Chief "Set-Imkia" Stumbling Bear

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Chief "Set-Imkia" Stumbling Bear's Geni Profile

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Chief Set-Imkia-Ge- Ah Stumblingbear (Stumbling Bear)

Also Known As: "Set- Em-Ge- Ah", "Stumblingbear", "Set-Em-Ge-Ah", "Chief Stumblingbear", "Stumbling Bear", "Set-Em-Ge-Ah Stumbling Bear"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Lawton, Comanche, Oklahoma
Death: March 14, 1903 (72-73)
Oklahoma, USA
Place of Burial: Fort Sill, Comanche County, Oklahoma, United States
Immediate Family:

Husband of To- Ye- Mah and To-Ye-Mah
Father of Andrew To-Kei Stumblingbear; Virginia “Au-Quo-Yah” Sahmaunt (Stumbling Bear); Gap-Kau-Go and Ah-ko-yah Apekaum

Occupation: Kiowa Tribe - Medicine Lodge - Treaty Signer
Managed by: William Owen "Bill" Irwin
Last Updated:

About Chief "Set-Imkia" Stumbling Bear

Kiowa Chief and Treaty Signer. During his youth, he became an influential war chief noted for his raids against the Sac, Fox, Pawnee, and Navajo tribes, as well as against white settlers.

In November of 1864 he fought United States forces led by Kit Carson at the Battle of Adobe Wells.

Soon after, both Stumbling Bear and Chief Kicking Bird became advocates of peace with the whites. On October 21, 1867, he signed the first Medicine Lodge Treaty which was between the Kiowa and Comanche tribes and the United States Government.

Later the same day the second treaty, with the Kiowa-Apache was signed.

The Cheyenne and Arapaho signed on October 28. In 1872, he and other Kiowa chiefs went to Washington, D.C. seeking peace when the Treaty was not being enforced.

In 1874, when Quanah Parker and the Comanche Tribe started the Red River War, Stumbling Bear was an advocate of peace with the whites.

As a result of his peace efforts, the federal government built him a home in 1878 on the Kiowa Reservation in the Indian Territory.

He is buried in the Fort Sill Post Cemetery in an area known as "Chief Hill."

Kiowa Chief and Treaty Signer. During his youth, he became an influential war chief noted for his raids against the Sac, Fox, Pawnee, and Navajo tribes, as well as against white settlers. In November of 1864 he fought United States forces led by Kit Carson at the Battle of Adobe Wells. Soon after, both Stumbling bear and Chief Kicking bird became advocates of peace with the whites. On October 21, 1867, he signed the first Medicine Lodge Treaty which was between the Kiowa and Comanche tribes and the United States Government. Later the same day the second treaty, with the Kiowa-Apache was signed. The Cheyenne and Arapaho signed on October 28. In 1872, he and other Kiowa chiefs went to Washington, D.C. seeking peace when the Treaty was not being enforced. In 1874, when Quanah Parker and the Comanche Tribe started the Red River War, Stumbling Bear was an advocate of peace with the whites. As a result of his peace efforts, the federal government built him a home in 1878 on the Kiowa Reservation in the Indian Territory. He is buried in the Fort Sill Post Cemetery in an area known as "Chief Hill."* Reference: Find A Grave Memorial - SmartCopy: Mar 18 2021, 5:02:57 UTC


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Chief "Set-Imkia" Stumbling Bear's Timeline

1830
1830
Lawton, Comanche, Oklahoma
1861
1861
Oklahoma, USA
1866
1866
Oklahoma, United States
1867
1867
1868
1868
1903
March 14, 1903
Age 73
Oklahoma, USA
March 14, 1903
Age 73
Fort Sill, Comanche County, Oklahoma, United States