Colonel Robert "King" Carter, I

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Colonel Robert "King" Carter, I

Also Known As: "King Carter", "King", "/King/"
Birthdate: (69)
Birthplace: Corotoman, Lancaster, Virginia, American Colonies
Death: Died in Lancaster, Virginia, American Colonies
Place of Burial: Lancaster County, Virginia
Immediate Family:

Son of Col. John Carter and Sarah Carter, of Dinton
Husband of Sarah Carter, of Dinton; Judith Carter and Elizabeth "Betty" Landon
Father of Elizabeth Thigpen; John Carter, Secretary of Virginia Colony; Sarah Carter; Elizabeth Carter Burwell; Judith Carter and 11 others
Brother of Anne Chisholm and Mary Swan
Half brother of George Carter, 1638; Elizabeth Johnson; Col. John Carter, Jr.; Sarah Carter and Charles Carter

Occupation: One of wealthest men in colonies - Virginia, Rector of William & Mary College; Speaker of House of Burgess, VA, Speaker, Councillor & Acting Governor of Virginia, acting Govenor, colonel, Plantation Owner
Managed by: Peter James Herbert
Last Updated:

About Colonel Robert "King" Carter, I

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Carter_I

Robert Carter also known as King Carter (1663 – August 4, 1732) of Lancaster County was a colonist in Virginia and became one of the wealthiest men in the colonies.

As President of the Governor's Council of the Virginia Colony, he was acting Governor of Virginia in Williamsburg from 1726-1727 after the death in office of Governor Hugh Drysdale. He acquired the moniker "King" from his wealth and autocratic business methods.

Biography

Robert Carter was born at Corotoman Plantation in Lancaster County, Virginia, to John Carter (1620-1669) of London, England, and Sarah Ludlow (1635-1668) of Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire. In 1668, he married Judith Armistead of Hesse in Gloucester County, an area which was included in the formaton of Mathews County in 1691. After her death in 1699, he married Elizabeth Landon in 1701.

At the age of 28, Robert entered the General Assembly of Virginia as a Burgess from Lancaster County, serving five consecutive years. In 1726, as President of the Governor's Council, he served as acting Governor of Virginia after the death of Governor Hugh Drysdale.

As an agent of Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron, better known in Virginia as Lord Fairfax, he served two terms as agent for the Fairfax proprietary of the Northern Neck of Virginia. During his first term, 1702-1711, he began to acquire large tracts of land for himself in the Rappahannock River region of Virginia. acquiring some 20,000 acres.

When he became representative of Fairfax’s interests again in 1722, and served from 1722-32, he succeeded in securing for his children and grandchildren some 110,000 acres in the Northern Neck, as well as additional acquisitions in Virginia west of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Robert Carter died on August 4, 1732, in Lancaster County, Virginia and was buried in Christ Church, Lancaster County, Virginia. He left behind 300,000 acres (1,200 km²) of land, 1,000 slaves and 10,000,000 British pounds in cash.

Descendants

Anne Carter (1702-1745), who married Benjamin Harrison IV and died on August 12, 1745; (parents of Benjamin Harrison V and grandparents of President William Henry Harrison).

Robert Carter II (1704-1734), who married Priscilla Churchill;

Elizabeth Carter (1705-1706);

Sarah Carter (1705-1705);

Charles Carter (1707-1764), who married Anne Byrd, daughter of Col. William Byrd II;

Ludlow Carter (b. 1709);

Landon Carter (1710-1778), who married Maria Byrd, daughter of Col. William Byrd II;

Mary Carter (1712-1736); who married George Braxton; {parents of Carter Braxton}.

Lucy Carter (1715-1763); and

George Carter (1718-1742).

See also

Robert Carter III

Carter's Grove Plantation


http://www.christchurch1735.org/history/robert_carter.html

http://arlisherring.com/tng/getperson.php?personID=I042629&tree=Herring

President of the council and acting governor from the death of Drysdale, July 22, 1726, till the arrival of William Gooch about October, 1727, was born in Virginia in 1663, son of Colonel John and Sarah (Ludlow) Carter. His father had been prominent in the colony as lieutenant-colonel, burgess and councillor. His mother was a daughter of Gabriel Ludlow, a nephew of General Edmund Ludlow, one of Cromwell's generals. Robert Carter was for many years the agent of Lord Fairfax, the proprietor of the Northern Neck grant. He was treasurer of the colony, speaker of the house of burgesses 1694-99, and member of the council for twenty-seven years (1699-1726). He became president of the council, and as such succeeded as acting governor. His great possessions earned him the name of "King" Carter. His residence was in Lancaster county. at Corotoman, on the Rappahannock river, and there is still standing nearby a church that he built shortly before his death, which occurred August 4, 1732. His splendid tomb in a rather shattered condition is still to be seen in the yard of the church. He was twice married, first to Judith, eldest daughter of John Armistead, Esq., a member of the council, and (second) to Elizabeth Willis, daughter of Thomas Landon, of an ancient family in Hereford county, England. By these wives he had numerous children, who have many influential descendants in Virginia and the south.

Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume I

Robert Carter was born at Corotoman Plantation in Lancaster County, Virginia, to John Carter (1620-1669) of London, England, and Sarah Ludlow (1635-1668) of Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire. In 1688, he married Judith Armistead of Hesse in Gloucester County, an area which was included in the formation of Mathews County in 1691. After her death in 1699, he married Elizabeth Landon in 1701.

At the age of 28, Robert entered the General Assembly of Virginia as a Burgess from Lancaster County, serving five consecutive years. In 1726, as President of the Governor's Council, he served as acting Governor of Virginia after the death of Governor Hugh Drysdale.

As an agent of Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron, better known in Virginia as Lord Fairfax, he served two terms as agent for the Fairfax proprietary of the Northern Neck of Virginia. During his first term, 1702-1711, he began to acquire large tracts of land for himself in the Rappahannock River region of Virginia. acquiring some 20,000 acres (81 km2), a large part of which was the 6,000-acre (24 km2) Nomini Hall plantation which Carter acquired in 1709 from the heirs of Col. Nicholas Spencer, cousin of the Lords Culpepper, from whom the Fairfaxes had inherited their Virginia holdings.

When he became representative of Fairfax’s interests again in 1722, and served from 1722-32, he succeeded in securing for his children and grandchildren some 110,000 acres (450 km2) in the Northern Neck, as well as additional acquisitions in Virginia west of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Robert Carter died on August 4, 1732, in Lancaster County, Virginia and was buried in Christ Church, Lancaster County, Virginia. He left behind 300,000 acres (1,200 km²) of land, 1,000 slaves and 10,000 British pounds in cash.


Robert Carter died on August 4, 1732, in Lancaster County, Virginia and was buried in Christ Church, Lancaster County, Virginia. He left behind 300,000 acres (1,200 km²) of land, 1,000 slaves and 10,000,000 British pounds in cash.

Marriages

Judith Armistead of Hesse, Gloucester County in 1688. She died in 1699. Mother of five children.

Betty Landon (widow of Richard Willis) in 1701. She died in 1719. Mother of ten children.

Descendants

Anne Carter (1702-1745), who married Benjamin Harrison IV and died on August 12, 1745; (parents of Benjamin Harrison V and grandparents of President William Henry Harrison).

Robert Carter II (1704-1734), who married Priscilla Churchill;

Elizabeth Carter (1705-1706);

Sarah Carter (1705-1705);

Charles Carter (1707-1764), who married Anne Byrd, daughter of Col. William Byrd II;

Ludlow Carter (b. 1709);

Landon Carter (1710-1778), who married Maria Byrd, daughter of Col. William Byrd II;

Mary Carter (1712-1736); who married George Braxton; {parents of Carter Braxton}.

Lucy Carter (1715-1763); and

George Carter (1718-1742).

See also

Robert Carter III


http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0007/g0000062.html#I38986

"Colonial official, landowner; born in Lancaster County, Va. He served in the Virginia Assembly (1691--92, 1695--99) and the Council (1699--1732). A large landowner himself, he became the agent for the wealthy Fairfax family in 1702 and used his position to become one of the wealthiest men in the colonies. His political and economic position earned him the title of "King Carter" or "King Robin." (see Glenn's 'Some Colonial Mansions')" - p. 182."

Children: Anne (Anna) Carter, b. 1702, Corotoman, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. betw. 1743-1745, +Benjamin Harrison Robert Carter II, b. 1704, Corotoman, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. May 12, 1732, Nomin, Westmoreland County, Virginia; + Priscilla Bladen Churchill, 1725 Sarah Carter, b. 1705, d. 1705 Betty Carter, b. 1706, d. 1706 Charles Carter, b. 1707 Ludlow Carter, b. 1708, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. bef. 1719

Landon Carter, b. 1710, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. Mar. 3, 1778; + 1) Elizabeth Wormely, 1732, + 2) Maria Bryd, 1742, + 3) Elizabeth Beale, 1746 Mary Carter, b. 1712, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. 1736 Lucy Carter, b. 1715, d. 1763, + Col. Henry Fitzhugh George Carter, b. 1718, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. 1742, England

COL. ROBERT CARTER, King Carter (3--7), of "Corotoman," Lancaster Co., Va., b. 1663; d. Aug. 4, 1732; he served as a Burgess, 1695-99, and as Speaker of the House; as Treasurer of the Colony, 1694-1732; an influential [p.110] member of the King's Council, 1699-1732, and its President; acting Governor, 1726-27. On account of his great prominence and wealth, he was called "King Carter." His estate consisted of 300,000 acres of land, 1,000 slaves and 10, 100 pounds Sterling; he was also a prominent and active member of the Established Church; served as Vestryman of Christ Church, Lancaster Co., and built the present Church, which is one of the prettiest and most interesting in Colonial Virginia; he is buried just outside of this old Church. He m. (first) Judith Armistead, d. 1699; dau. of Col. John and Judith (Bowles) Armistead, of "Hesse," Gloucester Co., Va.; (second) Elizabeth (Landon) Willis, dau. of Thomas Landon, of "Grednal," Hereford Co., England. (See Armistead lineage.) Issue by first marriage: 4--1. Elizabeth, b. 1688; d. 1721; (death date error) 4--2. JOHN, b. 1690; of whom later. 4--3. Judith, b. 1693; m. 1718, Hon. Mann Page, of "Roswell,"Gloucester Co., Va., son of Col. Matthew and Mary (Mann) Page, and had issue. 4--4. Ann, b. 1696; m. Hon. Benjamine Harrison, of "Berkeley," Charles City Co., Va., son of Hon. Benjamine and Elizabeth (Burwell) Harrison, and had issue. (See Harrison and Burwell lineage.) Issue by second marriage: 4--5. ROBERT, b. 1705; of whom later. [p.111] 4--6.CHARLES, b. 1707; of whom later. 4--7.George, of the Middle Temple, London, England, b. 1709;d. unm. 4--8.Sarah, b. 1711; d. unm. 4--9.Mary, b. 1712; d. 1736; m. 1732, Hon. George Braxton, of "Newington," King and Queen Co., Va., and had issue.(See Braxton lineage.) 4--10. LANDON, b. 1713; of whom later. 4--11. Ludlow, b. 1714; d. unm. page 111 4--12. Lucy, m. (first) 1730, Col. Henry Fitzhugh, of "Eagle's Nest," King George Co., Va., son of Hon. William and Ann (Lee) Fitz-hugh, of "Eagle's Nest;" (second) Hon. Nathaniel Harrison, of "Brandon," Surry Co., Va., son of Hon. Nathaniel and Mary (Cary) Harrison, of "Wakefield," and had issue. (See Fitzhugh, Lee, Harrison and Cary lineage.)

"The following translation of Mr. Robert Carter's epitaph may be a help to some of our readers:--

"Here lies buried Robert Carter, Esq., an honourable man, who by noble endowments and pure morals gave lustre to his gentle birth.

"Rector of William and Mary, he sustained that institution in its most trying times. He was Speaker of the House of Burgesses, and Treasurer under the most serene Princes William, Anne, George I. and II.

"Elected by the House its Speaker six years, and Governor of the Colony for more than a year, he upheld equally the regal dignity and the public freedom.

"Possessed of ample wealth, blamelessly acquired, he built and endowed, at his own expense, this sacred edifice,--a signal monument of his piety toward God. He furnished it richly.

"Entertaining his friends kindly, he was neither a prodigal nor a parsimonious host.

"His first wife was Judith, daughter of John Armistead, Esq.; his second Betty, a descendant of the noble family of Landons. By these wives he had many children, on whose education he expended large sums of money.

"At length, full of honours and of years, when he had well performed all the duties of an exemplary life, he departed from this world on the 4th day of August, in the 69th year of his age.

"The unhappy lament their lost comforter, the widows their lost protector, and the orphans their lost father."

From four sons of Robert Carter are descended the later generations of this family. These four were: John, Robert, Charles, Landon.

Robert Carter I

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corotoman

Portrait of Robert "King" Carter

Corotoman was then inherited by Carter's son Robert Carter I (whose wealth and autocratic business methods led to his becoming known by the nickname "King") in 1690.[2] Under Robert Carter I's ownership, Corotoman became the center of what developed into a 300,000-acre (1,200 km2) estate of 48 plantations and farms including places such as Indian Town and Hills Quarters.[2]


Construction


Robert Carter began construction of the large Georgian mansion at Corotoman around 1720.[2][5][6] The mansion was completed in 1725, and introduced a new era for early 18th century architecture in Virginia.[2][6] Corotoman also set the pattern for 18th century architectural patronage.[5] The mansion at Corotoman rivaled the other important Colonial mansions of Virginia, and affirmed Robert Carter I's status as the most powerful planter in the aristocracy of the Tidewater region.[2] Carter's correspondences and diary revealed that the construction of the mansion at Corotoman was a lengthy, complex, and frustrating endeavor.[5] Construction materials for the mansion included paving stones from England, lumber from his plantation saw mills and from neighboring plantations, and oyster shells for mortar.[5] For some of the mansion's windows, Carter used iron casement frames for quarrel glass.[5] To undertake the mansion's construction, Carter imported skilled indentured servants from England and hired local craftsmen.[5]

Gardens

Carter employed an English gardener, whom he instructed "to bring the yards around the mansion into closer accord with the architectural rhythms of the mansion.[7] Little is currently known of the garden's contents and design.[7]

Brick House Store

At Corotoman, Carter maintained a building known as the "Brick House Store" where he kept imported goods that he sold and bartered to local planters.[8] In 1730, an inventory of items at the Brick House Store included essential supplies such as cloths, tools, and gunpowder and luxury items such as spices, ivory combs, and brass candlesticks.[8]

Spinster's House

The "Spinster's House" at Corotoman in the early 20th century. Another supporting structure at Corotoman was known as the "Spinster's House."[9] The house was constructed in either the late 17th century or the early 18th century.[9] The "Spinster's House" was a one-story and a half frame house adorned with a gabled roof with large end chimneys.[9] It lay in ruins for years before finally disappearing around 1930.[9] Before its disappearance, the "Spinster's House" was the last remaining supporting structure of the original Corotoman plantation.


Destruction


In 1729, four years after "King" Carter's mansion was completed, a fire destroyed it.[2][5][6][9] Carter made little mention of the mansion fire in his diary, but did lament the total destruction of his wine cellar.[10] Carter died three years later and the mansion was not rebuilt.[2][9] An inventory taken in 1732 after Carter's death implies that after the fire, Carter resided in either the "Old House" or the "Spinster's House" at Corotoman rather than rebuild it because of fiscal difficulties or ill health.[7][9] In the mid-19th century, Corotoman and its adjacent lands passed out of the Carter family when they were sold by a granddaughter of Charles Carter.[2][


By Henry Robert Burke


Robert Carter III (1728-1804) was a very rich plantation owner in Colonial Virginia and in the early state of Virginia. His paternal great-grandfather John Carter (1613-1669) had come from England to Jamestown in 1635. By 1650 John Carter had some African slaves and was on his way to developing a large tobacco plantation in Lancaster County, Virginia called Corotomon.

When John Carter died he left Corotomon Plantation to his oldest son John Carter II (1640-1690). When John II, who had no [1]“white” sons, died he left Corotoman Plantation to his younger brother Robert "King” Carter (1663-1732).

Robert “King” Carter had an illustrious life, holding the post of appointed Governor of Virginia in 1726 and also by acquiring over 300,000 acres of land in Virginia, making him the richest man in all of North America.

While Robert Carter III was indeed rich and privileged, he was not immune to tragedy. Both his father, Robert Carter II (1704-1732) and his grandfather, Robert “King” Carter (1663-1732), died when Robert Carter III was only four years old.

Robert Carter III’s uncles, Landon and Charles Carter managed his inherited 6000 acre Nomini Hall Plantation in Westmoreland County, Virginia until Robert had grown up and completed his education. By the time of the American Revolution Robert Carter III owned 17 separate tobacco plantations located in several Virginia Counties that totaled 78,000 acres. Nomini Hall was the main plantation; Old Ordinary, Mitchells Spread, Forest Quarter and Coles Point were twelve other plantations named after the signs of the Zodiac.

In 1791 Robert Carter III began a process to emancipate his 500 slaves. This is the largest number of slaves emancipated by an individual slave owner in the history of the United States


Robert King Carter was Speaker of the House of Burgesses and treasurer of the colonies and a land baron


Father: John Carter / Mother: Sarah Ludlow // Her father: Gabriel Ludlow was a lineal descendant of that William Ludlow, of 'Hill Deverill,' Wilts, who was butler to the King and member of Parliament, and who died in 1478.

Family 1 Judith Armistead Children

   John Carter+2 b. 1689 or 1690, d. 31 Jul 1742
   Elizabeth Carter2 b. c 1692
   Anne Carter2 b. c 1695
   Judith Carter2 b. c 1695

Family 2 Elizabeth Landon Children

   Lucy Carter2 b. bt 1701 - 1715
   Robert Carter Jr. Esq.+2 b. c 1704, d. 1731
   Sarah Carter2 b. 1705 or 1708
   Betty Carter2 b. c 1706
   Charles Carter2 b. c 1707
   Ludlow Carter2 b. 1708 or 1714, d. c 1719
   Landon Carter+2 b. 7 Jun 1709
   George Carter2 b. 1710 or 1718
   Mary Carter2 b. c 1712
   John Carter II, who was about fifteen years older than his brother, obeyed their father's instructions, and furthered them by sending Robert home to England for higher education. The custom of the time was that boys were sent to England when they were nine or ten, and Robert probably sailed to England about 1673. From a letter of Robert's written late in his life when he was quarreling with his English factor, William Dawkins, over the education of his own sons and grandsons, we know that he spent at least six years in England, living in the home of merchant and family friend, Arthur Bailey, and learning from him, and from the opportunities presented by living with the merchant, much of the tobacco trade and its marketing end.
   Robert's education in England undoubtedly included thorough grounding in the Christian religion. Most of his schoolmasters would have been clergymen, and would have considered religious education a fundamental requirement of their curricula. While Robert always considered himself "of the Church of England way," he was not intolerant of dissenters, and Louis B. Wright has written in several places of the books by Puritans and others in the libraries of both John Carters which Robert would have had access to before and after his years in England. He would purchase titles on religious subjects for his library, which included the books that he inherited from his brother and father, through the rest of his life.
   Robert returned to Virginia about 1680 to take up the life of a Virginia gentleman on the modest estates he had been left by his father. He built a house on the home property at "Corotoman," however, a brick story-and-a-half structure of three rooms. He lived in it until he moved into the larger two-story mansion which dominated the Corotoman landscape for a decade beginning about 1720.
   John Carter II continued much of the service and prominence that his father had established as the norm for the family. He is referred to as captain at first, but by 1672, his rank is that of lieutenant colonel, a title, presumably from his militia service, that he is accorded until his death.. He served as sheriff in 1673 and again in 1678, burgess, and at other times, he was collector of the levy.
   Robert's first position was that of justice of the Lancaster Court, an office for which he took the required oaths on 10 June 1690. Election as a vestryman for Christ Church Parish followed on 8 November 1690; about a year later he was chosen church warden, a position he retained until his death. And service to the colony soon ensued with his election as burgess for the session beginning 1 April 1692. He was returned to every session of the Burgesses until 1699 with the exception of the two sessions held in 1693.
   As chairman of the Committee of Propositions and Grievances in 1695, Carter steered the members to present a protest against the actions of the Northern Neck proprietary agents, and the proprietary itself. This was his last effort of this sort because the appeal of acting as Virginia agent for the proprietors was soon to bring him over to their side.
   He took a leading role in the work of the House, and "in September 1696 Carter was elected Speaker over five other nominees. Carter was not chosen as Speaker for the 1698 session, but was in April 1699. Also at this session, the House chose Carter as Treasurer of the colony, an office which, as Jon Kukla has observed, was one usually associated with the Speaker. However, the House took the most unusual step of allowing Carter to retain the office of Treasurer even after his appointment to the Council was confirmed in England by the Privy Council on 14 December 1699. 
   There is no indication in the surviving records that Carter had any formal training in the law, but he was interested in it. Most planters of his day found it necessary to learn something of the law because many served as justices. Service in the House of Burgesses, particularly assignment in 1695 to serve on a committee to revise the laws of the colony as the Board of Trade had ordered, may have spurred Robert Carter's interest. By the time of his death, he had about 100 law books in his library, more than one-third of its total. He never hesitated to include references to the law in his letters.
   In colonial Virginia, one official post led quickly to others; a seat in the Council brought several posts with it. Carter was appointed on 3 June 1699 as colonel and commander-in-chief of the Lancaster-Northumberland counties militia; on November 11th of the same year the governor appointed him as naval officer and receiver, a post of value because of the considerable income it generated, and because of the power over one's neighbors that it meant
   By 1701, when the first of the extant letters was written by Robert Carter, he was already one of the most prominent men in the colony as a member of its council, and the significant events of the early portion of his life had occurred, including the death of his first wife in 1699 and his second marriage (to Elizabeth Landon Willis, by whom he would have ten children) in 1701. The letters dated between 1701 and 1710 included in this project reflect little of Carter's personal, political, and mercantile interests of that time because they are ones he wrote as one of the trustees of the children of his friend, Ralph Wormeley, and deal with their affairs rather than his own. There are a few that step outside his duties to his friend, and they show his interest in land acquisition, a topic that would occupy him all of the rest of his life.
   Robert Carter was influential in his own day and left a family dynasty that continues to this day. At one time, he was estimated to have over 50,000 descendants including six governors of Virginia, three signers of the Declaration of Independence, and two presidents of the United States. Five sons and five daughters survived to marry well and were themselves prolific. His letters and other writings reveal his drive to establish this dynasty, and the skill and intelligence he brought to this effort.

Sources

   There are two academic lives of Robert Carter that treat his life in detail: Carl F. Canon's masters thesis, "Robert ( "King" ) Carter of "Corotoman" for Duke University, 1956; and "Robert King Carter," a master's thesis at the University of Virginia by Edmund Berkeley, Jr., in 1961. A summary account of Carter by Edmund Berkeley, Jr., may be found in Volume 3 of the Dictionary of Virginia Biography, (Sara B. Bearss, John G. Deal, et al., eds. [Richmond: Library of Virginia, 2006])
   Details of the early Carter genealogy are to be found in Christine Jones, John Carter I of "Corotoman" Lancaster County, Virginia. (Irvington, Virginia: Foundation for Historic Christ Church, Inc., 1977). Details of Carter's wives, children, and descendants may be found in Florence Tyler Carleton, compiler. A Genealogy of the Known Descendants of Robert Carter of Corotoman. (Irvington, Virginia: Foundation for Historic Christ Church, Inc., 1983).
   One letter book of Carter's has been published: Louis B. Wright, Letters of Robert Carter 1720-1727: The Commercial Interests of a Virginia Gentleman (San Marino, CA: Huntington Library, 1940). Wright also wrote of the Carters' libraries in "The "Gentleman's Library" in Early Virginia: The Literary Interests of the First Carters," (Huntington Library Quarterly, I (1937), 3-61).
   His schooling in England has been covered very well by Alan Simpson in "Robert Carter's Schooldays" , an article in the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography (94[April 1986]: 161-188).
   And Jon Kukla in Speakers and Clerks of the Virginia House of Burgesses, 1643-1776 (Richmond: Virginia State Library, 1981) gives the details of Carter's career as a burgess and council member.
   Lloyd T. Smith, Jr.'s, detailed study of Carter's will is also very useful: Robert Carter of Corotoman 1663-1732: An Analysis of His Last Will and Testament. (Irvington, VA: Foundation for Historic Christ Church, 2009.) Smith's equally detailed study of the letter book of Carter's executors is a wwelcome addition: The Executors' Letters of Robert Carter of Corotoman, 1732-1738. [Irvington, VA: Foundation for Historic Christ Church, 2010].
   Fairfax Harrison's monumental study, Landmarks of Old Prince William (Berryville, Va.: Virginia Book Company, 1964, a one-volume reprint of the 1924 two-volume edition) remains invaluable for its detail about the development of that area of Virginia and the proprietary. There are numerous references to Carter and others of his period in Earl G. Swem's Virginia Historical Index which indexes a half-dozen publications on Virginia history and genealogy. 

Carter, Colonel Robert I King or King Robin https://archive.org/stream/armisteadfamily100garb/armisteadfamily100garb_djvu.txt // Robert Carter died "possessed of three hundred thousand acres of land, one thousand slaves, and ten thousand pounds sterling. He built Christ Church, Lancaster County, Virginia, which Mr. W. G. Stanard says is "the most perfect example of Colonial church architecture now remaining in A'irginia." There are three round windows in the gables and twelve others which are six by fourteen feet ; the high pews of solid black walnut with seats running around them are still (1906) solid and strong. There are twenty-five pews with a seating capacity of twelve each, and three, which will contain twenty persons each ;" walls three feet thick. One of these pews near the altar and opposite the pulpit was for his family. In addition to the high backs and sides, Mr. Carter had placed a railing of brass rods with damask curtains "to prevent being gazed at." Tradition has it that the congregation did not enter the church on Sundays until the arrival of his coach when all followed him. (Bishop Meade's Old Churches, etc.) August 4, 1663 Corotoman, Lancaster, Virginia, American Colonies Death: August 4, 1732 (69) Corotoman, Lancaster, Virginia, American Colonies Place of Burial: Old Christ Church, Lancaster County, Virginia Immediate Family: Son of Col. John Carter and Sarah Carter, of Dinton Husband of Sarah Carter, of Dinton; Judith Carter and Elizabeth "Betty" Landon Father of Elizabeth Thigpen; Charles Carter; John Carter, Secretary of Virginia Colony; Sarah Carter; Elizabeth Carter Burwell; Judith Carter; Judith Ann Page; Sarah Carter; Anne Frances Harrison; Elizabeth "Betty" Carter; Robert Carter, Jr.; Col. Charles Carter, of Cleve; Ludlow Carter; Colonel Landon Carter I, of Sabine Hall; Mary Braxton; Lucy Harrison and George Carter, 1718 « less Brother of Anne Chisholm and Mary Swan Half brother of George Carter, 1638; Elizabeth Johnson; Col. John Carter, Jr.; Sarah Carter and Charles Carter He m. (first) Judith Armistead, d. 1699; dau. of Col. John and Judith (Bowles) Armistead, of "Hesse," Gloucester Co., Va.; (second) Elizabeth (Landon) Willis, dau. of Thomas Landon, of "Grednal," Hereford Co., England. (See Armistead lineage.) Issue by first marriage: 4--1. Elizabeth, b. 1688; d. 1721; (death date error) Robert "King" Carter, I, Colonel Birth: August 4, 1663 Corotoman, Lancaster, Virginia, American Colonies Death: August 4, 1732 (69) Corotoman, Lancaster, Virginia, American Colonies Place of Burial: Old Christ Church, Lancaster County, Virginia Immediate Family: Son of Col. John Carter and Sarah Carter, of Dinton Husband of Sarah Carter, of Dinton; Judith Carter and Elizabeth "Betty" Landon Father of Elizabeth Thigpen; Charles Carter; John Carter, Secretary of Virginia Colony; Sarah Carter; Elizabeth Carter Burwell; Judith Carter; Judith Ann Page; Sarah Carter; Anne Frances Harrison; Elizabeth "Betty" Carter; Robert Carter, Jr.; Col. Charles Carter, of Cleve; Ludlow Carter; Colonel Landon Carter I, of Sabine Hall; Mary Braxton; Lucy Harrison and George Carter, 1718 « less Brother of Anne Chisholm and Mary Swan Half brother of George Carter, 1638; Elizabeth Johnson; Col. John Carter, Jr.; Sarah Carter and Charles Carter Robert Carter also known as King Carter (1663 – August 4, 1732) of Lancaster County was a colonist in Virginia and became one of the wealthiest men in the colonies.

As President of the Governor's Council of the Virginia Colony, he was acting Governor of Virginia in Williamsburg from 1726-1727 after the death in office of Governor Hugh Drysdale. He acquired the moniker "King" from his wealth and autocratic business methods.

Biography

Robert Carter was born at Corotoman Plantation in Lancaster County, Virginia, to John Carter (1620-1669) of London, England, and Sarah Ludlow (1635-1668) of Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire. In 1668, he married Judith Armistead of Hesse in Gloucester County, an area which was included in the formaton of Mathews County in 1691. After her death in 1699, he married Elizabeth Landon in 1701.

At the age of 28, Robert entered the General Assembly of Virginia as a Burgess from Lancaster County, serving five consecutive years. In 1726, as President of the Governor's Council, he served as acting Governor of Virginia after the death of Governor Hugh Drysdale.

As an agent of Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron, better known in Virginia as Lord Fairfax, he served two terms as agent for the Fairfax proprietary of the Northern Neck of Virginia. During his first term, 1702-1711, he began to acquire large tracts of land for himself in the Rappahannock River region of Virginia. acquiring some 20,000 acres.

When he became representative of Fairfax’s interests again in 1722, and served from 1722-32, he succeeded in securing for his children and grandchildren some 110,000 acres in the Northern Neck, as well as additional acquisitions in Virginia west of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Robert Carter died on August 4, 1732, in Lancaster County, Virginia and was buried in Christ Church, Lancaster County, Virginia. He left behind 300,000 acres (1,200 km²) of land, 1,000 slaves and 10,000,000 British pounds in cash.

Descendants

Anne Carter (1702-1745), who married Benjamin Harrison IV and died on August 12, 1745; (parents of Benjamin Harrison V and grandparents of President William Henry Harrison).

Robert Carter II (1704-1734), who married Priscilla Churchill;

Elizabeth Carter (1705-1706);

Sarah Carter (1705-1705);

Charles Carter (1707-1764), who married Anne Byrd, daughter of Col. William Byrd II;

Ludlow Carter (b. 1709);

Landon Carter (1710-1778), who married Maria Byrd, daughter of Col. William Byrd II;

Mary Carter (1712-1736); who married George Braxton; {parents of Carter Braxton}.

Lucy Carter (1715-1763); and

George Carter (1718-1742).

See also

Robert Carter III

Carter's Grove Plantation

http://www.christchurch1735.org/history/robert_carter.html

http://arlisherring.com/tng/getperson.php?personID=I042629&tree=Herring

President of the council and acting governor from the death of Drysdale, July 22, 1726, till the arrival of William Gooch about October, 1727, was born in Virginia in 1663, son of Colonel John and Sarah (Ludlow) Carter. His father had been prominent in the colony as lieutenant-colonel, burgess and councillor. His mother was a daughter of Gabriel Ludlow, a nephew of General Edmund Ludlow, one of Cromwell's generals. Robert Carter was for many years the agent of Lord Fairfax, the proprietor of the Northern Neck grant. He was treasurer of the colony, speaker of the house of burgesses 1694-99, and member of the council for twenty-seven years (1699-1726). He became president of the council, and as such succeeded as acting governor. His great possessions earned him the name of "King" Carter. His residence was in Lancaster county. at Corotoman, on the Rappahannock river, and there is still standing nearby a church that he built shortly before his death, which occurred August 4, 1732. His splendid tomb in a rather shattered condition is still to be seen in the yard of the church. He was twice married, first to Judith, eldest daughter of John Armistead, Esq., a member of the council, and (second) to Elizabeth Willis, daughter of Thomas Landon, of an ancient family in Hereford county, England. By these wives he had numerous children, who have many influential descendants in Virginia and the south.

Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume I

Robert Carter was born at Corotoman Plantation in Lancaster County, Virginia, to John Carter (1620-1669) of London, England, and Sarah Ludlow (1635-1668) of Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire. In 1688, he married Judith Armistead of Hesse in Gloucester County, an area which was included in the formation of Mathews County in 1691. After her death in 1699, he married Elizabeth Landon in 1701.

At the age of 28, Robert entered the General Assembly of Virginia as a Burgess from Lancaster County, serving five consecutive years. In 1726, as President of the Governor's Council, he served as acting Governor of Virginia after the death of Governor Hugh Drysdale.

As an agent of Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron, better known in Virginia as Lord Fairfax, he served two terms as agent for the Fairfax proprietary of the Northern Neck of Virginia. During his first term, 1702-1711, he began to acquire large tracts of land for himself in the Rappahannock River region of Virginia. acquiring some 20,000 acres (81 km2), a large part of which was the 6,000-acre (24 km2) Nomini Hall plantation which Carter acquired in 1709 from the heirs of Col. Nicholas Spencer, cousin of the Lords Culpepper, from whom the Fairfaxes had inherited their Virginia holdings.

When he became representative of Fairfax’s interests again in 1722, and served from 1722-32, he succeeded in securing for his children and grandchildren some 110,000 acres (450 km2) in the Northern Neck, as well as additional acquisitions in Virginia west of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Robert Carter died on August 4, 1732, in Lancaster County, Virginia and was buried in Christ Church, Lancaster County, Virginia. He left behind 300,000 acres (1,200 km²) of land, 1,000 slaves and 10,000 British pounds in cash.

Robert Carter died on August 4, 1732, in Lancaster County, Virginia and was buried in Christ Church, Lancaster County, Virginia. He left behind 300,000 acres (1,200 km²) of land, 1,000 slaves and 10,000,000 British pounds in cash.

Marriages

Judith Armistead of Hesse, Gloucester County in 1688. She died in 1699. Mother of five children.

Betty Landon (widow of Richard Willis) in 1701. She died in 1719. Mother of ten children.

Descendants

Anne Carter (1702-1745), who married Benjamin Harrison IV and died on August 12, 1745; (parents of Benjamin Harrison V and grandparents of President William Henry Harrison).

Robert Carter II (1704-1734), who married Priscilla Churchill;

Elizabeth Carter (1705-1706);

Sarah Carter (1705-1705);

Charles Carter (1707-1764), who married Anne Byrd, daughter of Col. William Byrd II;

Ludlow Carter (b. 1709);

Landon Carter (1710-1778), who married Maria Byrd, daughter of Col. William Byrd II;

Mary Carter (1712-1736); who married George Braxton; {parents of Carter Braxton}.

Lucy Carter (1715-1763); and

George Carter (1718-1742).

See also

Robert Carter III

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0007/g0000062.html#I38986

"Colonial official, landowner; born in Lancaster County, Va. He served in the Virginia Assembly (1691--92, 1695--99) and the Council (1699--1732). A large landowner himself, he became the agent for the wealthy Fairfax family in 1702 and used his position to become one of the wealthiest men in the colonies. His political and economic position earned him the title of "King Carter" or "King Robin." (see Glenn's 'Some Colonial Mansions')" - p. 182."

Children: Anne (Anna) Carter, b. 1702, Corotoman, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. betw. 1743-1745, +Benjamin Harrison Robert Carter II, b. 1704, Corotoman, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. May 12, 1732, Nomin, Westmoreland County, Virginia; + Priscilla Bladen Churchill, 1725 Sarah Carter, b. 1705, d. 1705 Betty Carter, b. 1706, d. 1706 Charles Carter, b. 1707 Ludlow Carter, b. 1708, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. bef. 1719

Landon Carter, b. 1710, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. Mar. 3, 1778; + 1) Elizabeth Wormely, 1732, + 2) Maria Bryd, 1742, + 3) Elizabeth Beale, 1746 Mary Carter, b. 1712, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. 1736 Lucy Carter, b. 1715, d. 1763, + Col. Henry Fitzhugh George Carter, b. 1718, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. 1742, England

COL. ROBERT CARTER, King Carter (3--7), of "Corotoman," Lancaster Co., Va., b. 1663; d. Aug. 4, 1732; he served as a Burgess, 1695-99, and as Speaker of the House; as Treasurer of the Colony, 1694-1732; an influential [p.110] member of the King's Council, 1699-1732, and its President; acting Governor, 1726-27. On account of his great prominence and wealth, he was called "King Carter." His estate consisted of 300,000 acres of land, 1,000 slaves and 10, 100 pounds Sterling; he was also a prominent and active member of the Established Church; served as Vestryman of Christ Church, Lancaster Co., and built the present Church, which is one of the prettiest and most interesting in Colonial Virginia; he is buried just outside of this old Church. He m. (first) Judith Armistead, d. 1699; dau. of Col. John and Judith (Bowles) Armistead, of "Hesse," Gloucester Co., Va.; (second) Elizabeth (Landon) Willis, dau. of Thomas Landon, of "Grednal," Hereford Co., England. (See Armistead lineage.) Issue by first marriage: 4--1. Elizabeth, b. 1688; d. 1721; (death date error) 4--2. JOHN, b. 1690; of whom later. 4--3. Judith, b. 1693; m. 1718, Hon. Mann Page, of "Roswell,"Gloucester Co., Va., son of Col. Matthew and Mary (Mann) Page, and had issue. 4--4. Ann, b. 1696; m. Hon. Benjamine Harrison, of "Berkeley," Charles City Co., Va., son of Hon. Benjamine and Elizabeth (Burwell) Harrison, and had issue. (See Harrison and Burwell lineage.) Issue by second marriage: 4--5. ROBERT, b. 1705; of whom later. [p.111] 4--6.CHARLES, b. 1707; of whom later. 4--7.George, of the Middle Temple, London, England, b. 1709;d. unm. 4--8.Sarah, b. 1711; d. unm. 4--9.Mary, b. 1712; d. 1736; m. 1732, Hon. George Braxton, of "Newington," King and Queen Co., Va., and had issue.(See Braxton lineage.) 4--10. LANDON, b. 1713; of whom later. 4--11. Ludlow, b. 1714; d. unm. page 111 4--12. Lucy, m. (first) 1730, Col. Henry Fitzhugh, of "Eagle's Nest," King George Co., Va., son of Hon. William and Ann (Lee) Fitz-hugh, of "Eagle's Nest;" (second) Hon. Nathaniel Harrison, of "Brandon," Surry Co., Va., son of Hon. Nathaniel and Mary (Cary) Harrison, of "Wakefield," and had issue. (See Fitzhugh, Lee, Harrison and Cary lineage.)

"The following translation of Mr. Robert Carter's epitaph may be a help to some of our readers:--

"Here lies buried Robert Carter, Esq., an honourable man, who by noble endowments and pure morals gave lustre to his gentle birth.

"Rector of William and Mary, he sustained that institution in its most trying times. He was Speaker of the House of Burgesses, and Treasurer under the most serene Princes William, Anne, George I. and II.

"Elected by the House its Speaker six years, and Governor of the Colony for more than a year, he upheld equally the regal dignity and the public freedom.

"Possessed of ample wealth, blamelessly acquired, he built and endowed, at his own expense, this sacred edifice,--a signal monument of his piety toward God. He furnished it richly.

"Entertaining his friends kindly, he was neither a prodigal nor a parsimonious host.

"His first wife was Judith, daughter of John Armistead, Esq.; his second Betty, a descendant of the noble family of Landons. By these wives he had many children, on whose education he expended large sums of money.

"At length, full of honours and of years, when he had well performed all the duties of an exemplary life, he departed from this world on the 4th day of August, in the 69th year of his age.

"The unhappy lament their lost comforter, the widows their lost protector, and the orphans their lost father."

From four sons of Robert Carter are descended the later generations of this family. These four were: John, Robert, Charles, Landon.

Robert Carter I

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corotoman Portrait of Robert "King" Carter

Corotoman was then inherited by Carter's son Robert Carter I (whose wealth and autocratic business methods led to his becoming known by the nickname "King") in 1690.[2] Under Robert Carter I's ownership, Corotoman became the center of what developed into a 300,000-acre (1,200 km2) estate of 48 plantations and farms including places such as Indian Town and Hills Quarters.[2]

Construction

Robert Carter began construction of the large Georgian mansion at Corotoman around 1720.[2][5][6] The mansion was completed in 1725, and introduced a new era for early 18th century architecture in Virginia.[2][6] Corotoman also set the pattern for 18th century architectural patronage.[5] The mansion at Corotoman rivaled the other important Colonial mansions of Virginia, and affirmed Robert Carter I's status as the most powerful planter in the aristocracy of the Tidewater region.[2] Carter's correspondences and diary revealed that the construction of the mansion at Corotoman was a lengthy, complex, and frustrating endeavor.[5] Construction materials for the mansion included paving stones from England, lumber from his plantation saw mills and from neighboring plantations, and oyster shells for mortar.[5] For some of the mansion's windows, Carter used iron casement frames for quarrel glass.[5] To undertake the mansion's construction, Carter imported skilled indentured servants from England and hired local craftsmen.[5]

Gardens Carter employed an English gardener, whom he instructed "to bring the yards around the mansion into closer accord with the architectural rhythms of the mansion.[7] Little is currently known of the garden's contents and design.[7]

Brick House Store At Corotoman, Carter maintained a building known as the "Brick House Store" where he kept imported goods that he sold and bartered to local planters.[8] In 1730, an inventory of items at the Brick House Store included essential supplies such as cloths, tools, and gunpowder and luxury items such as spices, ivory combs, and brass candlesticks.[8]

Spinster's House The "Spinster's House" at Corotoman in the early 20th century. Another supporting structure at Corotoman was known as the "Spinster's House."[9] The house was constructed in either the late 17th century or the early 18th century.[9] The "Spinster's House" was a one-story and a half frame house adorned with a gabled roof with large end chimneys.[9] It lay in ruins for years before finally disappearing around 1930.[9] Before its disappearance, the "Spinster's House" was the last remaining supporting structure of the original Corotoman plantation.

Destruction

In 1729, four years after "King" Carter's mansion was completed, a fire destroyed it.[2][5][6][9] Carter made little mention of the mansion fire in his diary, but did lament the total destruction of his wine cellar.[10] Carter died three years later and the mansion was not rebuilt.[2][9] An inventory taken in 1732 after Carter's death implies that after the fire, Carter resided in either the "Old House" or the "Spinster's House" at Corotoman rather than rebuild it because of fiscal difficulties or ill health.[7][9] In the mid-19th century, Corotoman and its adjacent lands passed out of the Carter family when they were sold by a granddaughter of Charles Carter.[2][

By Henry Robert Burke

Robert Carter III (1728-1804) was a very rich plantation owner in Colonial Virginia and in the early state of Virginia. His paternal great-grandfather John Carter (1613-1669) had come from England to Jamestown in 1635. By 1650 John Carter had some African slaves and was on his way to developing a large tobacco plantation in Lancaster County, Virginia called Corotomon.

When John Carter died he left Corotomon Plantation to his oldest son John Carter II (1640-1690). When John II, who had no [1]“white” sons, died he left Corotoman Plantation to his younger brother Robert "King” Carter (1663-1732).

Robert “King” Carter had an illustrious life, holding the post of appointed Governor of Virginia in 1726 and also by acquiring over 300,000 acres of land in Virginia, making him the richest man in all of North America.

While Robert Carter III was indeed rich and privileged, he was not immune to tragedy. Both his father, Robert Carter II (1704-1732) and his grandfather, Robert “King” Carter (1663-1732), died when Robert Carter III was only four years old.

Robert Carter III’s uncles, Landon and Charles Carter managed his inherited 6000 acre Nomini Hall Plantation in Westmoreland County, Virginia until Robert had grown up and completed his education. By the time of the American Revolution Robert Carter III owned 17 separate tobacco plantations located in several Virginia Counties that totaled 78,000 acres. Nomini Hall was the main plantation; Old Ordinary, Mitchells Spread, Forest Quarter and Coles Point were twelve other plantations named after the signs of the Zodiac.

In 1791 Robert Carter III began a process to emancipate his 500 slaves. This is the largest number of slaves emancipated by an individual slave owner in the history of the United States

Robert King Carter was Speaker of the House of Burgesses and treasurer of the colonies and a land baron

Minutes of the Governor’s Council March 14, 1745/46:

Read the petition of James Bennett a Chowan Indian complaining of one Henry Hills having obtained a Deed of Sale for some of the Chowan Indian Land from some Indians who had no right to sell the same.

Ordered that Henry Hill be summoned to attend this Board at their next sitting, And that Thomas Hoyster and John Robin the two Indians who sold the Land to the said Hill to be summoned to attend at the same time.

Charles Carter of Deerwood had a large

plantation ("Deerwood," among many other plantations) where he lived until his death (1827) in Pittsylvania Co, just over the Bedford Co. line and adjacent to Halifax Co. This Charles Carter is the great grandson of Robert "King" Carter.

John^ had a large fortune, but it was not approaching to the estate of Robert II., master of 'Corotoman.' To read Robert Carter's will is to read a big bit of contemporaneous history. He was so powerful and wealthy that he is known as "King." There have been intimations (whether true or false, we cannot say) that his business methods Avere hard and grasping, but his magnificent tomb refutes all such sinister insinuations. His father, John\ built Christ Church, but the capacity of this church was not equal to the increasing congregation. Lancaster County was on a boom in the time of Robert Carter, and he built the present beautiful and interesting edifice. There is nothing like it in Virginia, with its solid pews of black walnut, its ancient sounding board and perfect architecttural proportion. The Association for the Preservation of \^irginia Antiquities has the honor of restoring this fascinating landmark. Outside the church is the tomb of Robert, the "King," the tomb which expla-ns who and what he was. His father's tomb is in the chancel. Robert's tomb deposes: 'Here lies an honorable man !" Splendid preface to 'Rector of William and Mary- he sustained the Institution in its most trying times.' " 'Possessed of ample wealth blamelessly acquired.' " " 'Entc-'-ing his friends kindly, he was neither a prodigal or a parsimonio/=; host.' " " 'By his wives 1° had many children, on whom he expended large sums of money.' " 'At length, full of honors and years, when he had performed all the duties of an exemplary life, he departed from this world ■36 The Armistead Family on the 4th day of August,' in the sixty-ninth year of his age. The unhappy lament their lost comforter, the widows their lost protector, and the orphans their lost father !' " Magnificent conclusions ! What more could he have done ? Robert- Carter, of 'Corotoman,' married, first Judith, eldest daughter of John Armistead, the councillor, and second, Elizabeth Landon, then a widow Willis, of the noble family of Landons. By these two marriages he had twelve children.

view all 24

Colonel Robert "King" Carter, I's Timeline

1663
August 4, 1663
Lancaster, Virginia, American Colonies
1688
1688
Age 24
Virginia, United States
1689
1689
Age 25
Lancaster, Virginia
1690
1690
Age 26
Lancaster County, Virginia, Colonial America
1692
1692
Age 28
Lancaster, Virginia
1694
1694
Age 30
1695
1695
Age 31
Corotoman, Lancaster Co, Virginia
1702
1702
Age 38
Corotoman, Lancaster, VA