerball enjoyed good relations with the Loígis of Leinster (his sister Lann was initially married to the king of this population group). Nevertheless, Cerball engaged in hostilities against other kings in the province on at least three occasions. The marriages of Cerball’s daughters to kings of Uí Cheinnselaig and Uí Dróna in Leinster may indicate attempts to reduce border warfare.

Cerball’s relations with Munster fluctuated. In 864, he attacked the heartlands of the province. He later allied with Dúnchad mac Duibdábairenn, who became overking of Munster in 872. They plundered Connacht together in 871 and 873. His alliance with Dúnchad later collapsed, and Cerball campaigned in Munster in 878.

Cerball’s relations with the powerful Uí Néill rulers seem to have been flexible and pragmatic. From 859, Cerball supported Máel-Sechnaill against his rival Áed, overking of Northern Uí Néill. Nevertheless, Cerball quickly joined sides with Áed following Máel-Sechnaill’s death. Cerball’s sister Lann assisted in securing these important alliances by marrying both kings in succession.

Cerball ruled for a total of forty-six years. His longevity, success, and the dramatic potential of events in his career encouraged the later development of legends about him.

CLARE DOWNHAM

References and Further Reading

Clarke, Howard B. et al., eds. Ireland and Scandinavia in the Early Viking Age. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1998.

Ó Corráin, Donnchadh. “Nationality and Kingship in Pre-Norman Ireland.” In Nationality and the Pursuit of National Independence, Historical Studies 11, edited by T.W.Moody, 1–35. Belfast: Blackstaff Press, 1978.

Ó Corráin, Donnchadh. “Viking Ireland: Afterthoughts.” In H.B. Clarke et al. eds. Ireland and Scandinavia in the Early Viking Age, edited by H.B.Clarke et al., 442–445, 447. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1998.

Radner, Joan Newlon, ed. and trans. Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1978.

Radner, Joan N. “Writing History: Early Irish Historiography and the Significance of Form.” Celtica 23 (1999):312–325.


Name: Cerball MACDUNLAINGE , King Of Osraige

Sex: M

Name: Cearbhall MACDUNGHAL

Birth: 800 in Ireland

Death: 888 in Ireland


The kingdom of Osraige occupied roughly the area of modern County Kilkenny and lay between the larger provincial kingdoms of Munster and Leinster.

Cerball came to prominence after the death of Feidlimid mac Cremthanin, King of Munster, in 847. Osraige was traditionally subject to the Eóganachta kings of Munster, but Feidlimid was succeeded by a series of weak kings who had to contend with Viking incursions on the coasts of Munster. As a result, Cerball was in a strong position and is said to have been the second most powerful king in Ireland in his later years.

The period of Cerball's life covered much of the first Viking Age. While several kingdoms in Britain—East Anglia, Fortriu, Mercia, and Northumbria—would collapse under the shock of Viking attacks, their impact in Ireland was very much less immediate. In the first half of the ninth century, raiders appear to have come in small groups, increasing in size until larger forces appear, such as that led by the shadowy Turgéis (Turgesius) in the 840s, and those led by Amlaíb and Ímar from the 850s onwards. Vikings would be both enemies and allies for Cerball and other Irish kings. In the long run, the creation of Norse-Gaelic towns by Vikings operating as traders rather than raiders would change the Irish political landscape, but the results of this were seen in the tenth and eleventh centuries rather than the ninth.[


Kong Kiarval MacDunghal, Kjarval Irakonge, Cearbhall (Kjarval) MacDunghal, MacDunlang.


King in Ireland


http://www.bookrags.com/tandf/cerball-mac-dnlainge-tf/

CERBALL MAC DÚNLAINGE (d. 888)

During the reign of Cerball mac Dúnlainge (842–88) the Osraige rose from relative obscurity to become a major player in Irish politics. The most lavish account of his deeds survives in an eleventh-century saga embedded in The Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. This saga appears to have been written under the sponsorship of Cerball’s great-great grandson Donnchad mac GillaPátraic, who ruled Osraige (1003–1039) and Leinster (1033–1039). The exaggerations and anachronisms found in the saga urge a degree of caution in its use as a historical source. Cerball is also mentioned in the Icelandic Landnámabók and later sagas. These demonstrate that a number of prominent Icelandic families claimed descent from Cerball as a figure of legend.

Cerball’s kingdom, Osraige, was strategically placed between the heartlands of Munster and Leinster. At the beginning of Cerball’s reign, Osraige owed allegiance to overkings of Munster. However, in the 850s and 860s the fortunes of Munster declined, a factor that can be seen to aid Cerball’s advancement.

Nevertheless, Cerball also faced dangers from Viking incursions. He is most renowned for his victories over Vikings that are elaborated in The Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. Cerball’s first battle against Vikings is reported in 846. He also allied with some Viking groups when it suited his policies. In the late 850s he joined forces with Ívarr, a king of the “Dark foreigners.” In 859, they raided Southern Uí Néill, thus challenging the power of the Uí Néill overking Máel-Sechnaill mac Máele-Ruanaid. In consequence of this attack, a royal meeting was arranged at Rathugh (Co. Westmeath) in 859. Osraige was formally ceded from Munster control and placed under the authority of Máel-Sechnaill. The event caused Cerball to reject his alliance with Ívarr. Further hostilities against Vikings are recorded for the remainder of Cerball’s reign, although a temporary alliance with one viking group is recorded in 864.

Cerball was able to deal effectively with the threats posed by other Irish kings. Cerball enjoyed good relations with the Loígis of Leinster (his sister Lann was initially married to the king of this population group). Nevertheless, Cerball engaged in hostilities against other kings in the province on at least three occasions. The marriages of Cerball’s daughters to kings of Uí Cheinnselaig and Uí Dróna in Leinster may indicate attempts to reduce border warfare.

Cerball’s relations with Munster fluctuated. In 864, he attacked the heartlands of the province. He later allied with Dúnchad mac Duibdábairenn, who became overking of Munster in 872. They plundered Connacht together in 871 and 873. His alliance with Dúnchad later collapsed, and Cerball campaigned in Munster in 878.

Cerball’s relations with the powerful Uí Néill rulers seem to have been flexible and pragmatic. From 859, Cerball supported Máel-Sechnaill against his rival Áed, overking of Northern Uí Néill. Nevertheless, Cerball quickly joined sides with Áed following Máel-Sechnaill’s death. Cerball’s sister Lann assisted in securing these important alliances by marrying both kings in succession.

Cerball ruled for a total of forty-six years. His longevity, success, and the dramatic potential of events in his career encouraged the later development of legends about him.

CLARE DOWNHAM

References and Further Reading

Clarke, Howard B. et al., eds. Ireland and Scandinavia in the Early Viking Age. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1998.

Ó Corráin, Donnchadh. “Nationality and Kingship in Pre-Norman Ireland.” In Nationality and the Pursuit of National Independence, Historical Studies 11, edited by T.W.Moody, 1–35. Belfast: Blackstaff Press, 1978.

Ó Corráin, Donnchadh. “Viking Ireland: Afterthoughts.” In H.B. Clarke et al. eds. Ireland and Scandinavia in the Early Viking Age, edited by H.B.Clarke et al., 442–445, 447. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1998.

Radner, Joan Newlon, ed. and trans. Fragmentary Annals of Ireland. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1978.

Radner, Joan N. “Writing History: Early Irish Historiography and the Significance of Form.” Celtica 23 (1999):312–325.


Name: Cerball MACDUNLAINGE , King Of Osraige

Sex: M

Name: Cearbhall MACDUNGHAL

Birth: 800 in Ireland

Death: 888 in Ireland -------------------- The kingdom of Osraige occupied roughly the area of modern County Kilkenny and lay between the larger provincial kingdoms of Munster and Leinster.

Cerball came to prominence after the death of Feidlimid mac Cremthanin, King of Munster, in 847. Osraige was traditionally subject to the Eóganachta kings of Munster, but Feidlimid was succeeded by a series of weak kings who had to contend with Viking incursions on the coasts of Munster. As a result, Cerball was in a strong position and is said to have been the second most powerful king in Ireland in his later years.

The period of Cerball's life covered much of the first Viking Age. While several kingdoms in Britain—East Anglia, Fortriu, Mercia, and Northumbria—would collapse under the shock of Viking attacks, their impact in Ireland was very much less immediate. In the first half of the ninth century, raiders appear to have come in small groups, increasing in size until larger forces appear, such as that led by the shadowy Turgéis (Turgesius) in the 840s, and those led by Amlaíb and Ímar from the 850s onwards. Vikings would be both enemies and allies for Cerball and other Irish kings. In the long run, the creation of Norse-Gaelic towns by Vikings operating as traders rather than raiders would change the Irish political landscape, but the results of this were seen in the tenth and eleventh centuries rather than the ninth.


Cearbhall was King of Leinster in Ireland. In 902 he conquered Dublin from the Vikings and secured peace in the land for the next 20 years. Three of his daughters (all ancestors of Frida Rage) married Norsemen - one of which was to become the ancestor of the famous Thorfinn Karlsevne, who sailed with Leif Erikson from Greenland to North America around the year 1000 AD.

Cearbhall var konge av Leinster i Irland. I 902 erobret han Dublin fra vikingene og sikret fred i landet de neste 20 år. Også en annen irsk konge med samme navn hadde en datter som ble giftet inn i den samme familien.


Konge af Irland

Har det fra andre slægtsforskere - Og det kan dokumenteres fremgår det af de kilder jeg har set,Hans fornavn udtales Kjerval og hans efternavn er i nutidens sprog MacDonald - altså er han ikke bare stamfar til Bue men må også være stamfader til den bekendte burgerkæde !

I øvrigt er der rigtig mange efterkommere efter denne irske konge.

Kjerval/Cearbhail levede fra 800 til 888 og var konge over Osraige i det sydøstlige Irland. Det menes at han styrede over det næst-største/vigtigste kongedømme i Irland . Han optræder i Islandske sagaer og "mange prominente islandske familier nedstammer fra ham" Og det er Bue helt med på!


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerball_mac_D%C3%BAnlainge
Kjarval irekonge.

Kong Cearbalh av Ossiry i Leinster (ca 800-887)

Källa

Obs, fanns redan här.

Cerbhall mac Dunghal, King of Osraige in Ireland


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Cerbhall mac Dunghal, King of Osraige in Ireland's Timeline

800
800
Ireland
820
820
Age 20
Kilkenny, Leinster, Osraige, Ireland
832
832
Age 32
of Ireland
834
834
Age 34
Ossory, , Kilkenny, Ireland
834
Age 34
of Ireland
840
840
Age 40
Kilkenny, Leinster, Osraige, Ireland
840
Age 40
Reykjanes, Arnessysla, Iceland
850
850
Age 50
of Ireland
873
873
Age 73