Elizabeth (Saint Albin) FitzPenne

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Elizabeth Fitzpen (Saint Albin)

Also Known As: "Fitzpenn. Fitz-Penne", "Fitzpenne", "Fitzpen", "St. Albin"
Birthdate: (51)
Birthplace: Cornwall, , England
Death: Died in Cornwall, , England
Immediate Family:

Wife of Thomas Fitzpen
Mother of Joseph FitzPen

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Elizabeth (Saint Albin) FitzPenne

Elizabeth (St. Albin) Fitzpenne's ancestors came from Normandy, France with William the Conqueror.


http://www.famgen.net/jordan/fam01886.htm

THE ST. AUBYNS OF CLOWANCE AND THE MOUNT._

[Illustration: (beginning of chapter vignette.)]

_THE ST. AUBYNS OF CLOWANCE AND THE MOUNT._

 'A Wit's a feather, and a Chief a rod;--
 An HONEST MAN'S the noblest work of God.'
                               POPE: _Essay on Man_.

'This gentle and knightly family,' as Hals calls them, are amongst the few examples of eminent Cornishmen who, like the Bevills, the Grenvilles, the Lanyons, the Chamonds, the Bassets, and others, were of Norman, or at least of French, origin.

In the 'Chronicum Johannis Brompton' (quoted by John Henneker) we read:

   'Vous que desyrez assaver
   Le nons de Grauntz de la mer,
   Que vindrent od le Conquerour,
   William Bastard de graunt vigoure,
      *       *       *       *       *
   Seint Aubyn, et Seynt Omer,
   Seynt Filbert Fyens, et Gomer.'

Leland says that St. Albin came out of Brittany; and Camden, in his 'Remains,' names Plaus as the place of their origin; according, however, to other authorities, St. Aubin du Cormier in Brittany enjoys this distinction. Of Armorican extraction, they were therefore akin to Cornishmen, though abiding in 'Little Britain.' Possibly the name was not an uncommon one; and either of the two above surmises may be correct. There are now upwards of thirty French Communes into which the name of St. Aubin enters: to say nothing of the picturesque little village in Jersey of that name, which fringes the shores of St. Aubin's Bay.

Their first English home seems to have been in Somersetshire; and here, in the middle of the fourteenth century, we find Guy de St. Aubyn, or Albin, settled at Alfoxton. It seems to have been he who, by his marriage with Eleanor Knoville, first obtained a footing on the Cornish soil; and, according to Tonkin, it was his grandson, Geffrey, who took up his abode at Clowance on the latter's marriage with Elizabeth Kymyell of Kymyell, the sole heir of Piers Kymyell and his wife, a daughter of--as Tonkin assures us, 'an old and notable Cornish family'--the house of Sergeaux, or Seriseaux. Their son Geffrey has a monument in Crowan church, thus inscribed:

 'Hic jacent Galfridus Seynt aubyn, Et Alicia uxor ejus, filia et heres
 Johannes Tremure de Iaunebet, Armigeri, qui quidem Galfridus obiit
 tertio die mensis Octobris, Anno Domini, Mill'imo cccc^o; Alicia obiit
 Anno Domini Mill'imo cccc^o; quorum Animabus propicietur deus, Amen.
 Jhu mercy, lady help.'

Since the time of the first Geffrey, the St. Aubyns, for nearly thirty descents, have dwelt at their pleasantly situated seat[131] at Clowance, 'the ancient house of an ancient gentleman,' as Norden calls it; though the present mansion dates only from the early part of the present century.

From the days of Richard II., the St. Aubyns have frequently filled the post of High Sheriff of Cornwall, and have also served their country as Members of Parliament and Justices of the Peace. For several descents they have been Baronets, until at last the name of 'Sir John St. Aubyn, Bart., M.P.,' has become in Cornwall a 'household word.'

Of the earlier members of the family I have found little of interest, unless, indeed, it be the remarkable physique of one of them, Sir Mauger de St. Albin, who lived at Barnton; in Risdon's 'Devonshire,' it is stated that he was a man of enormous strength and stature, as is evidenced by a huge stone thrown by him to a great distance, and by his very large effigy on a tomb in the church.

On their settling in Cornwall, the St. Aubyns followed the accustomed (perhaps the almost inevitable) practice of intermarrying with the old county families--the Tremeres, the Trethurfes, the Trenowiths, the Grenvilles of Stow; and, in later times, with the Arundells, the Godolphins, the Pendarveses, the Killigrews, the Bullers, the Bassets, the Prideauxes, and the Molesworths.

Of the fruit of one of the pre-Reformation marriages--namely, that of Thomas St. Aubyn (who was Sheriff of Cornwall in 1545) with Mary, fourth daughter of Thomas Grenville of Stow, we have a touching little notice in the MSS. Lisle papers preserved at the Public Record Office. Thomas is writing to his sister-in-law, Honor Grenville, Viscountess Lisle; and the following passage occurs in his letter:

 'My daughter Phelyp is departyd on Crstmas Day, Almyghtie (God) pardon
 her soule; and my wyffe hath take grette discofort therbye; but, I
 thank our Lord, she doth take it better way, and thankyth god of his
 sending.'

From this marriage of Thomas St. Aubyn with Mary Grenville, descended his grandson, Thomas,--the St. Aubyn of Carew's days--of whom that historian of his native county wrote thus:

 'Saintabin, whose very name (besides the Conquest roll) deduceth his
 first ancestors out of France. His grandfather married Greinvile;
 his father, one of Whittington's coheirs: which latter couple, in
 a long and peaceable date of years, exercised a kind, liberal, and
 never-discontinued hospitality. He himself took to wife the daughter
 of Mallet; and with ripe knowledge, and sound judgment, dischargeth
 the place which he beareth in his country.'

I find nothing further of general interest touching the family until we come to the stirring times of the Civil War--a conflict in which Cornwall took, as is well known, a distinguished part. Until that period the St. Aubyns seem to have been a thriving and distinguished family, serving their country in the various capacities already mentioned, and 'gathering house to house, and vineyard to vineyard.' Their possessions were in almost every part of the county: for instance, Lysons (who was indebted to the fifth Sir John St. Aubyn for the loan of Borlase's MS. folio of notes on Cornwall) says that, amongst other properties, 'The manor of Godolphin is still held of Sir John St. Aubyn, as of his manor of Lambourne, by the payment of a gammon of bacon;' and, that the manors of Berippa and Penpons were in the possession of the St. Aubyns; also a moiety of the manor of Gaverigan in St. Columb Major, the manor of Argallez or Arrallas in St. Enoder, of Trelowith in St. Erth, of half of Treninick in St. Gorran, Kimiel and Butsava in Paul, and Mayon in Sennen; they were also impropriators of the great tithes of Crowan, and patrons of the Vicarage; and they held a moiety of the advowson of the rectory of Duloe. The revenues of the nunnery of Clares, which formerly stood near the junction of Boscawen and Lemon Streets, Truro, came (according to Hals) into the possession of Sir John Seyntaubin and others; and again, the Priory of Tywardreath, so Davies Gilbert tells us, 'was the joint property of the St. Aubyns, and the Pendarveses of Roscrow.'

Elizabeth Fitzpen (born St. Alpin? from a My Heritage listing)

Birth: 1410 Death: 1456 in Cornwall, England

Marriage 1 Thomas FITZPENNE b: 1405 in Cornwall, England

Children

1. Has Children Joseph Fitzpen PHIPPEN b: 1432 in Cornwall, England 2. Elinor PHIPPEN b: 1425 3. John PHIPPEN b: Abt. 1428 4. Robert PHIPPEN b: Abt. 1430 5. Geoffrey PHIPPEN b: Abt. 1434 6. Jonetta PHIPPEN b: Abt. 1434 7. Elizabeth PHIPPEN b: Abt. 1436 8. Albin PHIPPEN b: May 1442

Elizabeth St. Albin Scott Dickson's Family

Family Thomas Fitzpenne, b. 1405, Cornwall, England d. 1459, Cornwall, England Children

	1. Joseph Fitzpen,   b. 1432, Cornwall, England  d. 1502, Cornwall, England  (Age 70 years)

Sources

   [S442] Dark Enough to See the Stars in a Jamestown Sky.

John Fitzpenne Birth 1380

   England, Middlesex, London
        
       Links
       GENUKI County Page

Eleanor Tipping Birth 1380

   England, Cornwall

Birth about 1410 England

Marriage Thomas (Fitzpenne) Phippen 1425 (Age 15) England

Death 1456 (Age 46) Cornwall, England

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Elizabeth (Saint Albin) FitzPenne's Timeline

1405
1405
Cornwall, , England
1432
1432
Age 27
Cornwall, England
1456
1456
Age 51
Cornwall, , England
????