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Edmund Hopwood

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Hopwood Hall, Middleton, Lancashire, England (United Kingdom)
Death: 1567 (62-63)
Hopwood Hall, Middleton, Lancashire, England (United Kingdom)
Immediate Family:

Son of John Hopwood and Margaret Hopwood
Husband of Anne Hopwood; Jane Hopwood and Jennet Hopwood
Father of John Hopwood; Ann Valentine; Edmund "the Puritan" Hopwood; John Hopwood; Robert Hopwood and 2 others
Brother of Richard Hopwood; Thomas Hopwood and Thomas Hopwood
Half brother of Elizabeth Hopwood and Anne Hopwood

Managed by: holly G winters, ms
Last Updated:

About Edmund Hopwood

Wife: #1 Ann Hopwood (born Talbot) Wife #2 Jennette Gerrard of Ince Wife #3 Jane Moreland of Assheton

The Hopwoods are believed to be junior sons of the de Middleton family.

In Tudor times:

The Hopwoods were subject to Sir Ralph Assheton, Vice constable of England the new Lord of Middleton at this time. Sir Ralph Assheton executed Richard Crookback's enemies with great severity. He had a reputation for cruelty and was known as the 'Black Knight'. Thomas Hopwood and his three young sons John, Robert and Ralph fought under the Black Knight's banner at Bosworth though the battle was lost owing to treachery. After the death of their royal master Richard, they fled the field, but the forces of Henry Tudor captured them and Sir Ralph was later beheaded. However, Henry Tudor wanted to make peace with the Yorkists, and marry Elizabeth of York, so the Hopwoods and many others were spared. A pardon written in Latin with the seal of Lancaster was given to the Hopwoods, and bore their names.

Flodden field 1513

Middleton, Hopwood and Langley were famous for their archers. Richard Assheton, Lord of Middleton won glory against the Scots at Flodden in 1513, when he with his company of bowmen captured the High Sheriff of Aberdeen and the Sergeant Porter to King James. The latter captive identified the Scottish king's corpse after the battle. John Hopwood of Hopwood, who had married Assheton's sister, probably led many Hopwood men at Flodden Field. Nine years later, in thanksgiving for the victory, Sir Richard enlarged Cardinal Langley's church, and had a stained glass window commemorating Flodden inserted in the church.

Hopwood Chapel

The Hopwoods heard Mass in their own chapel at Hopwood Hall. The chaplain at the Hall in 1439 was Robert de Musbere, or in modern idiom, Father Robert of Musbury. Other chaplains probably included one Richard Bexwycke who was buried at Middleton in 1534 and who left curate and singers, James Hopwood and Robert Coke sixteen pence to say a dirge, and a Mass. He asked Edmund Hopwood to stand as surety.

In 1522 John Hopwood had part of the exterior wall built to enclose the Hopwood Lady Chapel. A statue of the Blessed Virgin stood on the stone bracket that is on the east wall. The Reformers probably destroyed this statue at the same time as the altar-stone was cast out of the church.

On the southeast corner of the outside wall there are two inscribed stones just under the parapet. Although the inscriptions seemed indecipherable, C. S. Macdonald read the upper stone as HO.HH. & SFF to stand for "Hopwode (of) Hopwode Hall et Sui Filii Fecerunt" --- in English, "Hopwode of Hopwode Hall and his sons built (this). An alternative solution is "Hopwode of Hopwode Hall 9th Sept. Flodden Field". The inscription on the lower stone was read as "Sept 9th Sanctificata (sunt) Tabernacula Domini" --- in English, "The Tabernacles of the Lord were consecrated on Sept 9th". This stone gives the exact date of the dedication of the church extension that was purposely dedicated on the ninth day of the ninth month --- the ninth year after Flodden to the day.

Manor

¶As in the case of other hamlets in the parish, HOPWOOD was held of the lord of Middleton by a family adopting the local surname. Little is known of it, (fn. 5) though pedigrees were recorded at visitations from 1533 to 1664. (fn. 6) After the death of Edmund Hopwood in 161 2 it was found that he held the manor of Hopwood with its appurtenances, thirty messuages, a water-mill, 300 acres of arable land, &c., of Sir Richard Assheton as of his manor of Middleton, by knight's service and 5s. 8d. rent. He held other lands in Hopwood, Thornham, Middleton, and Manchester. (fn. 7) His grandson and heir, Edmund, lived through the Civil War apparently without taking any active part in it; (fn. 8) he was, however, a magistrate and served as sheriff in 1650, (fn. 9) and was also a member of the Bury Presbyterian Classis. (fn. 10) He was buried at Middleton, 6 March 1665–6. (fn. 11) His great-grandson, Dr. Robert Hopwood, died in 1762 (fn. 12) without issue, and bequeathed the estates to his wife for life, and after her death, which happened in 1773, to Edward Gregge of Chamber Hall in Werneth, who accordingly succeeded, and took the name of Hopwood. Services rendered during the incursion of the Young Pretender in 1745 are said to have been the motive for the bequest. (fn. 13) The estate has since descended regularly from Edward Gregge Hopwood, (fn. 14) who died in 1798, to his son Robert, who was high sheriff in 1802, (fn. 15) and died in 1854; his grandson Captain Edward John, who died in 1891; and his great-grandson, the present owner, Lieut. Colonel Edward Robert Gregge-Hopwood, born in 1846. (fn. 16)

Hopwood Hall is situated in a hollow on the high ground between Middleton and Rochdale about a mile directly north of the former town. It is a picturesque two-story brick building on a stone base, set round a small quadrangle, with the entrance on the north side and the principal front facing south. Though usually stated to belong to the Tudor period there is nothing in the house as it stands at present to suggest a date earlier than the first part of the 17th century; but it is possible that some of the brickwork in the south front may be before this time. The original arrangement seems to have been that the house was built round four sides of a courtyard about 60 ft. long from west to east and 30 ft. from north to south, with the great hall in the south range opposite to the entrance. In later rebuildings this first arrangement has been followed to some extent, but the hall has disappeared, and corridors have encroached on the quadrangle on two sides, reducing its size to about 50 ft. by 24 ft., and the plan is now that of a suite of living rooms on all four sides of the central space, with a large western servants' wing added in later times. The older parts are constructed with small 2 in. bricks, in contrast to much of the later work, but both the older and later buildings are of more than one date.

British History Online

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Edmund Hopwood's Timeline

1504
1504
Middleton, Lancashire, England
1520
1520
Middleton, Lancashire, England
1521
1521
1521
Middleton, Lancashire, England
1530
1530
Middleton, Lancashire, England
1541
1541
Middleton, Lancashire, England
1567
1567
Age 63
Middleton, Lancashire, England
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