Dorothy May Widmerpool Frobisher Savile

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Dorothy May Widmerpool Frobisher Savile (Wentworth)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Nettlestead, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom
Death: January 03, 1601 (67-68)
Gwynedd, Wales, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Thomas Wentworth, 6th Lord le Despenser, 1st Lord Wentworth and Margaret Wentworth
Wife of Paul Withypole; Sir Martin Frobisher and Sir John Savile, MP, of Methley
Mother of Katherine Cholmeley
Sister of Anne Poley; Cecily Wingfield; Thomas Wentworth, 2nd Baron Wentworth of Nettlestead; Mary Cavendish; Margaret "Margery" Wentworth and 10 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Dorothy May Widmerpool Frobisher Savile

  • Dorothy Wentworth1,2
  • F, #62528, b. circa 1540, d. 3 January 1601
  • Father Sir Thomas Wentworth, 6th Lord le Despenser, 1st Lord Wentworth3,2 b. c 1500, d. 3 Mar 1551
  • Mother Margaret Fortescue2 b. c 1502, d. bt 23 Apr 1546 - 12 May 1551
  • Dorothy Wentworth was born circa 1540 at of Nettlestead, Yorkshire, England.4 She married Sir John Savile, Baron of the Exchequer, Burgess of Newton, Chief Justice of the County Palatine of Lancaster, son of Henry Savile, Esq. and Elizabeth Ramsden, circa 1590 at of Nettlestead, Suffolk, England.2 Dorothy Wentworth died on 3 January 1601 at of Methley, Yorkshire, England.4
  • Family Sir John Savile, Baron of the Exchequer, Burgess of Newton, Chief Justice of the County Palatine of Lancaster b. c 1555, d. 2 Feb 1607
  • Citations
  • [S11576] A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies of England, Ireland, and Scotland, by John Burke, Esq. and John Bernard Burke, Esq., p. 474.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 381.
  • [S147] Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage, Baronetage, and Knightage, 1938 ed., by Sir Bernard Burke, p., 1723.
  • [S61] Unknown author, Family Group Sheets, Family History Archives, SLC.
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p2081.htm#i62528

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  • Dorothy Wentworth1
  • F, #525389
  • Last Edited=11 Feb 2012
  • Consanguinity Index=0.04%
  • Dorothy Wentworth is the daughter of Thomas Wentworth, 1st Lord Wentworth and Margaret Fortescue.1 She married, thirdly, Sir John Savile, son of Henry Savile and Elizabeth Ramsden.1 She married, firstly, Sir Paul Widmerpool.1 She married, secondly, Sir Martin Frobisher.1
  • Her married name became Frobisher.1 Her married name became Savile. Her married name became Widmerpool.1
  • Citations
  • [S37] BP2003 volume 2, page 2674. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
  • From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p52539.htm#i525389

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  • Dorothy WENTWORTH
  • Born: 1543, Nettlestead, Suffolk, England
  • Died: 3 Jan 1601
  • Father: Thomas WENTWORTH (1° B. Wentworth of Nettlestead)
  • Mother: Margaret FORTESCUE (B. Wentworth of Nettlestead)
  • Married 1: William WIDMERPOOLE (Sir) (d. 1579)
  • Married 2: Martin FROBISHER (Sir) (See his Biography) ABT 1564 / 1591, Scrooby, Nottingham, England
  • ¿Married 3: John SAVILE (Sir)?
  • From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/WENTWORTH.htm#Dorothy WENTWORTH2

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  • Sir Martin Frobisher (c. 1535 or 1539 – 15 November 1594[1]) was an English seaman and privateer (licenced pirate) who made three voyages to the New World to look for the Northwest Passage. All landed in northeastern Canada, around today's Resolution Island and Frobisher Bay.[2] On his second voyage, Frobisher found what he thought was gold ore and carried 200 tons of it home on three ships, where initial assaying determined it to be worth a profit of £5.2 per ton. Encouraged, Frobisher returned to Canada with an even larger fleet and dug several mines around Frobisher Bay. He carted 1,350 tons of the ore back where, after years of smelting, it was realised that both that batch of ore and the earlier one he had taken were worthless iron pyrite. As an English privateer/pirate, he collected riches from French ships. He was later knighted for his service in repelling the Spanish Armada in 1588.
  • Frobisher was born c. 1535, the son of merchant Bernard Frobisher of Altofts, Yorkshire. He was raised in London by a relative, Sir John York.[3]
  • He first went to sea as a cabin boy in 1544. In 1554 he was captured by the Portuguese and spent some time in captivity, after which he set up in business as a merchant in Morocco. He later became a pirate, operating from a port in southern Ireland.[4]
  • .... etc.
  • In 1591, he visited his native Altofts, and there married his second wife and sailed with her, Dorothy Wentworth (1543 – 3 January 1601), a daughter of Thomas, 1st Baron Wentworth, becoming at the same time a landed proprietor in Yorkshire and Notts. He found, however, little leisure for a country life, and the following year took charge of the fleet fitted out by Sir Walter Raleigh to the Azores, capturing a rich prize the Madre de Deus.
  • In November 1594, he was engaged with a squadron in the siege and relief of Brest, where he received a gunshot wound during the Siege of Fort Crozon,[15] a Spanish-held fortress. Poor medical treatment resulted in his death days later at Plymouth on 15 November. His soft organs were buried at St Andrew's Church, Plymouth on 22 November. His body was then taken to London and buried at St Giles-without-Cripplegate, Fore Street.[16]
  • .... etc.
  • From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Frobisher

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  • Sir John Savile (1546–1607) was an English lawyer and judge.
  • He was the eldest son of Henry Savile of Bradley, North Yorkshire, by his wife Elizabeth, only daughter of Robert Ramsden; Sir Henry Savile and Thomas Savile were younger brothers. He matriculated at Brasenose College, Oxford, in 1561, but did not graduate.[1] To avoid the plague in 1563, he remained in Bradley, where he studied law books on his own.[2]
  • Savile entered the Middle Temple, where he was autumn reader in 1586. In 1572 he was elected member of parliament for Newton, Lancashire.[1] His candidacy has been attributed to friendship with William Fleetwood; another friend and parliamentarian was Henry Gates.[2]
  • Savile practised in the exchequer court, and in 1594 he was made serjeant-at-law. In 1598 he became baron of the exchequer on Lord Burghley's recommendation. In 1599 he was placed on a commission for suppressing heresy. He was knighted by James I on 3 July 1603, and in 1604 was made chief justice of the county palatine of Lancaster.[1]
  • In November 1606 Savile was one of the barons of the exchequer who decided that the king could by royal prerogative levy impositions on imports and exports.[1] He had consistently supported the common law courts against the prerogative in his earlier judicial career, however.[2] He died on 2 February 1606–7, and was buried in St. Dunstan's-in-the-West, London; his heart was taken to Methley in Yorkshire, in the church of which a monument, with an inscription, was erected to his memory. Like other members of his family, Savile was a friend of William Camden, whom he entertained at Bradley in August 1599. He was also an original member of the College of Antiquaries.[1]
  • The only published work by Savile is the collection of Reports of cases tried in the exchequer court, edited (1675) by John Robertson.[1]
  • Savile was four times married:[1]
  • 1. to Jane, daughter of Richard Garth of Morden, Surrey, by whom he had issue a son Henry, and two daughters;
  • 2. to Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Wentworth of North Elmsall, Yorkshire, by whom he had issue John (died 1651), who was heir to his half-brother Henry, and great-grandfather of John Savile, 1st Earl of Mexborough (1720–1778);
  • 3. to Dorothy, daughter of Thomas Wentworth, 1st Baron Wentworth (died 1551), and widow of Sir W. Widmerpoole and then of Sir Martin Frobisher; and
  • 4. to Margery, daughter of Ambrose Peake, and widow of Sir Jerome Weston.
  • By his last two wives, Savile had no issue.[1]
  • From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Savile_(died_1607)

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  • SAVILE, John I (1546-1607), of Bradley and Methley, Yorks.
  • b. 26 Mar. 1546, 1st s. of Henry Savile of Bradley, and bro. of Henry Savile II. educ. Brasenose, Oxf. 1561, ?BA 1563; Clement’s Inn 1564; M. Temple 1565, called 1573, bencher and Autumn reader 1586, serjeant-at-law 1594. m. (1) 1575, Jane, da. of Richard Garth of Morden, Surr., 1s. 2da.; (2) 1587, Elizabeth, da. of Thomas Wentworth of Elmsall, wid. of Richard Tempest of Bowling, 1s. 2da.; (3,) 1594, Dorothy, da. of Thomas Wentworth†, 1st Baron Wentworth of Nettlestead, wid. of Paul Wythypole of Ipswich, Suff. and of Sir Martin Frobisher; (4) 1603, Margery, da. of Ambrose Peake of London, wid. of Sir Jerome Weston of Essex and of one Thwaites of London. suc. fa. 1566. Kntd. 1603.1
  • From: http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1558-1603/member/savile-john-i-1546-1607

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  • Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 20
  • Frobisher, Martin by Charles Henry Coote
  • FROBISHER, Sir MARTIN (1535?–1594), navigator, belonged to a family of Welsh origin, which removed from Chirk in Denbighshire, and settled at Altofts in the parish of Normanton, in the West Riding of Yorkshire, in the middle of the fourteenth century. His father, Bernard Frobisher, of Altofts, died during his infancy, and he was sent to London, and placed under the care of Sir John York, a kinsman, who perceiving the boy to be of great spirit, courage, and hardiness of body, sent him on his first voyage to Guinea in the autumn of 1554. During the following ten years he doubtless acquired his knowledge of seamanship in the yearly expeditions which were despatched by Sir John Lock and his brother, Thomas Lock, either to the northern shores of Africa or the Levant. The earliest direct notice of Frobisher appears to be an account of two examinations before Dr. Lewis on 30 May and 11 June 1566, ‘on suspicion of his having fitted out a vessel as a pirate’ (State Papers, Dom. series, xl. 7). .... etc.
  • In an undated letter, written between 1576 and 1578, probably before the termination of his third voyage, his first wife, Isabel, whom he married 30 May 1559, wrote to Walsingham that whereas her former husband, Thomas Rickard of Snaith, left her with ample portions for herself and all her children, her present husband, ‘whom God forgive,’ had spent everything, and ‘put them to the wide world to shift,’ she and her children were starving at Hampstead, and begged Walsingham to help her in recovering a debt of 4l. due to her husband, and so to keep them from starving until Captain Frobisher's return (Fox Bourne, i. 177).
  • .... etc.
  • .... In the summer of 1591 Frobisher was residing at Whitwood in Yorkshire, when he married his second wife, Dorothy, widow of Sir W. Widmerpoole, daughter of Lord Wentworth. In the following May he was sent by Sir W. Raleigh in the Garland ‘to annoy the Spanish fleet’ off the coast of Spain .... etc.
  • .... In the last fight, when the garrison surrendered and the fort was reduced to ashes, Frobisher was wounded in the hip while leading his men on shore; this ultimately led to his death through unskilful surgery (Lediard, p. 308). He died soon after reaching Plymouth, where his entrails were buried in the church of St. Andrew, while his other remains were interred in St. Giles's, Cripplegate, 14 Jan. 1595 (Jones, p. 335). An impartial account of Frobisher is still a desideratum, as recent attempts to exalt his fame at the expense of Drake and Hawkins have only served to obscure it. Although a gentleman by birth, Frobisher was no scholar, as his letters prove (cf. ib. p. 284). Frobisher from his youth was trained in a rough school, whose highest ideal was courage, tempered by piracy, which was either patronised or reprobated according to its value or inconvenience to the state.
  • .... etc.
  • From: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Frobisher,_Martin_(DNB00)
  • https://archive.org/stream/dictionaryofnati20stepuoft#page/281/mode/1up to https://archive.org/stream/dictionaryofnati20stepuoft#page/284/mode/1up

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  • Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 50
  • Savile, John (1545-1607) by Albert Frederick Pollard
  • SAVILE, Sir JOHN (1545–1607), judge, born in 1545, was the eldest son of Henry Savile of Bradley, Yorkshire, by his wife Elizabeth, only daughter of Robert Ramsden. Sir Henry Savile (1549–1622) [q. v.], provost of Eton, was a younger brother. He must be distinguished from John Savile, first baron Savile of Pontefract [q. v.] John matriculated from Brasenose College, Oxford, in 1561, but did not graduate, and entered the Middle Temple, where he was autumn reader in 1586. In 1572 he was elected member of parliament for Newton, Lancashire. He practised in the exchequer court, and in 1594 he was made serjeant-at-law. In 1598 he became baron of the exchequer on Burghley's recommendation. In 1599 he was placed on a commission for suppressing heresy. He was knighted by James I on 3 July 1603, and in 1604 was made chief justice of the county palatine of Lancaster. In November 1606 he was one of the barons of the exchequer who decided that the king was ‘entitled by his sole prerogative to levy impositions upon imports and exports,’ a decision that has been received by posterity with universal disfavour (Gardiner, ii. 6). Savile died on 2 Feb. 1606–7, and was buried in the church of St. Dunstan's-in-the-West, London; his heart was conveyed to Methley in Yorkshire, in the church of which a handsome monument, with an inscription, was erected to his memory.
  • Savile was four times married: first, to Jane, daughter of Richard Garth of Morden, Surrey, by whom he had issue Henry Savile (see below) and two daughters; secondly, to Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Wentworth of North Elmsall, Yorkshire, by whom he had issue John (d. 1651), who was heir to his half-brother Henry, and great-grandfather of John Savile, first earl of Mexborough (1720–1778); thirdly, to Dorothy, daughter of Thomas, first baron Wentworth (d. 1551), and widow of Sir W. Widmerpoole and then of Sir Martin Frobisher [q. v.]; and fourthly, to Margery, daughter of Ambrose Peake, citizen of London, and widow of Sir Jerome Weston. By the last two Savile had no issue.
  • Like several other members of his family, Savile was an intimate friend of Camden, whom he entertained at Bradley in August 1599 (Gent. Mag. 1852, i. 270, 271). One of his letters to Camden, pointing out errors in the ‘Britannia,’ is printed in ‘Camdeni et Illustrium Virorum Epistolæ,’ 1691, 4to, pp. 36–9. Savile was himself an original member of the Society of Antiquaries, founded by Archbishop Parker in 1572, and is said by Wood to have left behind him ‘certain things fit for the press;’ but the only published work of his is the collection of ‘Reports’ of cases tried in the exchequer court, edited (1675, fol.) by John Robertson, with a preface containing a poor account of him and his family (cf. Bridgman, Legal Bibliography, p. 297; Wallace, Reporters, 1855, p. 142). The judge must be distinguished from a contemporary John Savile, ‘a great pretender to poetry,’ who published ‘King James his entertainment at Theobalds, with his welcome to London, and a salutatory Poem,’ London, 1603, 4to, which Halliwell erroneously styles a play (Wood, Athenæ Oxon. i. 774; Fleay, English Drama, ii. 175).
  • Sir Henry Savile (1579–1632), the eldest son, born in 1579, matriculated from Merton College, Oxford, on 4 Feb. 1583–4, but left without a degree, entering Middle Temple in 1593. He was knighted at the coronation of James I, on 23 July 1603, and created a baronet on 29 June 1611. He represented Aldborough in parliament from 1604 to 1611, and again in 1614. Before 1627 he became vice-president of the council of the north, serving under Wentworth. In the following year he was sheriff of Yorkshire, and in 1629 was knight of the shire in parliament. He died on 23 June 1632, having married Mary, daughter of John Dent, citizen of London, by whom he had three sons, all of whom predeceased him without issue. The baronetcy consequently expired on his death. His widow married Sir William Sheffield.
  • [Cal. State Papers, Dom. 1581–1610; Hunter's Antiquarian Notices of Lupset; Official Return of Members of Parliament; Wood's Athenæ Oxon. i. 773–4; Foster's Alumni Oxon. 1500–1714; Lodge's Peerage of Ireland, iii. 162–3; Wotton's Baronetage, i. 153; Burke's Extinct Baronetage and Extinct Peerage; Foster's Yorkshire Pedigrees; Notes and Queries, 1st ser. v. 366; Forster's Life of Strafford (sometimes ascribed to Robert Browning), 1892, p. 70; Foss's Lives of the Judges.]
  • From: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Savile,_John_(1545-1607)_(DNB00)
  • https://archive.org/stream/dictionaryofnati50stepuoft#page/371/mode/1up to https://archive.org/stream/dictionaryofnati50stepuoft#page/372/mode/1up

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  • The Wentworth genealogy, comprising the origin of the name, the family in England, and a particular account of Elder William Wentworth, the emigrant, and of his descendants (1870)
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/wentworthgenealo01inwent#page/n176/mode/1up
  • The line was continued by
  • (18) Sir Thomas Wentworth, Kt., Lord Chamberlain of the Household; who, in 1529, was summoned to Parliament, by writ, as Baron Wentworth. He died on the 3d, and was buried on the 7 March, 1550-1, in Westminster Abbey. His wife, who survived him, was Margaret, daughter of Sir Adrian Fortescue, Kt. They had issue as follows:
    • 1. Sir Thomas, 2d Baron, of whom hereafter.
    • 2. Sir Henry (not 21 in 1544), who married his first cousin, Elizabeth Glemham. (See back to number (17-7) of this note.)
    • 3. Richard (not 21 in 1544), who married Margaret Royden.
    • 4. Philip (not 21 in 1544), who married a daughter of Sir Richard Corbet, Kt.
    • 5. John (not 21 in 1455), who perished at sea, in 1564.
    • 6. Edward (not 21 in 1544.)
    • 7. James (not 21 in 1544), who perished at sea in 1564.
    • 8. Roger (not 21 in 1544), who married, and had a daughter Katherine, who was buried at Stepney, Co. Middlesex, 14 July, 1577.
    • 9. Anne, living 1544; the wife of Sir John Poley, Kt., of Badley, Suffolk.
    • 10. Cicily (or Cecilia) married, after 1544, to Sir Robert Wingfield, Kt.
    • 11. Mary, who married, after 1544, William Cavendish, Esq., eldest son of Sir Richard Cavendish, Kt.
    • 12. Elizabeth, living 1544, unmarried.
    • 13. Margaret, who married, after 1544, 1st John Lord Williams; 2dly, Sir William Drury, Kt.; and 3dly, Sir John Crofts, Kt.
    • 14. Margery, living, 1544, unmarried.
    • 15. Jane, married, after 1544, to Sir Henry Cheyne, Kt., Lord Cheyne of Toddington, Co. Bedford, She died without issue, 16 April, 1614, and was buried at Toddington.
    • 16. Catherine, living, 1544, unmarried.
    • 17. Dorothy, married, after 1544, 1st, to Sir Wm. Widmerpoole, Kt.; 1dly, to Sir Martin Frobisher, Kt.; and 3dly, to Sir John Savile, Kt., one of the Barons of the Exchequer, who survived her and died 2 February, 1606-7.
  • The line was continued by

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  • Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study In Colonial And Medieval Families, 2nd Edition ... By Douglas Richardson
  • http://books.google.com/books?id=kjme027UeagC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Plantagenet+ancestry&hl=en&sa=X&ei=U8VLUYTME-boiALhroHwBw&ved=0CEcQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=stonor&f=false
  • Pg.216
  • 15. THOMAS WENTWORTH, Knt., de jure 6th Lord Despenser, of Nettlestead, Suffolk, Harston, Cambridgeshire, etc., Knight of the Shire for Suffolk, Privy Councillor, Lord Chamberlain of the Household to King Edward VI, son and heir, born about 1500 (age 28 in 1528). He married about 1520 MARGARET FORTESCUE, daughter of Adrian Fortescue, K.B., of Stonor (in Pyrton) and
  • Pg.217
  • Shirburn, Oxfordshire, and St. Clement Danes, London, by his 1st wife, Anne (descendant of Kind Edward III), daughter and heiress of William Stonor, Knt. [see STONOR 14 for her ancestry]. They had eight sons, Thomas [2nd Lord Wentworth], Henry, Richard, Philip, Gent., John, Edward, James, and Roger, and nine daughters, Anne, Cecily (wife of Robert Wingfield, Knt.), Mary wife of William Cavendish), Elizabeth (wife of John Cock and Leonard Matthew), Margaret, Margery (wife of John Williams [Lord Williams of Thame], William Drury, Knt., and James Croft, Knt.), Jane (wife of Henry Cheney [Lord Cheny]), Katherine, and Dorothy (wife of Paul Withypoll, and Martin Frobisher, Knt., John Savile, Knt.). He took part in the Duke of Suffolk's expedition to France in 1523. He was created Lord Wentworth and admitted to the House of Lords, 2 Dec. 1529. In 1530 he was one of the peers who tried Queen Anne Boleyn. His wife, Margaret, was heiress in 1540 to her younger sister Frances, wife of Thomas Fitz Gerald, 10th Earl of Kildare. In 1544 he served under the Duke of Norfolk as the Siege of Montreuil, being one of his Council of War. Margaret died between 23 April 1546 and 12 May 1551, presumably before her husband. He was granted the manor of Stepney, Hackney, and Cheyney Gate (now The Deanery), Westminster, all in Middlesex, in 1550. SIR THOMAS WENTWORTH, 1st Lord Wentworth, died at the King's Palace at Westminster 3 March 1550/1, and was buried 7 March 1550/1 in Westminster Abbey. He left a will proved 27 Nov. 1551 (P.C.C. 35 Bucke).
  • .... etc.

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Dorothy May Widmerpool Frobisher Savile's Timeline

1532
1532
Nettlestead, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom
1601
January 3, 1601
Age 69
Gwynedd, Wales, United Kingdom
????