Edmund de Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March

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3rd Earl of March Edmund "The Good" de Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March

Also Known As: "The Good", "Earl Of March", "The good", "1st Earl of March", "3rd Earl of March", ""Edmund The Good""
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Llangoed, Llyswen, Breconshire, Wales
Death: Died in Dominican Friary, Cork, Ireland
Place of Burial: Wigmore, Herefordshire, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March and Philippa Montacute, Countess
Husband of Philippa, 5th Countess of Ulster
Father of Lady Elizabeth Percy; Lady Agnes Mortimer; Roger de Mortimer, 4th Earl of March; Philippa Poynings; Sir Edmund Mortimer and 4 others
Brother of Margery de Mortimer and Beatrice De Mortimer

Occupation: Baron
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Edmund de Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March

Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March

Edmund de Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March and jure uxoris Earl of Ulster (1 February 1352 – 27 December 1381) was son of Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March, by his wife Philippa, daughter of William Montagu, 1st Earl of Salisbury and Catherine Grandison.

An infant at the death of his father, Edmund, as a ward of the crown, was placed by Edward III of England under the care of William of Wykeham and Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel.

The position of the young earl, powerful on account of his possessions and hereditary influence in the Welsh marches, was rendered still more important by his marriage on 24 August 1369 at the age of 17 to the 14-year-old Philippa, the only child of the late Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence, the second son of Edward III.

Lionel's late wife, Elizabeth, had been daughter and heiress of William Donn de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster, and Lionel had himself been created Earl of Ulster before his marriage. Edmund inherited the title Earl of Ulster on Lionel's death.

Therefore, the Earl of March not only represented one of the chief Anglo-Norman lordships in Ireland in right of his wife Philippa, but Philippa's line was also the second most senior line of descent in the succession to the crown, after Edward, the Black Prince and his son, King Richard II of England. John of Gaunt, younger brother of Prince Edward, had become the 1st Duke of Lancaster and thus the source of the House of Lancaster's claim to the throne.

This marriage had, therefore, far-reaching consequences in English history, ultimately giving rise to the claim of the House of York to the crown of England contested in the Wars of the Roses between the Yorks and the Lancasters; Edward IV being descended from the second adult son of Edward III as great-great-grandson of Philippa, countess of March, and in the male line from Edmund of Langley, the first Duke of York and the fourth adult son of Edward III.

Edmund Mortimer's son Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March would become heir presumptive to the English crown during the reign of Richard II.

Mortimer, now styled Earl of March and Ulster, became Marshal of England in 1369, and was employed in various diplomatic missions during the next following years. He was a member of the committee appointed by the Peers to confer with the Commons in 1373 —; the first instance of such a joint conference since the institution of representative parliaments on the question of granting supplies for John of Gaunt's war in France.

He participated in the opposition to Edward III and the court party, which grew in strength towards the end of the reign, taking the popular side and being prominent in the Good Parliament of 1376 among the lords who supported the Prince of Wales and opposed the Court Party and John of Gaunt. The Speaker of the House of Commons in this parliament was March's steward, Peter de la Mare, who firmly withstood John of Gaunt in stating the grievances of the Commons, in supporting the impeachment of several high court officials, and in procuring the banishment of the king's mistress, Alice Perrers. March was a member of the administrative council appointed by the same parliament after the death of Edward, the Black Prince to attend the king and advise him in all public affairs.

Following the end of the Good Parliament its acts were reversed by John of Gaunt, March's steward was jailed, and March himself was ordered to inspect Calais and other remote royal castles as part of his duty as Marshall of England. March chose instead to resign the post.[1]

On the accession of Richard II, a minor, in 1377, the Earl became a member of the standing council of government; though as husband of the heir-presumptive to the crown he wisely abstained from claiming any actually administrative office. The richest and most powerful person in the realm was, however, the king's uncle John of Gaunt, whose jealousy led March to accept the office of Lord Lieutenant of Ireland in 1379. March succeeded in asserting his authority in eastern Ulster, but failed to subdue the O'Neills farther west. Proceeding to Munster to put down the turbulent southern chieftains, March was killed at Cork on 27 December 1381.[1] He was buried in Wigmore Abbey, of which he had been a benefactor, and where his wife Philippa was also interred.

The earl had two sons and two daughters:[1]

  • Lady Elizabeth married Henry Hotspur Percy, son of the Earl of Northumberland. She may have later married Thomas de Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys.[2]
  • His elder son, Sir Roger, succeeded him as 4th Earl of March and Ulster.
  • His second son, Sir Edmund played an important part, in conjunction with his brother-in-law Hotspur, in the fortunes of Owain Glyndŵr.
  • Lady Philippa married firstly John Hastings, 3rd Earl of Pembroke; after his death in 1389 she became the second wife of Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel; she married thirdly Sir Thomas de Poynings.[3]

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_Mortimer,_3rd_Earl_of_March

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  • Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 39
  • Mortimer, Edmund de (1351-1381) by Thomas Frederick Tout
  • MORTIMER, EDMUND (II) de, third Earl of March (1351–1381), was the son of Roger de Mortimer (V), second earl of March fq. v.], and his wife Philippa, daughter of William Montacute, first earl of Salisbury [q. v.], and was born at 'Langonith' (? Llangynwyd or Llangynog) on 1 Feb. 1351 (Monasticon, vi. 353). When still a child there was an abortive proposal in 1354 to marry him to Alice Fitzalan, daughter of Richard Fitzalan II, earl of Arundel [q. v.] On 26 Feb. 1360 the death of his father procured for the young Edmund the succession to the title and estates of his house when only in his tenth year. He became the ward of Edward III, but was ultimately assigned to the custody of William of Wykeham [q. v.], bishop of Winchester, and of the above-mentioned Richard, earl of Arundel (Dugdale, Baronage, i. 148). Henceforth he was closely associated with the king's sons, and especially with Edward the Black Prince. Mortimer's political importance dates from his marriage with Philippa, only daughter of Lionel of Antwerp, duke of Clarence [q. v.], the second surviving son of Edward HI, by his wife Elizabeth de Burgh, the heiress of Ulster. Philippa was born in 1355, and her wedding with Mortimer took place in the spring of 1368, just before the departure of Lionel for Italy (Cont. Eulogium Hist. iii. 333). Before the end of the year Lionel's death gave to his son-in-law the enjoyment of his great estates. When, on coming of age, Mortimer entered into public life, he represented not simply the Mortimer inheritance, but also the great possessions of his wife. Besides his Shropshire, Herefordshire, Welsh, and Meath estates, which came from the Mortimers and Genvilles, he was, in name at least, lord of Ulster and Connaught, and by far the most conspicuous representative of the Anglo-Norman lords of Ireland. He was now styled Earl of Ulster as well as Earl of March. But important as were the immediate results of Edmund's marriage, the ulterior results were even more far-reaching. The descendants of Philippa before long became the nearest representatives of the line of Edward III, and handed on to the house of York that claim to the throne which resulted in the Wars of the Roses. And not only the legitimist claim but the territorial strength of the house of York was almost entirely derived from the Mortimer inheritance.
  • In 1369 Mortimer became marshal of England, an office which he held until 1377. In the same year he served against the French. On 8 Jan. 1371 he received his first summons to parliament (Lords' Report on Dignity of a Peer, iv. 648). In 1373 he received final livery of his own estates. On 8 Jan. 1373 he was sent as joint ambassador to France, and in March of the same year he was chief guardian of the truce with Scotland (Doyle, Official Baronage, ii. 468). The Wigmore family chronicler (Monasticon, vi. 353) boasts of the extraordinary success with which he discharged these commissions, and erroneously says that he was only eighteen at the time. In 1375 he served in the expedition sent to Brittany to help John of Montfort, and captured the castle of Saint-Mathieu (Walsingham, Hist. Angl. i. 318-319 ; Froissart, viii. 212, ed. Luce).
  • Mortimer's close association with the Prince of Wales and his old guardian, William of Wykeham, necessarily involved an attitude of hostility to John of Gaunt. Ancient feuds between the houses of March and Lancaster still had their effects, and Edmund's dislike of Gaunt was strengthened by a feeling that Lancaster was a possible rival to the claims of his wife and son to the succession. Accordingly he took up a strong line in favour of the constitutional as against the court party, and was conspicuous among the aristocratic patrons of the popular opposition in the Good parliament of 1376. He was, with Bishop Courtenay of London, the leader of the committee of twelve magnates appointed at the beginning of the session, on 28 April, to confer with the commons (Rot. Parl, ii. 322; Chron. Angliæ, 1328-88, p. 70; Stubbs, Const. Hist. ii. 428-9). The commons showed their confidence in him by electing as their speaker Sir Peter De la Mare, his steward, who, as knight of the shire for Herefordshire, Svas probably returned to parliament through his lord's influence [see De la Mare, Sir Peter]. A vigorous attack on the courtiers was now conducted by the commons under their speaker; but the death of the Black Prince on 8 June weakened the effect of their action. John of Gaunt now sought to obtain from parliament a settlement of the succession in the case of the death of the Black Prince's only son, Richard. He even urged that, as in France, the succession should descend through males only, thus openly setting up his own claims against those of the Countess of March (Chron. Angl. 1328-88, pp. 92-3). The commons prudently declined to discuss the subject. Yet even with the support of the knights, the Earl of March and the constitutional bishops were not strong enough of themselves to resist Gaunt and the courtiers. But they continued their work until the end of the session, on 6 July, their last care being to enforce the appointment of a permanent council, some members of which were always to be in attendance on the king. The Earl of March was among the nine additional persons appointed to this council (ib. pp. lxviii, 100). But as soon as the parliament was dissolved, Lancaster, in the king's name, repudiated all its acts. The new councillors were dismissed, and March was ordered to discharge his office as marshal by surveying the defences of Calais and other of the more remote royal castles (ib. p. 107), while his steward, De la Mare, was thrown into prison. But March, 'preferring to lose his staff rather than his life,' and believing that he would be waylaid and murdered on the narrow seas, resigned the office of marshal (ib. p. 108).
  • After the accession of Richard II (21 June 1377), power remained with Lancaster, though he now chose to be more conciliatory. March's position was moreover immensely improved. The king was a young child. The next heir by blood was March's own son. On 16 July 1377 March bore the second sword and the spurs at the coronation of the little king. He was not, however, in a position to claim any great share in the administration, and contented himself with a place on the new council of government, into whose hands power now fell (Fœdera, iv. 10; Stubbs, Const. Hist. 11. 442). But he was as strong as ever in parliament. He was among the lords whose advice, as in 1376, was requested by the parliament of October 1377, and had the satisfaction of seeing his steward again elected as the speaker of this assembly. It was a further triumph when the young king was forced by the commons to remodel his council, and when March was one of the nine members of the new and extremely limited body thus selected (ib. ii. 444; cf. Chron. Angl. p. 164). On 1 Jan. 1378 he was appointed chief member of a commission to redress infractions of the truce with Scotland (Fœdera, iv. 26; cf. Chron. Angl. p. 203), and on 20 Jan. was put first on a commission appointed to inspect and strengthen the fortifications of the border strongholds of Berwick, Carlisle, Roxburgh, and Bamburgh (Doyle, Official Baronage, ii. 468). On 14 Feb. 1379 he was sent with other magnates on a special embassy to Scotland.
  • On 22 Oct. 1379 March was appointed lieutenant of Ireland (Fœdera, iv. 72). It was convenient for the party of Lancaster to get him out of the way, and his great interests in Ireland gave him a special claim to the thankless office. Those parts of the island, Ulster, Conuaught, and Meath, over which he bore nominal sway, had long been the most disorderly districts; and so far back as 1373 the English in Ireland had sent a special commission to Edward III representing that the only way of abating the evils that were rampant in those regions was for the king to force the Earl of March to dwell upon his Irish estates and adequately defend them. Partly then to enter upon the effectual possession of his own estates ('ad recuperandum comitatum suum de Holuestre,' Monk or Evesham, p. 19), and partly to set the king's rule on a better footing, March now accepted the government of Ireland for three years. He stipulated for good terms. He was to have twenty thousand marks paid over to him, from which he was to provide troops, but he was not to be held accountable to the crown for his expenditure of the money. He was also to have the disposal of the king's ordinary revenue in Ireland. Before he left his Welsh estates he made his will, dated 1 May 1380, at Denbigh, the contents of which are summarised in Dugdale's 'Baronage,' i. 149, and printed in Nichols's 'Royal Wills,' pp. 104-16. On 15 May 1380 March arrived in Ireland (Cart., &c., of St. Mary's, Dublin, ii. 284), having among his other attendants a herald of his own, called March herald. His first work was to establish himself in his wife's Ulster estates. In Eastern Ulster his arms were successful, the more so as some of the native chieftains threw themselves on his side, though these before long deserted him, on account of his treacherous seizure of an important Irish leader, Magennis, lord of Iveagh, in what is now co. Down. But the O'Neils ruled without a rival over Western Ulster, and March could not even draw a supply of timber from the forests of the land that was nominally his own. He had to bring the oak timber used to build a bridge over the Bann, near Coleraine, from his South Welsh lands on the Usk. This bridge was protected by fortifications at each end and by a tower in the middle; thus only was it prevented from being captured by the Irish. March also made some efforts to obtain possession' of Connaught, and succeeded in capturing Athlone from the O'Connors, and thus secured the passage over the Shannon. But Kilkenny Castle was now assailed by the Hibernised Norman sept of the Tobyns, to revenge the imprisonment of their chief within its walls. This and other business drew the viceroy into Munster. There he caught cold in crossing a river in winter time, and on 27 Dec. 1381 he died at the Dominican friary at Cork (Gilbert, Viceroys of Ireland, pp. 234, 242-7, gives the best modern account of March's Irish government). The Anglo-Irish writers, who thoroughly knew the difficulties of his position, say that after great efforts he appeased most of the wars in Ireland (Cart., &c., of St. Mary's, Dublin, ii. 285). In England his government of Ireland was regarded as pre-eminently wise and successful ('multum de hoc quod amisit recuperavit,' Monk of Evesham, p. 19; Chron. Angl. p. 334; Adam of Usk, p. 21).
  • According to the directions in his will, March's body was interred on the left hand of the high altar of Wigmore Abbey (Nichols, p. 104). An Irish chronicle speaks of his being buried in the church of the Holy Trinity at Cork, but this probably only refers to the more perishable parts of his body (Cart., &c., of St. Mary's, Dublin, ii. 285). March had been an extremely liberal benefactor to Wigmore Abbey, the chief foundation of his ancestors. The old fabric of the abbey church had become decayed and ruinous, and March granted lands in Radnor and elsewhere to the value of two thousand marks a year for its reconstruction. He laid the foundationstone of the new structure with his own hands, and by the time of his death the walls had been carried up to their appointed height, and were only wanting a roof. He also presented to the canons costly vestments and many relics, especially the body of St. Seiriol, and a large piece of the wood of the true cross. He further promised, when he took his departure from the canons of Wigmore as he went to Ireland, that on his safe return he would confer on them the advowson of three churches and the appropriation of Stoke Priory. Further benefactions were made by him in his will, including a rare and choice collection of relics. For all this liberality he is warmly commended by the Wigmore annalist (Monasticon, vi. 353), who quotes the eulogistic epitaph of the grateful canons, which celebrated his constancy, wisdom, popularity, and bounty. March supported Adam of Usk, his tenant's son, when the future chronicler was studying civil and canon law at Oxford (Adam of Usk, p. 21), and in return Adam loudly celebrates his praises. March was also highly eulogised by the St. Albans chronicler, who was a warm partisan of the constitutional opposition.
  • The Countess Philippa died before her husband, who celebrated her interment at Wigmore by almost regal pomp. Her epitaph speaks of her liberality, kindness, royal descent, and severity of morals. The children of Edmund and Philippa were: (1) Elizabeth, the eldest, born at Usk on 12 Feb. 1371, and married to the famous 'Hotspur,' Henry Percy, son of the Earl of Northumberland [see Percy, Henry]. (2) Roger, also born at Usk on 11 April 1374 [see Mortimer, Roger VI, fourth Earl of March]. (3) Philippa, born at Ludlow on 21 Nov. 1375, who became first the second wife of Richard Fitzalan III, earl of Arundel [q. v.], and afterwards married John of St. John; she died in 1400 (Adam of Usk, p. 53). (4) Edmund, born at Ludlow on 9 Nov. 1376, the future ally of Owen Glendower [see Mortimer, Sir Edmund III, 1376–1409?]. The above dates are from the Wigmore annalist (Monasticon, vi. 354), who now becomes contemporary and fairly trustworthy. (5) Sir John Mortimer, executed in 1423 for treason, and sometimes described as a son of Mortimer's, must, if a son at all, have been illegitimate (Sandford, Genealogical Hist. pp. 222-3). He is not mentioned in March's will.
  • [Dugdale's Monasticon, vi. 352-4; Dugdale's Baronage, i. 148-50; Doyle's Official Baronage, ii. 468-9; Rolls of Parliament; Rymer's Fœdera; Chron. Angl. 1328-88 (Rolls Ser.); Adam of Usk, ed. Thompson; Chartularies, &c., of St. Mary's Abbey, Dublin (Rolls Ser.); Froissart, ed. Luce; Monk of Evesham, ed. Hearne; Sandford's Genealogical Hist. of the Kings of England, pp. 221 223; Gilbert's Viceroys of Ireland; Wright's Hist. of Ludlow; Stubbs's Const. Hist. vol. ii.]
  • From: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Mortimer,_Edmund_de_(1351-1381)_(DNB00)

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  • Sir Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, Lord Mortimer & Connaught, Earl of Ulster, Marshal of England, Chief Governor of Ireland, Ambassador to France1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19
  • M, #12919, b. 1 February 1352, d. 27 December 1381
  • Father Sir Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl March, Constable of Dover, Bridgnorth, Corfe, Montgomery, & Trim Castles20,21,22 b. 11 Nov 1328, d. 26 Feb 1360
  • Mother Philippa de Montacute20,21,22 b. c 1332, d. 5 Jan 1382
  • Sir Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, Lord Mortimer & Connaught, Earl of Ulster, Marshal of England, Chief Governor of Ireland, Ambassador to France was born on 1 February 1352 at Llangoed, Llyswen, Breconshire, Wales, England.2,6,16 He married Philippa Plantagenet, daughter of Sir Lionel 'of Antwerp' Plantagenet, Duke of Clarence, 5th Earl of Ulster, Lord of Clare & Connaught, Chief Governor of Ireland and Elizabeth de Burgh, circa May 1368 at Reading, Berkshire, England; They had 2 sons (Sir Roger, 4th Earl of March; & Sir Edmund) and 2 daughters (Elizabeth, wife of Sir Henry 'Hotspur' Percy, & of Sir Thomas, Lord Camoys; & Philippe, wife of Sir John de Hastings, 3rd Earl of Pembroke, of Sir Richard, Earl of Arundel & Surrey, & of Sir Thomas Poynings, 5th Lord St. John of Basing).2,3,4,5,6,8,9,10,11,12,14,15,16,18,19 Sir Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, Lord Mortimer & Connaught, Earl of Ulster, Marshal of England, Chief Governor of Ireland, Ambassador to France left a will on 1 May 1380.6,16 He died on 27 December 1381 at Dominican Friary, Cork, Cork, Munster, Ireland, at age 29; Buried eventually at Wigmore Abbey, Herefordshire. Caught a cold crossing a river in winter.2,6,16 His estate was probated on 22 January 1382.6,16
  • Family Philippa Plantagenet b. 16 Aug 1355, d. c 7 Jan 1378
  • Children
    • Sir John Mortimer d. 6 Feb 1424
    • Elizabeth Mortimer+2,23,4,6,7,10,24,13,17,19 b. 12 Feb 1371, d. 20 Apr 1417
    • Sir Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl March, 6th Earl of Ulster, Lord Wigmore, Lord Lieut. of Ireland+2,6,16 b. 11 Apr 1374, d. 20 Jul 1398
    • Philippa Mortimer25,26,5,6,8,9,14,15,18 b. 21 Nov 1375, d. 24 Sep 1401
    • Sir Edmund Mortimer6,16 b. 10 Dec 1376, d. Jan 1409
  • Citations
  • [S3643] Unknown author, Burke's Peerage (1963), p. lxi; Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, by F. L. Weis, 4th Ed., p. 40.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 526.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 364.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 398-399.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 190-191.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 193-194.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 250.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 307.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 334-335.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 341-342.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 88.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 24.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 246.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 610-611.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 262.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 173-174.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 237-238.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 323.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 354-355.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 525-526.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 192-193.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 172-173.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 577-578.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 70-71.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 320.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 570.
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p430.htm#i12919

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  • Edmund de Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March1
  • M, #101991, b. 1 February 1352, d. 27 December 1381
  • Last Edited=5 Dec 2008
  • Edmund de Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March was born on 1 February 1352 at Llangoed, Llyswen, Breconshire, Wales.2 He was the son of Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March. He married Philippa Plantagenet, Countess of Ulster, daughter of Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence and Lady Elizabeth de Burgh, circa May 1368 at Reading Abbey, Queen's Chapel, Reading, Berkshire, England.3 He died on 27 December 1381 at age 29 at Dominican Priory, Cork, County Cork, Ireland.
  • He gained the title of 3rd Earl of March.1
  • Children of Edmund de Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March and Philippa Plantagenet, Countess of Ulster
    • Elizabeth de Mortimer+4 b. 12 Feb 1371, d. 20 Apr 1417
    • Roger de Mortimer, 4th Earl of March+5 b. 11 Apr 1374, d. 20 Jul 1398
    • Philippa de Mortimer+6 b. 21 Nov 1375, d. 24 Sep 1401
    • Sir Edmund de Mortimer+ b. 9 Nov 1376, d. b 13 May 1411
  • Citations
  • [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), Volume 12, page 905. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  • [S125] Richard Glanville-Brown, online <e-mail address>, Richard Glanville-Brown (RR 2, Milton, Ontario, Canada), downloaded 17 August 2005.
  • [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 95. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  • [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 550.
  • [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 246.
  • [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 245.
  • From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p10200.htm#i101991

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  • Edmund Mortimer
  • Birth: 1351 Llangoed, Isle of Anglesey, Wales
  • Death: Dec. 27, 1381 Cork, County Cork, Ireland
  • This memorial is dedicated to my ancestor Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March and Earl of Ulster. He was the son of Roger Mortimer,by his wife Philippa, daughter of William Montagu, 1st Earl of Salisbury.
  • He was an infant when his father died. Edmund, as a ward of the crown, was placed by Edward III of England under the care of William of Wykeham and Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel.
  • Edmund's position was powerful on account of his possessions and hereditary influence in the Welsh marches, it became more important by his marriage in 1368 at the age of 17 to the 13 year old Philippa, the only child of Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence. He was the second son of King Edward III and his wife Philippa of Hainault. Lionel's wife, Elizabeth, was daughter and heiress of William Donn de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster, and Lionel had himself been created Earl of Ulster before his marriage. Edmund inherited the title Earl of Ulster on Lionel's death.
  • Therefore, the Earl of March not only represented one of the chief Anglo-Norman lordships in Ireland in right of his wife Philippa, but Philippa's line was also the second most senior line of descent in the succession to the crown, after Edward, the Black Prince and his son, King Richard II of England.
  • This marriage had far-reaching consequences in English history, ultimately giving rise to the claim of the House of York to the crown of England contested in the Wars of the Roses; Edward IV being descended from the second adult son of Edward III as great-great-grandson of Philippa, countess of March, and in the male line from Edmund of Langley, fourth adult son of Edward III.
  • Edmund's son Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March would become heir presumptive to the English crown during the reign of Richard II.
  • Edmund died at Cork on December 27, 1381. He was buried in Wigmore Abbey, of which he had been a benefactor, and where his wife Philippa was also interred.
  • Family links:
  • Parents:
  • Roger Mortimer (1328 - 1360)
  • Philippa Montagu (1333 - 1381)
  • Spouse:
  • Philippa Plantagenet (1355 - 1381)
  • Children:
    • Elizabeth de Mortimer Camoys (1371 - 1417)*
    • Roger De Mortimer (1374 - 1398)*
    • Phillipe de Mortimer Poynings (1375 - 1401)*
  • Sibling:
  • Edmund Mortimer (1351 - 1381)
  • Margery de Mortimer Touchet (1352 - 1405)*
  • Burial: Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire Unitary Authority, Herefordshire, England
  • Find A Grave Memorial# 57654426
  • From: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=57654426

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  • ROGER [V] de Mortimer, son of EDMUND [I] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer & his wife Margaret de Fiennes (25 Apr or 3 May 1287-executed Tyburn, London 29 Nov 1330, bur Shrewsbury, Church of the Grey Friars). A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Rogerus primus comes Marchiæ” as son of “Edmundus de Mortuomari”[400]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerum primum comitem” as son of “Edmundus de Mortuomari…Rogeri de Mortuomari…secundogenitus” and his wife “Margaretam…filiam domini Willielmi de Fendles de Hispania”[401]. He succeeded his father in 1304 as Lord Mortimer. He took possession of Meath in Ireland, inherited from his wife, 28 Oct 1308. He was appointed the king's lieutenant in Ireland 23 Nov 1316 and crossed to Ireland from Haverfordwest with a great army in Feb 1317. He opposed the Despencer family and joined the rebellion of Thomas Earl of Lancaster in 1321, surrendered to the king at Shrewsbury 22 Jan 1322 with his uncle Roger, and was sent to the Tower of London. He escaped 1 Aug 1324 and fled to France where he became the lover of Queen Isabelle, who went there in the spring 1325, and together they landed near Ipswich 24 Sep 1326 where they were joined by other opponents of the Despencers who were captured and executed[402]. He was created Earl of March [25/31] Oct 1328. King Edward III led a conspiracy to rid himself of Mortimer who was captured at Nottingham Castle 18 Oct 1330, condemned to death and his lands forfeited. The Annals of Bermondsey record that “Rogerus Mortymer…comitem Marchiæ” was hanged “Londoniæ in vigilia Sancti Andreæ Apostoli” in 1330[403]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rogerum primum comitem” was buried “ad Fratres Minores Salopiæ…in vigilia S. Andreæ apostolic 1331”[404].
  • m (before 6 Oct 1306) JOAN de Geneville, daughter and co-heiress of PETER de Geneville [Joinville] of Walterstone & his wife Jeanne de Lusignan (2 Feb 1286-19 Oct 1356). A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rogerum primum comitem” married “dominæ Johannæ filiæ domini Petri de Genyville, filii domini Galfridi de Genyville, domini de Trym”[405]. A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Johannæ, Matildi et Beatrici” as the children of “Petro Genevyle”, adding that “Johanna” married “domino Rogero de Mortuomari”[406]. The Chronicle of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire names "Joannam, Matildam et Beatricem" as the children of "Petro de Genyvile" and his wife, adding that Jeanne married "Rogero de Mortuomari primo comiti Marchiæ"[407].
  • Mistress (1): (1325/1330) ISABELLE de France, wife of EDWARD II King of England, daughter of PHILIPPE IV "le Bel" King of France & his wife doña Juana I Queen of Navarre (Paris 1292-Castle Rising, Norfolk or Hertford Castle 21 Nov 1358, bur Greyfriars Church, Newgate, London).
  • Roger [V] & his wife had twelve children:
    • 1. EDMUND [II] de Mortimer (-Stanton Lacy 16 Dec 1331). A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Edmundus” as son of “Rogerus primus comes Marchiæ”[408]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Edmundum primogenitum…Rogerum militem, Galfridum…Johannem…Katherinam…Johannam…Agnetam…Margaretam…Matildam… Blanchiam…et Beatricem” as children of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, adding that Edmund died “apud Staunton-Lacy XVII Kal Jan 1331”[409]. He was summoned to Parliament 20 Nov 1331, whereby he is held to have become Lord Mortimer. m (Earnwood, Kinlet 27 Jun 1316) as her first husband, ELIZABETH de Badlesmere, daughter of BARTHOLOMEW de Badlesmere Lord Badlesmere & his wife Margaret de Clare ([1313]-8 Jun 1355). A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Edmundum primogenitum”, son of “Roger comes et Johanna uxor eius”, married “Elizabetham filiam domini Bartholomei…de Badelesmere et de Ledys”[410]. A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey records the marriage of “Willielmus de Bohun”, son of “Humfredus octavus”, and “Elizabetham filiam domini Bartholomei de Badlesmere”, previously married to “domino Edmundo de Mortuomari”[411]. She married secondly (licence 1335) William de Bohun, later created Earl of Northampton. Edmund [II] & his wife had two children:
      • a) ROGER [VI] de Mortimer (Ludlow 11 Nov 1328-Rouvray 26 Feb 1360, bur in France, transferred to Wigmore). A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Rogerus” as son of “Edmundus”, son of “Rogerus primus comes Marchiæ”[412]. He was granted Wigmore Castle by King Edward III in 1342 at the request of his stepfather William Earl of Northampton, and thereafter appears to have been rehabilitated completely, serving the king loyally[413]. He was summoned to parliament 20 Nov 1348 as Lord Mortimer of Wigmore. In 1354 he obtained a reversal of the sentence against his paternal grandfather and was restored as Earl of March. He died while on active campaign in France. m PHILIPPA de Montagu, daughter of WILLIAM de Montagu Earl of Salisbury & his wife Katherine Grandison (-5 Jan 1382, bur Bisham). A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rogerum primogenitum”, son of “Edmundum”, married “Philippa…filia domini Willielmi Mountagu comitis Sarum”[414]. The will of "Edmond de Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster Lord of Wigmore", dated 1 May 1380, proved 22 Jan 1382, bequeathed property to “Roger son of John de Mortimer...our...mother...Roger our son and heir...our son Edmond...our daughter Elizabeth...our daughter Philippa...our...brother Mons Henry Earl of Northumberland...our...son Mons Henry Percy...”[415]. Roger [VI] & his wife had one child:
        • i) EDMUND [III] Mortimer "the Good" (Llangoed, Llyswen, Breconshire 1 Feb 1352-Cork, Dominican Friary 27 Dec 1381, bur Cork, Dominican Friary, later transferred to Wigmore). A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records the birth “apud Langonith in vigilia Purificacionis beatæ Mariæ Virginis 1351” of “Edmundus”, son of “Rogeri et Philippæ”[416]. He succeeded his father in 1360 as Earl of March.
        • - see below.
      • b) JOHN (-young). A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Rogerum primogenitum et Johannem” as sons of “Edmundum primogenitum” and his wife “Elizabetham filiam domini Bartholomei…de Badelesmere et de Ledys”, adding that John died “puer”[417].
    • 2. ROGER . .... etc.
  • EDMUND [III] Mortimer "the Good", son of ROGER [VI] de Mortimer Lord Mortimer Earl of March & his wife Philippa de Montagu of Salisbury (Llangoed, Llyswen, Breconshire 1 Feb 1352-Cork, Dominican Friary 27 Dec 1381, bur Cork, Dominican Friary, later transferred to Wigmore). A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records the birth “apud Langonith in vigilia Purificacionis beatæ Mariæ Virginis 1351” of “Edmundus”, son of “Rogeri et Philippæ”[443]. A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Edmundus comes Marchiæ et Ultoniæ” as son of “Rogerus”[444]. He succeeded his father in 1360 as Earl of March. Earl of Ulster, Lord of Connaught, and Lord of Clare in Suffolk 1368, by right of his wife, having livery of her inheritance 24 Aug 1369 when she came of age. Marshal of England, resigned 1376. He sided with the Prince of Wales and the clergy, against John of Gaunt and the Barons. He was appointed to the Council of Regency on the accession of King Richard II. Appointed King's Lieutenant in Ireland 22 Oct 1379, arriving in Ireland 15 May 1380[445]. The will of "Edmond de Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster Lord of Wigmore", dated 1 May 1380, proved 22 Jan 1382, chose burial “with the body of my wife...in the church of the abbey of Wigmore”, and bequeathed property to “Roger son of John de Mortimer...our...mother...Roger our son and heir...our son Edmond...our daughter Elizabeth...our daughter Philippa...our...brother Mons Henry Earl of Northumberland...our...son Mons Henry Percy...”[446]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records the death “in festo S. Johannis Evangelistæ…1381…apud Cork in Hibernia” of “Edmundus” and his burial at Cork[447].
  • [448]Betrothed (1354) to ALICE FitzAlan, daughter of RICHARD FitzAlan Earl of Arundel & his second wife Eleanor of Lancaster ([1350]-17 Mar 1416).
  • m (Queen’s Chapel, Reading Abbey before 5 May 1364) PHILIPPA of Clarence, daughter of LIONEL Duke of Clarence & his first wife Elizabeth de Burgh Ctss of Ulster (Eltham Palace, Kent 16 Aug 1355-[21 Nov 1378/9 Feb 1381], bur Cork, Ireland, later transferred to Wigmore, Herefordshire). The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Philippa” as only daughter of “Leonellus filius secundus Regis Edwardi tertii” and his wife Elizabeth, adding that she married “domino Edmundo comiti Marchiæ” and naming her descendants[449]. She succeeded her mother in 1363 as Ctss of Ulster. A charter dated 5 Mar 1364 records that “filio nostro Leonello duci Clarenciæ...consanguineam nostram comitissam Marchiæ filiam ipsius ducis” was brought from Ireland to England[450]. The will of "Philippa de Mortimer Countess of March", dated 21 Nov 1378, proved 9 Feb 1381, chose burial “in the Conventual Church of the Holy Trinity in the Priory of Bustelesham Montagu...near the body of my...father”, bequeathed property to “Edmond my son”[451].
  • Edmund [III] Mortimer Earl of March & his wife had four children:
  • 1. ELIZABETH Mortimer (Usk, Monmouthshire 12 Feb 1371-20 Apr 1417, bur Trotton, Sussex). A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Elizabetha primogenita” as daughter of “Edmundo comite Marchiæ et Philippa consorte sua”, adding that she was born “apud Uske XII Feb 1371”, married “domino Henrico Percy, filio domini Henrici comitis Northumbriæ”[452]. The will of "Edmond de Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster Lord of Wigmore", dated 1 May 1380, proved 22 Jan 1382, bequeathed property to “Roger son of John de Mortimer...our...mother...Roger our son and heir...our son Edmond...our daughter Elizabeth...our daughter Philippa...our...brother Mons Henry Earl of Northumberland...our...son Mons Henry Percy...”[453]. m firstly (before 10 Dec 1379) HENRY Percy “Hotspur”, son of HENRY Percy Earl of Northumberland & his first wife Margaret de Neville (20 May 1364-killed in battle Shrewsbury 21 Jul 1403, bur Whitchurch, transferred Nov 1403 to York Minster). m secondly as his second wife, THOMAS de Camoys Lord Camoys, son of JOHN de Camoys & his wife --- (-28 Mar 1421, bur Trotton).
  • 2. ROGER [VII] Mortimer (Usk, Monmouthshire 11 Apr 1374-killed in battle against the Irish Kenlis 20 Jul 1398, bur Wigmore, Herefordshire). A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Rogerus comes Marchiæ et Ultoniæ” as son of “Edmundus comes Marchiæ et Ultoniæ”[454]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records the birth “III Id Apr…1374” of “Rogerus de Mortimer quartus Marchiæ comes”, son of “Edmundo comite Marchiæ et Philippa consorte sua”[455]. He succeeded his mother as Earl of Ulster. The will of "Edmond de Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster Lord of Wigmore", dated 1 May 1380, proved 22 Jan 1382, bequeathed property to “Roger son of John de Mortimer...our...mother...Roger our son and heir...our son Edmond...our daughter Elizabeth...our daughter Philippa...our...brother Mons Henry Earl of Northumberland...our...son Mons Henry Percy...”[456]. He succeeded his father in 1381 as Earl of March. He was proclaimed heir presumptive of the English crown in Oct 1385 by King Richard II. Appointed Lieutenant in Ireland 23 Jul 1392, renewed for three years Apr 1397. Summoned to Parliament 15 Oct 1397, he was greeted by a great popular welcome. King Richard had by then become suspicious of him, and ordered the Duke of Surrey to go to Ireland and capture him[457]. A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rogerus de Mortimer quartus Marchiæ comes” was killed “apud Kenles in Hibernia…in festo St Margaretæ virginis 1398” and was buried at Wigmore abbey[458]. m ([7 Oct 1388]) ELEANOR de Holand, daughter of THOMAS de Holand Earl of Kent & his wife Alice FitzAlan ([1373]-6 or 18 Oct 1405). A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records that “Rogerus de Mortimer quartus Marchiæ comes” married “dominæ Elianoræ filiæ domini Thomæ Holland comitis Kanciæ”[459]. She married secondly (after [19/30] Jun 1399) Edward Cherleton, who later succeeded as Lord Cherleton. A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Eleanor Countess of the March, after wed to the Lord Powis [of] Charlton" as daughter of "Thomas Holand Earl of Kent" and mother of "Anne Countess of Cambridge" and of "Jocosa Lady Tiptoft, married John, Lord Tiptoft"[460]. Roger [VII] & his wife had [five] children:

a) ANNE Mortimer .... etc.

  • 3. PHILIPPA Mortimer (Ludlow Castle, Shropshire 21 Nov 1375-Halnaker, Sussex 24 Sep 1401, bur Boxgrove Priory, near Lewes, Sussex). A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey names “Philippa” as daughter of “Edmundo comite Marchiæ et Philippa consorte sua”, adding that she was born “apud Loddelowe XXI Nov 1375”, married “domino Radulpho Hastynges comiti Pembrochiæ, postea Ricardo comiti Arundelliæ et ultimo --- domino St John”[471]. The will of "Edmond de Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster Lord of Wigmore", dated 1 May 1380, proved 22 Jan 1382, bequeathed property to “Roger son of John de Mortimer...our...mother...Roger our son and heir...our son Edmond...our daughter Elizabeth...our daughter Philippa...our...brother Mons Henry Earl of Northumberland...our...son Mons Henry Percy...”[472]. The Chronicle of Adam de Usk records the death “VII Kal Oct...aput Halnakyt juxta Cicestriam” of “domina Philippa...comitis Marchie filia...xxiv etatis sue annum attingens” and her burial “in prioratu de Bosgrove”, adding that he had first married “juveni...comiti Penbrochie aput Wotstok in hastiludio perempto”, secondly “comiti Arundelle decapitato”, and thirdly “domino de Seynt John”[473]. Her third marriage is confirmed by the will of "Thomas Poynings Lord St John", dated 6 Mar 1428, which chose burial “within the quire of the priory of Boxgrave in Sussex on the north part of the tomb of Lady Philippa sometime Countess of Arundel my wife”[474]. She had no children by any of her three marriages. m firstly ([1385]) as his second wife, JOHN Hastings Earl of Pembroke, son of JOHN de Hastings Earl of Pembroke & his second wife Anne de Mauny (11 Nov 1372-Woodstock 30/31 Dec 1389, bur Hereford, church of the Friars Preachers, transferred after Mar 1391/2 to church of the Grey Friars, London). He succeeded his father in 1375 as Earl of Pembroke, and his mother in 1384 as Lord Mauny. He was killed while practising for a tournament. m secondly (15 Aug 1390) as his second wife, RICHARD FitzAlan Earl of Arundel and Earl of Surrey, son of RICHARD FitzAlan "Copped Hat" Earl of Arundel & his second wife Eleanor of Lancaster (1346-beheaded Cheapside 21 Sep 1397, bur church of the Augustine Friars, Bread Street, London). He succeeded his father 1376 as Earl of Arundel. A member of the Council of Regency on the accession of King Richard II. He took an active part against the King with the Duke of Gloucester. Despite obtaining a pardon for his political offences in 1394, he was arrested 12 Jul 1297 and found guilty of treason. All his honours were forfeited. m thirdly ([Apr 1398/24 Nov 1399]) as his second wife, THOMAS de Poynings Lord St John of Basing, son of LUKE de Poynings & his wife Isabel de St John Baroness St John of Basing (-7 Mar 1429).
  • 4. EDMUND Mortimer (Ludlow Castle, Shropshire 9 Nov 1376-Harlech Castle [1409], before 13 May 1411). A manuscript narrating the foundation of Wigmore Abbey records the birth “apud Loddelowe V Id Nov…1376” of “Edmundus”, son of “Edmundo comite Marchiæ et Philippa consorte sua”[475]. The will of "Philippa de Mortimer Countess of March", dated 21 Nov 1378, proved 9 Feb 1381, chose burial “in the Conventual Church of the Holy Trinity in the Priory of Bustelesham Montagu...near the body of my...father”, bequeathed property to “Edmond my son”[476]. The will of "Edmond de Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster Lord of Wigmore", dated 1 May 1380, proved 22 Jan 1382, bequeathed property to “Roger son of John de Mortimer...our...mother...Roger our son and heir...our son Edmond...our daughter Elizabeth...our daughter Philippa...our...brother Mons Henry Earl of Northumberland...our...son Mons Henry Percy...”[477]. He was taken prisoner by Owen Glendower, whose daughter he married. m ([Nov 1402]) KATHERINE Glendower, daughter of OWAIN Glyndwr [Glendower] & his wife Margaret Hanmer (-before 1 Dec 1413, bur London, St Swithun’s Church). Edmund & his wife had [five or more] children:
    • a) ..... etc.
  • Earl Edmund had one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress:
  • 5. JOHN (-1424). The primary source which confirms his parentage has not been identified.
  • From: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL2.htm#EdmundMortimerMarchdied1381B

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  • Phillippa PLANTAGENET (C. Ulster)
  • Born: 16 Aug 1355, Eltham Palace, Kent, England
  • Died: 1 Jan 1382
  • Buried: Wigmore, Hertford, England
  • Father: Lionel PLANTAGENET of Antwerp (1º D. Clarence)
  • Mother: Elizabeth BURGH (C. Ulster)
  • Married: Edmund MORTIMER (3º E. March) (son of Roger Mortimer, 2º E. March, and Phillippa Montague) AFT 15 Feb 1359, Queen's Chapel, Reading Abbey, Berkshire, England
  • Children:
    • 1. Phillipa MORTIMER (C. Pembroke / C. Arundel) (d. 24 Sep 1401) (m. John Hastings, 3° E. Pembroke - m.2 Richard Fitzalan, 6º E. Arundel - m.3 Thomas De Poynings, 1º B. St. John of Basing)
    • 2. Elizabeth MORTIMER (b. 1370) (m.1 Henry Percy - m.2 Thomas Camoys, 1º B. Camoys)
    • 3. Roger MORTIMER (4º E. March) (m. Eleanor De Holland)
    • 4. Edmund MORTIMER (Sir)
    • 5. John MORTIMER (Sir)
  • From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/PLANTAGENET.htm#Phillippa PLANTAGENET (C. Ulster)1

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Edmund de Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March's Timeline

1351
February 1, 1351
Llangoed, Llyswen, Breconshire, Wales
February 1, 1351
Llys-Wen, Breconshire, Wales, United Kingdom
1352
February 1, 1352
Age 1
Llyswen, Breconshire, Wales
February 1, 1352
Age 1
Llyswen, Breconshire, Wales
February 1, 1352
Age 1
Llyswen, Breconshire, Wales
February 1, 1352
Age 1
Llyswen, Breconshire, Wales
1370
1370
Age 18
1371
February 12, 1371
Age 20
Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales
1372
1372
Age 20
Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales