Daniel McLoughlin, Sgt-RIC

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About Daniel McLoughlin, Sgt-RIC

The photo shows collar numbers 170, which were only worn by RIC in Cork or Derry or Belfast Cities where local City Forces had been amalgamated with the RIC. He therefore must have been stationed in one of those Cities as an RIC Con. 170 seems too high for Derry City since the size of the Force needed in Derry City must have been under that. Many or most of the RIC in Belfast in the 1911 Census were not Ulstermen but Southerners [ and also farmers sons ], and it is thus probable he was at some point stationed in either Belfast City or Cork City.

Sgt RIC, Mullinavat Sub-District, Thomastown RIC District, South County Kilkenny, 1911. Constabulary Station Party = 3 RC Constables [ somewhat untypical in that 1 Officer of 4 was very often a Protestant - mostly Church of Ireland ]. Stationed in Tullaroan, North Kilkenny, 10 miles North of the City, before Mullinavat. Farmer's son from Queen's County [= Co Leix ] . He was RC but his wife Maria [ nee Lappin ] who was also RC in 1911 and at least since her marriage in 1890, was herself born Church of Ireland. His oldest son, Johnnie, enlisted in the Irish Guards in 1916 in WW I, being twice Wounded In Action, while his second son Patrick 1896-1980 retired as a Garda Det-Insp in Dublin. By 1916, when Johnnie enlisted, Daniel was retired and the Pensioner Recruiter in Mullinavat who provided him with a Recruitment Notice.

Daniel was 27 and an RIC Constable stationed in Bennettsbridge when on May 16, 1890 in Tullaherin Catholic Chapel, Bennettsbridge, County Kilkenny, he married Maria Lappin, only 17 years and 5 months - born Dec 17, 1872 - her RIC father, Peaden Lappin, had died on Sept 16, 1878, when she was only 5 years and 9 months. As Maria is a Catholic in the 1911 Census, aged 38, as are all the McLoughlin family in Mullinavat, she might have *turned* on marriage, aged 17.

Daniel was 59 when the British disbanded the RIC in 1922, the force in which his father-in-law and brother-in-law had also served, but neither of them lived to see that day as the former had died, while serving, in 1878, aged only 46, and the latter died in 1914 [ in Perth, Western Australia ] aged only 51.

The RIC Bks at Hugginstown, Callan RIC District, South-West County Kilkenny, was attacked by the Irish Volunteers on March 8, 1920, the first of only 6 serious incidents [ 1 every 152 days ] by their Kilkenny Brigade in the entire County in the whole 912-day [ = 31-month ] period from Jan 21, 1919 to July 11, 1921 [ *The Troubles* or *War of Independence* ], with 3 separate attacks killing 3 RIC [ 1 in each attack ], 1 RIC Missing, presumed killed, in another incident, with 2 of the IV attacks [ both against troops ] involving only Irish Volunteer losses [ 2 IV killed by the British Army in each incident - in Coolbawn Ambush, Castlecomer, and the earlier Feb 21, 1921 failed Ambush at Friary St, Kilkenny City when Capt Thomas Hennessy and Vol Michael Dermody were killed, and 2 more IV were injured ]. No serious incident had occurred in the 11 months following the attack on Hugginstown RIC Bcks.

 2  other RIC  [ both  Temporary Constables ] were killed when RIC Patrols wee attacked,  both ex-soldiers, single and English-born  *Tans*.  

Near Callan on March 12, 1921, 19 days after the failed Friary Street Ambush, Con 79407 Ernest J Riley, 26, from Sussex, was killed, when the Column of 7 [ Callan ] Bn Kilkenny Bde IV shot their way out, having been surrounded at Garryricken House, and 14 weeks later, on June 18, 1921, Con 72721 Albert Bradford from Essex, 21, at Fiddown, South Kilkenny, when RIC Sgt Sweatman was seriously wounded.

 On the same day, June 18, 1921, at Coolbawn, North of Castlecomer, the Devonshire Regt , under  WW I veteran [ serving 1917 to 1949 ] Capt Reginald Bovill 1899-1974  along with some RIC and ADRIC [ Auxilaries=ex-Officers ] , surprised 36 Irish Vols laying in ambush for them and 2 IV were killed - Mullins, born 1894 and Hartley, born 1897 - while Jame Doyle was captured. The Ambush had been revealed by a local woman, Florrie Draper, whose home was then burnt. But unlike Mrs Lindsay in Cork, who revealed the Dripsey Ambush and was kidnapped and murdered - aged 60 -  by Frank Busteed, Vice-Cmdy, 6th Bn, 1st [ East ] Cork Bde, Florrie was not harmed. [ On the following day, in South County Tipperary,  June 19, 1921, Pvt Smith, 1st Devons, a soldier in the military escort for the coffin of Con Bradford, was killed in an Ambush at 7.15 PM at Newbridge. Carrick-on-Suir ].  And 9 days earlier, on June 10, 1921, an Auxy Cadet  from *A Coy, based at Woodstock House, Inistiogue, was reported Missing -  82,537 Leonard J French, 26, single, from Staffordshire, an ex-2 Lt in RAF, recruited to RIC only 4 month earlier on Feb 2, 1921. The Rower Coy in SE County Kilkenny was believed responsible for killing him. His body was never found. 

From Jan 21, 1919 to Aug 5, 1922, 493 RIC were killed across the Island of Ireland. 428 killed before and 65 after [ and in complete violation of ] the July 1921 Anglo-Irish Truce.

At Hugginstown, in the first killing in County Kilkenny, a married County Limerick-born regular Constable 60822 Thomas Ryan, 35, father of 4 children, was killed. He had 17 years service. The Bcks was 4.5 miles East from the Kilmaganny RIC Bks which was the first station of Con Peaden Lappin in 1852, and 9.5 miles North from Sgt Daniel McLoughlin in Mullinavat RIC Bcks, while Fiddown is 9 miles to the West of Mullinavat. The 4th Bn of the Kilkenny Bde IV was based around Mullinavat. That *A* Coy of the ADRIC [ Auxiliary Division ] was from Aug 26, 1920 to Jan 16, 1922, based at Woodstock House, Inistiogue, about 10 miles North-East of Mullinavat, with 3 mobile Platoons and 6 Crossley Tenders, may have added to its security, as did the capture in Kilkenny in Dec 1920 of IV GHQ Organizer, Ernie O'Malley 1997-1957 along with his notes naming key local IVs, along with the vigor of the RIC County Inspector, Pierce Charles Power, a County Westmeath-born Roman Catholic who retired at 60 on August 1, 1920, in a County with 312 RIC on Sept 30, 1891.

Only 4 miles from Hugginstown, at Knocktopher Abbey, was the home of an Officer in the Irish Guards Regt, Terence Hume Langrishe, 25, serving in Dublin on Nov 1920 when on Bloody Sunday his close friend Lt Peter A. Ames, Grenadier Guards, a Catholic, like him attached to *D Branch* [ the undercover military Intel Dublin District Special Branch, commanded from May to Dec 1920 by LTC W Wilson ] and newly engaged to be married, was among 6 undercover Intel Officers [ along with Angliss, Bennett, Dowling, MacLean, Price ] and 9 others [ 1 RIC - Con 71614 John Fitzgerald, an ex-Army Capt, 2 ADRIC Cadets, 2 Court Martial Officers, 1 Staff Officer, and 2 civilian ex-Officers staying in the Gresham Hotel, as well as 1 civilian, Thomas Henry Smith, 45 married with 3 children, of Morehampton Road, Dublin ] killed by the Irish Volunteers that morning. When Terence telegraphed his own fiancee, aged 20, the future novelist Barbara Cartland, 1901-2000 to tell his friend's fiancee, Millicent Orr Ewing, 21, daughter of an Army Major, Barbara was so horrified at the thought of also seeing her own fiancee Terence killed that she ended their engagement, but concealed her terror by telling him she did not love him enough. Terence continued his Army career, serving as an Int Corps Capt in WW II, married in 1926, and succeeding to the estate and as 6th Baronet when his father, Sir Hercules Langrishe, died in 1943, aged 84, when his Catholic wife Helen was 81. Barbara, whose father, a Major, had been killed in Flanders in WW I, married a Scottish Army Officer and after their divorce in 1936, married his cousin, an ex-Officer. Millicent married 1 year later, in Nov 1921 but died age 32, in Nov, 1931

The notable but almost unmentioned IV link to Kilkenny was Liam [ William Joseph ] Tobin, 1895-1963, the Cork City-born GHQ Deputy Director of Intel [ under Collins as Director ], who was reared and schooled in Kilkenny City, before moving to Dublin where he was among 47 who fought in the Four Courts Garrison during the April 1916 Easter Rising, a garrison led by Citizen Army Capt Sean Connolly who was shot dead there on Easter Monday [ 3 of his brothers and a sister were among the 47 ].

Tobin was crucial in the systematic targeting for assassination of DMP [ Dublin Metropolitan Police ] *G* Division Detectives, as well as in running key agents, both in *G* Division [ County-Kildare-born Ned Broy, Joe Kavanagh, County Limerick-born David Neligan, Jim McNamara ], and civilians, such as Dr Garret Fitzgerald's mother, a Belfast-born Presbyterian and former GPO employee, Mabel McConnell who decoded messages for the Under-Secretary or Ireland from 1918-1922 in Dublin Castle, a Belfast-born Catholic, James MacMahon, 1865-1954, who brought her from the Post Office, where he had been Assistant Secretary from 1913 and Secretary from 1916, Dubliner Lily Mernin, aged 33 in 1921, a Typist in the Army's Irish Command GHQ, and Pat Moynihan in the Post Office Central Sorting Office [ located at Parnell=Rutland Square North, now the Garden of Remembrance, since the GPO was destroyed in 1916 ] . Tobin was not involved in planning the Nov 1920 *Bloody Sunday* mass assassination of British Officers in Dublin as he had suffered a nervous breakdown.

Other key IV secret agents included RIC Sgt Matt McCarthy in Belfast, Sgt William Costelloe in Cork City [ Clerk in the CI's Office ], both Kerrymen, along with Sgt Jerry Maher and his successor from Feb 1921, Sgt Paddy Casey in Naas [ both Clerks in the CI's Office and who both provided every new RIC Code ], ex-RIC Sgt Thomas J McElligott, along with a Typist in 6th Div HQ in Cork, a widow, Mrs Josephine Marchmount nee Brown, whose father was a Head Constable, and Dubliner Willie Beaumont, ex-Royal Dublin Fusiliers, who penetrated the Secret Service [ as did DMP *G* Div Det Neligan ]. Both Maher and MacCarthy became Chief Supt in the Gardai, as did ex-DMP Detectives Broy [ in 1933 promoted to Commissioner ] and Neligan, while Casey became a Supt

When Tobin, a Roman Catholic, was starting school as an Infant, in the Lake School near John's Quay on the Left [ East ] bank of the River Nore, and living on New Road [ 100 yds to the West of the Military Bcks ], a Church of Ireland neighbor was Richard Dale Winnett Harrison, 1883-1982, an older Kilkenny schoolboy, living in Newpark Lower on the North side of the Military Bcks. He was a son of the RIC District Inspector in the City, who had been born in North Tipperary in 1846, Richard J Harrison, married to Sarah, a County Monaghan woman, and he served as DI from 1882 until retiring in Kilkenny City on June 1, 1906. Richard Jnr was finishing second-level education in Kilkenny College in John Street, now the County Council Offices, beside the RIC Bcks in Lower John Street [ which by 1920 was also RIC County HQ ]. and 150 yards from Tobin's school.

The same County Carlow-born RIC Constable collected the 1901 Census Forms from both the Tobin and Harrison homes, 200 yards apart - Con Patrick Lawler, then 35. He also lived in Greensbridge Street, around the corner from the Tobin home in New Road, and his Kilkenny City-born wife, Mary, 32, a National Teacher, was a younger sister of Canice Dowling, 42, a Kilkenny City-born RIC Head Constable. By 1911, Tobins were living on Johns Quay, 300 yards South from Patrick Lawler, then an RIC Sgt and still living in Greensbridge St, and with Canice Dowling, then retired and living with them..

Richard Jnr went from Kilkenny College to Trinity College, Dublin, and spent 21 months teaching in County Derry, before becoming an RIC District Inspector on Nov 1, 1906, 5 months after his father in Kilkenny retired as a DI. Richard Jnr by 1920 was DI in the key city center *A* District at Musgrave Street Bcks, Belfast, when the City Force from March 11, 1920, was commanded by another Southerner, a Rector's son from Kingscourt, County Cavan, John Fitzhugh Gelston, born 1864 and a DI from June 21, 1890. Most of the Belfast City Force in 1911 [ like the rest of the RIC ] were Southern Catholic farmer's sons.

Newly promoted to County Inspector, on Nov 4, 1920 Harrison became the Staff Officer in Belfast RIC HQ of the newly-recruited USC [ Ulster Special Constabulary ]. Transferred to the RUC on June 1, 1922, when the RIC was disbanded, he later was promoted to Belfast City Commissioner, and held that key post when over 900 people were murdered by the Nazi Bombing Blitz on Belfast in April and May, 1941, including 12 RIC [ 7 regular and 5 USC ], and when 6 RUC [ 4 regular and 2 USC ] were murdered by the IRA between April 5, 1942 and Oct 1, 1943 [ Murphy, Forbes, Laird, Hamilton, Lyons, and Patrick McCarthy, born 1891 County Cork and ex-Irish Guards ]. The IRA were actively collaborating with the Nazis [ the same IRA also murdered 6 Gardai - Roche, McKeown, Hyland, O'Brien, Walsh, Mordant - between Jan 4, 1940 and Oct 24, 1942, during WW II ].

The leading and very respected nationalist-Catholic Belfast journalist, employed in the Irish News, James Kelly, whose Kilkenny City-born father was a Belfast RIC man and a contemporary of Harrison, knew Harrison when a young journalist and testified to his vigorous work in combating Loyalist rioting in 1935. He had been awarded an OBE in 1923 and was living on the Malone Road, South Belfast when he died in 1982, aged 99

Tobin, then 29 and a Major-General in the new Free State Army, was a leader of the March 7, 1924 *Army Mutiny*, along with Col Charlie Dalton, 21, and a young veteran of Collins assassination Squad, and both were among those Army Officers dismissed by the Government in March, 1924. Liam Devlin's Bar at 70 Parnell Street, at the junction with Moore Street, a *safehouse* and favored haunt of Collins and Tobin in 1920-21, and later known as Conways, was surrounded by 2 truck-loads of troops on March, 18, 1924 when 40 armed *Army Mutiny* conspirators gathered there - Tobin and Dalton, familiar with the area, escaped. In Nov 1923, 60 Army Officers had been dismissed. The Govt disbanding of 37,000 of the large 55,000-strong Army mobilized to win the Civil War led to mutiny, as did suspicions about alleged preference for the 50% of the 3,500 Officers who were ex-British Army, and concern about accepting the Border with Ulster. Many Army Officers had been in the secret IRB [ Irish Republican Brotherhood ], founded in 1867, whose 7-member *Military Committee* was behind the April 1916 Easter Rising, and whose President from 1917 was Michael Collins. It infiltrated and came to dominate the GAA, the Gaelic League and the National Volunteers, with the founding moderate Presidents of both the GAA [ Maurice Davin from Carrick-on-Suir ] and the League [ Douglas Hyde from county Roscommon ] both being ousted. The final failed conspiracy, by 1 faction in 1924, was the end of military conspiracy in the new Irish State, and a vital victory for democracy . Tobin later joined De Valera's new Fianna Fail Party, which he founded on May 16, 1926 when his proposal in Sinn Fein to allow their elected members to take their seats as TDs in Leinster House, had narrowly failed to get the necessary 2/3rds majority at their March 1926 Ard Fheis [ delegate conference ]. FF won 26.1% of the votes and 44 seats in the June 1927 General Election, while the Abstentionist Sinn Fein rump was rightly marginalized with only 3.6% of votes and 5 seats. FF took their seats as TDs in August, 1927, and further increased their support in the Sept 1927 General Election, with 35.2% of votes and 57 seats. In 1932 it formed the Government. After WW II Tobin became Superintendent of the Houses of Parliament [ a post traditionally filled by ex-Officers ]. He died in 1963, aged 68.

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Daniel McLoughlin, Sgt-RIC's Timeline

1863
1863
1891
1891
Age 28
County Leix, Leinster, Ireland
1892
July 17, 1892
Age 29
Kilkenny, Leinster, Ireland
1895
October 5, 1895
Age 32
Kilkenny, Leinster, UK of GB and Ireland
1895
Age 32
Kilkenny, Leinster, Ireland
1898
1898
Age 35
Kilkenny, Leinster, Ireland
1902
1902
Age 39
Kilkenny, Leinster, Ireland
1904
1904
Age 41
Mullinavat, South Kilkenny, Leinster, Ireland
1909
1909
Age 46
Kilkenny, Leinster, Ireland