Elizabeth Browne

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Elizabeth Browne (Paston)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Paston, Norfolk, England
Death: February 01, 1488 (58)
Poynings, Sussex, , England
Place of Burial: Greater London, England
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Sir William Paston and Agnes Paston
Wife of Robert Poynings and Sir George Browne
Mother of Sir Edward Poynings, KG, MP; Mary Browne and Sir Matthew Browne, of Betchworth Castle
Sister of John Paston; Joan or Jane Hervey; Edmond Paston; Gertrude Reade; Clement Paston and 2 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Elizabeth Browne

Sir George 1443 - 1483 and Elizabeth (Paston, Poynings, Browne) Will states she only had three children, Edward Poynings and Mathew & Mary Browne.

The Visitation of Cambridge 1575 dose not confirm a son George, there is a George as son of Mathew but he died.


  • Elizabeth Paston1,2,3
  • F, #51116, b. 1 July 1429, d. 1 February 1488
  • Father Sir William Paston, Justice of the Common Pleas4,2,3 b. 1378, d. 14 Aug 1444
  • Mother Agnes Berrey4,2,3 b. c 1380, d. 1479
  • Elizabeth Paston married Robert Poynings, son of Sir Robert Poynings, 4th Lord Poynings and Eleanor Grey.1,2,3 Elizabeth Paston was born on 1 July 1429 at of Paston, Norfolk, England.4,2,3 She married Sir George Browne, Sheriff of Kent, Burgess of Guildford & Canterbury, son of Sir Thomas Browne, Sheriff of Kent, Burgess for Dover, Treasurer of the Household, Steward of Milton & Marden and Eleanor FitzAlan, in 1471; They had 2 sons (Sir Matthew; & George) and 1 daughter (Mary, wife of Mr. Bradbridge/Benbridge).4,2,3 Elizabeth Paston died on 1 February 1488 at age 58; Requested burial at Blackfriars Church, London, with her husband.5,2,3 Her estate was probated on 26 June 1488.2,3
  • Family 1 Robert Poynings d. 3 Feb 1461
  • Child
    • Sir Edward Poynings, Lord Deputy of Ireland+1 d. Oct 1521
  • Family 2 Sir George Browne, Sheriff of Kent, Burgess of Guildford & Canterbury b. 1440, d. 4 Dec 1483
  • Child
    • Sir Matthew Browne, Sheriff of Surrey & Sussex+5,2,3 b. 1473, d. 6 Aug 1557
  • Citations
  • [S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. X, p. 668, notes.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 340.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 581.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 160-161.
  • [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 161.
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p1701.htm#i51116

_______________

  • Elizabeth Paston Browne
  • Birth: Jul. 1, 1429, England
  • Death: Feb. 1, 1488, England
  • Daughter of William Paston and Agnes Berry.
  • Wife of Robert Poynings, slain at the 2nd Battle of Albans 1461.
  • Secondly, wife and widow of Sir George Browne, and they had two sons and one daughter: Sir Matthew, George and Mary, wife of a Bradbridge. Sir George was beheaded as a rebel in 1483, his property was restored in 1485, but Elizabeth followed him five years later.
  • Family links:
  • Spouse:
  • George Browne (1439 - 1483)*
  • Burial: Blackfriars London, Ludgate, City of London, Greater London, England
  • Find A Grave Memorial# 101786002
  • From: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=101786002

______________

  • Elizabeth PASTON
  • Born: ABT 1429/30
  • Died: 1487/8
  • Father: William PASTON
  • Mother: Agnes BARRY
  • Married 1: Robert POYNINGS (6º B. Poynings)
  • Children:
    • 1. Edward POYNINGS (Sir Knight)
  • Married 2: George BROWNE (Sir) AFT 1465
  • Children:
    • 2. Mathew BROWNE (Sir)
    • 3. Mary BROWNE
  • From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/PASTON.htm#Elizabeth PASTON1

________________________

  • Sir Robert Poynings (c.1419 – 17 February 1461), was the second son of Robert Poynings, 4th Baron Poynings (1382–1446). He joined the rebellion of Jack Cade in 1450, and was slain fighting on the Yorkist side at the Second Battle of St Albans in 1461.
  • Robert Poynings was the second son of Robert Poynings, 4th Baron Poynings (1382 – 2 October 1446), by his first wife Eleanor Grey, the daughter of Reginald Grey, 3rd Baron Grey de Ruthyn, and Margaret Roos (or Ros).[1][2][3] By his father's first marriage, he had an elder brother, Sir Richard Poynings (d. 10 June 1429), slain near Orleans in France, and a younger brother, Edward Poynings (d.1484), Master of Trinity College in Arundel, Sussex, and rector of North Cray, Kent.[4][2][5]
  • By his father's second marriage to Margaret Squery (d. 3 November 1448), widow of Sir William Cromer (d. January 1434), Lord Mayor of London, elder daughter of Thomas Squery of Westerham, Kent, Robert Poynings had a half sister, Eleanor Poynings, who married Thomas Palmer.[2]
  • The 4th Baron had settled the manors of Tirlingham, Newington, Eastwell and Westwood in Kent on his granddaughter, Eleanor Poynings (1428–1484), wife of Henry Percy, 3rd Earl of Northumberland, and daughter of Robert Poynings' elder brother, Sir Richard Poynings, by his second wife, Eleanor Berkeley. Robert Poynings claimed these manors against Eleanor 'as heir by gavelkind', claiming as well the manor of Great Perching in Sussex. He also claimed the 4th Baron's moveable goods against William Cromer, son of Margaret Squery by her first husband, Sir William Cromer.[5]
  • In the summer of 1450 Poynings joined the rebel Jack Cade, and is said to have acted as Cade's 'carver and sword-bearer'.[5] He was imprisoned and outlawed as a result, despite which he was elected a Member of Parliament for Sussex in 1450 and 1451. In 1457 he sued a pardon for his participation in Cade's rebellion.[5]
  • Poynings was slain on 17 February 1461 while fighting on the Yorkist side at the Second Battle of St Albans.[5]
  • In 1458 he married Elizabeth Paston (1 July 1429 – 1 February 1488), the daughter of William Paston, by whom he had an only son, Sir Edward Poynings, who married Elizabeth Scott (d. 15 August 1528), daughter of Sir John Scott (d.1485), and who also fathered seven illegitimate children by several mistresses, including Thomas Poynings, 1st Baron Poynings, and Sir Adrian Poynings.[6][7][8][5][9][10]
  • After Poynings' death his widow married Sir George Browne of Betchworth Castle, Surrey, (beheaded on Tower Hill 4 December 1483), by whom she had two sons, Sir Matthew Browne (d. 6 August 1557), who married Frideswide Guildford, daughter of Richard Guildford, and George, and a daughter, Mary.[11]
  • From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Poynings

____________________

  • William Paston (1378 – 13 August 1444), the only son of Clement Paston and Beatrice Somerton, had a distinguished career as a lawyer and Justice of the Common Pleas. He acquired considerable property, and is considered "the real founder of the Paston family fortunes".[1][2]
  • William Paston was the only son of Clement Paston (d.1419) and Beatrice Somerton (d.1409). Two decades after William Paston's death it was alleged that the Paston family had descended from serfs.[2] However during the reign of Edward IV the Pastons were granted a declaration that they were "gentlemen discended lineally of worship blood sithen the conquest hither".[2]
  • .... etc.
  • Paston died at London on 13 August 1444, and was buried at Norwich, in the Lady Chapel of Norwich Cathedral.[2][4] His widow, who was about twenty years of age at the time of her marriage, survived him by thirty-five years, but never remarried. She died on 18 August 1479, and was buried at the Whitefriars, Norwich, with her parents, grandparents, and youngest son, Clement, who had predeceased her.[2][6]
  • In 1420, at the age of forty-two, Paston married Agnes Barry or Berry (d. 18 August 1479), the daughter and coheir of Sir Edmund Barry (d.1433) of Horwellbury, near Therfield and Royston, Hertfordshire,[7] by whom he had four sons and one daughter:[8][2][9][5]
    • John Paston (10 October 1421 – 21 or 22 May 1466), who married Margaret Mautby (d.1484), daughter of John Mautby of Mautby,[10] and has issue including two sons both called John, one born in 1442 and one born in 1444.
    • Edmund Paston (1425 – c. 21 March 1449), who died without issue.[11]
    • William Paston (1436 – September 1496), who married, before 1470, Anne Beaufort, third daughter of Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset, by whom he had at least four daughters, one of whom died in childhood. He is credited with having compiled, about 1450, part of the manuscript known as The Paston Book of Arms (NRO, MS Rye 38).[12][13]
    • Clement Paston (1442 – c. August 1479), who died without issue.[14]
    • Elizabeth Paston (1 July 1429 – 1 February 1488), who married firstly Sir Robert Poynings, slain at the Second Battle of St Albans on 17 February 1461, by whom she had an only son, Sir Edward Poynings, and secondly Sir George Browne of Betchworth Castle (beheaded on Tower Hill 4 December 1483), by whom she had two sons, Sir Matthew and George, and a daughter, Mary.[2][9][15][16]
  • Many letters written by William Paston's family and their circle have survived, making the Paston Letters an exceptionally valuable collection of historical documents; the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography has called them "the richest source there is for every aspect of the lives of gentlemen and gentlewomen of the English middle ages".[1]
  • From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Paston_(died_1444)

______________

  • Sir George Browne (1440 – 4 December 1483) was the eldest surviving son and heir of Sir Thomas Browne, beheaded 20 July 1460. He took part in Buckingham's rebellion, and was beheaded on Tower Hill on 4 December 1483.
  • George Browne was the second but eldest surviving son of Sir Thomas Browne of Betchworth Castle, Surrey, and Eleanor Arundel, the daughter of Sir Thomas Arundel and Joan Moyne, daughter of Henry Moyne. By his mother's first marriage, he had six brothers, including Sir Anthony Browne,[1] and two sisters. After his father's death, his mother married Sir Thomas Vaughan (executed at Pontefract on 23 June 1483).[2]
  • On 30 September 1460, two months after his father's execution, Browne was granted a pardon by the Yorkists, and in 1470 was arrested with George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence, and Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick. He fought at the Battle of Tewkesbury on 4 May 1471, and was knighted after the battle by the Duke of Clarence.[1]
  • He was elected a Member of Parliament for Guildford in 1472 and for Canterbury in 1483. In 1478 he was Knight of the Shire for Surrey, and in 1480 Sheriff of Kent.[1]
  • In 1472, he surrendered his title and the Manor of Tong to Cecily Neville, Duchess of York.[3]
  • An undated letter in Browne's hand to John Paston, esquire, containing the cryptic message 'It shall never come out for me', survives among the Paston letters.[4][5]
  • By 1483 he had switched his allegiance to the future Henry VII, and with a force in Kent took part in the rebellion by Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, against Richard III. According to Speed:[6]
    • Another commotion at the same time was in Kent, where George Browne and John Guildford, knights, Fogge, Scot, Clifford and Bonting, with five thousand men attempted great matters at Gravesend, but hearing of the Duke of Buckingham’s surprise, dispersed themselves for that time....whereupon those that lately fled England were indicted of treason, and other of Henry’s factions beheaded, whereof Sir George Browne and Sir Roger Clifford, knights, with four others were beheaded at London, and at Exeter for the like cause died Sir Thomas Sentleger, who had married Lady Anne, Duchess of Exeter, King Richard’s own sister, with others, so jealous was the king of his usurped crown.
  • Browne was beheaded on Tower Hill on 4 December 1483, and buried at the Blackfriars, London. His widow left a will, proved 26 June 1488, in which she asked to be buried at the Blackfriars with her husband.[1]
  • In 1471 Browne married Elizabeth Paston (1 July 1429 – 1 February 1488), widow of Sir Robert Poynings (slain at the Second Battle of St Albans on 17 February 1461), and daughter of William Paston, Justice of the Common Pleas, and Agnes Berry. By her first marriage she had an only son, Sir Edward Poynings.[7][1][8][9][10]
  • By Elizabeth Paston, Browne had two sons and a daughter:[11]
    • Sir Matthew Browne (d. 6 August 1557), who married Frideswide Guildford, daughter of Richard Guildford, by whom he had eight sons and six daughters.
    • George Browne.
    • Mary Browne, who married a husband surnamed Bradbridge (or Benbridge).
  • From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Browne_(died_1483)

______________

  • Sir Edward Poynings KG (1459 – 22 October 1521) was an English soldier, administrator and diplomat, and Lord Deputy of Ireland under King Henry VII of England.[1]
  • Edward Poynings was the only son of Sir Robert Poynings (c.1419–1461) and Elizabeth Paston (1429?–1487/8),[2] the only daughter of William Paston (1378–1444). He was likely born at his father's house in Southwark, afterwards the Crosskeys tavern, and then the Queen's Head. His father had been carver and sword-bearer to Jack Cade, and was killed at the Second Battle of St Albans on 17 February 1461. His mother, who married Robert Poynings in December 1459, inherited her husband's property in Kent in spite of opposition from her brother-in-law, Edward Poynings, master of Arundel College. Before 1472 she married a second husband, Sir George Browne of Betchworth Castle, Surrey, by whom she had a son, Matthew, and a daughter. She died in 1487, appointing Edward as her executor. Some of her correspondence is included in the Paston Letters.
  • Poynings was brought up by his mother. In October 1483 he was a leader of the rising in Kent planned to second Buckingham's insurrection against Richard III. He was named in the king's proclamation, but escaped abroad to follow Henry, Earl of Richmond. He was in Brittany in October 1484, and in August 1485 landed with Richmond at Milford Haven. He was at once made a knight banneret, and in the same year was sworn of the Privy Council.
  • .... etc.
  • Poynings married, before 1485, Isabel or Elizabeth Scott (d. 15 August 1528), daughter of Sir John Scott (d.1485), Marshal of Calais, and sister of Sir William Scott, Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports and Sheriff of Kent, by whom he had a son, John Poynings, who predeceased him without issue. Elizabeth Scott was buried in Brabourne church, where she is commemorated by a brass.[2][4]
  • Poynings also had seven illegitimate children:[5][6][7][8][9]
    • Thomas Poynings, 1st Baron Poynings.
    • Edward Poynings, captain of the guard at Boulogne, killed in action there in 1546.
    • Sir Adrian Poynings, appointed lieutenant to Wyatt at Boulogne in February 1546, captain of Boulogne in the following June, and served for some years under the Lord High Admiral. He was knighted at the accession of Elizabeth, and in 1561 became governor of Portsmouth, where he died on 15 February 1571. His daughter, Anne, married Sir George More of Loseley, Surrey.
    • Jane Poynings, who married firstly Thomas Clinton, 8th Baron Clinton (d.1517), by whom she was the mother of Edward Clinton, 1st Earl of Lincoln (d.1585), Lord Admiral of England, and secondly, as his second wife, Sir Robert Wingfield (d.1539), by whom she had no issue.
    • Margaret Poynings, who married Edward Barry of Sevington.
    • Mary Poynings, who married Thomas Wilsford.
    • Rose Poynings (born 1505), who married a husband surnamed Lewknor.
  • From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Poynings

_____________

  • POYNINGS, Sir Edward (1459-1521), of Westenhanger, Kent.
  • b. autumn 1459, o. s. of Robert Poynings of Maidstone by Elizabeth, da. of Sir William Paston of Paston, Norf.; half-bro. of Sir Matthew Browne. m. by 1485, Elizabeth or Isabel (d.1528), da. of Sir John Scott of Scot’s Hall, Smeath, Kent, 1s. d.v.p.; 3s. 4da. illegit. suc. fa. 17 Feb. 1461. Kntd. 7 Aug. 1485, KG 1493, banneret Aug. 1513.1
  • .... etc.
  • Robert Poynings was killed at St. Albans in 1461, and Edward was brought up by his mother and his stepfather, Sir George Browne of Betchworth, Surrey. He took part in the Kentish rising of 1483 in support of the 2nd Duke of Buckingham’s rebellion against Richard III and was attainted, as ‘Edward Ponyngs late of Marsham, esquire’, in the Parliament of January 1484. He made his escape from England, joined Henry Tudor and returned with him in August 1485, being knighted after the landing at Milford Haven; when Parliament met in November his attainder was reversed.3
  • .... etc.
  • From: http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1509-1558/member/poynings-sir-edward-1459-1521

__________________

  • Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 46
  • Poynings, Edward by Albert Frederick Pollard
  • POYNINGS, Sir EDWARD (1459–1521), lord deputy of Ireland, only son of Robert Poynings [see under Poynings, Michael de], and his wife, Elizabeth, only daughter of William Paston (1378–1444) [q. v.], was born towards the end of 1459, probably at his father's house in Southwark, which afterwards became famous as the Crosskeys tavern, and then as the Queen's Head (cf. Rendle and Norman, Inns of Old Southwark, p. 204). His father had been carver and sword-bearer to Jack Cade, and was killed at the second battle of St. Albans on 17 Feb. 1461 (Archæol. Cant. vii. 243–4); his mother, who was born on 1 July 1429, and married Poynings in December 1459, inherited her husband's property in Kent, in spite of opposition from her brother-in-law, Edward Poynings, master of Arundel College; before 1472 she married a second husband, Sir George Browne of Betchworth, Surrey, by whom she had a son Matthew and a daughter. She died in 1487, appointing Edward her executor. Some of her correspondence is included in the ‘Paston Letters.’
  • Poynings was brought up by his mother; in October 1483 he was a leader of the rising in Kent planned to second Buckingham's insurrection against Richard III. He was named in the king's proclamation, but escaped abroad, and adopted the cause of Henry, earl of Richmond. He was in Brittany in October 1484 (Polydore Vergil, p. 208; Busch, i. 17), and in August 1485 he landed with Henry at Milford Haven. He was at once made a knight banneret, and in the same year he was sworn of the privy council. In 1488 he was on a commission to inspect the ordnance at Calais, and in 1491 was made a knight of the Garter.
  • .... etc.
  • .... Henry also entertained the intention of making him a peer, and he is occasionally referred to as Lord Poynings, but the intention was never carried out. In 1518 he was treating for the surrender of Tournai, and in 1520 he took an important part in the proceedings at the Field of the Cloth of Gold. He was also present at Henry's meeting with Charles at Gravelines on 10 July. He died at Westenhanger in October 1521.
  • Poynings married Isabel or Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Scot (d. 1485), marshal of Calais, and sister of Sir William Scot, warden of the Cinque ports and sheriff of Kent (cf. Letters and Papers, passim; Weever, Funerall Mon. p. 269; Archæolog. Cant. x. 257–8). She died on 15 Aug. 1528, and was buried in Brabourne church, where she is commemorated by a brass. By her Poynings had one child, John, who predeceased him without issue. Poynings's will is printed in Nicolas's ‘Testamenta Vetusta,’ pp. 578–9. His estates passed to Henry Algernon Percy, fifth earl of Northumberland [q. v.], the grandson of Poynings's first cousin Eleanor, who married Henry, third earl of Northumberland [see under Henry, second Earl] (Letters and Papers, vol. iii. No. 3214). He had seven illegitimate children—three sons and four daughters. Of the sons, the eldest, Thomas, baron Poynings, is separately noticed. Edward, the second, became captain of the guard at Boulogne, and was slain there in 1546. Adrian, the third, was appointed lieutenant to Wyatt at Boulogne in February 1546, captain of Boulogne in the following June, and served for some years under the lord high admiral. He was knighted at the accession of Elizabeth, and in 1561 became governor of Portsmouth, where he died on 15 Feb. 1570–1. His daughter Anne married Sir George More [q. v.] of Losely. Of Sir Edward Poynings's daughters, Jane married Thomas, eighth lord Clinton, and became mother of Edward Fiennes Clinton, earl of Lincoln [q. v.]
  • [Letters and Papers of Henry VII, and Materials for the Reign of Henry VII (Rolls Ser.); Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, ed. Brewer and Gairdner; Hist. MSS. Comm. 9th Rep. App. pt. i. passim; Cotton MSS. passim; Rolls of Parl.; Rymer's Fœdera, orig. edit. vols. xii. and xiii.; Paston Letters, ed. Gairdner; Three Books of Polydore Vergil, Chron. of Calais and Rutland Papers (Camden Soc.); Hall, Fabyan, Grafton, and Holinshed's Chronicles; Bacon's Henry VII; Myles Davies's Athenæ Brit. ii. 60–1; Beltz's Memorials of the Garter; Gairdner's Richard III, p. 398, and Henry VII (English Statesmen Ser.); Lingard's Hist. of England; Brewer's Reign of Henry VIII; Busch's England under the Tudors, vol. i., which gives the best account of Henry VII's reign yet published; Sussex Archæol. Coll. vol. iv.; Norfolk Archæol. iv. 21, &c.; Archæol. Cantiana, v. 118, vii. 244, x. 257, 258, 264, xi. 394; Hasted's Kent, passim; Boys's Hist. of Sandwich; Burrows's Cinque Ports. For Poynings's Irish administration see Annals of the Four Masters; Book of Howth; Ware's Annales Hib.; Harris's Hibernica; Lascelles's Liber Munerum Hib.; Leland's Hist. of Ireland, 3 vols., 1773; Plowden's Hist. View; Cox's Hib. Angl., 2 vols., 1689–90; Smith and Ryland's Hist. of Waterford; Hist. of the Earls of Kildare; Gilbert's Viceroys of Ireland; Richey's Lectures on Irish Hist. to 1534; Froude's English in Ireland; Wright's History of Ireland, vol. i.; Bagwell's Ireland under the Tudors, vol. i. For Poynings's law see Irish Statutes; Hardiman's Statutes of Kilkenny; Davies's Hist. Tracts, ed. 1786; A Declaration setting forth how … the laws … of England … came to be of force in Ireland, 1643, attributed to Sir Richard Bolton [q. v.]; An Answer to the above by Samuel Mayart [q. v.]; Molyneux's Case of Ireland being bound, and the Replies to it [see under Molyneux, William]; Hallam's Const. Hist.; Lecky's Hist. of Ireland; Ball's Irish Legislative Systems.]
  • From: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Poynings,_Edward_(DNB00)

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  • A genealogical and heraldic history of the extinct and dormant baronetcies ... By John Burke, Sir Bernard Burke
  • http://books.google.com/books?id=LKIKAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA87&lpg=PA87&dq=George+Browne+1483&source=bl&ots=4TOUz1a9fJ&sig=hQxyWw8O05RE7JqgevDemme1ruY&hl=en&ei=rM_lS47ZC4L6sgP0n_XQCw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CBkQ6AEwATgK#v=onepage&q=George%20Browne%201483&f=false
  • Pg. 87
  • .... etc.
  • SIR THOMAS BROWNE, treasurer of the household to HENRY VI. and sheriff of Kent in 1444 and 1460. He m. Eleanor, daughter and sole heir of Sir Thomas Fitz-Alan, of Beechworth Castle, brother of John, Earl of Arundel, and had issue,
    • I. GEORGE (Sir), his heir.
    • II. .... etc.
  • Sir Thomas was s. by his eldest son,
  • SIR GEORGE BROWNE, knt. of Beechworth Castle, sheriff of Kent in 1481, who espousing the cause of the Earl of Richmond, was included in the proclamation for apprehending the Duke of Buckingham and his associates, and being soon after taken, suffered decapitation in London anno 1483. He m. Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William Paston, and widow of Richard Lord Poynings (NOTE BY CP., THIS SHOULD BE ROBERT POYNINGS), and was s. by his son,
  • SIR MATTHEW BROWNE, knt., of Beechworth Castle, sheriff of Surrey in 1496, living in 1530, who m. Fridiswide, daughter of Sir Richard Guilford, K.G. of Hempsted, in Kent, and had issue,
    • .... etc
  • Pg.401
  • .... etc.
  • SIR WILLIAM PASTON, knt. born at Paston, son and heir of Clement Paston, by Beatrix, his wife, daughter and heir of John de Somerton, adopted the legal profession, and was one of the judges of the court of Common Pleas temp. HENRY VI. He married Agnes, daughter and co-heir of Sir Edmund Berry, knt. and had issue,
    • JOHN, his heir.
    • Edmond, who was retained in 1474, by Richard, Duke of Gloucester, constable and admiral of England, to serve him with the king, in his voyage over sea, for a whole year, with three archers, well horsed, armed, and arraied.
    • Walter.
    • William (Sir), knt. a devoted adherent of the Lancastrian cause, m. Anne, daughter and do-heir of Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, and had two daughters,
      • Pg.402
      • Anne, m. to Sir Gilbert Talbot.
      • Elizabeth, m. to Sir John Savill.
    • Elizabeth, m. to Robert, son of Robert, Lord Poynings.
    • Anne, m. to William Yelverton, esq.
    • Margery, m. to Richard Colle, esq.
  • Sir William, commonly known as "the good judge," died in London, 14th August, 1444, aged sixty-six, and was buried in our Lady's chapel at the east end of the cathedral church of Norwich. His eldesst son and successor,
  • JOHN PASTON, esq. of Oxnead, in Norfolk, aged twenty-three at his father's decease, m. Margaret, daughter and heir of Sir John de Mauteby, and dying in 1466, was succeeded by his son,
  • .... etc.

________

____________________

http://www.archive.org/stream/pastonlettersad04gairiala/pastonlettersad04gairiala_djvu.txt

1 [From Fenn, iv. 266.] Elizabeth Paston, as we have seen (No. 374), had

married Robert Poynings by the beginning of January 1459. We must however,

correct a slight inaccuracy in the preliminary note to that letter, where it is said that

by the year 1470 they must have been married several years. Their union, in fact,

lasted little more than two years , for Robert Poynings was slain at the second battle

of St. Albans on the i7th February 1461. The inquisition post mortem, taken some

years afterwards (9 and 10 Edw. iv., No. 49), gives that day as the date of his death.

His son and heir, Edward, named in this letter (who was afterwards Lord-Deputy of

Ireland in the reign of Henry vn.), was probably born towards the close of the year

1459, for he is mentioned at the date of the inquisition (3ist Jan. 49 and i Hen. vi.,

i.e. 1471) as eleven years old and over. Elizabeth Poynings must have remained a

widow some years j but before 1472 she had married Sir George Browne of Betch-

worth, Surrey. This letter is certainly of later date than No. 627, for the lands which

she was then endeavouring to recover from the Earl of Kent were now occupied by

the Earl of Essex. It may perhaps have been a year or two after 1466, but it was

probably not later than 1469, as in 1470 Henry vi. was restored, and Essex, being a

Yorkist, would not have been so powerful. The year 1468 must be a tolerable

approximation to the true date.

____________________

http://abitofhistory.net/html/rhw/p_body.htm

Paston, Elizabeth – (1429 – 1488)

English Plantagenet gentlewoman

Elizabeth Paston was born (July 1, 1429), the only daughter of William Paston I (1378 – 1444), of Paston, Norfolk, and his wife Agnes Berry of Hertfordshire. Despite many possible marital arrangements, Elizabeth Paston remained unmarried until she was nearly thirty, when she made the first of her aristocratic marriages (Nov, 1458) with Sir Robert Poynings. He served as carver and sword bearer to the rebel leader Jack Cade and was killed at the Battle of St Albans (1461), leaving Elizabeth with an infant son the future Sir Edward Poynings (1459 – 1521) who served as Lord Deputy of Ireland (1494 – 1496) under Henry VII. The house in Southwark in London where Lady Elizabeth’s son was born later became famous as the Crosskey’s Tavern.

In spite of family opposition led by her brother-in-law Sir Edward Poynings, the master of Arundel College, Lady Poynings was permiited to retain her husband property in Kent for her maintenance and that of her child. Lady Poynings remarried secondly (1472) to Sir George Browne, of Betchworth, Surrey, who was later executed by order of Richard III (1483). There were two further children. Her will survives, and in it she made no mention of her Paston relatives at all. Some of her surviving letters were published in the famous Paston Letters. Elizabeth Paston died (Feb 11, 1488) aged fifty-eight.

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  • 'Paston01'
  • William Paston of Paston (b c1378, d 14.08.1444, judge) - continued above
  • m. Agnes Berry (dau of Sir Edmund Berry or Barrey by Alice, dau of Sir John Gerbridge by Elizabeth)
    • 1. John Paston of Paston (b c1421, d 1466)
    • m. Margaret Mawtby (dau of John Mawtby by Margaret, dau of John Barney of Redham)
      • A. .... etc.
    • The following are shown by BEB1841 as children of William but by Visitation as children of William's son John. Other than to report that he was son of Judge William, BE1883 starts with John, showing him as married to Margaret Mantby (having John and "several other children") then Anne Beaufort (having Sir William "inter alios"). Following cross-references from elsewhere and noting the dates, we suggest the following allocation but stress that it is not certain.
      • C. Sir William Paston
      • m. Anne Beaufort (dau of Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset)
        • i. William Paston (dsp)
        • ii. Anne Paston
        • m. Sir Gilbert Talbot (d 22.10.1542)
        • iii. Elizabeth Paston
        • m. Sir John Savill of Thornhill
        • iv. Mary Paston (b 19.01.1469/70, d 1489) apparently of this generation
        • m. Ralph Nevill (dvp 1498, son of Earl of Westmorland)
      • D. Anne Paston
      • m. William Yelverton (a 1474)
    • 2. Elizabeth Paston
    • m1. Robert Poynings (d 17.02.1460/1, son of Lord Robert)
    • We presume that this was the Elizabeth, described by BEB1841 (Browne of Beechworth) as widow of Richard, Lord Poynings, who also married ...
    • m2. Sir George Browne of Beechworth Castle (d 1483)
    • 3. Margery Paston uncertain on what generation she belonged to
    • m. Robert Colle or Call
    • 4.+ other issue - Edmund, Walter
  • Main source(s):
  • (1) For upper section : Visitation (Norfolk, 1563+1589+1613, Paston)
  • (2) For lower section : BEB1841 (Paston of Oxnead), BE1883 (Paston of Yarmouth), Visitation (Norfolk, 1563+1589+1613, Paston)
  • From: Stirnet.com
  • http://www.stirnet.com/genie/data/british/pp/paston01.php

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Elizabeth Browne's Timeline

1429
July 1, 1429
Paston, Norfolk, England
1459
1459
Poynings, West Sussex, England
1474
1474
Of Bechworth, Surrey, Eng
1476
1476
Betchworth Castle,Surrey,England
1488
February 1, 1488
Age 58
Poynings, Sussex, , England
1946
October 23, 1946
Age 58
1955
June 23, 1955
Age 58
1957
February 27, 1957
Age 58