David Demarest, I

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David Demarest (des Marets), I

Also Known As: "David /Des Marets", "David Demarest"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Beauchamp, Picardy, France
Death: Died in New Milford, Bergen, New Jersey, USA
Place of Burial: New Bridge, Bergen Co. Kindechemak, NJ
Immediate Family:

Son of Jean des Marets; Marguerite Des Marets and Marguerite Demarest
Husband of Marie Demarest (Sohier); Marie Demarest and Rachel Clauss
Father of Jean Desmarets; Marie Desmarets; David Desmarets; Jan Demarest; David Demarest, II and 7 others
Brother of NN Desmarets

Occupation: David founded the French Patent in NJ
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About David Demarest, I

In 1886, David D. Demarest published a speech entitled Huguenots On The Hackensack, drawing attention to the important historical role played by David desMarets in the settlement of modern-day Manhattan and Bergen County, New Jersey. Drawing strongly on Riker's Harlem, this document is significant today for two primary reasons: it was the first document to claim that David desMarets was born in 1620 in a town called Beauchamps in what is today northern France, and it was the first document to publish what purports to be a transcription of the record of David's marriage to Marie Sohier. In all other respects, this document has been superceded by the work of more recent historians.

Notes for David Des Marets: "David Des Marets was a member of a distinguished family from the province of Picardy, France; descended from Baudoin, Seigneur des Marets, 1080 and also from his son Baudoin des Marets, "who made over to the Abbey of Mount St. Andre in 1190 several heritages situated in the Seigneury des Marets". The family seat was at Menil-le-Cressons and they were allied to the Cressons of Burgundy. A Huguenot, he fled with his parents to Sluis, Zealand, Holland c1635; was living in Leyden in 1640; removed to Mannheim, Germany. He became an Elder in the French Church at Mannheim on the Rhine and four of his children were baptised there. When the Palantine was threatened by neighbouring Catholic princes, they escaped by the Rhine river to Amsterdam. He left from Amsterdam in the "Bearer" to New Amstel on the Delaware River and made a return trip to Holland in 1657. He left from Amsterdam with wife and four children in the "Bonte Koe" (Bontica - Spotted Cow) to New Amsterdam in 1663. He commanded a company of the New Haarlem militia in the second Esopus War, 1663; was a delegate from Staten Island to the General Assembly (Landtag) of the New Netherlands and magistrate for Staten Island, 1664; one of the founders of New Haarlem and purchased land there in 1665; overseer, 1667--8, 1671-2; "schepen (alderman)", 1673; magistrate, 1673, 75; large landowner. He bought several thousand acres from the Tappon Indians in 1677 and founded the French Church at Kinderkameek. " Source: Compendium of American Genealogies "David des Marets left France with his family and lived 12 years in the Netherlands then went to the US; spent two years on Staten Island where he was connected with the Huguenot church, (the church contains a tablet in his memory), then 12 years in Haarlem, connected with the Dutch church. In 1677 he secured from the Indians and Sir George Carteret the French Patent of the Hackensack. In 1678 he came accompanied by seven adults of his own name; a few other French families--La Rou, de Viaux, DuRie. " Source: Holland Society of New York compiled genealog


IMMIGRATION: 1663, Bontecou to New Amsterdam
Married Marie Sohier at the French Church Middleburg, Zeeland, 7/24/1643.

They migrated to America sailing from Holland April 16,1663

They had 8 children.


David Des Marets was also known as David Demarest. He was also known as David De Maree. David Des Marets was born in 1620 at near, Amiens, Beauchamps, Picardie, France. David Des Marets was born in 1620 at Beauchamps, Chambray, France. David Des Marets was born in 1620 at Beauchamps, near Amiens, Cambray, France. He resided at at Middleburg, Island of Walcheren, Netherlands, in 1642; joined a colony of Belgian and French refugees. He a member of the Protistant church, Middleburg, island of Walcheren, Netherlands at Protistant Church, Middleburg, Island of Walcheren, Netherlands, 1643. Marriage banns for David Des Marets and Marie Sohier were published on 4 July 1643. Marriage banns for David Des Marets and Marie Sohier were published on 19 July 1643. David Des Marets married Marie Sohier, daughter of Francois Sohier and Margrieta (Unknown), on 29 July 1643 at Walloon Church, Middleburg, Zeeland, Netherlands. David Des Marets and Marie Sohier resided at at German Palatinate, Mannheim on the Rhine, Germany, in 1651. David Des Marets Elder, French Church, Manheim, Germany at French Church, Manheim, Palatinate, Germany, circa 1652. On 16 April 1663 Sailed from Amsterdam, Netherlads of Landed in New Netherlands aboard the ship Bontekoe (The Spotted Cow). He resided at at Huguenot Village, Staten Island, Richmond County, New York, between 1664 and 1668. In the group were about 90 persons, men, women, and children, the French comprising a third of the number. On the passenger list were the names "David deMaire from Picardie, his wife ad four children, the ages of the children being eighteen, eleven, six and one years respectively. Each adult was charged 39 flrins por passage and board, children of ten years and under (except infants) half price. The bill for the desMarets family was 175 florins, 10 stivers, and exhobitant amount for that period. He was also known as David D'Amerex as he was known on Staten Island. He was was appointed Senior Commisary of the local courd opened on Staten Island by order of the Director General and Council of New Netherland. He resided at at Harlem, New York County, New York, in 1669. He left a will on 26 August 1689. He died on 16 October 1693 at New Mllford, Bergen County, New Jersey. He was buried circa 18 October 1693 at New Bridge, Kindachemack, Bergen County, New Jersey. He died on 16 October 1695 at New Milford, Bergen County, New Jersey. He died in 1697 at New Milford, Bergen County, New Jersey. He was buried at New Milford, Bergen County, New Jersey. His estate was proved on 30 July 1697.
In 1886, David D. Demarest published a speech entitled Huguenots On The Hackensack, drawing attention to the important historical role played by David desMarets in the settlement of modern-day Manhattan and Bergen County, New Jersey. Drawing strongly on Riker's Harlem, this document is significant today for two primary reasons: it was the first document to claim that David desMarets was born in 1620 in a town called Beauchamps in what is today northern France, and it was the first document to publish what purports to be a transcription of the record of David's marriage to Marie Sohier. In all other respects, this document has been superceded by the work of more recent historians.

Notes for David Des Marets: "David Des Marets was a member of a distinguished family from the province of Picardy, France; descended from Baudoin, Seigneur des Marets, 1080 and also from his son Baudoin des Marets, "who made over to the Abbey of Mount St. Andre in 1190 several heritages situated in the Seigneury des Marets". The family seat was at Menil-le-Cressons and they were allied to the Cressons of Burgundy. A Huguenot, he fled with his parents to Sluis, Zealand, Holland c1635; was living in Leyden in 1640; removed to Mannheim, Germany. He became an Elder in the French Church at Mannheim on the Rhine and four of his children were baptised there. When the Palantine was threatened by neighbouring Catholic princes, they escaped by the Rhine river to Amsterdam. He left from Amsterdam in the "Bearer" to New Amstel on the Delaware River and made a return trip to Holland in 1657. He left from Amsterdam with wife and four children in the "Bonte Koe" (Bontica - Spotted Cow) to New Amsterdam in 1663. He commanded a company of the New Haarlem militia in the second Esopus War, 1663; was a delegate from Staten Island to the General Assembly (Landtag) of the New Netherlands and magistrate for Staten Island, 1664; one of the founders of New Haarlem and purchased land there in 1665; overseer, 1667--8, 1671-2; "schepen (alderman)", 1673; magistrate, 1673, 75; large landowner. He bought several thousand acres from the Tappon Indians in 1677 and founded the French Church at Kinderkameek. " Source: Compendium of American Genealogies "David des Marets left France with his family and lived 12 years in the Netherlands then went to the US; spent two years on Staten Island where he was connected with the Huguenot church, (the church contains a tablet in his memory), then 12 years in Haarlem, connected with the Dutch church. In 1677 he secured from the Indians and Sir George Carteret the French Patent of the Hackensack. In 1678 he came accompanied by seven adults of his own name; a few other French families--La Rou, de Viaux, DuRie. " Source: Holland Society of New York compiled genealog -------------------- IMMIGRATION: 1663, Bontecou to New Amsterdam -------------------- Married Marie Sohier at the French Church Middleburg, Zeeland, 7/24/1643.

They migrated to America sailing from Holland April 16,1663

They had 8 children. -------------------- David Des Marets was also known as David Demarest. He was also known as David De Maree. David Des Marets was born in 1620 at near, Amiens, Beauchamps, Picardie, France. David Des Marets was born in 1620 at Beauchamps, Chambray, France. David Des Marets was born in 1620 at Beauchamps, near Amiens, Cambray, France. He resided at at Middleburg, Island of Walcheren, Netherlands, in 1642; joined a colony of Belgian and French refugees. He a member of the Protistant church, Middleburg, island of Walcheren, Netherlands at Protistant Church, Middleburg, Island of Walcheren, Netherlands, 1643. Marriage banns for David Des Marets and Marie Sohier were published on 4 July 1643. Marriage banns for David Des Marets and Marie Sohier were published on 19 July 1643. David Des Marets married Marie Sohier, daughter of Francois Sohier and Margrieta (Unknown), on 29 July 1643 at Walloon Church, Middleburg, Zeeland, Netherlands. David Des Marets and Marie Sohier resided at at German Palatinate, Mannheim on the Rhine, Germany, in 1651. David Des Marets Elder, French Church, Manheim, Germany at French Church, Manheim, Palatinate, Germany, circa 1652. On 16 April 1663 Sailed from Amsterdam, Netherlads of Landed in New Netherlands aboard the ship Bontekoe (The Spotted Cow). He resided at at Huguenot Village, Staten Island, Richmond County, New York, between 1664 and 1668. In the group were about 90 persons, men, women, and children, the French comprising a third of the number. On the passenger list were the names "David deMaire from Picardie, his wife ad four children, the ages of the children being eighteen, eleven, six and one years respectively. Each adult was charged 39 flrins por passage and board, children of ten years and under (except infants) half price. The bill for the desMarets family was 175 florins, 10 stivers, and exhobitant amount for that period. He was also known as David D'Amerex as he was known on Staten Island. He was was appointed Senior Commisary of the local courd opened on Staten Island by order of the Director General and Council of New Netherland. He resided at at Harlem, New York County, New York, in 1669. He left a will on 26 August 1689. He died on 16 October 1693 at New Mllford, Bergen County, New Jersey. He was buried circa 18 October 1693 at New Bridge, Kindachemack, Bergen County, New Jersey. He died on 16 October 1695 at New Milford, Bergen County, New Jersey. He died in 1697 at New Milford, Bergen County, New Jersey. He was buried at New Milford, Bergen County, New Jersey. His estate was proved on 30 July 1697.

PDF] The de Marest / des Marets problem by Laurence ... - The Desmarets

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=6348605 Descendants of @@@@David Demarest Generation No. 1 1. @@@@David2 Demarest (@@@@Jean1) (Source: Mary A Demarest and William H S Demarest, The Demarest Family: David Des Marest of the French Patent on the Hackensack and his Decendants, New Brunswick, N J 1938, #1, pgs 13 - 14.) was born Dec 1620 in Beauchamp, Picardy, France, and died 16 Oct 1695 in New Milford, Bergen, NJ. He married @@@@Marie Sohier 24 Jul 1643 in Walloon Church, Middleburg, Walcheren Island, Zeeland, daughter of @@@@Francois Sohier and @@@@Margrietta de Herville. She was born 1620 in Nieppe, Hainault, France, and died 1677 in Bergen Co NJ. Notes for @@@@David Demarest: "David des Marets left France with his family and lived 12 years in the Netherlands then went to the US; spent two years on Staten island where he was connected with the Huguenot church (apparently, the church contains a tablet to his memory), then 12 years in Haarlem, connected with the Dutch church. In 1677 he secured from the Indians and Sir George Carteret the French Patent of the Hackensack. In 1678 he came accompanied by seven adults of his own name; a few other French families -- La Rou, de Via ux, Du Rie. " Source: Holland Society of New York compiled genealogy. "David des Marets was a member of an ancient and distinguished family from the province of Picardy, France; descended from Baudoin, Seigneur des Marets, 1080 and also from his son Baudoin des Marets, "who made over to the Abbey of Mount St Andre in 1190 several heritages situated in the Seigneury des Marets". The family seat was at Menil-le-Cressons and they were allied to the Cressons of Burgundy. "A Huguenot, he fled to Sluis, Zeeland, Holland ca. 1635; was living in Leyden in 1640; removed to Mannheim, Germany. He became an Elder in the French Church at Mannheim on the Rhine and four of his children were baptized there. When the Palantine was threatened by neighboring Catholic princes, they escaped by the Rhine River to Amsterdam. He left from Amsterdam in the "Beaver" to New Amstel on the Delaware River and made a return tripto Holland in 1657 . He left from Amsterdam with wife and four children in the"Bonte Koe" (Spotted Cow) to Neuw Amsterdam (New York) in 1663. He commanded a company of the New Haarlem militia in the second Esopus War, 1663; was a delegate from Staten Island to the General Assembly ( Landtag) of the New Netherlands and magistrate for Staten Island, 1664; one of the founders of New Haarlem and purchased land therein 1665; overseer, 1667--8, 1671-2; "schepen (alderman)",1673; magistrate, 1673, 75; large landowner. He bought several thousand acres from the Tappon Indians in 1677 and founded the French Church at Kinderkameek. " Source: Compendium of American Genealogies. NARRATIVE by Mabel Boyce Spell, desc. "Our common ancestor was David des Marets, born in 1620 at Beauchamps, ne ar Amiens, in the district of Cambray, France. He was the son of Jean and Margrieta de Herville des Marets. "David with his parents was forced to flee from France because of their Protestant religion. They moved, in 1642, to Middleburg, on the island of Walcheren off the west coast of Holland, where they joined a colony of Belgian and French refugees. A Protestant Church had been firmly established here, and the names of Jean des Marets and family appeared as members in 1643. In this Church David married Marie Sohier, whose family had taken refuge during the first Walloon migration. The term "Walloon" was used to refer to Belgian Protestants, while the term "Huguenot" denoted French background. Due to the frequently shifting boundary lines between France and Belgium, an exact date must be known in order to determine nationalities, but most of the families here were French. "Marie Sohier was the daughter of Francois and Margrieta, and is believed to have been the grand- daughter of David Sohier, a native on Mons in Hainault, who married Feb. 12, 1585 at Amsterdam, Anne Crommelin from Donay. The Sohier family also originated from the land of Cambray and bore 'in gules a fine pointed star, argent." In the 16th and 17th centuries a branch of this family had memberships in the French Reformed Church in London, England. "The marriage of David desMarets and Marie Sohier is thus recorded: '1643, 4 Juillet, Assiste de Jean Marets et Francois Sohier, MargueritedeHerv ille et Marguerite Sohier; David desMarets, fils de Jean, natif de Beauchamps et Marie Sohier, fille de Francois, natif de Nieppe, et le 19 Juille t. Marie le 29 juliet.' These dates show first banns July 4, second banns July 19, marriage July 29, 1643." 1 Maria was the first burial in what is now called the French Burying Grounds, New Milford, Bergen County, NJ. Cemetery has a historical marker. More About @@@@David Demarest and @@@@Marie Sohier: Marriage: 24 Jul 1643, Walloon Church, Middleburg, Walcheren Island, Zeeland Children of @@@@David Demarest and @@@@Marie Sohier are: 2 3 4 + 5 + 6 7 8 9 i. Jean3 Demarest (Source: Mary A Demarest and William H S Demarest, The Demarest Family: David Des Marest of the French Patent on the Hackensack and his Decendants, New Brunswick, N J 1938, #2, pgs 14 - 15.), born Apr 1645 in Middleburg, Holland; died 16 Oct 1719 in Bergen NJ. He married Jacomina DeRuine; born 09 Sep 1668 in Provinice of Hainault, France; died Bef. 1692. ii. Marie Demarest, born Oct 1646 in Middleburg, Holland; died 1650 in Middleburg, Holland. Notes for Marie Demarest: Not Listed in The Demaest Family More About Marie Demarest: Baptism: 21 Oct 1646, Walloon Church Middleburg, Zeeland iii. David D Demarest (Source: Mary A Demarest and William H S Demarest, The Demarest Family: David Des Marest of the French Patent on the Hackensack and his Decendants, New Brunswick, N J 1938, #3, pg 13 - 14.), born Jun 1649 in Middleburg, Holland; died 1650 in Middleburg, Holland. More About David D Demarest: Baptism: 22 Jun 1649, Wallon Church Middlberg, Walcheren, Zeeland iv. @@@@David Jr Demarest, born 20 Dec 1651 in Mannheim Germany; died Aug 1691 in Begen, NJ. v. Samuel Demarest, born 05 Aug 1656 in Mannheim Germany; died 1728 in Bergen NJ. vi. Marie Demarest (Source: Mary A Demarest and William H S Demarest, The Demarest Family: David Des Marest of the French Patent on the Hackensack and his Decendants, New Brunswick, N J 1938, #6, pg 13.), born 27 Mar 1659 in Mannheim, Germany; died 1660 in Mannheim Germany. More About Marie Demarest: Baptism: 10 Apr 1659, French Church Mannheim, Germany vii. Marie Demarest (Source: Mary A Demarest and William H S Demarest, The Demarest Family: David Des Marest of the French Patent on the Hackensack and his Decendants, New Brunswick, N J 1938, #7, pg 17.), born 17 May 1662 in Mannheim, Germany; died Bef. 1689 in New Haarlem NY. viii. Daniel Demarest (Source: Mary A Demarest and William H S Demarest, The Demarest Family: David Des Marest of the French Patent on the Hackensack and his Decendants, New Brunswick, N J 1938, #8, pg 13.), born Jul 1666 in New Haarlem NY; died 08 Jan 1671/72 in New Haarlem NY. Notes for Daniel Demarest: First child born in the new world for the Demarests Babtised NYC Dutch Reform Church 7 Jul 1666


Born ‎20 Dec 1620 Beauchamps, near Amiens, Cambray, France, died ‎16 Oct 1695 New Milford, Bergen, New Jersey, USA‎, 74 years The family moved to Germany and in 1651 were living within the German Palatinate at Mannheim on the Rhine. French and Belgian Protestants from Holland and England were fleeing to this refuge, fearing a war between those two countries. They were drawn especially by assurances of protection and hope of religious freedom.

David desMarets and his associates had, by 1652, reorganized the French Church at Mannheim which had been inactive since 1623 due to a prolonged period of European wars. A church building was provided by the Elector Charles Lewis, son of Frederick V. Following the reorganization, David became an Elder and four of his children were baptized there: David, Dec. 24, 1651; Samuel, Aug. 10, 1656; Marie, Apr. 10, 1659; Marie, May 19, 1662. It has been established defineitely by official documents that both of the daughters died in infancy; one in Holland, the other in America. Many of the refugees then living in Mannheim later joined the New French Settlement in America, established at Harlem, north of New Amsterdam. Among these appear DeVeaux, LeConte, and VanOblinus, neighbors and friends of the desMarets family in both locations.
Soon the Palatinate was threatened with hostile invation by neighboring Catholic princes, and the desMarets, VanOblinus, and a number of other French families left Mannheim, sailed down the Rhine, and after a short stay in Amsterdam embarked for the New Netherlands on the ship Bontekoe (The Spotted Cow), skipper Jan Bergen. The date Apr. 16, 1663 may have been that of departure from Holland, or arrival in America. In the group were about 90 persons, men, women and children, the French comprising a third of the number. On the passenger list were the names "David deMaire from Picardie, his wife and four children, the ages of the children being eighteen, eleven, six , and one years respectively. Each adult was charged 39 florins for passage and board, children of ten years and under (except infants) half price. The bill for the desMarets family was 175 florins, 10 stivers, an exhorbitant amount for that period.
A voyage at that date was beset by many dangers. Piracy flourished upon the high seas, contageious diseases and ravages of fever were common. It often required some months for small vessels to make the crossing, and may of them were wrecked within sight of land, due to faulty maps and instruments.
The food consisted of a doled amount of salt meat (either pork or beef) with peas, beans or pudding. The portion for the week was measured and distributed each Monday morning. Passengers boiled their own food and the regulations provided "if at any time it shall happen that they are not willing the Kettle shall be boyled or by bad weather can not, in such case each passenger shall have 1 pound of cheese every such day." Children were allowed fruit, sugar, butter and extra rations, and for the ill a supply of brandy, sugar, figs, raisins, and sugar biscuits was carried on the voyage.
The desMarets family made the voyage safely and upon arrival settled first in a Huguenot village on Staten Island where they remained for two years before moving to Harlem where the VanOblinus family had gone immediately upon reaching New Amsterdam.
David D'Amerex, as he was known on Staten Island, soon was appointed Senior Commisary of the local court opened on Staten Island by order of the Director General and Council of New Netherland. The appointment was as follows;
"Ordinance of the Director General and Council of New Netherland erecting a Court of Justice on Staten Island, Passed 28 January 1664. The Director General and Council of New Netherland to all those who shall see these Presents or hear them read, Greetings, make known that they for public good, for the greater advancement and increase of the recently begun Village of Staten Island and for the more convenient administration fo Justice have considered it necessary to establish in the aforenamed commissaries to wit: David D'Amerex, Pierre Billiou, and Walraven Lutten before whom in the first instance shall be brought all Questions, Actions, and Differences arising in said Village between Lord and Vassal, Master and Servant, Man, Mistress and Maid, Neighbor and Neighbor, Burger (Buyer-?) and Seller, Lessor and Lessee, Master and Worman, and other such like; Item: all Criminal Actions, consisting of Deeds, Threats, Fighting or Wounding, whether moved or instituted by party or by the Senior Commissary who until further order shall represent the Sheriff in the place. And said Connissaries (spelling in book) shall do justice to the best of their knowledge between parties appearing before them, and may decree provision of Deposit, Dismissal or Definite comdemnation as the Circumstance of the case shall authorize. But any party felling aggrieved may appeal to the Director General and Council of New Netherland, according to the custom here, from all judgements exceeding fifty guilders pronounced by said Commissaries. And said Commissaries are hereby specially commissioned and authorized to enact proper ordinances, that the Cornfields and Gardens be carefully fenced and kept enclosed, and the broken fences properly repaired. They hereby command all Inhabitants of the aforesaid Village who already are there, or who will hereafter come thither to respect and acknowledge the aforesaid Commissaries for such as there are hereby qualified and all that, until it be otherwise ordained by the Director General and Council aforesaid."
Staten Island at that time was sparsely settled and open to constant danger from Indian attacks, as well as threats of English invasion. Due to these conditions, a meeting of delegates was held first at Flushing, Long Island, and on April 10, 1664, at New Amsterdam, where Staten Island was represented by David desMarets and Pierre Billiou, a French refugee of unusual ability, who took an important part in the affairs of the Colony.
At that period, according to a report made by Governor Stuyvesant, the only fortification was a small wooden block-house about 18 x 20 ft. square, in the center of the houses of the village, which were lightly constructed of straw and clap-board. The garrison consisted of six old soldiers, unfit to accompany the others against Indians.
This dangerous condition was protested in vain by David desMarets and Pierre Billiou , and it probably was the unsettled condition and the constant threat of danger on Staten Island that caused the family to move to Harlem, on Manhattan Island, which they did, in 1665. It is known that one of the first efforts of David desMarets while living on Staten Island was to organize a French Protestant Church, and the present Huguenot Church, at Huguenot Park, contains a tablet to his memory with the inscription:
"In memory of David Demarest
Staten Island 1663
Harlem 1665
The Hackensack 1667
Delegate from Staten Island to the
Provincial Assembly of New Netherland 1664
Founder of the Huguenot Colony on the Hackensack"
Immediately after the arrival of the family in Harlem, arrangements were completed for the purchase of a village property, as well as farm lands, "including the crops thereon." The village had been in existence only a short time. The first patent granted the inhabitants by Governor Nicolls in May, 1666 was confirmed and extended Oct. 11, 1666, while the Dongan patent of March 7, 1686 confirmed the last patent of Governor Nicolls. The first free-holders numbered only five, Joost Oblinus being one of the original patentees. The arrangement was for twenty-five families to be established within three years time, and there was to be a ferry across the river to Westchester. A rowboat with two oars conveyed the passengers and horses, while mules and cattle had to swim behind the boat. The ferry, completed in 1669, was at the sight of the present First Avenue and 125th St., and was called "From the Island to the Main." The population, consisting of Belgians, French, Dutch, Danes, Swedes and Germans found it difficult to live in harmony, and many quarrels arose. At this time Harlem was laid out in lots of narrow adjoining strips, the houses all being at the same end, with the fields in the rear, planted with different types of grain or produce in adjacent plots, so that the men might be near together while working, to guard against surprise attacks by the Indians. One section was to be exempt from any "after planting of buck-wheat, pumpkins, turnips, or any summer fruits that the cattle of the village after the crop was off the field might pasture there." The other section was to be sown and planted with summer fruits and this arrangement was to alternate from year to year. The village was surrounded by a stockade and entered thru a gate.
David desMarets bought his land from John Montagne, and on October 9, 1666 Montagne brought suit against him, claiming payments had not been made according to the contract terms. The defense claimed an "arrest of money in another connection" of which Montagne professed ignorance, and David was ordered by the local court to give up the land with costs. He was dissatisfied with this decision and appealed within three days to the higher court at New Amsterdam. The higher court reviewed the case, reversed the decision of the lower court as unjust, and ruled that the sale of the property should stand. David was to repossess the land, and pay the second installment within fourteen days, according to contract. Three months later he was permitted to extend his lot "out the strand as far as possible."
Daniel, the only child born to this family in this country, was baptized at "New Harlem" July 7, 1666. The baptism is recorded in the 'Dutch Reformed Church at New York. The witness was Walraven Lutten, who had served as one of the commissaries with David on Staten Island.
From the first years of his residence there, David desMarets took and active interest in the affairs of Harlem, and joined in plans to improve the village. Fortunately, the original Town Records of Harlem have been preserved. An accurate translation of the original Dutch was made two hundred years later. The records are contained in four books entitled:
"Register en Protocol
Gebouden ten Durpe
Nieuw Haerlem
Door
Jan la Montagne
David desMarets was appointed to his first public office in Harlem, the position of Overseer, on August 6, 1667. He was reappointed to the same office Octoober 2, 1668, February 7, 1671, and again on Dec. 3, 1672. He was made schepen (magistrate) Aug. 23, 1673 and Constable Dec.8, 1674. A real tragedy befell the family in January 1672. Their youngest son, Daniel, was killed accidentally when five years of age thru the carelessness of a child of Joost Oblinus. The nine or ten year old boy was riding a horse, drawing a sleigh, and rode over Daniel and killed him. 
view all 24

David Demarest, I's Timeline

1620
1620
Beauchamp, Picardy, France
1620
Beauchamp, , , France
1645
1645
Age 25
Middelburg, Zeeland, Republiek der Zeven Verenigde Nederlanden
1646
October 21, 1646
Age 26
Isle of Wlachern, Zeeland, Nederlands

Baptized October 31, 1646

1647
1647
Age 27
1649
June 1649
Age 29
Zeeland, Holland
1651
December 20, 1651
Age 31
Mannheim
December 20, 1651
Age 31
Mannheim, Palatinate, Germany
1656
August 5, 1656
Age 36
Mannheim, Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg, Germany