Elizabeth Cromwell

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Elizabeth Cromwell (Tuttle)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Dover, Massachusetts Bay Colony
Death: Died in Dover, Old Norfolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony
Immediate Family:

Daughter of John Tuttle and Dorothy Tuttle
Wife of Capt. Philllip Cromwell
Mother of Phillip Crommett; Alice Cromwell; Joshua Cromwell; Samuel Cromwell; Sarah Wentworth and 3 others
Sister of Thomas Tuttle; Judge John Tuttle and Dorothy Tibbetts

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Elizabeth Cromwell

  • CROMWELL, Philip
  • b. ABT 1634 England
  • d. 26 MAY 1708 New Hampshire
  • Family:
  • Marriage: ABT 1662 Dover, Strafford, NH.
  • Spouse: TUTTLE, Elizabeth
  • b. ABT 1642
  • d. BEF 1671 Dover, Strafford, NH.
  • Children:
    • CROMWELL, Sarah
    • CROMWELL, Joanna
  • Family:
  • Marriage: ABT 1672
  • Spouse: LEIGHTON, Elizabeth
  • b. ABT 1640 Dover, Strafford, NH.
  • Children:
    • CROMWELL, Ann b. 19 AUG 1674 Dover, Strafford, NH.
    • CROMWELL, Mercy
  • From: http://www.genealogyofnewengland.com/f_13e.htm#34

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  • The descendants of William and Elizabeth Tuttle, who came from old to New England in 1635, and settled in New Haven in 1639, with numerous biographical notes and sketches : also, some account of the descendants of John Tuttle, of Ipswich; and Henry Tuthill, of Hingham, Mass. (1883)
  • https://archive.org/details/descendantsofwil01tutt
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/descendantsofwil01tutt#page/n72/mode/1up
  • Pg.xxvii
  • .... etc.
  • JOHN TUTTLE, the immigrant ancestor of the New Hampshire family, sailed from Bristol Eng., in the "Angel Gabriel;" in 1635. The vessel was wrecked at Pemaquid, on the coast of Maine, Aug. 15, 1635. He went first to Ipswich, Mass. In 1640 his name appears among the first settlers of Dover, where he received lot No. 7 of the 20 acre lots. There were 24 of these 20 acre allotments laid out to as many persons, and that of JOHN TUTTLE is the only on of the 24 that is now and always has been owned by descendants of the first grantee. He d. in Dover, June, 1663, a. abt. 45. leaving wid. DOROTHY and three children. Wid DOROTHY appt. Admx. He was no doubt of the Devon family, as he came from that part of England, and the same arms were in possession of his descendants. A tradition says that he had a brother who settled in Conn. For the first 150 years all of this name in New Hampshire were his descendants. -- Rec. by Charles W. Tuttle, Esq., pub. in N. E. Gen. Reg., Apr. 1867.
    • * .... etc.
  • Pg.xxviii
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/descendantsofwil01tutt#page/n74/mode/1up
    • I. A Dau., per. named Elizabeth, and m. Capt. Philip Cromwell.
    • II. Thomas, accidentally Killed when a lad, by a falling tree.
    • III. John.
    • IV. Dorothy, m. Capt. Samuel Tibbets of Dover, N. H.
  • 3. John Tuttle, b. 1646; d. June 1720; Capt. of the Dover Military Co.; Judge of Their Majesties' court of Common Pleas, province of New Hampshire; Selectman of Dover, 1686-7-8; Town Clerk from 1691 to 1717; Town Treasurer several years; Mem. of the Provincial Assemby, 1698-9, 1705-6-6. One of the six Dover Commissioners to the N. Hamp. Convention. In 1705 Col. Richard Waldron and Judge Tuttle were the "two provincial mem." of Dover to hear and determine matters relating to Mr. Allen's Claim." He was Chairman of the Board of Public Surveyors of Land; one of the leading members of the chh. at Dover, and with other members of the General Assembly in 1698 subscribed a declaration adversly to transubstantiation, the invocation or adoration of the Virgin Mary or any other Saint, and the Sacrifice of the Mass, as "superstitious and idolatrous." As Capt. of the Dover Co. he had charge of the defenses of the town, and left a large est.; wf. Mary, execx.; Lieut. Tristiam Heard and Capt. Francis Mathews names as trustees for his grandchildren. The hill included in his home farm was ever since been called "Captian's Hill." He gave it to his s. Ebenezer, who sold it to Judge Willett in 1738.
    • .... etc.

_________________________

  • Items of ancestry by Robinson, Ida May Frost
  • https://archive.org/details/itemsofancestry00inrobi
  • https://archive.org/stream/itemsofancestry00inrobi#page/18/mode/1up
  • [The early portion from the Tuttle Family of New Hampshire, by CHARLES WESLEY TUTTLE, A.M., Ph.D., member of the N. E. Historic Genealogical Society.]
  • .... etc.
  • https://archive.org/stream/itemsofancestry00inrobi#page/19/mode/1up
  • John Tuttle died intestate in May or June, 1663, leaving a widow Dorothy and three children. He was probably not far from forty-five years of age at his death. She was appointed administratrix of her husband's estate, and made return to the court June 30, 1663. Although cut off by death in the prime of life, soon after he settled in this wilderness, his personal property inventoried shows him to have been a well-to-do planter. The court decreed a distribution of the estate, reciting in its decree "yt the eldest daughter of the deceased is married and hath her portion already; that the youngest daughter is to have 15 pounds when she comes to the age of 18 years, or be dispossess of on marrying." The bulk of the property, consisting of real estate, was given to the only son then living, John,2 "when he comes to 21 years of age." The widow Dorothy was taxed for several years after, but nothing further is known of her, nor is it known whether she married her husband in England or here. Children :
    • i. ELIZABETH,2 m. before 1663 Capt. Philip Crommett.
    • ii. THOMAS, killed by a falling tree in youth.
    • 2. iii. JOHN, b. 1646; d. June, 1720.
    • iv. DOROTHY, m. Capt. Samuel Tibbetts.

_______________

  • Historic homes and places and genealogical and personal memoirs ..., Volume 4 edited by William Richard Cutter
  • https://books.google.com/books?id=nn1yyHiYJFYC&pg=PA1545&lpg=PA1545#v=onepage&q&f=false
  • https://archive.org/details/historichomespla04cutt
  • https://archive.org/stream/historichomespla04cutt#page/1545/mode/1up
  • John Tuttle, immigrant ancestor of the Tuttle family of New Hampshire, was born in England, in 1618. The English spelling is Tuthill and Tothill, but in this line the American families since the first few generations have spelt the surname Tuttle. There is good reason to believe that the American family springs from the old Devonshire family, England, the coat-of-arms of which is : Az. on a bend ar. cotised or, a. lion passant sable. The crest : On a mount vert a Cornish chough proper, in its beak a branch of olive, fructed, or.
  • John, Richard and William Tuttle, with their families, all came in the ship "Planter." in 1635, to New England. William settled in New Haven, Richard in Boston, and John in Ipswich. What connection these three brothers were to John Tuttle of Dover, New Hampshire, who came over probably a few years earlier, is unknown.
  • John Tuttle signed the protest of 1640 against uniting the little republic at Dover with the Massachusetts Bay Colony. His home was then on the east side of Dover Neck, the river on the east, the lot of Thomas Bearde on the south, and the Great High street on the west. It was about forty rods south-southeast of the First Church, now or lately owned by Samuel Tuttle. This place has been longer than any other in Dover in the hands of the same family. Tuttle died intestate 1663, in May or June. His wife Dorothy was administratrix, making her first return June 30, 1663. Children: 1. Daughter, married Captain Philip Cromwell. 2. Thomas, accidentally killed when a young lad by falling from a tree. 3. John, born 1646; died June, 1720, mentioned below. 4. Dorothy, married Captain Samuel Tebbets, grandson of the pioneer settler, Henry Tebbets.
  • (II) Judge John Tuttle, son of John Tuttle (1), was a man of great distinction in both civil and military life. .... Three generations of the family are buried in the old Tuttle burial ground on the east side of the homestead, next to the road. He died June, 1720, leaving a large estate. He married Mary —— , who survived him, and was his executor. Children: .... etc.

___________

  • New England families, genealogical and memorial: a record of the ..., Volume 2 edited by William Richard Cutter
  • https://books.google.com/books?id=ofcsAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA773&lpg=PA773#v=onepage&q&f=false
  • https://archive.org/details/newenglandfamili02cutt_0
  • https://archive.org/stream/newenglandfamili02cutt_0#page/773/mode/1up
  • .... etc.
  • (I) John Tuttle, the ancestor of the New Hampshire family, settled in Dover between 1633 and 1640. It is not known that he was connected with the brothers who came in the "Planter", although there is a tradition that he had a brother who settled in Connecticut. Also it is said that he came to Dover from Wales, while another report has it that he came from the western part of England. Most of the families who settled at Dover between 1633 and 1640 were from the west of England, and "were of good estates, and of some account for religion", so it is likely that he came from that part of England, but no proof has been found. The first mention of him in Dover is in 1640, when his name was on a list of the principal citizens of that place, on a protest against the plan of Underhill to place Dover under the jurisdiction of Massachusetts. Those who signed this paper are thought to have been the royalists and Church of England men who did not favor the Puritans of Massachusetts, but rather favored the views of Mason and Gorges. John Tuttle's home was situated on the east side of Dover Neck, about forty rods southeast of what is now Henderson's Field. He owned eight acres of land there, and the land is still in possession of descendants. He also owned thirty acres of the "400 upland on the Great Bay", and had a grant of land from the town which was laid out to his son, Judge Tuttle, in 1706. He was a well-to-do farmer. He died intestate in May or June, 1663, probably about forty-five years of age. His widow was appointed administratrix on his estate, and she made return to the court, June 30, 1663.
  • He married Dorothy —— , who survived him several years. Children : Daughter, married before 1663, seems to have married Captain Philip Cromwell and if so her name was Elizabeth ; Thomas, accidentally killed by the fall of a tree when a boy ; John, mentioned below ; Dorothy, married Captain Samuel Tebbets.
  • (II) Judge John (2) Tuttle, son of John (1) Tuttle, was born in 1646. .... He died in June, 1720, leaving a large estate, and his wife Mary was administratrix. Children, born in Dover : .... etc.

____________

  • Genealogical and family history of the state of New Hampshire: a ..., Volume 2 By Lewis publishing company, Chicago
  • https://books.google.com/books?id=cfoI0UIOCKQC&pg=PA483&lpg=PA483#v=onepage&q&f=false
  • https://archive.org/details/genealogicalfami02stea
  • https://archive.org/stream/genealogicalfami02stea#page/483/mode/1up
  • .... etc.
  • (I) John Tuttle, the ancestor of the New Hampshire family of Tuttles, settled in Dover some time between 1633 and 1640. Tradition says he had a brother who settled in Connecticut ; otherwise it is not known that he was connected with those who came in the "Planter" to Boston. There is a tradition current among his descendants that he came to Dover from Wales ; another tradition says he came from the western part of England. In 1640 the name of John Tuttle appears among the principal citizens of Dover, on a protest against the project of Underhill to place the little republic of Dover under the jurisdiction of Massachusetts. John Tuttle selected for his residence a charming site on the east side of Dover Neck "bounded with the river on the East, and the lott of Thomas Bearde on the South," and the "Greate High Street" on the West. John Tuttle owned eight acres of the projected city which was laid out into house lots, of one quarter of an acre each. His plantation was on the "west side of Back River adjacent to the Three Creeks." This plantation embraced "lot No. 7," of the "twenty acre lots," which was laid out to John Tuttle in 1642. He also owned other land. He is styled "planter" in public records. He seems to have communicated to his posterity a bias for his own calling; for, with but very few exceptions, his descendants to this day have been "husbandmen" tenaciously holding on to landed property, as illustrated by the fact of the uninterrupted ownership of the farm, which he owned and cultivated more than two hundred and fifty years ago, by his descendants to this day. John Tuttle died intestate in May or June, 1663, a well-to-do planter, probably aged about forty-five. He left a widow Dorothy, and four children: Elizabeth (?), Thomas, John and Dorothy.
  • (II) Judge John (2), second son and third child of John (1) and Dorothy Tuttle, born in Dover, in 1646, died June, 1720, .... etc.
  • https://archive.org/stream/genealogicalfami02stea#page/484/mode/1up
  • .... He died in June, 1720, leaving a large estate which he disposed of by will among his children and grandchildren. His wife's name was Mary, and they were the parents of seven children : .... etc.

______________

  • History of the town of Durham, New Hampshire : (Oyster River Plantation) with genealogical notes ([1913])
  • http://archive.org/details/historyoftownofd02stac
  • http://archive.org/stream/historyoftownofd02stac#page/83/mode/1up
  • Philip Cromwell born 1612, aged 74 in 1686 as per deposition, was taxed at Cochecho 1657-58. He was juryman in 1662, select-
  • http://archive.org/stream/historyoftownofd02stac#page/84/mode/1up
  • man in 1670. He owned land on Dover Neck that formerly belonged to William Storer, where he was living in 1674 when he was complained of for taking in the highway and trespassing the common. He bought land at Sandy Point, in Great Bay, of Richard Waldron, 26 Nov. 1660. He married (1) Elizabeth, daughter of Capt. John Tuttle, (2) Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Leighton before 1671. Philip Cromwell and Elizabeth "my present wife," 6 Oct. 1699, sold land to Richard Pinkham. He was commissioned captain in 1683. June 23, 1714, Samuel Cromwell, and Rachel his wife, sold to Thomas Kenney land on Dover Neck, only reserving "three rods square for a burying place at ye place where my father was buried." [N. H. Prov. Deeds, XVI. 556.] His will, dated 19 May 1708, names wife Elizabeth and the following children. He died 26 May 1708.
    • 2. JOSHUA m. Lydia —— .
    • 3. SAMUEL m. Rachel —— .
    • JOANNA m. Morris Hobbs about 1698.
    • ALICE.
    • ELIZABETH.
    • SARAH m. Timothy Wentworth before 1698.
    • MERCY m. Hatevil Hall, 14 March 1706/7.
    • ANN born 19 Aug. 1674.
  • 2. Joshua Cromwell (Philip) had a grant of land in 1693. His wife, Lydia, is named in deeds from 1709 to 1743. He lived on Dover Neck and died before 1752. .... etc.

______________________

  • The New England historical and genealogical register (1874) Vol. 21
  • https://archive.org/details/newenglandhisto17unkngoog
  • https://archive.org/stream/newenglandhisto17unkngoog#page/n167/mode/1up
  • Pg. 133
  • JOHN1 TUTTLE, the ancestor of the New Hampshire Family of Tuttles, settled in Dover, sometime between 1633 and 1640,† Tradition says he had a brother who settled in Connecticut ; otherwise it is not known that he was connected with those who came in the Planter to Boston. There is a tradition, current among his descendants, that he came to Dover from Wales ; another tradition says he came from the
    • * .... etc.
  • https://archive.org/stream/newenglandhisto17unkngoog#page/n168/mode/1up
  • Pg. 134
  • western part of England. A coat-of-arms, in the possession of one branch of the family, corresponds with the arms of the Tothill families of Devonshire, Eng.* Besides, it is a well-known historical fact, that the planters who settled in Dover, between 1633 and 1640, consisted of "families in the west of England, some of whom were of good estates, and of some account for religion." As John1 Tuttle is here aptly described, so far as estate and religion are concerned, it may be safely concluded, from all the facts, that he is as to the place whence he came. .... etc.
  • https://archive.org/stream/newenglandhisto17unkngoog#page/n169/mode/1up
  • Pg.135
  • John1 Tuttle died intestate in May or June, 1663, leaving widow Dorothy, and three children. He was probably not far from forty-five years of age at his death. She was appointed Administratrix of her husband's estate, and made return to the Court June 30, 1663. Although cut off by death in the prime of life, soon after he settled in this wilderness his personal property inventoried shows him to be a well-to-do Planter. The Court decreed a distribution of the estate, reciting in its decree "yt the eldest daughter of the deceased is married and hath had her portion already ; " that the "youngest daughter is to have £15 when she comes to the age of 18 years, or be disposess of on marrying." The bulk of the property, consisting of real estate, was given to the only son then living, John2 Tuttle, "when he comes to 21 years of age." The widow Dorothy was taxed for several years after, but nothing further is known of her ; nor is it known whether she married her husband in England or here.
  • 1. John1 Tuttle, by wife Dorothy, had four children, as follows : (2) I. Daughter,1 who married prior to 1661; she appears to be the wife of Capt. Philip Cromwell ; if so, and she survived him, her name was Elizabeth. (3) II. Thomas;2 he was accidentally killed by the fall of a tree while a young lad. The cause of his death was oflicially inquired into by the Coronor and a jury consisting of twelve principal citizens of Dover. The verdict of the jury is recorded at Exeter : it recites how "wee found Thomas Tuttell, the son of John Tuttell by the stump of a tree which he had newly fallen upon another tree, rebounding back and fell upon him which was the cause of his death, as wee consider." (4) III. JOHN,2 b. 1646, d. June, 1720. (5) IV. Dorothy :2 she married Capt. Samuel Tebbets, one of the principal citizens of Dover. Capt. Tebbets was grandson of Henry Tebbets, the first settler of the name.
  • 4. John,2 son of John1 and Dorothy Tuttle, was a man of distinction in civil and military life. .... etc.
  • https://archive.org/stream/newenglandhisto17unkngoog#page/n170/mode/1up
  • Pg.136
  • .... The Tuttle Burial Ground" was on the east side of the homestead next to the road. Not within the memory of the oldest resident on the Neck, has there been any other private burial ground below the hill where the old Church stood. The first settlers on this part of the Neck, including John1 Tuttle (I.), lie buried in the old cemetery on the east side of the road above "Meeting-house Hill," or the site of the old Church. Not more than three generations of Tuttles lie buried in this old "Tuttle Burial Ground," which is now barely discernible.
  • Judge Tuttle died in June, 1720, leaving a large estate which he disposed of by will among his children and grandchildren. His wife Mary survived him, and was Executrix of his will. Her family name is not known. .... etc.

______________________

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Elizabeth Cromwell's Timeline

1642
1642
Dover, Massachusetts Bay Colony
1662
1662
Age 20
1664
1664
Age 22
1666
1666
Age 24
1667
1667
Age 25
1668
1668
Age 26
Dover, Old Norfolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony
1668
Age 26
Dover, Strafford County, New Hampshire, United States
1669
1669
Age 27
Dover, Strafford County, New Hampshire, United States
1670
1670
Age 28