Colonel Philemon Hawkins, II

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Colonel Philemon Hawkins, II

Also Known As: "Philemon Hawkins"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Charles City County, Virginia, Colonial America
Death: September 10, 1801 (83)
Warren County, North Carolina, USA, Warren County, NC, United States
Place of Burial: Warrenton, Warren County, North Carolina, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Philemon Hawkins, I and Ann Eleanor Howard
Husband of Delia Martin and Delia Hawkins
Father of Col. Benjamin Hawkins; Gen. Micajah Hawkins; Col. Joseph Hawkins; Col. John Hawkins; Delia Hawkins and 9 others
Brother of Maj. John D. Hawkins; Benjamin Hawkins and Ann Borden

Managed by: John Ware Lawshe
Last Updated:

About Colonel Philemon Hawkins, II

Col Philemon Hawkins, Jr BIRTH 28 Sep 1717 Charles City County, Virginia, USA DEATH 10 Sep 1801 (aged 83) Warren County, North Carolina, USA BURIAL Hawkins Cemetery Warrenton, Warren County, North Carolina

DAR A 053514, Col; patriotic service; civil service for NC.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=67108211

Philemon Hawkins JR in FamilySearch Family Tree:

Birth: Sep 28 1717 - Charles City, Charles City County, Virginia, United States

Death: Sep 10 1801 - Warren, North Carolina, United States

https://www.ncpedia.org/biography/hawkins-philemon-ii

Philemon Hawkins, II, planter, Revolutionary soldier, and public officeholder, was born in Virginia. He was the oldest son of Philemon and Ann Eleanor Howard Hawkins, founders of this branch of the Hawkins family in America. His parents were born in Devonshire, England, and settled in Virginia in 1715. Philemon the emigrant, the great-grandson of Sir John Hawkins, Elizabethan naval commander, was a young man when he died in Gloucester County, Va., in 1725.

In 1735, at age eighteen, Hawkins moved his mother, his brother John, and his sister Ann to Bute County where he soon became the wealthiest man in the county. He was a member of the Anglican church and filled many public positions from 1743 until the end of the Revolutionary War. Hawkins took an active part in the events of 1771–76, serving as aide-de-camp to Governor William Tryon on the expedition against the Regulators in 1771 and later as a member of the two Provincial Congresses that met at Halifax in 1776. The Congress named him a lieutenant colonel of cavalry, but he soon resigned his commission to raise his own battalion. Between 1779 and 1787 he served seven terms in the General Assembly, and in 1782–83 he was a member of the Council of State.

In 1743 Hawkins married Delia Martin, daughter of Colonel Zachariah Martin of Mecklenburg County, Va. They had four sons—John, Joseph, Benjamin, and Philemon—all of whom were colonels in the Continental Army during the Revolution, and two daughters, Delia and Ann. Mrs. Hawkins died in 1794. Both she and her husband were buried at the old homestead in Warren County


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https://www.ncpedia.org/biography/hawkins-philemon-ii

http://freepages.rootsweb.com/~markfreeman/genealogy/hawkinva.html

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Hawkins-2355 ___________________________________

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philemon_Hawkins_II

Philemon Hawkins II From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search Philemon Hawkins, II Hawkins Philemon III.png Philemon Hawkins, II Born September 28, 1717 Charles City County, Colony of Virginia Died September 10, 1801 (aged 83) Warren County, North Carolina Place of burial Pleasant Hill, Vance County, North Carolina Allegiance United States of America Service/branch North Carolina militia Years of service 1775-1783 Rank Lieutenant Colonel Unit Bute County Regiment, Warren County Regiment Philemon Hawkins II (September 28, 1717 – September 10, 1801) was a planter, an officer in the North Carolina militia during the American Revolution, and a public officeholder in North Carolina.[1][2]

Contents 1 Early life and political career 2 Military service 3 See also 4 References Early life and political career Philemon Hawkins II was born on September 28, 1717 in Charles City County, Colony of Virginia. His parents were Philemon Hawkins I and Anne Eleanor Howard. He was initially known as Philemon Hawkins, Jr. His parents were from Devonshire in England, and settled in the Colony of Virginia in 1717. His father was the grandson of Sir John Hawkins,the English naval commander, and died in Gloucester County, Virginia in 1725.[1][2]

After his father's death, Philemon Hawkins II moved to Bute County, Province of North Carolina in 1735, along with his mother and two siblings, John and Ann. In 1743 he married Delia Martin, daughter of Colonel Zachariah Martin of Mecklenburg County, Virginia. He filled many public positions in Bute County and became the wealthiest man in the county. In 1771 he served as an aide-de-camp to Governor William Tryon during the expedition against the Regulators. He served as a delegate to both North Carolina Provincial Congresses in Halifax in 1776. He served seven terms representing Granville County in the North Carolina General Assembly between 1779 and 1787. In 1782-1783, he was elected to Council of State in the General Assembly.[1]

Philemon and Delia had six children: John Hawkins, Joseph Hawkins, Benjamin Hawkins, Philemon Hawkins, III, Delia Hawkins, and Ann Hawkins. Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Hawkins and Major John Hawkins served in the Warren County Regiment, along with their father.[1][2][3]

Military service He served in the North Carolina militia during the Revolutionary War[2]:

September 9, 1775: He was appointed by the North Carolina Provincial Congress to serve as a lieutenant colonel in Bute County Regiment in which he served until the regiment was abolished in 1779 May 3, 1776: The Provincial Congress selected him as a colonel over the 2nd Battalion of Militia. He did not stay with this unit and resigned this commission. January 30, 1779: He was appointed to serve as a lieutenant colonel in the Warren County Regiment, which was created after Bute County and the Bute County Regiment were abolished. He died on September 10, 1801 in Warren County, North Carolina and was buried at the family homestead (Pleasant Hill/Hawkins House, along with his wife who died in 1794.[1]

See also Battle of Alamance References

Maupin, Armistead Jones (1988). "Philemon Hawkins, II". NCPedia. Retrieved May 8, 2019.
Lewis, J.D. "Philemon Hawkins, Jr". The American Revolution in North Carolina. Retrieved May 8, 2019.
Ashe, Samuel A., ed. (1906). Biographical History of North Carolina. 5. p. 135-141.

Cheney, John L. Jr., ed. (1981). North Carolina Government, 1585–1979. Hawkins, John D. (1829). An Oration Commemorative of Col. Philemon Hawkins, Senior, Deceased. Powell, William S., ed. (1981). The Correspondence of Governor William Tryon. 2. "Hawkins Genealogy". Retrieved May 8, 2019. "Memorial to Philemon Hawkins, Jr" (PDF). Retrieved May 8, 2019. "Pleasant Hill, National Register of Historic Places" (PDF). NRHP. Retrieved May 8, 2019. Categories: 1717 births1801 deathsNorth Carolina militiamen in the American RevolutionBute County, North CarolinaPeople from Granville County, North CarolinaPeople from Vance County, North CarolinaMembers of the North Carolina Provincial CongressesNorth Carolina Council of StateMembers of the North Carolina House of Representatives

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Colonel Philemon Hawkins, II's Timeline

1717
September 28, 1717
Charles City County, Virginia, Colonial America
1743
1743
Edgecombe County, North Carolina, Colonial America
1744
1744
Bute County
1750
1750
Bute, Colony of North Carolina, British Colonial America
1752
December 3, 1752
1752
1752
1754
August 15, 1754
Bute, NC, United States