Constance Snow, "Mayflower" Passenger

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Constance Snow (Hopkins), "Mayflower" Passenger

Also Known As: "Constancia Hopkins", "Constant Snow", "Constanta Hopkins", "Constanta", "Hughes", "Constancia", "Snow"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Hursley, Hampshire, England
Death: October 25, 1677 (71)
Eastham, Barnstable County, Plymouth Colony, Colonial America
Place of Burial: Cove Burying Ground, Eastham, Massachusetts
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Stephen Hopkins, "Mayflower" Passenger and Mary Hopkins
Wife of Nicholas Snow
Mother of Capt. Mark Snow; Mary Paine; Child Snow; Sarah Walker; Lt. Joseph Snow and 13 others
Sister of Elizabeth Hopkins, (died young) and Giles Hopkins, "Mayflower" Passenger
Half sister of Damaris Hopkins, (died young); Oceanus Hopkins, "Mayflower" Passenger; Caleb Hopkins; Deborah Ring; Damaris Cooke and 2 others

Occupation: Mayflower Passenger
Label: She was approximately 13 years old when she sailed on the Mayflower with her parents, Stephen and Elizabeth Hopkins. She came with the Hopkins group. They were recruited by Thomas Weston of London Merchant Adventurers.
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Constance Snow, "Mayflower" Passenger

Constance Hopkins

was an Original Mayflower passenger.

She was baptised on 11 May 1606, Hursley, Hampshire, England.

She died mid-October 1677, Eastham. Massachusetts.

Parents:

Stephen Hopkins (1581-1644) of the Sea Venture & Mayflower & Mary his first wife.

Married:

  1. sometime before the 22 May 1627

Division of Cattle to Nicholas Snow (1646-1662),

He was the first Clerk of Eastham.

12 children include:

  1. Mark Snow, married 1st, Anna Cooke*; married, 2d, Jane Prence
  2. Mary Snow, married Thomas Paine.
  3. Sarah Snow, married William Walker
  4. Joseph Snow, married Mary ---
  5. Stephen Snow, married, 1st, Susanna (Deane) Rogers; married, 2d, Mary Bigford.
  6. John Snow, married Mary Smalley.
  7. Elizabeth Snow, married Thomas Rogers (son of Joseph Rogers)
  8. Jabez Snow, married Elizabeth ---.
  9. Ruth Snow, married John Cole.
  10. --- Snow, living and unmarried, in 1651.†

may have been the Constance who later married Daniel Doane

  1. --- Snow, living and unmarried, in 1651.†
  2. --- Snow, living and unmarried, in 1651.†

n.b. three children whose names have not been conclusively documented--but one may have been Constance, who later married Daniel Doane.

Note the following are *NOT* children:

  1. Anthony
  2. Samuel
  3. Micajah
  4. Hannah

Mayflower

Biographical Summary

Constance Hopkins was baptized on 11 May 1606 in Hursley, Hampshire, England, to parents Stephen Hopkins and his first wife Mary. It should be noted that the long-standing Constance Dudley myth was disproven in 1998: the Hopkins family of the Mayflower was not from Wortley, Gloucester as had been previously speculated and published.

Constance came with her father Stephen, step-mother Elizabeth, brother Giles, and step-sister Damaris on the Mayflower in 1620, at the age of 14. Constance's future husband, Nicholas Snow, arrived on the ship Anne in 1623. Nicholas and Constance Snow were married shortly before the 1627 Division of Cattle, and lived in Plymouth for a time. Around 1645, the family moved to Eastham.

William Bradford, writing in 1651, stated that Constance Hopkins had 12 children "all of them living". Only 9 can be documented with existing records. Constance, wife of Daniel Doane, is quite probably one of the three "missing" children, but unfortunately there is no conclusive proof.

Notes

Constance2 Hopkins (Stephen1), B., 11, May 1606 Hursley, Hampshire, England [1] a Mayflower Passenger with her father and stepmother, married Nicholas Snow.

Children of Nicholas and Constance Snow

  1. Mark Snow3, married, 1st, Anna Cooke*; married, 2d, Jane Prence.
  2. Mary Snow3, married Thomas Paine.
  3. Sarah Snow3, married William Walker.
  4. Elizabeth Snow3, maried Thomas3 Rogers (Joseph2, Thomas1).
  5. Joseph Snow3, married Mary ---.
  6. Stephen Snow3, married, 1st, Susanna (Deane) Rogers; married, 2d, Mary Bigford.
  7. John Snow3, married Mary Smalley.
  8. Jabez Snow3, married Elizabeth ---.
  9. Ruth Snow3, married John Cole.
  10. --- Snow3, living and unmarried, in 1651.†
  11. --- Snow3, living and unmarried, in 1651.†
  12. --- Snow3, living and unmarried, in 1651.†

_______________________________

  • Constance Hopkins (baptized May 11, 1606 – October 1677), also sometimes listed as Constanta.

She was probably born in Hursley, Hampshire, England.

Constance was the second daughter of Stephen Hopkins, by his first wife, Mary.

Some believe she was named in honor of Constance (Marline) Hopkins. Constance,

at the age of fourteen, along with her father and his second wife Elizabeth (Fisher),

accompanied by brother Giles, half-sister Damaris

as well as two servants by the name of Edward Doty and Edward Lester

were passengers on the Mayflower on its journey to the New World in 1620.

Along the way her half-brother Oceanus was born, the only child born on the Mayflower journey.

Her headstone marker, placed in 1966 by descendants, states in part

“Wife of Nicholas Snow, Eastham’s first town clerk 1646 – 1662”.

  • Constance married Nicholas, sometime before the Division of Cattle which occurred May 22, 1627. Nicholas came to Plymouth on board the ship Anne in 1623 and was made a freeman at Plymouth in 1633. The inventory of Nicholas Snow's estate made at his death lists a wide variety of cooper's and carpenter's tools; this may indicate his trade. He was town clerk at Eastham and held several other local government offices.
  • According to Governor William Bradford, who wrote between March 6 and April 3, 1651:
  • “Constanta is also married, and hath 12 children all of them living, and one of them married”.
  • Children of Constance and Nicholas Snow
    • Mark b. Plymouth, May 9, 1628, married (1) Ann Cooke daughter of Josiah Cooke, married (2) Jane Prence, daughter of Thomas Prence
    • Mary b. Plymouth, 1630, married Thomas Paine
    • Sarah b. Plymouth, 1632, married William Walker, who came to the colony on the ship Elizabeth, in 1635
    • Joseph b. Plymouth, 1634, Joseph Snow married Mary Higgins she was the daughter of Richard and Mary (Yates) Higgins
    • Stephen b. Plymouth, 1636, married (1) Susanna Rogers (Deane), daughter of Stephen Deane, married (2) Mary Bigford (Cottle, Bickford), daughter of Edward Cottle and Judith, last name unknown
    • John b. Plymouth, December 11, 1638, married Mary Smalley, a twin daughter of John Smalley and Ann Walden
    • Elizabeth b. Plymouth, 1640, married Thomas Rogers, son of Joseph Rogers, the son of Pilgrim, Thomas Rogers
    • Jabez b. Plymouth, 1642, married Elizabeth, last name unknown, she was possibly the daughter of Ralph Smith
    • Ruth b. Plymouth, 1644, married Lieutenant John Cole Sr., son of Daniel Cole and Ruth Chester
  • Josiah Paine, a Town Clerk and historian of Harwich wrote “Nicholas and Constance had a dau. named for her mother who was the first wife of Daniel Doane of Eastham…”
    • Constance (unproved), b. Plymouth, married Daniel Doane
    • unnamed
    • Anthony (not if he was born in 1619), b. Plymouth, married Abigail Warren, daughter of Richard Warren
  • Constance Hopkins is the central character in Patricia Clapp's young adult novel Constance: A Story of Early Plymouth.
  • From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constance_Hopkins_Snow __________________________
  • Constance Hopkins
  • F, #73878, b. 11 May 1606, d. October 1677
  • Father Stephen Hopkins b. 30 Apr 1581, d. bt 6 Jun 1644 - 17 Jul 1644
  • Mother Mary b. c 1580
  • Constance Hopkins was christened on 11 May 1606 at of Hursely, Hampshire, England.1 She married Nicholas Snow, son of Nicholas Snow and Elizabeth Rowles, on 22 May 1627 at Plymouth, Plymouth, MA. Constance Hopkins died in October 1677 at Eastham, Barnstable, MA, at age 71.
  • Family Nicholas Snow b. 25 Jan 1600, d. 15 Nov 1676
  • Child
    • Mary Snow+ b. c 1630, d. 28 Apr 1704
  • Citations
  • 1.[S61] Unknown author, Family Group Sheets, Family History Archives, SLC.
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p2459.htm#... __________________________
  • HOPKINS, Constance
  • b. 11 MAY 1606 Gloucester, England
  • d. 25 NOV 1677 Eastham, Barnstable, Mass.
  • Parents:
  • Father: HOPKINS, Stephen
  • Mother: DUDLEY, Constance
  • Family:
  • Marriage: 22 MAY 1627 Plymouth, Plymouth, Mass.
  • Spouse: SNOW, Nicholas
  • b. 1605 Hoxton, Middlesex, England
  • d. 15 NOV 1676 Eastham, Barnstable, Mass.
  • Children:
    • SNOW, Deborah
    • SNOW, Mark
    • SNOW, Sarah
    • SNOW, Joseph
    • SNOW, Stephen
    • SNOW, Mary
    • SNOW, Jabez
    • SNOW, Ruth
  • From: http://www.genealogyofnewengland.com/f_7b.htm#258 __________________________________
  • 2 Constance HOPKINS bapt: 5-11-1606 in Hursley, Hampshire, England d: 10-1677 in Eastham, Massachusetts MAYFLOWER PASSENGER
  • ........m.Nicholas SNOW b: 01-25-1598/99 in Hoxton, Middlesex, England m: 05-22-1627 in Plymouth, Co, Massachusetts d: 11-15-1676 in Plymouth, Massachusetts Father: Nicholas SNOW Mother: Mary UPHAM
    • ..........3 Mark SNOW b: 1630 in Plymouth, Plymouth Co, Massachusetts d: 01-09-1695/95 in Eastham, Branstable Co, Massachusetts
    • ..........m. Anna COOK b. 1635 d:7-24-1756 married 1-18-1653/54
      • ..............4 Anne SNOW b: 7-7-1656 d: 7-4-1714
      • ..............m. Eldad ATWOOD b: 7-2-1651 d: 1707 married 2-14-1682/83
        • .................5Mary ATWOOD b: 11-1684 d: 1721? / 1779?
        • .................5 John ATWOOD b: 8-10-1686 d: 1745
        • .................5 Anna ATWOOD b: 1-1686/87 d:aft. 9-1764
        • .................m. William NICKERSON b: Bef. 1675 d: 1742 m. 10-24-1717
    • ..........* 2nd Wife of Mark SNOW
    • ..........Jane PENCE b: 11-1-1637 d. 1703 m. 1-9-1659/60
    • ..........3 Mary SNOW b: 11-09-1628 in Plymouth, Plymouth Co, Massachusetts d: 04-28-1704 in Eastham, Branstable Co, Massachusetts
    • ..........m. Thomas PAINE b: 1614 d: 8-16-1706 m. 1649
    • ..........3 Sarah SNOW b: 1632 in Plymouth, Plymouth Co, Massachusetts d: 03-08-1696/97 in Eastham, Branstable Co, Massachusetts
    • ..........m.William WALKER b: 1620 in Europe m: 01-05-1653/54 in Eastham, Branstable Co, Massachusetts d: 1703 in Plymouth, Plymouth Co, Massachusetts
      • .............4 John WALKER b: 04-24-1655 d: 1659
      • .............4 William WALKER b: 10-12-1657 d: 1659
      • ............m.Susnana RING b: 1644-1671 in Eastham, Branstable Co, Massachusetts m: 1674-1696 in d: Aft 1700
        • ................5 William WALKER b: 08-02-1659 in Eastham, Branstable Co, Masshusetts d: ................01-1742/43 in Eastham, Branstable Co, Massachusetts
        • ................5 John WALKER II b: 1693 in Eastham Mass. d: 01-28-1760
        • ................m.Mercy BROWN b: Bef 1702 m: Bef 1716 d: Bef 4-10-1754
          • ...................6 Mercy WALKER b: 03-04-1717/18 in Eastham MA
          • ...................m.Barnabas COOK b: 5/7/1695 in Cambridge MA m: 3-4-1745/46
  • Descendants of Stephen Hopkins
  • Second Generation

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Hopkins-5

'Constance (Hopkins) Snow (1606 - 1677)

Constance Snow formerly Hopkins

Born 11 May 1606 in Hursley, Hampshire, England

Daughter of Stephen Hopkins and Mary (Kent) Hopkins Sister of Elizabeth Hopkins [half], Giles Hopkins, John Hopkins, Damaris Hopkins [half], Oceanus Hopkins [half], Caleb Hopkins [half], Deborah (Hopkins) Ring [half], Bartholomew Hopkins [half], Damaris (Hopkins) Cooke [half] and Ruth Hopkins [half] Wife of Nicholas Snow — married before 22 May 1627 in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts Mother of Mark Snow, Mary (Snow) Paine, Sarah (Snow) Walker, Joseph Snow, Stephen Snow, John B. Snow Sr., Elizabeth (Snow) Rogers, Jabez Snow, Ruth (Snow) Cole, Constance Snow, Samuel Snow and Unamed Infant Snow Died 15 Oct 1677 in Eastham, Barnstable Co., Plymouth colony, New England Profile managers: Katherine Patterson [send private message], Chet Snow [send private message], Bobbie Hall [send private message], and Kathleen Squires [send private message] Hopkins-5 created 23 Dec 2008 | Last modified 14 Nov 2016 This page has been accessed 8,035 times.

Categories: Mayflower Passengers | Colonial America | English Immigrants to America | Massachusetts Bay Colonists | Cove Burying Ground, Eastham, Massachusetts | Eastham, Massachusetts.

Constance (Hopkins) Snow was a passenger on the Mayflower.

Biography

That first spring in the new land, the colonists looked on as the two young men,

Edward Doty and Edward Leister, carried on a dual courtship for the hand

of pretty Constance [Hopkins].

On 18 June 1621, the colonists were awakened at dawn

by the sound of the clash of cold steel.

Rushing outside, they found Leister and Doty slashing away at each other in a duel.

"They were quickly disarmed and haled before Governor Bradford, who ordered them strung up with head and heels tied together so they could cool off their hot blood." Governor Bradford said later that "Edward Doty retrieved his character by change from youthful folly."

The fair Miss Constance never married either swain.

Instead, she later married the honorable Nicholas Snow,

one of the founders of Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.

The information just below is from: the Pilgrim Hall Museum.

Nicholas and Constance Hopkins Snow

Constance Hopkins was a Mayflower passenger.

She journeyed with her father and stepmother, Stephen and Elizabeth Hopkins,

her brother Giles, her half-sister Damaris

and her half-brother Oceanus who was born during the voyage. Sometime before 1627, Constance Hopkins married Nicholas Snow. Nicholas Snow had arrived in Plymouth on the Anne in 1623. The inventory of Nicholas’ estate, taken at the time of his death, includes carpenter’s tools. This may have been his trade. His inventory also included books, so he was probably literate. Nicholas held various minor positions in Plymouth, such as highway surveyor. The Snows moved from Plymouth to Nauset, on Cape Cod in 1643. The town was then renamed "Eastham" and still retains that name today, nearly 400 years later. On the Cape (called Barnstable County), Nicholas served as surveyor, constable and selectman. He was a carpenter and also ran a family farm with the help of his sons and daughters. Constance and Nicholas had 12 children. Nicholas died in November 1676, Constance about a year later in October of 1677. Before his death, Nicholas Snow wrote a will. See below. The Pilgrim Society displays one artifact that is attributed to Constance Hopkins. It is a beaver hat, made in England, c.1615-1640. Steeple crowned hats, usually with a decorative band, were popular for both men and women in the early 17th century. Beaver fur, imported into England from the colonies, was processed into felt to make hats. Baptism

Constancia Hopkins was the daughter of Stephen Hopkins and his first wife, Mary Kent, of Hursley, Hampshire, England. Her baptism is noted in the Hursley, Hampshire, parish register, available at the Hampshire County Archives, Winchester, England.

"[1606] undecimo die Maij Constancia filia Steph Hopkyns fuit baptizata [11th day of May, 1606, Constance daughter of Steph[en] Hopkins was baptized]" Date: 11 MAY 1606 Place: Hursley, Hampshire, England[1] Constance Hopkins had a younger brother, Giles Hopkins, born in Hursley, Hampshire, England, in 1607. Their father, Stephen Hopkins, by all accounts a world-traveler and adventurer, left his family in the care of their maternal grandmother, "the widow Kent," in Hursley, while he traveled to Jamestown, Virginia colony, being shipwrecked in Bermuda for over a year. Shortly thereafter his wife, Mary Kent, died. Stephen Hopkins remarried to Elizabeth Fisher in 1617. In 1620 he embarked with his entire family, including older children Constance and Giles, on the "Mayflower," bound for "Northern Virginia," landing at Plymouth Rock in New England that November.

Nicholas Snow did not sail on the "Mayflower" but arrived at Plymouth 18 months later, in 1623, aboard HMS "Anne". It's not known whether he already knew young Constance Hopkins in England and followed her to America but it is certain that after 1623 Constance never considered anyone else to share her life with. They were married within a few years of Nicholas' arrival in Plymouth.

'The will of Nicholas Snow of Eastham, dated 14 Nov. 1676 and proved 5 March 1677, left livestock and household goods to his wife constant for life use and then to his youngest son Jabez, and devised various parcels of land to sons Mark, Joseph, Steven, John and Jabez. The description of land near the testator's house mentioned 'son Thomas Paine' <actually son-in-law> as an abutting owner. Nicholas also gave, after the death of his wife, the sum of ten shillings to the Church of Eastham for the furniture of the Table of the Lord, with pewter or other Necessaries.' He named Deacon Samuel Freeman and John Mayo as executors. Letters of administration were granted to Constanta, Mark and John Snow on 6 March 1677. A lengthy inventory, including many cooper's and carpenter's tools, was sworn to by widow Constant Snow on 22 March 1677. 'Governor Bradford wrote between 6 March and 3 April 1651 that Constanta is also married, and hath 12 children, all of them living and one of them married.' Marriage

Husband: Nicholas Snow Wife: Constant Hopkins Marriage Date: Before 22 MAY 1627 Place: Plymouth, Plymouth Colony, New England[2][3] Children: all probably born in Plymouth or in Eastham: Mark SNOW, b. 9 May 1628. Mary b. ca. 1630. Sarah b. ca. 1632. Joseph b. ca. 1634. Stephen b. ca. 1636. John B. Snow, b. May 1638. Elizabeth b. ca 1640. Jabez b. in 1642. Ruth b. ca. 1644. (child) traditionally "Constance" b. ca. 1646 (child) traditionally "Hannah" b. ca. 1648 (child) No name given b. ca. 1650 If Governor Bradford's 1651 account of 12 living children is accurate, Constance's last 3 children may have been sons who predeceased their father Nicholas Snow, without issue, and thus were not mentioned in his will; or they may have been daughters. Like many others at the time, Nicholas Snow did not specifically name his daughters in his will, only his wife and his living sons.

Josiah Paine, town clerk and historian of Harwich, wrote that Nicholas and Constance Snow had a daughter named for her mother (i.e., Constance) who was the first wife of Daniel Doane of Eastham. Daniel Doane was born most-likely in Plymouth ca. 1636; died in Eastham 20 Dec. 1712 in his 76th year. He had the following children: Joseph, Israel, Daniel, Nathaniel, Constant (twin son) & Constanta (twin daughter), Rebecca, Abigail, Ruth and Hepzibah. Daniel's first wife, by tradition Constance Snow, was undoubtedly the mother of all of these children, except Hepzibah.

Some believe that Constance Hopkins is buried at the Cove Burying Ground, in Eastham, Massachusetts. A monument is erected to her and the Snow family there. [4]

Death

"Constant Snow which was the Wife of Nicholas Snow died about the Midle of october in the year 1677." This was less than a year after Nicholas' death in March 1677. Date: OCT 1677 Place: Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts[5] Sources

↑ Source: #S2759 p. 148, citing Hursley parish records ↑ Source: #S173 p. 151, citing PCR 1:50-57 ↑ Source: #S179 ↑ Find A Grave Memorial# 8634 - Constance Hopkins Snow ↑ Source: #S89 Eastham VRs, p. 40 FindaGrave Memorial 8634 - Constance Hopkins Snow Ferris, Mary W. Dawes-Gates Ancestral Lines: A Memorial Volume Containing the American Ancestry of Rufus R. Dawes, Volume 1, published online by Ancestry.com, The Generations Network, Inc., Provo, UT, 2005; original book privately printed, 1943. Freeman, Frederick. "The History of Cape Cod: The Annals of The Thirteen Towns of Barnstable County," Volumes 1 and 2, published online by Google Books, 2009 The History of Cape Cod: The Annals of The Thirteen Towns of Barnstable County, Volumes 1 and 2; original publisher: Geo. C. Band & Avery & Cornhill, Boston, Mass., 1858. Mayflower Marriages. Susan E. Roser. Genealogical Publishing Co. 1990 A Munsey-Hopkins Genealogy. Lowell, D.O.S. Boston: Privately Printed, 1920 John D. Austin, Mayflower Families Through 5 Generations, Stephen Hopkins, Vol. 6 (General Society of Mayflower Descendants, Plymouth, MA, 2001 Genealogy - Boston and Eastern Massachusetts. William Richard Cutter, A. M. Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York, 1908 New England Connections. K. Alan & Roberta J. Streeter - Genealogy Research Assistants, New England Connections established 12 July 1996 - Our Mayflower Passangers. robert@usroots.com james@usroots.com Plymouth Colony Recs 1:4, 10, 27, 31, 44, 52, 87-8, 141, 151, 155; 2:115, 123, 125, 154; 3:9, 33; 4:15; 5:35, 57-8, 92, 144, 164, 220, 278; 7:7-8, 16-17, 20, 23, 34-5. GMF (NEHGR) 2:79-80, 3:348-51. Bradford's Hist 81959) pp. 442, 445. Banks English Ancestry p. 160. Gen Journal 13:153, 176. Libr of Cape Cod no. 34. TAG 14:229. Doane Gen 1:26-30, 2:2. Torrey's Marriages p. 692. Savage 4:138. Mayo (John) Rev p. 149. Plymouth Col by Stratton pp. 307, 354. Updated research on Constance Hopkins by Caleb Johnson Eastham, Massachusetts, Vital Records The Great Migration Begins: immigrants to New England 1620-1633. Robert Charles Anderson Publication: Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995. Source: S173 George Ernest Bowman, Mayflower Descendant: Plymouth Colony Division of Cattle in 1627, Vol. I (Broderbund's Family Archive CD #203 Publication: Jul 1899) Source: S2759 Caleb H. Johnson, Here shall I die ashore : Stephen Hopkins : Bermuda castaway, Jamestown survior, and Mayflower Pilgrim (Xlibris Corporation, 2007) Source: S89 Early Vital Records of Barnstable Co., MA to about 1850 Eastham Vital Records & Cemetery Inscriptions (CD: Search & Research, Wheat Ridge, CO, 1997)



_____________________________________

3. Constance Hopkins (Stephen ) was christened on 11 May 1606 in Hursley, Hampshire, England. She died in Oct 1677 in Eastham MA.

Constance married Nicholas Snow on 22 May 1627 in prob. Plymouth, MA. Nicholas was christened on 25 Jan 1599/1600 in Poss. St Leonard's Shoreditch, London, England. He died on 15 Nov 1676 in Eastham, MA.

They had the following children:

+ 12 M i Mark Snow + 13 F ii Mary Snow + 14 F iii Sarah Snow + 15 M iv Joseph Snow + 16 M v Stephen Snow + 17 M vi John Snow + 18 F vii Elizabeth Snow + 19 M viii Jabez Snow + 20 F ix Ruth Snow

 21 F x Constance Snow. 
 22  xi child Snow. 
 23  xii child Snow. 

Stephen HOPKINS Mayflower(1374). —He most likely was the Stephen Hopkins who sailed on the Seaventure to Virginia in 1609, but was shipwrecked in Bermuda, where he was almost hanged for mutiny. He spent two years in Jamestown, where he learned much of later use to the Plymouth colonists (Adventurers of Purse and Person —Virginia 1607-1625, ed. by Annie Lash Jester with Martha Woodroof Hiden, 2nd ed. (1964), p. 213-17). See also the excellent account of his family in Dawes-Gates 2:443-51, which includes the reasoning for believing that the Stephen Hopkins of Virginia was identical with the one of Plymouth.

Hopkins arrived at Plymouth on the 1620 Mayflower accompanied by his wife, Elizabeth, and his sons Giles and Oceanus, and daughters Constance and Damaris, Oceanus having been born at sea on the Mayflower, plus two servants, Edward Doty and Edward Leister. Damaris died during the early years, and Hopkins and his wife later had a second daughter Damaris. He was probably also one of the dissenters at Plymouth whose actions led to the necessity for drafting the Mayflower Compact. Bradford (Ford) 1:219, and Mourt's Relation, p. 40, tell how in 1621 the colonists sent Mr. Edward <Picture>Winslow<Picture> and Mr. Stephen Hopkins on a mission to visit Massasoit. Mourt's Relation, pp. 7-8, also shows how Hopkins warned colonists on an early expedition about an Indian trap to catch deer, and how Bradford, not hearing the warning, stepped on the trap and was immediately caught by his leg. When Samoset first came to the settlement on 16 February 1620/21, the Englishmen were suspicious of him, and they "lodged him that night at Steven Hopkins house, and watched him" (Mourt's Relation, p. 33). Hopkins was an Assistant at least as early as 1633, and he continued in 1634, 1635, and 1636. He was on the original freeman list, and he was a volunteer in the Pequot War (PCR 1:61).

Keeping in mind the delicate balance in Plymouth between "covenant" and "noncovenant" colonists, it is reasonable to assume that Hopkins must have been a leader of the non-Separatist settlers, and in his career at Plymouth can be seen some of the ambiguity that attached to the non-Separatists living in a Separatist colony. On 7 June 1636, at a time when Hopkins was an Assistant, the General Court found him guilty of battery against John Tisdale, and he was fined £5, and ordered to pay Tisdale forty shillings, the court observing that he had broken the King's peace, "wch [p.309] he ought after a speciall manner to have kept" (PCR 1:42). On 2 October 1637 he was presented twice, first for suffering men to drink in his house on the Lord's day before meeting ended, and for allowing servants and others to drink more than proper for ordinary refreshing, and second for suffering servants and others to sit drinking in his house contrary to orders of the court, and to play at shovel board and like misdemeanors (PCR 1:68). On 2 January 1637/38 Hopkins was presented for suffering excessive drinking in his house "as old Palmer, James Coale, & William Renolds" (PCR 1:75). On 5 June 1638 he was presented for selling beer for two pence a quart which was not worth a penny a quart, and for selling wine at excessive rates "to the oppressing & impovishing of the colony"; he was fined £5 for some of these offenses, including selling strong waters and nutmegs at excessive rates (PCR 1:87, 97). In the Dorothy Temple case (see text) he was "committed to ward for his contempt to the Court, and shall so remayne comitted untill hee shall either receive his servant Dorothy Temple, or els pvide for her elsewhere at his owne charge during the terme shee hath yet to serve him" (PCR 1:112). On 3 December 1639 he was presented for selling a looking glass for sixteen pence which could be bought in the Bay Colony for nine pence, and he was also fined £3 for selling strong water without license" (PCR 1:137). Jonathan Hatch, who from the records seems to have been a recurring disciplinary problem in the colony, on 5 April 1642 was ordered by the court to dwell with Mr. Stephen Hopkins, "& the said Mr Hopkins to have a speciall care of him" (PCR 2:38).

xxx He dated his will 6 June 1644, inventory 17 July 1644, and mentioned his deceased wife; sons Giles and Caleb; daughter Constance, wife of Nicholas Snow; daughters Deborah, Damaris, Ruth and Elizabeth; and grandson Stephen, son of his son Giles (MD 2:12). Ralph D. Phillips, "Hopkins Family of Wortley, Gloucestershire—Possible Ancestry of Stephen Hopkins," TAG 39:95, suggests that he might have come from the parish of Wotten-under-Edge, Gloucestershire, but the evidence is not sufficient to say positively. Some writers, such as Banks in English Ancestry, pp. 61-64, and Jacobus in Waterman Family, 1:86, have felt that his wife, Elizabeth, may have been Elizabeth Fisher, whom a Stephen Hopkins married at London 19 February 1617/18—Mourt's Relation, p. 15, states that he was of London. If so, she would have been a second wife, for the births of some of his children would predate this marriage. Dawes-Gates 2:443, citing the London marriage record, states that his wife was "undoubtedly" Elizabeth Fisher. Timothy Hopkins, "Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower and Some of His Descendants," NEHGR 102:46, 98, 197, 257, 103:24, 85, 166, 304, 104:52, 123, 213, 296, 105:32, 100, covers some of his early generations, but it is not documented. George E. Bowman wrote an article in MD 5:47 to consolidate much of the early information known about his family. A popularized biography of Stephen Hopkins was written by Margaret Hodges, Hopkins of the Mayflower—Portrait of a Dissenter (New York, 1972). Claims that a John Hopkins of Hartford, Connecticut, was his son are baseless. By his first wife he had Constance, who married Nicholas Snow, and [p.310] Giles, who married Catherine Wheldon. By Elizabeth Fisher he had the Damaris, who died young; Oceanus, who died young; Caleb, who died at Barbados as an adult without issue; Deborah, who married Andrew Ring; the second Damaris, who married Jacob Cooke, son of Francis; Ruth, who died without issue; and Elizabeth, who died without issue (Dawes-Gates, 2:449).

Children were: Damaris HOPKINS Mayflower.

_____________________________

1620, on the ship "Mayflower"

_________________________

Constance Hopkins was a passenger on the Mayflower.

_________________________

CONSTANCE HOPKINS & NICHOLAS SNOW

Constance Hopkins was a Mayflower passenger. She journeyed with her father and stepmother, Stephen and Elizabeth Hopkins, her brother Giles, her half-sister Damaris and her half-brother Oceanus who was born during the voyage.

Sometime before 1627, Constance Hopkins married Nicholas Snow. Nicholas Snow had arrived in Plymouth on the Anne in 1623.

The inventory of Nicholas’ estate, taken at the time of his death, includes carpenter’s tools. This may have been his trade. His inventory also included books, so he was probably literate. Nicholas held various minor positions in Plymouth, such as highway surveyor.

The Snows moved from Plymouth to Nauset, on Cape Cod in the 1640s. On the Cape, Nicholas served as surveyor, constable and selectman.

Constance and Nicholas had 12 children. Nicholas died in November of 1676, Constance a year later in October of 1677. Before his death, Nicholas Snow wrote a will. Click HERE for that will as well as for the inventory of his estate at the time of his death.

The Pilgrim Society displays one artifact that is attributed to Constance Hopkins. It is a beaver hat, made in England, c.1615-1640. Steeple crowned hats, usually with a decorative band, were popular for both men and women in the early 17th century. Beaver fur, imported into England from the colonies, was processed into felt to make hats. Click HERE to see the Constance Hopkins beaver hat.

  • How do we know about Constance Hopkins and Nicholas Snow?
  • From the written records of the 17th century.
  • For a look at the 17th century records that pertain to Constance Hopkins and Nicholas Snow, click HERE.

________________________________

Constance arrived in the new world abourd the Mayflower traveling with her father Stephen and stepmother and siblings.

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Mayflower Passenger-

"The names of those which came over first, in the year 1620, and were by the blessing of God the first beginners and in a sort the foundation of all the Plantations and Colonies in new England; and their families…

"Mr. Stephen Hopkins and Elizabeth his wife, and two children called Giles and Constanta, a daughter, both by a former wife. And two more by this wife called Damaris and Oceanus; the last was born at sea. And two servants called Edward Doty and Edward Lester."

William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647, ed. Samuel Eliot Morison (New York : Knopf, 1991), p. 441-3.

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Constance was 14 when she and her father, Stephen Hopkins, traveled to the "New World" aboard a little ship called the Mayflower. Her family was part of "The Strangers."

She was baptized on May 11, 1606.

_______________________________

Constance Hopkins (May 11, 1606 – October 1677), also sometimes listed as Constanta. She was probably born in Hursley, Hampshire, England. Constance was the second daughter of Stephen Hopkins, by his first wife, Mary. Some believe she was named in honor of Constance (Marline) Hopkins. Constance, at the age of fourteen, along with her father and his second wife Elizabeth (Fisher), accompanied by brother Giles, half-sister Damaris as well as two servants by the name of Edward Doty and Edward Lester were passengers on the Mayflower on its journey to the New World in 1620. Along the way her half-brother Oceanus was born, the only child born on the Mayflower journey. Her headstone marker, placed in 1966 by descendants, states in part “Wife of Nicholas Snow, Eastham’s first town clerk 1646 – 1662”.

Constance married Nicholas, sometime before the 1627 division of cattle, probably May 22, 1627. Nicholas came to Plymouth on board the ship Anne in 1623 and was made a freeman at Plymouth in 1633. The inventory of Nicholas Snow's estate made at his death lists a wide variety of cooper's and carpenter's tools; this may indicate his trade. He was town clerk at Eastham and held several other local government offices.

According to Governor William Bradford, who wrote between March 6 and April 3, 1651:

“Constanta is also married, and hath 12 children all of them living, and one of them married”.

Constance Hopkins is the central character in Patricia Clapp's young adult novel Constance: A Story of Early Plymouth.

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Arrived on the Mayflower 1620.Original Mayflower passenger, wife of Nicholas Snow,

first Clerk of Eastham (1646-1662).

Buried in Family Plot- Eastham Cove Burial Ground.

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_____________________

Original Mayflower passenger, wife of Nicholas Snow, first Clerk of Eastham (1646-1662).



Descendants of Steven Hopkins of the Mayflower, "Mayflower Families Through Five Generations", volume six, "Hopkins", published by General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1992.


ancestry.com:

'Constance Hopkins

(Born in Shorwditch, London, England on 1608) Massachusetts

to Stephen Hopkins

Constance married Nicholas Snow and had children.

She passed away on 15 Nov 1676 in Eastham, Massachusetts, USA.

Family Members

Parents

Stephen Hopkins 1585-44

Spouse(s)

Nicholas Snow

1600-1676 Children

Mark Snow 1628-1694

Mary Snow 1636-1704

Sarah Snow 1641-1696

Joseph Snow 1651-1722

Stephen Snow 1648-1705

John Snow 1651-1690

Elizabeth Snow 1651-1675

Ruth Snow 1651-1716

Constance Snow 1651-1706

Hannah Snow 1647-1737

John Snow 1643-Unknown

Rebecca Snow 1644-1740


“The pilgrims didn’t know it, but they were moving into a cemetery,” About 1614, a series of three epidemics, inadvertently introduced through contact with Europeans, began to sweep through the Indian villages in Massachusetts. At least ten Wampanoag villages were abandoned because there were no survivors. The Wampanoag population decreased from 12,000 to 5,000.

Note: It is not known what the actual disease was that caused this epidemic. Various writers have suggested bubonic plague, smallpox, and hepatitis A. There is strong evidence supporting all of these theories. It is estimated that by 1619, 75% of the Native population of New England had died as a result of this epidemic.

When Squanto returned from England with captain Thomas Dermer in 1619, he searched for the Wampanoag of his village, but found that they had all died in the epidemic.

By the end of the wars the Wampanoag were nearly exterminated: only 400 survived.

When the Mayflower pilgrims and the Wampanoag sat down for the first Thanksgiving in 1621, it wasn’t actually that big of a deal. Likely, it was just a routine English harvest celebration. More significant—and less remembered—was the peace treaty that the parties established seven months earlier, which lasted for 50 years. (See also: National Geographic Kids: First Thanksgiving.)

“There’s in fact very little historical record of the first Thanksgiving, which is why Thanksgiving wasn’t really celebrated as a holiday until the 19th century,” says Charles C. Mann, author of 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus. “To historians, it seems kind of funny that the celebration … now seems more important than the treaty itself.”

President Abraham Lincoln established Thanksgiving as a national holiday during the Civil War, and the feast has since become an American tradition. Yet the story of the Wampanoag and the pilgrims who first broke bread is not commonly known. (See also: Talking Turkey: Facts about Thanksgiving's Big Bird.)

Here’s a little background about the much-mythologized meal.

1. It wasn’t actually a “Thanksgiving.”

In 1841, Boston publisher Alexander Young printed a book containing a letter by pilgrim Edward Winslow, which described the feast:

“[O]ur harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a more special manner rejoice together … [There were] many of the Indians coming amongst us, and among the rest their greatest King Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted.” (See also: National Geographic Kids: First Thanksgiving.)

Pilgrims land An engraving depicts the Mayflower pilgrims landing at Plymouth Rock in 1620. In reality, the pilgrims never wrote of any such rock. The first written mention of Plymouth Rock was in 1835.

Among 17th-century pilgrims, a “Thanksgiving” was actually a period of prayerful fasting, and Winslow did not use the word anywhere in his letter. But when Young published the letter, he called it the “first Thanksgiving” in a footnote, and the name stuck.

Edward Winslow Pilgrim Edward Winslow visits Massasoit, the Sachem (or leader) of the Wampanoag Confederacy.

2. A year before the first Thanksgiving, the pilgrims raided Native American graves.

When the pilgrims arrived in Cape Cod, they were incredibly unprepared. “They were under the persistent belief that because New England is south of the Netherlands and southern England, it would therefore be warmer,” says Mann. “Then they showed up six weeks before winter with practically no food.”

In a desperate state, the pilgrims robbed corn from Native Americans graves and storehouses soon after they arrived; but because of their overall lack of preparation, half of them still died within their first year. To learn how to farm sustainably, they eventually required help from Tisquantum, an English-speaking Native American who had been staying with the Wampanoag. (See also: Cranberries, a Native American Superfood.)

3. The pilgrims could only settle at Plymouth because thousands of Native Americans, including many Wampanoag, had been killed by disease.

If the pilgrims had arrived in Cape Cod three years earlier, they might not have found those abandoned graves and storehouses … in fact, they might not have had space to land.

Europeans who sailed to New England in the early to mid-1610s found flourishing communities along the coast, and little room for themselves to settle. But by 1620, when the Mayflower arrived, the area looked abandoned.

“A couple of years before, there’d been an epidemic that wiped out most of the coastal population of New England, and Plymouth was on top of a village that had been deserted by disease,” says Mann.

“The pilgrims didn’t know it, but they were moving into a cemetery,” he adds.

CULTURE & HISTORY

This is what happens when the migrant caravan comes to town

4. The peace that led to the first Thanksgiving was driven by trade and tribal rivalries.

Before the Wampanoag suffered losses from disease, they had driven Europeans like John Smith away. “Now,” says Mann, “the Wampanoag [were] much weaker because of the disease, and they’re much weaker than their hated adversaries, the Narragansett.”

Ann McMullen, curator at the National Museum of the American Indian, says that the Wampanoag weren’t necessarily looking to make alliances against the Narragansett; but “because the Wampanoag were in a slightly weakened position,” they realized that an alliance with the pilgrims “could fortify their strength.”

The Europeans were valuable trading partners for the Wampanoag and other Native Americans in the area because they traded steel knives and axes for beaver pelts—something that, in the beaver-rich New England area, the Wampanoag considered essentially worthless.

“It’s a little like somebody comes to your door, and says I’ll give you gold if you give me a rock,” Mann says. “The Wampanoag thought: if we tie ourselves to these guys, everybody else will be hesitant to attack us, because they could drive away these people who are willing to pay gold for rocks.

When the pilgrims arrived in Cape Cod, they were incredibly unprepared. “They were under the persistent belief that because New England is south of the Netherlands and southern England, it would therefore be warmer,” says Mann. “Then they showed up six weeks before winter with practically no food.”

In a desperate state, the pilgrims robbed corn from Native Americans graves and storehouses soon after they arrived; but because of their overall lack of preparation, half of them still died within their first year. To learn how to farm sustainably, they eventually required help from Tisquantum, an English-speaking Native American who had been staying with the Wampanoag. (See also: Cranberries, a Native American Superfood.)

3. The pilgrims could only settle at Plymouth because thousands of Native Americans, including many Wampanoag, had been killed by disease.

If the pilgrims had arrived in Cape Cod three years earlier, they might not have found those abandoned graves and storehouses … in fact, they might not have had space to land.


GEDCOM Source

Ancestry Family Trees Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. @R-1668579344@ Ancestry Family Tree http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=43001438&pid...


GEDCOM Note

Constance Hopkins was baptized on 11 May 1606 in Hursley, Hampshire, England, to parents Stephen Hopkins and his first wife Mary Kent . It should be noted that the long-standing Constance Dudley myth was disproven in 1998: the Hopkins family of the Mayflower was not from Wortley, Gloucester as had been previously speculated and published.

Constance came with her family on the Mayflower in 1620 at the age of 14. Constance's future husband, Nicholas Snow, arrived in Plymouth aboard the ship Anne in 1623. Nicholas and Constance Snow were married shortly before the 1627 Division of Cattle, and lived in Plymouth for a couple decades. Around 1645, the family moved to Eastham.

William Bradford, writing in 1651, stated that Constance Hopkins had 12 children "all of them living". Only 9 can be documented with existing records. The wife of Daniel Doane has been suggested as one of the three "missing" children, but unfortunately there is no conclusive proof.

http://mayflowerhistory.com/hopkins-constance

GEDCOM Note

GEDCOM data

GEDCOM Note

1st generation Mayflower descendant (Ste

1st generation Mayflower descendant (Stephen Hopkins). Source: ANCESTRAL REGISTER of HALSTED WATKINS HULL-Compiled by Algot G. Steinberg-Hartford CT 1934-Connecticut State Library. "HOPKINS, Stephen", Caleb Johnson The American Genealigist,73(1998): 161-171 Mayflower Families Through Five Generations Vol.6 2nd Ed. Stephen Hopkins Non-standard gedcom data: 1 PEDI birth

GEDCOM Note

!Cape Cod History History and Genealogy

!Cape Cod History History and Genealogy (FHL 1004003 pg. 7).

GEDCOM Note

Gen Soc of Mayflower Descendants Genealo

Gen Soc of Mayflower Descendants Genealogical Dict, James Savage, p 138

GEDCOM Note

She lived to be 70 years old. All of he

She lived to be 70 years old. All of her children survived to adulthood. In the Mayflower Passenger List by William Bradford, he called her "Constanta". He said she and her husband lived twenty years in Plymouth Plantation. William Bradford wrote "Of Plymouth Plantation" between the years of 1630-1654. Constance came on the Mayflower with her family. Nicholas Snow came on the Anne in 1623 and was made a freeman at Plymouth in 1633. In the will of Nicholas, a lengthy inventory, including many cooper's and carpenter's tools, was sworn to by widow Constant on 22 March,1676/77. Govenor Bradford wrote between 6 March and 3 April 1651 that "Constanta is also maried, and hath 12 children all of them living, and one of them married.

GEDCOM Note

Ref: Mayflower Web Pages: by Caleb Johns

Ref: Mayflower Web Pages: by Caleb Johnson Baptism: 11 May 1606, Hursley, Hampshire, England Will dated and signed Nov. 14, 1676

GEDCOM Note

[dHatch.FTW] [Hatche.ftw] Plymouth Colon

[dHatch.FTW] [Hatche.ftw] Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691 Part Three: Biographical Sketches Biographical Sketches Hopkins, Damaris xxx —A daughter of Stephen Hopkins, q.v., Constance accompa nied him on the 1620 Mayflower to Plymouth, and later marri ed Nicholas Snow, q.v. -----------------------------------------------------------


Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691 Part Three: Biographical Sketches Biographical Sketches Hopkins, Elizabeth xxx —A daughter of Stephen Hopkins, q.v., Damaris was wit h him on the 1620 Mayflower, and she died at Plymouth durin g the early years. The Damaris Hopkins who married Jacob2 C ooke, son of Francis, was a second daughter of that name bo rn in Plymouth almost certainly after the death of the firs t Damaris. Bowman, in the article cited under Stephen Hopki ns, gives the indirect evidence for this conclusion. -----------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------- Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691 Part Three: Biographical Sketches Biographical Sketches Hopkins, Giles xxx —The wife of Stephen Hopkins, q.v., Elizabeth's maide n name was probably Fisher. She accompanied Hopkins on th e 1620 Mayflower. -----------------------------------------------------------
Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691 Part Three: Biographical Sketches Biographical Sketches Hopkins, Oceanus xxx —A son of Stephen Hopkins, q.v., Giles came to Plymout h with his father on the 1620 Mayflower, and on 9 October 1 639 he married Catherine Wheldon (PCR 1:134; MD 13:85). Th e will of Giles [p.308] Hopkins of Eastham, dated 19 Januar y 1682/83, codicil 5 March 1688/89, proved 16 April 1690, m entioned his wife "Catorne," and sons Stephen, William, Cal eb, and Joshua (MD 1:110). MD 7:236-37 gives the births o f his children, as later recorded at Eastham, as Mary, Nove mber 1640; Stephen, September 1642; John, 1643 (died at ag e of three months); Abigail, October 1644; Deborah, June 16 48; Caleb, January 1650/51; Ruth, June 1653; Joshua, June 1 657; William, 9 January 1660/61; and Elizabeth, November 16 64 (died one month old). -----------------------------------------------------------
Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691 Part Three: Biographical Sketches Biographical Sketches Hopkins, Stephen xxx —A son of Stephen Hopkins and his wife Elizabeth, q.v. , Oceanus was born on the 1620 Mayflower while at sea—henc e the first name. He died without issue before the 1627 div ision. -----------------------------------------------------------
Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691 Part Three: Biographical Sketches Biographical Sketches: Hopkins, Stephen xxx —He most likely was the Stephen Hopkins who sailed on t he Seaventure to Virginia in 1609, but was shipwrecked in B ermuda, where he was almost hanged for mutiny. He spent tw o years in Jamestown, where he learned much of later use t o the Plymouth colonists (Adventurers of Purse and Person — Virginia 1607-1625, ed. by Annie Lash Jester with Martha Wo odroof Hiden, 2nd ed. (1964), p. 213-17). See also the exce llent account of his family in Dawes-Gates 2:443-51, whic h includes the reasoning for believing that the Stephen Hop kins of Virginia was identical with the one of Plymouth. -----------------------------------------------------------
Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691 Part Three: Biographical Sketches Biographical Sketches: Hopkins, Stephen xxx Hopkins arrived at Plymouth on the 1620 Mayflower accom panied by his wife, Elizabeth, and his sons Giles and Ocean us, and daughters Constance and Damaris, Oceanus having bee n born at sea on the Mayflower, plus two servants, Edward D oty and Edward Leister. Damaris died during the early years , and Hopkins and his wife later had a second daughter Dama ris. He was probably also one of the dissenters a t Plymout h whose actions led to the necessity for drafting the Mayfl ower Compact. Bradford (Ford) 1:219, and Mourt's Relation , p. 40, tell how in 1621 the colonists sent Mr. Edward Win slow and Mr. Stephen Hopkins on a mission to visit Massasoi t. Mourt's Relation, pp. 7-8, also shows how Hopkins warne d colonists on an early expedition about an Indian trap t o catch deer, and how Bradford, not hearing the warning, st epped on the trap and was immediately caught by his leg. Wh en Samoset first came to the settlement on 16 February 1620 /21, the Englishmen were suspicious of him, and they "lodge d him that night at Steven Hopkins house, and watched him " (Mourt's Relation, p. 33). Hopkins was an Assistant at le ast as early as 1633, and he continued in 1634, 1635, and 1 636. He was on the original freeman list, and he was a volu nteer in the Pequot War (PCR 1:61). -----------------------------------------------------------
Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691 Part Three: Biographical Sketches Biographical Sketches: Hopkins, Stephen xxx Keeping in mind the delicate balance in Plymouth betwee n "covenant" and "noncovenant" colonists, it is reasonabl e to assume that Hopkins must have been a leader of the non -Separatist settlers, and in his career at Plymouth can b e seen some of the ambiguity that attached to the non-Separ atists living in a Separatist colony. On 7 June 1636, a t a time when Hopkins was an Assistant, the General Court f ound him guilty of battery against John Tisdale, and he wa s fined £5, and ordered to pay Tisdale forty shillings, th e court observing that he had broken the King's peace, "wc h [p.309] he ought after a speciall manner to have kept" (P CR 1:42). On 2 October 1637 he was presented twice, first f or suffering men to drink in his house on the Lord's day be fore meeting ended, and for allowing servants and others t o drink more than proper for ordinary refreshing, and secon d for suffering servants and other s to sit drinking in hi s house contrary to orders of the court, and to play at sho vel board and like misdemeanors (PCR 1:68). On 2 January 16 37/38 Hopkins was presented for suffering excessive drinkin g in his house "as old Palmer, James Coale, & William Renol ds" (PCR 1:75). On 5 June 1638 he was presented for sellin g beer for two pence a quart which was not worth a penn y a quart, and for selling wine at excessive rates "to th e oppressing & impovishing of the colony"; he was fined £ 5 for some of these offenses, including selling strong wate rs and nutmegs at excessive rates (PCR 1:87, 97). In the Do rothy Temple case (see text) he was "committed to ward fo r his contempt to the Court, and shall so remayne comitte d untill hee shall either receive his servant Dorothy Templ e, or els pvide for her elsewhere at his owne charge durin g the terme shee hath yet to serve him" (PCR 1:112). On 3 D ecember 1639 he was presented for selling a looking glass f or sixteen pence which could be bought in the Bay Colony fo r nine pence, and he was also fined £3 for selling strong w ater without license" (PCR 1:137). Jonathan Hatch, who fro m the records seems to have been a recurring disciplinary p roblem in the colony, on 5 April 1642 was ordered by the co urt to dwell with Mr. Stephen Hopkins, "& the said Mr Hopki ns to have a speciall care of him" (PCR 2:38). [Hhatc.ftw] Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691 Part Three: Biographical Sketches Biographical Sketches Hopkins, Damaris xxx —A daughter of Stephen Hopkins, q.v., Constance accompa nied him on the 1620 Mayflower to Plymouth, and later marri ed Nicholas Snow, q.v. -----------------------------------------------------------
Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691 Part Three: Biographical Sketches Biographical Sketches Hopkins, Elizabeth xxx —A daughter of Stephen Hopkins, q.v., Damaris was wit h him on the 1620 Mayflower, and she died at Plymouth durin g the early years. The Damaris Hopkins who married Jacob2 C ooke, son of Francis, was a second daughter of that name bo rn in Plymouth almost certainly after the death of the firs t Damaris. Bowman, in the article cited under Stephen Hopki ns, gives the indirect evidence for this conclusion. -----------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------- Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691 Part Three: Biographical Sketches Biographical Sketches Hopkins, Giles xxx —The wife of Stephen Hopkins, q.v., Elizabeth's maide n name was probably Fisher. She accompanied Hopkins on th e 1620 Mayflower. -----------------------------------------------------------
Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691 Part Three: Biographical Sketches Biographical Sketches Hopkins, Oceanus xxx —A son of Stephen Hopkins, q.v., Giles came to Plymout h with his father on the 1620 Mayflower, and on 9 October 1 639 he married Catherine Wheldon (PCR 1:134; MD 13:85). Th e will of Giles [p.308] Hopkins of Eastham, dated 19 Januar y 1682/83, codicil 5 March 1688/89, proved 16 April 1690, m entioned his wife "Catorne," and sons Stephen, William, Cal eb, and Joshua (MD 1:110). MD 7:236-37 gives the births o f his children, as later recorded at Eastham, as Mary, Nove mber 1640; Stephen, September 1642; John, 1643 (died at ag e of three months); Abigail, October 1644; Deborah, June 16 48; Caleb, January 1650/51; Ruth, June 1653; Joshua, June 1 657; William, 9 January 1660/61; and Elizabeth, November 16 64 (died one month old). -----------------------------------------------------------
Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691 Part Three: Biographical Sketches Biographical Sketches Hopkins, Stephen xxx —A son of Stephen Hopkins and his wife Elizabeth, q.v. , Oceanus was born on the 1620 Mayflower while at sea—henc e the first name. He died without issue before the 1627 div ision. --------------------------------------

GEDCOM Note

!Source: "New England Historical and Gen

!Source: "New England Historical and Genealogical Register", Vol 1, page 51 and Vol 47, page 83. In the above source but vol 47, page 82, "The Snow Genealogy", her name is given as "Constanta".

GEDCOM Note

Constanza Hopkins was the daughter of Mr. Stephen Hopkins and a former wife. They came in the Mayflower. Bradford in his History of Plymoth Plantation, vol. 3, page 448, gives in the list of the Mayfl

GEDCOM Note

Constance Hopkins father

Book, " Here Shall I Die Ashore, Stephen Hopkins:Bermuda Castaway, Jamestown Survivor, and Mayflower Pilgrim,by Caleb Johnson,copyright 2007 Library of Congress Control Number: 2007907318

GEDCOM Note

!Arrived on Mayflower Dec 11 1620--The P

!Arrived on Mayflower Dec 11 1620--The Planters of the Commonwealth 1620-1640 by Charles Edward Banks p.48

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!BIRTH: Mayflower Families Through Five

!BIRTH: Mayflower Families Through Five Generations. Volume Six. Page 7. !MARRIAGE: THe Great Migration Begins Immigrants to New England 1620-1633. By Robert Charles Anderson. Page 988 !DEATH: Mayflower Families Through Five Generations. Volume Six. Page 9.

GEDCOM Note

The First Thanksgiving! The First Thanksgiving EDIT Autumn 1621 Plymouth, Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts, Colonial America "Our harvest being gotten in , our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a specia

GEDCOM Note

"Last" children

From the sources I have available there may have been 3 children born after Ruth's birth in "about 1644" but the names and sex are not known. People have been very creative in adding candidates!

GEDCOM Note

Life Sketch

per Margaret Weiler_1 > Constance (Hopkins) Snow (1606 - 1677)

Born May 11, 1606 in Hursley, Hampshire, England Daughter of Stephen Hopkins and Mary (Kent) Hopkins

Sisters: Elizabeth Hopkins, Giles Hopkins, John Hopkins, Damaris Hopkins, Ocenaus Hopkins, Caleb Hopkins, Deborah (Hopkins) Ring, Damaris (Hopkins) Cooke, Ruth Hopkins and Elizabeth Hopkins

Wife of Nicholas Snow — married before May 22, 1627 in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts

Mother of Mark Snow, Mary (Snow) Paine, Sarah (Snow) Walker, Joseph Snow, Stephen Snow, John B. Snow Sr., Elizabeth (Snow) Rogers, Jabez Snow, Ruth (Snow) Cole, Constance Snow, Samuel Snow and Unknown-Infant Snow

Died soon after the death of her husband, Nicholas Snow, in late 1676 or early 1677.

NOTE: There is no evidence that she was buried in the Cove Burying Ground in Eastham. See publications by the Eastham Historical Society.

Original Mayflower passenger, wife of Nicholas Snow, first Clere of Eastham (1646-1662).

That first spring in the new land, the colonists looked on as the two young men, Edward Doty and Edward Leister (According to Wikipedia they were servants of Stephen Hopkins), carried on a dual courtship for the hand of pretty Constance. On 18 June 1621, the colonists were awakened at dawn by the sound of the clash of cold steel. Rushing outside, they found Leister and Doty slashing away at each other in a duel.

"They were quickly disarmed and haled before Governor Bradford, who ordered them strung up with head and heels tied together so they could cool off their hot blood." Governor Bradford said later that "Edward Doty retrieved his character by change from youthful folly."

The fair Miss Constance never married either swain. Instead, she later married the honorable Nicholas Snow, one of the founders of Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.

Constance Hopkins was a Mayflower passenger. She journeyed with her father and stepmother, Stephen and Elizabeth Hopkins, her brother Giles, her half-sister Damaris and her half-brother Oceanus who was born during the voyage.

Sometime before 1627, Constance Hopkins married Nicholas Snow. Nicholas Snow had arrived in Plymouth on the Anne in 1623.

The inventory of Nicholas’ estate, taken at the time of his death, includes carpenter’s tools. This may have been his trade. His inventory also included books, so he was probably literate. Nicholas held various minor positions in Plymouth, such as highway surveyor.

The Snows moved from Plymouth to Nauset, on Cape Cod in the mid-1640s. On the Cape, Nicholas served as surveyor, constable and selectman.

Constance and Nicholas had 12 children.

Nicholas died in November of 1676, Constance a year later in October of 1677. Before his death, Nicholas Snow wrote a will. Click here for that will as well as for the inventory of his estate at the time of his death.

The Pilgrim Society displays one artifact that is attributed to Constance Hopkins. It is a beaver hat, made in England, c.1615-1640. Steeple crowned hats, usually with a decorative band, were popular for both men and women in the early 17th century. Beaver fur, imported into England from the colonies, was processed into felt to make hats.

Constancia Hopkins was the daughter of Stephen Hopkins and his first wife, Mary Kent, of Hursley, Hampshire, England. Her baptism is noted in the Hursley, Hampshire, parish register, available at the Hampshire County Archives, Winchester, England.

"[1606] undecimo die Maij Constancia filia Steph Hopkyns fuit baptizata [11th day of May, 1606, Constance daughter of Steph[en] Hopkins was baptized]" Date: 11 MAY 1606 Place: Hursley, Hampshire, England[1]

Constance Hopkins had a younger brother, Giles Hopkins, born in Hursley, Hampshire, England, in 1607. Their father, Stephen Hopkins, by all accounts a world-traveler and adventurer, left his family in the care of their maternal grandmother, "the widow Kent," in Hursley, while he traveled to Jamestown, Virginia colony, being shipwrecked in Bermuda for over a year. Shortly thereafter his wife, Mary Kent, died. Stephen Hopkins remarried to Elizabeth Fisher in 1617. In 1620 he embarked with his entire family, including older children Constance and Giles, on the "Mayflower," bound for "Northern Virginia," landing at Plymouth Rock in New England that November.

Nicholas Snow did not sail on the "Mayflower" but arrived at Plymouth 18 months later, aboard HMS "Anne". It's not known whether he already knew young Constance Hopkins in England and followed her to America but it is certain that after 1623 Constance never considered anyone else to share her life with. They were married within a few years of Nicholas' arrival in Plymouth.

'The will of Nicholas Snow of Eastham, dated 14 Nov. 1676 and proved 5 March 1677, left livestock and household goods to his wife Constance for life use and then to his youngest son Jabez, and devised various parcels of land to sons Mark, Joseph, Steven, John and Jabez. The description of land near the testator's house mentioned 'son Thomas Paine' <actually son-in-law> as an abutting owner. Nicholas also gave, after the death of his wife, the sum of ten shillings to the Church of Eastham for the furniture of the Table of the Lord, with pewter or other Necessaries.' He named Deacon Samuel Freeman and John Mayo as executors. Letters of administration were granted to Constanta, Mark and John Snow on 6 March 1677. A lengthy inventory, including many cooper's and carpenter's tools, was sworn to by widow Constant Snow on 22 March 1677. 'Governor Bradford wrote between 6 March and 3 April 1651 that Constanta is also married, and hath 12 children, all of them living and one of them married.'

per zwmasters > Constance Hopkins was baptized on 11 May 1606 in Hursley, Hampshire, England, to parents Stephen Hopkins and his first wife Mary Kent . It should be noted that the long-standing Constance Dudley myth was disproven in 1998: the Hopkins family of the Mayflower was not from Wortley, Gloucester as had been previously speculated and published.

Constance came with her family on the Mayflower in 1620 at the age of 14. Constance's future husband, Nicholas Snow, arrived in Plymouth aboard the ship Anne in 1623. Nicholas and Constance Snow were married shortly before the 1627 Division of Cattle, and lived in Plymouth for a couple decades. Around 1645, the family moved to Eastham.

William Bradford, writing in 1651, stated that Constance Hopkins had 12 children "all of them living". Only 9 can be documented with existing records. The wife of Daniel Doane has been suggested as one of the three "missing" children, but unfortunately there is no conclusive proof.

http://mayflowerhistory.com/hopkins-constance

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!The American Genealogist-Vo. 73, No. 3

!The American Genealogist-Vo. 73, No. 3 pg. 161-171-The True Orgin of Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower With Evidence of His Earlier Presence in VA By Caleb Johnson. Constance Hopkins md. Nicholas SNOW by 23 May 1627, when they appeared in stephen Hopkins "companie" in the division of cattle. !Mayflower Familes thru 5 gene.-Stephen Hopkins Family-pg.7-bd. abt 1607 !Cooke Book-pg.44/45-bd. 1605, bapt. d. Jan. 1599/1600 (she cld/n h/b bapt. bef. she was b. so will go w/ the 1599/1600 date. !Signers of the Mayflower Compact-pg. 34-She and Nichols Snow give a double claim as signers through their desc., Robert Treat. Goodwin in his "Plymouth Republic" states that Contance was over 13 yrs. old when she arrived w/her father on the Mayflower, !http://expage.com/pagee/stephcarsonsn

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Name also reported as Constanta. Came f

Name also reported as Constanta. Came from England to Plymouth with her father on the "Mayflower." Had 12 children, the names of only nine of which are known for certain. Of the other three, one was probably named Constance. Harold A Smith, RIN #666, puts death date at 25 Nov 1677. Moved to Eastham, probably in 1644 when many Plymouth families moved to Nauset section of Cape Cod according to Wm Bradford's history of Plymouth Colony. Visited apparent grave at Cove Burying Ground in Eastham on July 2, 1998. The marker was placed by her descendents in 1966 at the apparent site of her grave. Sources: J J Smith (paper submitted to Mayflower Society) and Gen Soc of Mayflower Descendants.

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Mayflower Passenger

Mayflower Passenger

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Marriage

22May 1627

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Will of Nicholas Snow (His daughters are not mentioned. Perhaps they received their inheritances when they married.)

I Nicholas Snow of Eastham, being old and infirm of body but of perfect memory and understanding, not k

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Constance arrived on the Mayflower to P

Constance arrived on the Mayflower to Plymouth in 1620, with her father and step-mother, Elizabeth Fisher. She was also known as "Constanta" References: Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Vol. 6 - 2nd . Ed. - Stephen Hopkins, pub. by the General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1995. Cape Cod Genealogy, by Edward A. Cooper. MacKay Family & Connections in the Maritimes, by Michael MacKay. Mayflower Increasings, 2nd Ed., by Susan E. Roser, pub. by the Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 1997. ADDITIONAL SOURCES: http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~ahopkins/stephen.htm http://www.troycable.net/~wtw/steven-ed.html

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My 10th Great Grandmother

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Oceanus

Oceanus Hopkins Hopkins was born on the Mayflower during the voyage, to parents Stephen and Elizabeth (Fisher) Hopkins. He did not survive very long, however, and may have died the first winter, or during the subsequent year or two. Giving a child a unique name like Oceanus, commemorating some major event surrounding the birth, is not unheard of, even in the 17th century when most names were either inherited, Biblical, or came from a king or queen. The White family named their son, born shortly after arrival of the Mayflower, "Peregrine", meaning traveler. And when Stephen Hopkins was a castaway in Bermuda in 1609, the two children born there were named Bermudas (boy) and Bermuda (girl).

his death Oceanus Hopkins was born to Elizabeth and Stephen Hopkins, who traveled on Mayflower together, along with their daughter Damaris and two of Stephen's children from a previous marriage.

Oceanus is well-known for the circumstances of his birth, which occurred while aboard Mayflower. He survived the first winter in Plymouth, but died by 1627

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Passenger, about age 13, with her father

Passenger, about age 13, with her father, on the Mayflower, 1620. The following memorial inscription was placed on her grave in 1966: "Constance Hopkins Snow 1605-1677, Mayflower passenger, wife of Nicholas Snow, Eastham's first clerk 1646-1662. Placed by her descendants 1966."

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CONSTANCE HOPKINS 2nd Generation Consta

CONSTANCE HOPKINS 2nd Generation Constance Hopkins, arrived with her father Stephen Hopkins at Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts on the Mayflower in the year 1620 and married Nicholas Snow. Children of Nicholas and Constance Snow were: 1. Mark 2. Mary 3. Sarah 4. Joseph 5. Stephen 6. John 7. Elizabeth 8. Jabez 9. Ruth 10. Hannah 11. Samuel 12. Rebecca References Genealogical and Personal Memoirs, Volume IV, New York Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1910, page 2445 Genealogies of Mayflower Families, Volume II, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Balitmore, 1985, pages 270-71, 767 Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Vol. Six - Stephen Hopkins, pages 7 & 9, #2 Mayflower Source Records, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore, 1986, pages 437, 495, 498, 512, and 512 Paine Family Records, Volume II, page 15 The Snow Genealogy by Walter A. Snow, Brooksville, Maine, 1980 pages 2 and 5

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Listed as ~11 years old when sailed to M

Listed as ~11 years old when sailed to MA on Mayflower in 1620; 13 when attended "first Thanksgiving" with parents and 3 siblings. Married Nicholas Snow III in May or June 1627 in Plymouth, MA (Gene Pool Individual Records).

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Daughter of Stephen (Mayflower pilgrim) Hopkins (1581-1644)

Constance Hopkin's father Stephen Hopkins was a Bermuda castaway, Jamestown survivor, Mayflower pilgrim and assistant governor of Plymouth Plantation.

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Hannah and Rebecca

In my family records received through Abridged Compendum of America Genealogy Volume 6 Page 805 Library of Cape Cod Massachusets history and genealogy, it shows Hannah born 1646 Snow and Rebecca Snow born 1648 both born in Barnstable to Constance Hopkins Snow and Nicholas Snow. I can find now other source, but do not want to lose this information as I continue to search.

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!CHR-MARRIAGE: Caleb Johnson, "The True

!CHR-MARRIAGE: Caleb Johnson, "The True Origin of Stephen Hopkins of the MAYFLOWER, With Evidence of His Earlier Presence in Virginia"; THE AMERICAN GENEALOGIST, vol 73, No 3, July 1998; pp 161-171; copy in possession of Steven B. Watrous. This source states in part, the following: "...Now it is time to set the record straight and present documented evidence that Stephen Hopkins was not from Wortley, Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire, but instead from Hursely, Hampshire, England. The parish registers of Hursley, searched and photocopied by Leslie Mahler at my request, contain the following baptismal entries, literally transcribed from the original Latin with my own translation appearing below [see page 163]." ... "Stephen and Mary Hopkins of Hursley, Hampshire, were the parents of Elizabeth, Constance, and Giles. It should also be noted that both Constance and Giles named their first daughter Mary [page 164]. At my request, the Hampshire Record Office [in Winchester] undertook a search for Hopkins probate records, and uncovered only one at Hursley -- an administration on the estate of Mary Hopkins in 1613. Her estate inventory was dated 10 May 1613, and administration was granted on 12 May 1613...during the minority of Constance, Elize(beth) et Egidij (in that order) [Egidius is the Latin form of the English name Giles] [see page 164]". "She married Nicholas Snow by 22 May 1627, when they appeared in Stephen Hopkins's 'companie' in the division of cattle [see page 170]". !BIRTH: Timothy Hopkins, compiler; "Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower and Some of His Descendants"; New England Historical & Genealogical Society Register; vol.102, no.1 (Jan 1948); pp.46-49; photocopy in poss. of Steven B. Watrous (Springville, UT; 1996). !MARRIAGE: T.Hopkins; op.cit. p.46 states she md. before 1628 Nicholas Snow; also states that "Governor Bradford says, probably about 1650, 'Constanta is also married and hath 12 children, all of them living, and one of them married'. There is no positive record of all of their children, but the following are known:.." [and 11 are listed]. John D. Austin, FASG; MAYFLOWER FAMILIES THROUGH FIVE GENERATIONS: Descendants of the Pilgrims Who Landed at Plymouth, Mass. December 1620; vol. 6, p.10; Stephen Hopkins Family; General Society of Mayflower Descendants; 1992; FHL Book #974.4 D2mf v.6. ("Governor Bradford wrote bet. 6 Mar and 3 Apr 1651 that 'Constanta is also maried, and hath 12 children allof them living, and one of them maried.'", citing THE MAYFLOWER DESCENDANT; "Bradford's List of Mayflower Passengers"; v.1, p.10, 14; copy in poss. of S.B.Watrous. Austin does not list names or gender of the 3 children perhaps born after 1644. !DEATH: T.Hopkins; op.cit.; p.46 (gives date as 1670). James W. Hawes; "Stephen and Giles Hopkins: Mayflower Passengers & Some of Their Descendants, Including an Eldredge Line"; CAPE COD LIBRARY OF LOCAL HISTORY & GENEALOGY: A Facsimile of 108 Pamphlets Published in the Early 20th Century; vol.1, p. 624; Leonard H. Smith, Jr., CG; Genealogical Publ. Co.; Baltimore; 1992; BYU Book #F72. C3 S734. (states she d. about the middle of Oct, 1677, citing MD 3:167). Also cited in MD 6:203 "Eastham and Orleans, Mass., Vital Records".

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Two sets of Temple Ordinance would be wrong if they were done before 1940.

Two sets of Temple Ordinance Dates: Bap. 17 May 1881, End 10 Aug 1894; Bap 21 Jul 1939, End 7 Sep 1939. ! BAPTISM: Hursley Parish Records (TAG 73:3:163). ! MARRIAGE: Date unknown. In the 1627 Plymouth division of cattle "Nickolas Snow" and "Constance Snow" were the sixth and seventh persons in the seventh company, which was headed by her father, Stephen Hopkins [PCR 12:11]. ! REFERENCES: TAG 73:3:163, "The True Origin of Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower." NEHGR 47:81-84. (The Snow Genealogy) The Great Migration Begins, Anderson, II:988.

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Note origionally on the life sketch

Since is has been locked as read-only I enjoy seeing the marriage date 15 years before the Mayflower sailed. Married right around the time Constance was born. And the kids who aren't theirs. ===========Yup--new.dot is still dumping its errors. Today it make Richard Snow the husband of Constance Hopkins again. --James didn't leave an email address but we'd appreciate his providing a link to the sources he found on Ancestry that say she was BORN 25 JANUARY 1599 in Wooten, Gloucestershire and died that exact date in 1677. Thanks. --This is not her primary ID. We're in the process of merging. No need to add children. They're all duplicated elsewhere. Help find and merge. If you've not had a chance to read documentation on this family and think this Constance Hopkins is married to Richard from Woburn, here is some interesting reading on her father, Stephen Hopkins, and his family. He was not born 29 Oct 1581 anywhere, especially in Gloucestershire; not son of Nicholas and Mary; not married to the mythical Constance (who wouldn't have had a middle name) Dudley; not death or burial 20 Aug 1644. Here's a one-pager that has almost everything anyone needs about Stephen Hopkins http://mayflowerhistory.com/hopkins-stephen/ . Follow with well-sourced http://tinyurl.com/Johnson-Book with DOCUMENTS found in Hampshire in 1998 and more in 2004. Also see - Wikipedia http://tinyurl.com/WIKIPEDIA-Stephen-Hopkins which has him more correct than most trees - good rundown of the kids/grandkids for a few generations http://www.pilgrimhopkins.com/site1/pafv4/pafg01.htm#1 - http://pilgrimhopkins.com/site1/Newsletters/AC_su07.pdf from the research in Hampshire. -- from NEHGS--Researching the Mayflower--Sorting the Good from the Bad. http://tinyurl.com/RSRCH-Mayflower

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!SOURCE: LDS PERSONAL ANCESTRIAL FILE -

!SOURCE: LDS PERSONAL ANCESTRIAL FILE - AFN:46RG-ZT.

--Other FieldsCame to America on the Mayflower with her father Stephen Hopkins.

This is the ancestry of the Wiley and Dorr families of Maine. It was begun by Leonore Dorr and Keneth Wiley. it is a legay of their love of family

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Constance Hopkins was baptized on 11 May

Constance Hopkins was baptized on 11 May 1606 in Hursley, Hampshire, England, to parents Stephen Hopkins and his first wife Mary. It should be noted that the long-standing Constance Dudley myth was disproven in 1998: the Hopkins family of the Mayflower was not from Wortley, Gloucester as had been previously speculated and published.

Constance came with her father Stephen, step-mother Elizabeth, brother Giles, and step-sister Damaris on the Mayflower in 1620, at the age of 14. Constance's future husband, Nicholas Snow, arrived on the ship Anne in 1623. Nicholas and Constance Snow were married shortly before the 1627 Division of Cattle, and lived in Plymouth for a time. Around 1645, the family moved to Eastham.

William Bradford, writing in 1651, stated that Constance Hopkins had 12 children "all of them living". Only 9 can be documented with existing records. Constance, wife of Daniel Doane, is quite probably one of the three "missing" children, but unfortunately there is no conclusive proof.

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Constance Snow, "Mayflower" Passenger's Timeline

1606
May 11, 1606
Hursley, Hampshire, England
May 11, 1606
Hursley, Hampshire, England (United Kingdom)
May 11, 1606
Hursley, Hampshire, England
May 11, 1606
Hursley, Hampshire, England
May 11, 1606
Hursley, Hampshire, England
1620
September 20, 1620
Age 14
Plymouth, Devon, England

Planters recruited by Thomas Weston, of London merchant adventurers

Hopkins, Stephen (Upper Clatford, Hampshire)
Elizabeth (Fisher) Hopkins, wife
Giles Hopkins, 12, son by first marriage (Hursley, Hampshire)
Guild, John, (Essex)
Constance Hopkins, 14, daughter by first marriage (Hursley, Hampshire)
Damaris Hopkins, 1-2, daughter
Oceanus Hopkins, born en route

David Lindsay, PhD. Mayflower Bastard: A Stranger amongst the Pilgrims (St. Martins Press, New York, 2002) p. 27

November 11, 1620
Age 14
Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts
November 11, 1620
Age 14
Mayflower arriving Cape Cod