Brig. General Elijah Clark

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Brig. General Elijah Clark

Birthdate: (66)
Birthplace: Pertie Precinct, Edgecombe, NC, USA
Death: December 15, 1799 (66)
Woodburn, Lincoln County, Georgia, United States
Place of Burial: Lincolnton, Lincoln County, Georgia, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of John Clark, Jr. and Mary Clark
Husband of Hannah Clarke and Hannah Clark
Father of Molly Clarke; John Clark, Governor; Sarah Walton; Mary Clark; Nancy Thompson and 5 others
Brother of Alston Clark; William Clark; John Clark, Jr.; Lewis Clark and Thomas Clark
Half brother of Alston Clark

Occupation: Revolutionary and Indian Wars
Managed by: John G Miner
Last Updated:

About Brig. General Elijah Clark

  • DAR Ancestor #: A022268
  • Service: GEORGIA Rank: COLONEL
  • Birth: 1733 BERTIE CO NORTH CAROLINA
  • Death: 12-15-1799 WILKES CO GEORGIA
  • Service Source: HEITMAN, HIST REG OF OFFICERS OF THE CONT ARMY DURING THE WAR OF THE REV, 1775-1783, P 158; CANDLER, REV RECS OF GA VOL 2, P 137; DAVIS, GA CITIZENS & SOLS OF THE AM REV, P 89
  • Service Description: 1) ALSO CAPT 1776, LCOL 1779
  • Comments: EL- POLLY MARR CHARLES WILLIAMSON. EL- JOHN MARR NANCY WILLIAMSON, ONLY HAD 2 CHILDREN, AMY & WYLIE. EL- GIBSON NEVER MARRIED.

From: http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~lksstarr/reports/elijahpi.txt

Gen. ELIJAH Clark (1733-1799) of GA was the son of John and Mary (Turner, Griffith or Gibson) Clark who migrated to Anson Co., NC from Edgecombe Co. NC before 1750. This is the same John Clark who sold land to Quaker migrants (beginning with Benjamin DUMAS Sr.) from Louisa Co. VA in the late 1740's.

From : http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ncanson/people/clark2.htm

In addition to John, Sarah, and Elizabeth cited above, Elijah and Hannah Clark had six other children. Susan, as noted earlier, died in infancy. Nancy Clark married Jesse Thompson whom she divorced in 1818. Elijah Jr. and Frances were twins. Frances married Edwin Mounger. Elijah Jr. graduated from Yale University in 1801 and married Margaret Long. They later migrated to Louisiana where Elijah Jr. practiced law in Point Coupee Parish and speculated in land. Mary (Polly) Clark married first, Charles Williamson, brother of John’s wife Nancy, and second, William Hobby. Gibson Clark, born in 1784 (some say 1781), graduated from the University of Georgia, practiced law in Augusta and served in the Georgia Legislature. He never married and died in 1847.

http://home.comcast.net/~teresitaweaver/clarkeeli/pafg05.htm#1268


Elijah Clarke (1733 – December 15, 1799), born in Anson County, North Carolina, was a Georgian hero of the American Revolutionary War.

Clarke moved from North Carolina to Wilkes County, Georgia, in 1774 where he joined the patriot militia. During the war, he served under Andrew Pickens and alongside John Dooly in various skirmishes including the battles of Alligator Bridge and Kettle Creek.

On August 18 (or 19), 1780, Cols. Clarke, Isaac Shelby with Overmountain Men from the Watauga Association at Sycamore Shoals near present day Elizabethton, Tennessee, and James Miller from the Ninety-Six District of South Carolina, led 200 mounted Patriots in a surprising victory aganist a larger British Loyalist force numbering 500 men at the Battle of Musgrove Mill near the present day city of Clinton, South Carolina.

In September 1780, Clarke led an army in an unsuccessful attempt to reclaim Augusta, Georgia from the British. He would later succeed in taking the city with Andrew Pickens in a two-month siege beginning on April 1781.

After the war, Clarke served in the Georgia General Assembly from 1781 to 1790. After his service in the state legislature, he involved himself in somewhat dubious enterprises. In 1793, with the encouragement of French ambassabor Edmond-Charles Genêt, Clarke entered the French army as a major general and participated in designs against the Spanish in Florida. The Spanish, at that time, were allies of the British. The following year, he established the Trans-Oconee Republic, which included settlements in Creek territory in present day Greene, Morgan, Putnam and Baldwin counties. From his new settlements, he led a number of campaigns against the Creek Indians. The State of Georgia ordered Clarke to dismantle his settlements, but he refused. Governor George Mathews, disturbed that Clarke was attempting to create an independent government, ordered the settlements broken up. The Georgia militia accomplished this without violence and Clarke surrendered. Clarke was also alleged to have participated in the Yazoo Land Fraud and Governor Mathews was also involved in the scandal. In spite of his somewhat scandalous, post-revolution activities, Clarke continued to be held in high esteem by the public. He died in Augusta in 1799. His interment was located in his Lincolnton state park.

Clarke's son John Clark served as governor of Georgia from 1819 to 1823. Clarke County, Georgia is named in honor of Elijah Clarke.

Clarke and his actions served as one of the sources for the fictional character of Benjamin Martin in The Patriot, a motion picture released in 2000.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elijah_Clarke


Elijah Clarke (1733 – December 15, 1799), born in Anson County, North Carolina, was a Georgian hero of the American Revolutionary War.

Clarke moved from North Carolina to Wilkes County, Georgia, in 1774 where he joined the patriot militia. During the war, he served under Andrew Pickens and alongside John Dooly in various skirmishes including the battles of Alligator Bridge and Kettle Creek.

On August 18 (or 19), 1780, Cols. Clarke, Issac Shelby with Overmountain Men from the Watauga Association at Sycamore Shoals near present day Elizabethton, Tennessee, and James Miller from the Ninety-Six District of South Carolina, led 200 mounted Patriots in a surprising victory aganist a larger British Loyalist force numbering 500 men at the Battle of Musgrove Mill near the present day city of Clinton, South Carolina.

In September 1780, Clarke led an army in an unsuccessful attempt to reclaim Augusta, Georgia from the British. He would later succeed in taking the city with Andrew Pickens in a two-month siege beginning on April 1781.

After the war, Clarke served in the Georgia General Assembly from 1781 to 1790. After his service in the state legislature, he involved himself in somewhat dubious enterprises. In 1793, with the encouragement of French ambassabor Edmond-Charles Genêt, Clarke entered the French army as a major general and participated in designs against the Spanish in Florida. The Spanish, at that time, were allies of the British. The following year, he established the Trans-Oconee Republic, which included settlements in Creek territory in present day Greene, Morgan, Putnam and Baldwin counties. From his new settlements, he led a number of campaigns against the Creek Indians. The State of Georgia ordered Clarke to dismantle his settlements, but he refused. Governor George Mathews, disturbed that Clarke was attempting to create an independent government, ordered the settlements broken up. The Georgia militia accomplished this without violence and Clarke surrendered. Clarke was also alleged to have participated in the Yazoo Land Fraud and Governor Mathews was also involved in the scandal. In spite of his somewhat scandalous, post-revolution activities, Clarke continued to be held in high esteem by the public. He died in Augusta in 1799. His interment was located in his Lincolnton state park.

Clarke's son John Clark served as governor of Georgia from 1819 to 1823. Clarke County, Georgia is named in honor of Elijah Clarke.

Clarke and his actions served as one of the sources for the fictional character of Benjamin Martin in The Patriot, a motion picture released in 2000.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elijah_Clarke


http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/nge/Article.jsp?id=h-668

American Revolutionary War General. His actions in the southern campaign, primarily as a partisan commander, earned him the nickname "Hero of the Hornet's Nest." In 1781 he helped drive the British out of Augusta, Georgia, for which he was promoted to brigadier general and awarded land in that state. After the war Clarke served in the Georgia state assembly from 1781 to 1790, and was also commissioner for Georgia treaties with Native American groups. Today a state park and a Georgia county bear his name. Clarke and his war exploits served as one of the sources for the fictional character Benjamin Martin in the film "The Patriot" (2000). His son John Clark served as governor of Georgia from 1819 to 1823.

Bio by: Ray Bobo

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/26994641/Elijah-Clarke


A Patriot of the American Revolution for GEORGIA with the rank of COLONEL. DAR Ancestor # A022268

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Brig. General Elijah Clark's Timeline

1733
1733
Edgecombe, NC, USA
1766
February 28, 1766
Age 33
Edgecombe, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, United States
1767
1767
Age 34
Wake County, North Carolina, United States
1768
1768
Age 35
Wake County, North Carolina, United States
1770
March 14, 1770
Age 37
Wake County, North Carolina, United States
1770
Age 37
Wilkes, GA
1772
1772
Age 39
1772
Age 39
Wilkes County, Georgia, United States
1775
1775
Age 42
Wake Co., NC