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Edward Bangs

Also Known As: "Edward Banks", "Edward Banges"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Panfield, Essex, England
Death: February 16, 1678 (82-90)
Eastham, Cape Cod (Present Barnstable County), Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts)
Place of Burial: Eastham, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of John Bangs and Jane Bangs
Husband of Rebecca Hobart; Lydia Bangs and Rebecca Bangs
Father of Hannah Doane; John Bangs; Pandora Bangs; Edward Bangs, Jr.; Rebecca Sparrow and 7 others
Brother of John Bangs; James Bangs; Jonas Bangs; Sampson Bangs; Joshua Bangs and 4 others

Occupation: Captain, shipwright, Innkeeper
Managed by: Andrea Bernadette Twiss-Brooks
Last Updated:

About Edward Bangs

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massachusetts_Bay_Colony

http://www.ancestry.com/genealogy/records/edward-bangs_23959756

Edward Bangs was born in Essex, England on 5 Oct 1591 to John Bangs and Jane Chavis.

Edward married Lydia Hicks and had a child.

Edward married Rebecca Hobart and had 9 children. 

He passed away on Oct 1677.

Family Members

Parents

John Bangs 1567-1630

Jane Chavis 1565-1623

Spouse(s)

Lydia Hicks 1617-1633

Rebecca Hobart 1610-1651

Children

John Bangs 1628-1702

Rebecca Bangs 1634-1667

Sarah Bangs 1639-1683

Lydia Bangs 1643-1709

Hannah Bangs 1645-1694

Joshua Bangs 1645-1709

John Bangs 1647-Unknown

Bethia Bangs 1636-1696

Apphia Bangs 1651-1696

Mercy Bangs 1615-1688


Edward Bangs

On 22 June 1651 Edward Bangs of Eastham, yeoman, and Rebecca his wife, sold to "Mannasses Kemton" of Plymouth, yeoman, forty acres of upland in Plymouth [PCR 12:209]. Edward Bangs served on a dozen juries and on four grand juries between Oct. 1636 and Nov. 1643, and performed the usual minor services as a viewer, appraiser, and tax assessor. He was interested in the purchase of Nauset (Eastham), and his was one of the seven families which removed there about Apr. 1644. At the first town meeting in 1646, Edward was elected Treasurer, and held that office for nineteen years. He was said to have been Deputy in 1647, 1650-1, and other years. In 1656-7 he was licensed to sell "wine and strong waters" at Eastham.

His will, dated 19 Oct. 1677, giving his age as 86 years, was probated 5 Mar. 1677/8, and named all his children (below) except Rebecca, whose children were bequeathed 12 pounds. No wife was mentioned in the will.

Child of Edward and Lydia (Hicks) Bangs born at Plymouth:

i. JOHN, b. abt. 1630-1635; d. before 17 May 1708; m. at Plymouth, 23 Jan 1660/1, HANNAH SMALLEY

Children of Edward and Rebecca (Hobart) Bangs, the older ones born at Plymouth, the last four or five at Eastham:

ii. REBECCA, b. abt. 1636-7; d. abt. 1665-7; m. at Eastham, 26 Oct 1654, JONATHAN SPARROW, b. in England, {say 1630}, d. at Eastham, 21 Mar 1706-7.

iii. SARAH, b. {say 1634}; m. at Eastham, 1656, THOMAS HOWES, JR.

iv. JONATHAN, b. abt. 1641; d. at Brewster, Mass, 9 Nov 1729, m. (1) at Eastham, 16 July 1644, MARY MAYO; m. (2) SARAH ______; m. (3) in 1720, RUTH (COLE) YOUNG.

v. LYDIA, b. {say 1643}; d. after 1709; m. (1) 24 Dec 1661, BENJAMIN HIGGENS; m. (2) NICHOLAS SNOW.

vi. HANNAH, b. {say 1645}; living in 1677; m. 30 Apr 1662, JOHN DOANE.

vii. JOSHUA, b. {say 1647}; d. 14 Jan 1711; m. at Eastham, 1 Dec 1669, HANNAH SCUDDER.

viii. BETHIA, b. 28 May 1650; d. 15 Oct 1696; m. REV. GERSHOM HALL.

ix. MERCY, (twin), b. 15 Oct 1651; m. 28 Dec 1670, STEPHEN MERRICK.

x. APPHIA, (twin), b. 15 Oct 1651; living 1677; m. (1) 28 Dec 1670, JOHN KNOWLES; m. (2) before 1677, STEPHEN ATWOOD.

_____________________________________________________________

Last will and testament: http://docs.google.com/Doc?docid=0Ab_ICz_m4Fu7ZGdkZGNrcW5fM3NyNmZzNHJ6&hl=en

Information from various sources: http://docs.google.com/Doc?docid=0Ab_ICz_m4Fu7ZGdkZGNrcW5fNGhoaG40eGR2&hl=en

http://www.newenglandancestors.org/research/services/articles_6955.asp

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Passengers of the Anne and Little James 1623

Anne Passengers

  • 5.Edward Bangs – Born c.1591 - 86 in 1677. Per Banks he was of Panfield, Essex, son of John and Jane (Chavis) Bangs. Shipwright by occupation. The 1623 land division lists 4 shares for him under “Bangs.” From that it is thought that he may have had a family of wife and two children with him on the Anne that are mysteriously missing by the 1627 cattle division as he only drew one share then. It can only be surmised that something happened to them between 1623 and 1627 as he (re)married after 1627. Member of the 1626 Purchaser investment group as “Edward Banges.” He was with those chosen to lay out twenty-acre lots in the 1627 division. After 1627 married Lydia Hicks, daughter of Robert and Margaret Hicks, having been fellow passengers with him on the Anne in 1623. Died 1677. Three members of his family that may have been with him as counted in the 1623 land division:
  • 6.(Mrs) ___ Bangs – possibly died before 1627.
  • 7.(child) Bangs
  • 8.(child) Bangs[11][12]
  • 28.Lydia Hicks – Daughter of Robert and Margaret Hicks – she arrived with her mother Margaret on the Anne. After 1627 she married Edward Bangs, a fellow Anne passenger.[36][37]

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  • Genealogy of the Merrick--Mirick--Myrick family of Massachusetts (1902)
  • https://archive.org/details/genealogyofmerri00merr
  • https://archive.org/stream/genealogyofmerri00merr#page/15/mode/1up
  • 3. Stephen2 son of (William1) and Rebecca Merrick, born May 12, 1646, at Eastham, Mass. Married 1st. Mercy Bangs, dau. of Edward, Dec. 28, 1671. Within a year after his marriage Stephen joined the company which left Plymouth Colony and settled at New London and Norwich, Connecticut. Caulkin's History of Norwich says of him: — "Stephen Merrick married Mercy Bangs Dec. 28, 1671, he being 25 and she 20 years of age. Mercy and Apphia Bangs were twin daughters of Edward Bangs, of Plymouth Colony, and were married the same day — Apphia to John Knowles.

______________________

  • BANGS, Edward
  • b. 28 OCT 1591 Panfield, Essex, England
  • d. MAR 1677/8 Eastham, Barnstable, Mass.
  • Parents:
  • Father: BANGS, John
  • Mother: CHAVIS, Jane
  • Family:
  • Spouse: HICKS, Lydia
  • b. 1608 England
  • d. Eastham, Barnstable, Mass.
  • Parents:
  • Father: HICKS, Robert
  • Mother: Winslow, Margaret
  • Children:
    • BANGS, Rebecca
    • BANGS, John
    • BANGS, Joshua
    • BANGS, Sarah
    • BANGS, Jonathan
    • BANGS, Lydia
    • BANGS, Bethia
    • BANGS, Mercy
    • BANGS, Apphia
  • Family:
  • Marriage: 1634
  • Spouse: HOBART, Rebecca
  • b. 29 DEC 1611 Wymondham, Norfolk, England
  • d. 1679 Eastham, Barnstable, Mass.
  • Parents:
  • Father: HOBART, Edmund
  • Mother: Dewey, Margaret
  • Children:
    • BANGS, Hannah
  • From: http://www.genealogyofnewengland.com/f_0.htm#141

__________________ Check out Anderson’s article on Edward Bangs for a discussion of the claim that this Rebecca became his wife.5

In 1635 Rebecca married Edward Bangs, son of John Bangs (ca 1567-11 Feb 1633) & Jane Chavis (ca 1563-11 Feb 1633), in Plymouth, MA. Born ca 1591. Edward was baptized in Panfield, Essex, Eng., on 28 Oct 1591. Edward died in Feb 1677/8 in Eastham, MA.55

“Edward Bangs, one of the seven who began the settlement at Nausett in 1645, came over from England in the Ann in 1623, a fellow passenger with Nicholas Snow. At this period he was about thirty-two years of age, but whether a married or a single man is not positively known. In the beginning of the year 1624, it having been decided to allow each person who came over in the first three ships, one acre apiece to be laid out near the settlement as possible, for planting land, which each was to use for seven years, the records show that ‘Bangs’ was assigned four acres ‘towards Eel River,’ while Nicholas Snow was allowed the use of one acre. From this fact, it has been supposed Mr. Bangs was a married man with children at this early date. Mr. Bangs is mentioned in the records as being of John Jenney’s company, which numbered thirteen persons, and to whcih ‘the twelfth lot’ of cattle fell at the division, May 22, 1627. To this company ‘fell,’ says the recrod, ‘the great white back cow, which was brought over with the first of the Ann.’ Both Bradford and Morton say the first neat cattle were brought over in the 1624.

   “It having been decided at a court, Jan. 3rd, 1627-8, to allow every person twenty acres of land, besides the land each person had already, and Mr. Bangs, with Gov. Bradford, Edward Winslow, John Howland, Francis Cook and Joshua Pratt, was chosen with instructions to lay out the land near the water on both sides of the settlement, and to lay the lots out ‘5 acres in breadth by the water side, and 4 acres in length.’ These twenty acres laid out for each person were for tillage. At this period, no meadow ground had been divided in Plymouth. Each year the planters were shown where to cut their hay and how much, by men appointed. They now continued the same rules relative to this matter, which were satisfactory. 
   “Mr. Bangs was a tax payer in Plymouth, March 25, 1633, and his tax is put down as twelve shillings. The same year, with Mr. John Doane, he was appointed to divided meadow, and in 1634, with Nicholas Snow and others, to lay out roads at Plymouth. In 1634 and 1635, he was one of the assessors of Plymouth. In 1637, ‘for Eel River’ he was appointed one of the committee to view the hay ground and assist in laying it out. Among others appointed with him were Mr. Wm. Brewster, Mr. Stephen Hopkins, Mr. John Doane of Plymouth, and Jonathan Brewster of Duxbury. He was one of the grand jury the same year, also in 1638 and 1640. In 1639, he was an arbitrator to settle a case between Samuel Gorton and Thomas Clark. In 1642, he was employed to superintend the building of a barque at Plymouth, to which he contributed one-sixteenth part of the amount reased for its construction. This vessel is supposed to have been the first built in the Colony. 
   “Mr. Bangs was the first treasurer of Eastham, after the settlement in 1645. He was a surveyor of highways in 1647, 1650 and 1651, and perhaps a deputy to the court in 1652, which year he was also of the Grand Inquest. In 1657, he was allowed ‘to draw wine’ and strong water at Eastham, with instructions not to sell to the Indians. In 1658, he agreed to find”2 hoursesw and 2 men for the country’s service,’ upon the town providing ‘sufficient furniture for them.’ In 1659, he ‘promised freely’ to find ‘a man and horse with complete furniture, for the term of one year for the country’s service.’ Upon an order of the court to appoint overseers of the poor, with Nicholas Snow and Richard Higgins, he was appointed for Eastham in 1659. After this he took but little interest in public matters. 
   “Mr. Bangs died at Eastham, about the last of February in the year 1677-8, at the age of about 86 years, leaving no wife. His will, a lengthy document, in which he makes known his age, bears dat Oct. 19, 1677. It was presented for proof at Plymouth, March 5, 1677-8, Mr. John Freeman and Mr. Thomas Crosby upon oath, testifying as to its being his last will. Mr. Bangs’ younger son, Jonathan, was appointed the ‘whole and sole executor,’ who, it would appear, was somewhat of a favorite with his father, from whose hands he received a good share of his landed estate, which was considerable, he having been of that favored number called ‘Purchasers or Old Comers.’ Mr. Bangs undoubtedly resided with Jonathan the last years of his life.”55

http://aleph0.clarku.edu/~djoyce/gen/report/rr06/rr06_479.htm#P9390

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http://usinfo.state.gov/products/pubs/histryotln/

http://www.pilgrimhall.org/bangsedwardrecords.htm

Edward Bangs came in the Anne 1623. The vessels Ann and Little James parted company at sea. The Ann arrived the latter part of June, and the Little James some week or ten days later. Part of the number were the wives and children of persons already in the Colony. The ship Ann arrived in Plymouth in July 1623 accompanied by the Little James bringing new settlers along with many of the wives and children that had been left behind in Leyden when the Mayflower departed in 1620. (Source: Genealogical register of Plymouth Families - Emigrant Ancestors by John Camden Hotten 1874.) (The two sources do not agree on the month of arrival!)


Arrived on the Ann in 1623. Either he or his wife Lydia (Hicks) Bangs

____________________________

The Great Migration Begins

Sketches

PRESERVED PURITAN

 EDWARD BANGS 

ORIGIN: Unknown (but see COMMENTS)

MIGRATION: 1623 on the Anne

FIRST RESIDENCE: Plymouth

REMOVES: Eastham by 1645

OCCUPATION: Innkeeper ("Liberty is granted unto Edward Bangs to draw and sell wine and strong waters at Eastham, provided it be for the refreshment of the English, and not to be sold to the Indians," 6 October 1657 [PCR 3:123]; an account of liquor brought into Eastham dated 28 November 1664 included "Edward Bangs, six gallons of liquor" [PCR 4:100]).

FREEMAN: In "1633" Plymouth list of freemen in proximity to those admitted on 1 January 1632/3 [PCR 1:4]. In list of 7 March 1636/7 [PCR 1:52]. In Plymouth section of list of 1639, annotated as gone and added to list for Eastham [PCR 8:174, 177]. In Eastham portion of list possibly dated to 1658 [PCR 8:201]. In Eastham list of 29 May 1670 [PCR 5:278].

EDUCATION: Signed his will and several deeds.

OFFICES: Deputy to Plymouth Court for Eastham, 7 June 1652 [PCR 3:9]; Plymouth grand jury, 7 March 1636/7, 5 June 1638, 2 June 1640, 1 March 1641/2, 7 June 1652 [PCR 1:54, 87, 155; 2:34; 3:9]; Plymouth petit jury, 4 October 1636, 3 January 1636/7, 3 September 1639, 3 December 1639, 3 March 1639/40, 3 August 1641, 6 September 1641, 7 December 1641, 1 March 1641/2, 6 June 1643, 7 November 1643 [PCR 1:44, 7:4, 13, 14, 16, 22, 23, 25, 28, 35, 36]; committee to lay out land, 3 January 1627/8, 1 February 1640/1 [PCR 12:14, 2:7]; committee to divide meadow, 1 July 1633 [PCR 1:14]; committee to assess taxes, 5 January 1634/5, 1 March 1635/6 [PCR 1:33, 38]; Plymouth representative to committee to reunite Plymouth and Duxbury (but he did not serve), 14 March 1635/6 [PCR 1:41]; committee to allocate hay ground, 20 March 1636/7, 2 October 1637, 1 June 1640 [PCR 1:55, 67, 153]; committee to lay out highway, 1 February 1640/1, 24 February 1652 [PCR 2:7, 3:61]; coroner's jury, 30 October 1667 [PCR 4:169]; Eastham highway surveyor, 1 June 1647, 4 June 1650, 3 June 1651 [PCR 2:115, 155, 168]; Eastham treasurer, 1646-1665 [Bangs Gen 11]. In Plymouth section of 1643 list of men able to bear arms [PCR 8:189].

ESTATE: In the 1623 Plymouth division of land "Bangs" [no first name] received four acres as a passenger on the Anne in 1623 [PCR 12:6]. In the 1627 Plymouth division of cattle "Edward Banges" was the thirteenth person in the twelfth company [PCR 12:1].

  In the Plymouth tax lists of 25 March 1633 and 27 March 1634 Edward Bangs was assessed 12s. [PCR 1:10, 27]. Included in the undated list of Purchasers [PCR 2:177].
  On 20 March 1636/7 "John Banges" was assigned hay ground at Saggaquash (jointly with Edward Doty) [PCR 1:56, presumably a simple scribal error]. On 2 November 1640 granted ten acres of meadow in the South Meadows [PCR 1:166]. On 7 September 1641 "Edward Banges is granted a parcel of fourscore acres of upland about Warren's Wells" [PCR 2:25]. On 17 October 1642 "Whereas fourscore acres of upland are formerly granted to Edward Banges at Warren's Wells, he now desiring to have some land near his house, it is granted that he shall look out a parcel of land, which upon view shall be laid forth for him, and to be deducted out of the 80 acres he should have at Warren's Wells" [PCR 2:48].
  On 7 September 1643 Joyce Wallen, widow, sold to Edward Bangs of Plymouth for £8 "all that her house and messuage situate and being at Hobs Hole or Wellingsly with the garden place and uplands thereunto adjoining" [PCR 12:95]. On 22 June 1651 Edward Bangs of Eastham sold to Samuel Hicks of Plymouth for £3 10s. "a parcel of marsh meadow lying at the high pines on the Salthouse Beach" [PCR 12:208-09]. On 22 June 1651 "Edward Banges of the town of Nawsett alias Eastham ... yeoman" sold to "Mannasses Kemton" of Plymouth, yeoman, for £13 forty acres of upland in Plymouth near Browne's Rock, as well as "all the meadow or marsh that is on the island or spot of land commonly called and known by the name of Sagaquas"; "Rebeckah the wife of the said Edward Banges" consented to this deed [PCR 12:209].
  On 12 November 1666 "Edward Banges and Daniel Cole Sen[io]r of Eastham, yeomen," sold to James Mathews of Yarmouth, yeoman, for £10 "all the purchase lands that belonged unto and were the lands of Edward Banges and Daniell Cole ... between the two brooks commonly called Bound Brook and Stony Brook ... in Yarmouth" [PCLR 3:91-92].
  On 23 February 1676 Edward Bangs of Eastham for "my tender love and fatherly love unto my natural son Joshua Bangs" deeded him "all that my messuage, dwelling house and housing and lands, both upland and meadowing, lying and being in the township of Eastham," viz: five acres of upland "granted to me by the town for a houselot," with the dwelling house on it; four acres granted to Daniel Cole Sr. for a houselot; three acres granted to George Crispe for a houselot; four acres and half granted to John Jenkins for a houselot; two acres granted to Job Cole; fourteen acres granted to Ralph Smith; three acres "of meadow granted me by the town"; four acres of meadow at Great Blackfish River; one acre of meadow granted to John Jenkins; all of which parcels "appear more at length in the town book of records" [PCLR 4:134-36].
  In his will, dated 19 October 1677 and proved 5 March 1677/8, "Edward Banges, aged 86 years," made son Jonathan sole executor and bequeathed to him "all my purchased land at Namskekett," two acres and a half of meadow, "all my purchase land at Pocomett[?]," an acre and a half of meadow "at a place called the acars," one acre at the harbor's mouth, "a parcel of upland and meadow lying at Rock harbour which I had in exchange of John Done," and "all those things which I have at his house"; to son John "that twenty acres of upland at Pochett that he hath built upon," five acres adjoining to the twenty acres, "that land which I have at Pochett Island," two acres of meadow at Boat Meadow, and three-quarters of an acre at the head of Boat Meadow; to son Joshua "the house that I lived in and all the housing belonging to it," twenty-eight acres of land adjoining, three acres of meadow at Boat Meadow, one acre of meadow at Boat Meadow, four acres of meadow at the head of Blackfish Creek, and fourteen acres of upland at Pochett; to son Jonathan's eldest son Edward Bangs twenty-five acres of upland at Pochett Field, one acre of meadow at Rock Harbor, and "half an acre of meadow lying at Great Namscekett which I bought of Daniell Cole"; to "my daughter Howes, my daughter Higgens, my daughter Done, my daughter Hall, my daughter Merricke, and my daughter Attwood, four pounds apiece at my decease, and I give to my grandchildren, viz: the children of my daughter Rebecka deceased four pounds at my decease" [PCPR 3:2:106].

BIRTH: About 1591 based on his stated age of eighty-six on 19 October 1677 [PCPR 3:2:106] (although this may be exaggerated).

DEATH: Eastham between 19 October 1677 (date of will) and 5 March 1677/8 (date of probate).

MARRIAGE: (1) By about 1633 Lydia Hicks, baptized St. Mary Magdalen, Bermondsey, Surrey, 6 September 1612, daughter of ROBERT HICKS [TAG 51:58]; she apparently died within a year or two.

  (2) By about 1635 Rebecca ____; she joined her husband as grantor on a deed of 22 June 1651 [PCR 12:209].

CHILDREN:

With first wife 
   i   JOHN, b. say 1634; m. Eastham 23 January 1660[/1] Hannah Smalley [PCR 8:28; MD 7:17]. (If his deed to George Partridge, recorded in 1657, is correctly dated 21 June 1652, then he was probably born as early as 1631, which would also push back the date on which his father married Lydia Hicks [MD 12:83-84].) 
With second wife 
   ii   REBECCA, b. say 1636; m. Eastham 26 October 1654 Jonathan Sparrow [PCR 8:15]. 
   iii   SARAH, b. say 1638; m. about 1657 Thomas Howes [MD 6:233]. 
   iv   JONATHAN, b. say 1640; m. (1) Eastham 16 July 1664 Mary Mayo [PCR 8:56]; m. (2) by 1719 Sarah _____; m. (3) Eastham (int.) 23 July 1720 "Mrs. Ruth Young" [MD 28:111] (widow of John Young and daughter of Daniel Cole). 
   v   LYDIA, b. say 1642; m. Eastham 24 December 1661 Benjamin Higgins [MD 8:12]. 
   vi   HANNAH, b. say 1644; m. Eastham 30 April 1662 John Doane [MD 8:89]. 
   vii   JOSHUA, b. say 1646; m. Eastham 1 December 1669 Hannah Scudder [PCR 8:58]. 
   viii   BETHIA, b. Eastham 28 May 1650 [PCR 8:15]; m. by 1669 Gershom Hall [Bangs Gen 27-28, reproducing original Barnstable deed of 1 April 1729 in which Samuel Hall, Jonathan Hall and Mary Chess sell land in Eastham "that descended to us by the right & title of our honorable deceased mother Bethiah Hall wife of our honored father Gershom Hall which said right descended to her our said deceased mother from her honored father Edward Bangs deceased our honored grandfather"]. 
   ix   MERCY (twin), b. Eastham 15 October 1651 [PCR 8:15]; m. Eastham 28 December 1670 Steven Merrick [PCR 8:57]. 
   x   APPHIA (twin), b. Eastham 15 October 1651 [PCR 8:15]; m. (1) Eastham 28 December 1670 John Knowles [PCR 8:57; NEHGR 79:293-95]; m. (2) by 6 March 1677 Stephen Wood Jr. [PCR 5:220].   

COMMENTS: Mary Walton Ferris argues that the immigrant to Plymouth was the Edward Bangs baptized at Panfield, Essex, on 28 October 1591, but she does not present all the evidence, and the evidence which is printed is not sufficient to prove the origin [Dawes-Gates 2:61].

  How many wives did Edward Bangs have, and when? Since he was granted four acres in the 1623 land division, some have proposed that he brought with him a wife and at least one child, and that they must have died by 1627, when they do not appear in the 1627 cattle division. However, this is not the only possible interpretation of this record: the other three persons with Edward Bangs may have been servants, or the record itself may be erroneous. Thus, pending discoveries in English records, no wife prior to Lydia Hicks is assumed here. (Although if Edward's claimed age is close to correct, he certainly would have been old enough to have a family in 1623.)
  Both ROBERT HICKS and his wife MARGARET name in their wills grandson John Bangs. John, the son of Edward Bangs, married in 1660, which would be consistent with a birthdate about 1635, thus making him the eldest child of Edward. On 1 May 1660 "George Watson requested the Court in the behalf of his son, John Watson, and his nephew, John Banges," that the records be altered to reflect Robert Hicks as purchaser at Dartmouth, rather than Samuel Hicks [PCR 3:186]; George Watson had married a daughter of Robert Hicks, which explains the relationship to John Bangs.
  In a deed of 22 June 1651, Edward Bangs is joined by his wife Rebecca in selling land in Plymouth. Thus, she was certainly mother of the twins born later in 1651, and almost certainly mother of all other children except John Bangs. Citing a supposed entry in the Hobart diary, Mary Walton Ferris suggested that Rebecca was daughter of Edmund Hobart of Hingham, but this entry may not have existed, and the identity of Rebecca (_____) Bangs remains unknown [NEHGR 121:4, 56].
  On 8 November 1638 "Edward Banges, of [Plymouth], yeoman," posted bond of £20 as surety for John Smith of Plymouth, laborer [PCR 1:103]. On 5 March 1643/4 he was surety for John Smith of Eel River [PCR 2:69].

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: The basic genealogy for this family is Dean Dudley's History and Genealogy of The Bangs Family in America, with Genealogical Tables and Notes (Montrose MA 1896, cited above as Bangs Gen). This volume is basically sound, with complete transcripts of many important documents, including some Barnstable deeds which are probably not otherwise accessible. But there are also the usual idiosyncrasies typical of this author. As an example we are told that "The court at Plymouth granted to Edward Bangs eighty acres of land on condition that he contribute one-sixteenth part toward building a barque of 40 or 50 tons. He is said to have superintended the building of the vessel, being a shipwright by trade" [p. 10]. The Plymouth records state merely that on 23 January 1641/2 Edward Bangs contributed one-sixteenth of the cost of building the bark, and say nothing about any award of land in connection with this contribution [PCR 2:31]. The grant of land was made at court on 7 September 1641, five months before the contribution [PCR 2:25]. Beyond this, there is no evidence that he had anything to do with building the bark, or that he was a shipwright. As noted above, he was at times an innkeeper, and was otherwise called yeoman.

  Half a century later Mary Walton Ferris did her usual thorough job on Edward Bangs [Dawes-Gates 2:61-68].

________________________________

A Genealogical Profile of Edward Bangs

From http://www.newenglandancestors.org/pdfs/bangs_edward.pdf

Birth: Edward Bangs was born in England about 1591.

Death: He died in Eastham, Massachusetts, between October 19, 1677, and March 5, 1677/8, describing himself in his will as “aged 86 years.”

Ship: Anne or Little James, 1623

Life in England: Edward has been tentatively identified as the son of John and Jane (Chavis) Bangs of Panfield, Essex, who was baptized on October 28, 1591.

Life in New England: Edward Bangs came to Plymouth in

1623. In the land division of that year he received four acres,

causing some to believe that he had a wife and two children at that time.The other three people may, however, have been servants or other non-family members placed with him. Edward lived in Plymouth until about 1644 when he and a number of others moved to Nauset (Eastham). He was a freeman in 1633 and served in a number of offices, including “layer-out of lands,” deputy, surveyor, treasurer of Eastham, and on various juries and committees. In Eastham he was an innkeeper.

Family: Edward married Lydia Hicks by 1633 and possibly several years earlier.They had one son and she died within a year or two. He married (2) Rebecca _____ about 1635.They had nine children. She was not mentioned in his will and apparently predeceased him.

Child of Edward and Lydia Bangs:

• John was born about 1634, possibly earlier. He married

Hannah Smalley on January 23, 1660/1, in Eastham but there are no children recorded. He died between January 27, 1702/3, and May 17, 1708.

Children of Edward and Rebecca Bangs:

• Rebecca was born about 1636. She married Jonathan

Sparrow on October 26, 1654, in Eastham and had eight children. She died before October 19, 1677.

• Sarah was born about 1638. She married Thomas Howes, Jr. in Eastham about 1657 and had four children.

• Jonathan was born about 1640. He married (1) Mary Mayo in Eastham on July 16, 1664, and had twelve children. He married (2) Sarah _____ by 1719 and (3) Mrs. Ruth Young on July 23, 1720. He died in Brewster on November 9, 1728.

• Lydia was born about 1642. She married Benjamin Higgins on December 24, 1661, in Eastham and had nine children.

• Hannah was born about 1644. She married John Doane on

April 30, 1662, in Eastham and had eight children. She was

still alive in 1677.

• Joshua was born about 1646. He married Hannah Scudder on December 1, 1669, in Eastham, but left no children. He died on January 14, 1711.

• Bethia was born on May 28, 1650. She married Gershom Hall by 1669 and had five children. She died on October 15, 1696.

• Mercy was born October 15, 1651. She married Stephen

Merrick on December 28, 1670, in Eastham and had five children.

• Apphia, her twin, married (1) John Knowles on December

28, 1670, and had two sons. She married (2) Stephen Atwood Jr. by March 6, 1677, and had three or four children.

For Further Information:

Robert C. Anderson. The Great Migration Begins. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995.

Robert C. Anderson. The Pilgrim Migration. Boston: New

England Historic Genealogical Society, 2004.

Lydia B. P. Brownson, Grace Held, and Doris Norton.

Genealogical Notes on Cape Cod Families. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1972, microfilm.

Dudley Dean. History and Genealogy of the Bangs Family in

America. Montrose, Mass.: Privately printed, 1896.

Mary W. Ferris. Dawes-Gates Ancestral Lines:Vol. 2. Privately published by the author, 1931.

Eugene A. Stratton. Plymouth Colony: Its History and People, 1620–1691. Salt Lake City: Ancestry Publishing, 1986.

A collaboration between PLIMOTH PLANTATION and the

NEW ENGLAND HISTORIC GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY®

www.PlymouthAncestors.org

_____________________________

Birth: Oct., 1591 Panfield Essex, England Death: Oct. 19, 1677 Eastham Barnstable County Massachusetts, USA

Probably baptised 28 Oct 1591 in Panfield, Essex, England to John & Jane (Chavis) Bangs. Married first by about 1633 Lydia Hicks, baptized St. Mary Magdalen, Bermondsey, Surrey, 6 September 1612, daughter of ROBERT HICKS. Married 2nd Rebecca (Probably Hobart) by 1635 in Plymouth or Eastham. Died between 19 Oct 1677 & 5 Mar 1678 in Eastham MA. Their child: Rebecca (Bangs) Sparrow.


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Edward Bangs, Plymouth, born perhaps 1592, at Chichester, Co. Sussex, came in the Ann, 1623, and married after 1627, as is presumed Lydia, daughter of Robert Hicks, had Rebecca; John; Sarah, Jonathan, b. 1640; Lydia; Hannah; Joshua; Bethia, 28 May 1650; Mercy, and Apphia, twins 15 Oct. 1651.

He had removed with Gov. Prence, 1644, to Eastham, was a shipwright, and directed the labor, says a reasonable tradition, on the first vessel built in the Colony although earlier ones had been launched in Massachusetts, was a representative, 1647, and served other years. He died 1677. In his will of that year, 19 October, . . . he evidenced to us that all his children were then living except Rebecca, who had married 26 October 1654 Jonathan Sparrow, and left children. . . . No certainty is attainable as to the order of births of most of his children.

http://www.webster1.com/genealogy/d4.htm#P1226

According to tradition in the Bangs family, Edward was a native or inhabitant of Chichester, a city in the County of Sussex, England. He is supposed to be the ancestor of all by the name of Bangs in America. He came over from England in the Anne, one of the three first vessels which arrived at Plymouth. The other two were the Fortune and the Mayflower, and the passengers in these three vessels are commonly called the "Pilgrims of Plymouth", as they united in forming the government, dividing the lands, etc. The Mayflower arrived in Dec., 1620, with Carver, Bradford, etc. The Fortune arrived Nov., 1621, and the Anne in July, 1623. In 1645 Edward Bangs with his family moved to a new settlement of Cape Cod at the spot, or near it, where the pilgrims first set foot on land previous to their final landing at Plymouth. This settlement, for some time, retained the Indian name of Nauset, but afterwards was called Eastham, a name still belonging to a part of the territory. The Pilgrim's name was at first most frequently spelt "Banges", and was so inscribed on tombstones. I think he was often called "Captain", as he owned and commanded vessels, although he also carried on farming and leather manufacturing quiet extensively. In regard to where the pilgrim Edward Bangs' house stood we have evidence, as Mr. Josiah Paine writes, that it was on the borders of Town Cove, but the exact spot is not known. Undoubtedly he was buried in the ancient cemetery of Eastham, where others of the early settlers lie. The old meeting house stood near the cemetery. All of the first settlers were located in Eastham, but soon afterwards some of them went over to Pochet, where the land was better. In dividing his lands by his will, Edward Bangs gave Capt. Jonathan his portion principally in Satucket, that is Brewster, as it is now called, and Capt. Jonathan settled there about 1694, having sons and daughters, while the other two sons of the pilgrim had none.

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"MIGRATION: 1623 on the Anne FIRST RESIDENCE: Plymouth REMOVES: Eastham by 1645 OCCUPATION: Innkeeper ("Liberty is granted unto Edward Bangs to draw and sell wine and strong waters at Eastham, provided it be for the refreshment of the English, and not to be sold to the Indians," 6 October 1657 [PCR 3:123]; an account of liquor brought into Eastham dated 28 November 1664 included "Edward Bangs, six gallons of liquor" [PCR 4:100]). FREEMAN: In "1633" Plymouth list of freemen in proximity to those dated to 1658 [PCR 8:201]. In Eastham list of 29 May 1670 [PCR 5:278]. EDUCATION: Signed his will and several deeds. OFFICES: Deputy to Plymouth Court for Eastham, 7 June 1652 [PCR 3:9]; Plymouth grand jury, 7 March 1636/7, 5 June 1638, 2 June 1640, 1 March 1641/2, 7 June 1652 [PCR 1:54, 87, 155; 2:34; 3:9]; Plymouth petit jury, 4 October 1636, 3 January 1636/7, 3 September 1639, 3 De-cember 1639, 3 March 1639/40, 3 August 1641, 6 September 1641, 7 De-cember 1641, 1 March 1641/2, 6 June 1643, 7 November 1643 [PCR 1:44, 7:4, 13, 14, 16, 22, 23, 25, 28, 35, 36]; committee to lay out land, 3 January 1627/8, 1 February 1640/1 [PCR 12:14, 2:7]; committee'to di-vide meadow, 1 July 1633 [PCR 1:14]; committee to assess taxes, 5 Janu-ary 1634/5, 1 March 1635/6 [PCR 1:33, 38]; Plymouth representative to committee to reunite Plymouth and Duxbury (but he did not serve), 14 March 1635/6 [PCR 1:41]; committee to allocate hay ground, 20 March 1636/7, 2 October 1637, 1 June 1640 [PCR 1:55, 67, 153]; committee to lay out highway, 1 February 1640/1, 24 February 1652 [PCR 2:7, 3:61]; coroner's jury, 30 October 1667 [PCR 4:169]; Eastham highway sur-veyor, 1 June 1647, 4 June 1650, 3 June 1651 [PCR 2:115, 155, 168]; Eastham treasurer, 1646-1665 [Bangs Gen 11]. In Plymouth section of 1643 list of men able to bear arms [PCR 8:189]. ESTATE: In the 1623 Plymouth division of land "Bangs" [no first name] received four acres as a passenger on the Anne in 1623 [PCR 12:6]. In the 1627 Plymouth division of cattle "Edward Banges" was the thirteenth person in the twelfth company [PCR 12:1]. In the Plymouth tax lists of 25 March 1633 and 27 March 1634 Edward Bangs was assessed 12s. [PCR 1:10, 27]. Included in the undated list of Purchasers [PCR 2:177]. On 20 March 1636/7 "John Banges" was assigned hay ground at Saggaquash (jointly with Edward Doty) [PCR 1:56, presumably a simple scribal error]. On 2 November 1640 granted ten acres of meadow in the South Meadows [PCR 1:166]. On 7 September 1641 "Edward Banges is granted a parcel of fourscore acres of upland about Warren's Wells" [PCR 2:25]. On 17 October 1642 "Whereas fourscore acres of upland are formerly granted to Edward Banges at Warren's Wells, he now desir-ing to have some land near his house, it is granted that he shall look out a parcel of land, which upon view shall be laid forth for him, and to be deducted out of the 80 acres he should have at Warren's Wells" [PCR 2:48]. On 7 September 1643 Joyce Wallen, widow, sold to Edward Bangs of Plymouth for £8 "all that her house and messuage situate and being at Hobs Hole or Wellingsly with the garden place and uplands thereunto adjoining" [PCR 12:95]. On 22 June 1651 Edward Bangs of Eastham sold to Samuel Hicks of Plymouth for £3 10s. "a parcel of marsh meadow lying at the high pines on the Salthouse Beach" [PCR 12:208-09]. On 22 June 1651 "Edward Banges of the town of Nawsett alias Eastham ... yeoman" sold to "Mannasses Kemton" of Plymouth, yeoman, for £13 for-ty acres of upland in Plymouth near Browne's Rock, as well as "all the meadow or marsh that is on the island or spot of land commonly called and known by the name of Sagaquas"; "Rebeckah the wife of the said Ed-ward Banges" consented to this deed [PCR 12:209]. On 12 November 1666 "Edward Banges and Daniel Cole Sen[io]r of Eastham, yeomen," sold to James Mathews of Yarmouth, yeoman, for £10 "all the purchase lands that belonged unto and were the lands of Ed-ward Banges and Daniell Cole ... between the two brooks commonly called Bound Brook and Stony Brook ... in Yarmouth" [PCLR 3:91-92]. On 23 February 1676 Edward Bangs of Eastham for "my tender love and fatherly love unto my natural son Joshua Bangs" deeded him "all that my messuage, dwelling house and housing and lands, both upland and meadowing, lying and being in the township of Eastham," viz: five acres of upland "granted to me by the town for a houselot," with the dwelling house on it; four acres granted to Daniel Cole Sr. for a houselot; three acres granted to George Crispe for a houselot; four acres and half granted to John Jenkins for a houselot; two acres granted to Job Cole; fourteen acres granted to Ralph Smith; three acres "of meadow granted me by the town"; four acres of meadow at Great Blackfish River; one acre of meadow granted to John Jenkins; all of which parcels "ap-pear more at length in the town book of records" [PCLR 4:134-36]. In his will, dated 19 October 1677 and proved 5 March 1677/8, "Ed-ward Banges, aged 86 years," made son Jonathan sole executor and be-queathed to him "all my purchased land at Namskekett," two acres and a half of meadow, "all my purchase land at Pocomett[?]," an acre and a half of meadow "at a place called the acars," one acre at the harbor's mouth, "a parcel of upland and meadow lying at Rock harbour which I had in exchange of John Done," and "all those things which I have at his house"; to son John "that twenty acres of upland at Pochett that he hath built upon," five acres adjoining to the twenty acres, "that land which I have at Pochett Island," two acres of meadow at Boat Meadow, and three-quarters of an acre at the head of Boat Meadow; to son Joshua "the house that I lived in and all the housing belonging to it," twenty-eight acres of land adjoining, three acres of meadow at Boat Meadow, one acre of meadow at Boat Meadow, four acres of meadow at the head of Blackfish Creek, and fourteen acres of upland at Pochett; to son Jonathan's eldest son Edward Bangs twenty-five acres of upland at Pochett Field, one acre of meadow at Rock Harbor, and "half an acre of meadow lying at Great Namscekett which I bought of Daniell Cole"; to "my daughter Howes, my daughter Higgens, my daughter Done, my daughter Hall, my daughter Merricke, and my daughter Attwood, four pounds apiece at my decease, and I give to my grandchildren, viz: the children of my daughter Rebecka deceased four pounds at my decease" [PCPR 3:2:106].

BIRTH: About 1591 based on his stated age of eighty-six on 19 October 1677 [PCPR 3:2:106] (although this may be exaggerated).

DEATH: Eastham between 19 October 1677 (date of will) and 5 March 1677/8 (date of probate)."


Edward came to America on the ship "Ann' on 10 Jul 1623. He and John Doane founded Eastham, Massachusetts.


  • Edward arrived in New England in 1623 on either the ship Anne or Little James.
  • He was a shipwright.
view all 49

Edward Bangs's Timeline

1591
October 28, 1591
Panfield, Essex, England
October 28, 1591
Panfield, Essex, England
October 28, 1591
Panfield, Essex, England
October 28, 1591
Of, Panfield, Essex, England
October 28, 1591
Panfield, Essex, England
October 28, 1591
Panfield, Essex, England
October 28, 1591
Panfield, Essex, England
1634
1634
Age 42
Plymouth, (Present Plymouth County), Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts)