Edwin B. Nolt

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Edwin B. Nolt

Birthdate: (82)
Birthplace: Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States
Death: April 21, 1992 (82)
Place of Burial: West Earl Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Edwin H. Nolt and Mary Nolt
Husband of Annie W Nolt
Father of Clarence M Nolt
Brother of Levi Burkholder Nolt; Mary Burkholder High; Katie Burkholder Kurtz; Ada Burkholder Hoover and Joseph Burkholder Nolt

Managed by: Jim Wile
Last Updated:

About Edwin B. Nolt

Married Anna W. Martin December 10, 1931 Married Katie B. Horning September 24, 1959

EDWIN NOLT,82,INVENTED HAY BALER

 Edwin B. Nolt, an inventor whose automatic hay baler helped transform New Holland Machine Company into a worldwide manufacture, died early Tuesday at Lancaster General Hospital after a long illness.
  A resident of 355 N. Railroad Ave., New Holland, he was the husband of Katie B. Horning Nolt, who died in November 1957.
  Nolt was a retired engineer with the former New Holland Machine Company, now Ford New Holland. He retired about 5 years ago.
  He held 61 patents, most notably a 1941 patent for the world's first hay baler with fully automatic pickup of the crop.
  Before's Nolt invention, farming had two options; cut their hay and haul it to a stationary baler, or hire five men to tie bales as a machine pressed hay into blocks behind a moving tractor.
   "It revolutionized the haying industry worldwide," said Ford New Holland spokeman Gene Hemphill.
   "There are certain landmarks in the history of agricultural equipment, like the invention of the tractor and the three-point hitch. Ed Nolt's invention stands right alongside those," Hemphill said.
    According to newspaper records, Nolt and Kinzers implement dealer Arthur S. Young made and sold about 100 of the balers between 1937 and 1939. The device later was called an Automaton.
    In 1940, they sold the rights to the machine to George C. Delp and the late Rev. J. Henry Fisher, Ira A. Daffin and Raymond D. Buckwalter, who had taken over the struggling New Holland Machine Company.
     With Nolt joining the company, it successfully mass-produced his hay baler and helped turn the ailing company around.
     "That is what really put New Holland Machine Company on the map," recalled Delp today. "Not only the baler, but he came with it. He was quite an innovator."
     Nolt was a member of Groffdale Frame Mennonite Church.
     Born in West Earl Township, he was the son of the late Edwin H. and Mary Burkholder Nolt.
      He is survived by two sons, Clarence M. of Bethel R1 and Edwin M. Jr. of New Holland; two daughters, Vera, wife of Leon Burkholder of New Holland, and Shirley A. Glick of Gordonville; 23 grandchildren; and 25 great-grandchildren.

Lancaster Intellinger Journal Obit provided by Ruth George


Married Anna W. Martin December 10, 1931 Married Katie B. Horning September 24, 1959

EDWIN NOLT,82,INVENTED HAY BALER

 Edwin B. Nolt, an inventor whose automatic hay baler helped transform New Holland Machine Company into a worldwide manufacture, died early Tuesday at Lancaster General Hospital after a long illness.
  A resident of 355 N. Railroad Ave., New Holland, he was the husband of Katie B. Horning Nolt, who died in November 1957.
  Nolt was a retired engineer with the former New Holland Machine Company, now Ford New Holland. He retired about 5 years ago.
  He held 61 patents, most notably a 1941 patent for the world's first hay baler with fully automatic pickup of the crop.
  Before's Nolt invention, farming had two options; cut their hay and haul it to a stationary baler, or hire five men to tie bales as a machine pressed hay into blocks behind a moving tractor.
   "It revolutionized the haying industry worldwide," said Ford New Holland spokeman Gene Hemphill.
   "There are certain landmarks in the history of agricultural equipment, like the invention of the tractor and the three-point hitch. Ed Nolt's invention stands right alongside those," Hemphill said.
    According to newspaper records, Nolt and Kinzers implement dealer Arthur S. Young made and sold about 100 of the balers between 1937 and 1939. The device later was called an Automaton.
    In 1940, they sold the rights to the machine to George C. Delp and the late Rev. J. Henry Fisher, Ira A. Daffin and Raymond D. Buckwalter, who had taken over the struggling New Holland Machine Company.
     With Nolt joining the company, it successfully mass-produced his hay baler and helped turn the ailing company around.
     "That is what really put New Holland Machine Company on the map," recalled Delp today. "Not only the baler, but he came with it. He was quite an innovator."
     Nolt was a member of Groffdale Frame Mennonite Church.
     Born in West Earl Township, he was the son of the late Edwin H. and Mary Burkholder Nolt.
      He is survived by two sons, Clarence M. of Bethel R1 and Edwin M. Jr. of New Holland; two daughters, Vera, wife of Leon Burkholder of New Holland, and Shirley A. Glick of Gordonville; 23 grandchildren; and 25 great-grandchildren.

Lancaster Intellinger Journal Obit provided by Ruth George

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Edwin B. Nolt's Timeline

1910
March 10, 1910
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States
1934
March 25, 1934
Age 24
1992
April 21, 1992
Age 82
????
West Earl Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States