Ethelred, Lay Abbot of Dunkeld

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Æthelred mac Máel Coluim

Lithuanian: Eterledas mac Máel Coluim, Škotijos kunigaikštis
Also Known As: "Edelred", "Edelred mac Maíl Coluim", "Æþelræd Margotsson", "Edelret mac Maíl Coluim"
Birthdate: (18)
Birthplace: Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, United Kingdom
Death: between 1093 and 1107 (14-36)
Fife, Scotland, UK
Place of Burial: Kilremont, Scotland
Immediate Family:

Son of Malcolm III, 'Canmore', King of Scots and Saint Margaret, Queen of Scots
Brother of Edward mac Máel Coluim; Edmund mac Máel Coluim, Prince of Cumbria; Étgar, King of Scots; Alexander I, King of Scots; Matilda of Scotland and 2 others
Half brother of Duncan II, King of Scots; Malcolm mac Malcolm and Donald mac Malcolm

Occupation: Lay Abbot of Dunkeld
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Ethelred, Lay Abbot of Dunkeld

ETHELRED (-before [1107], bur [St Andrew´s Church, Kilremont]). He is named, and his parentage given, by Roger of Hoveden, who lists him fifth of the sons[376]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun names "Edward, Edmund, Ethelred, Edgar, Alexander and…David" as the sons of King Malcolm and his wife, adding in a later passage that Ethelred "as some assert…lies buried in St Andrew´s church at Kilremont"[377]. Lay abbot of Dunkeld. "Edelradus…filius Malcolmi Regis Scotiæ Abbas de Dunkeldense et insuper Comes de Fyf" made donations to the Keledei of Loch Leven by undated charter, witnessed by "duo fratres Hedelradi…David et Alexander…Constantini comitis de Fyf et Nesse et Cormac filii Macbeath et Malnethte filii Beollani sacerdotum de Abyrnethyn et Mallebride alterius sacerdotis"[378].

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WIKIPEDIA

Ethelred of Scotland

Ethelred (died c. 1093 Edelret mac Maíl Coluim or Æthelred Margotsson) was the son of King Malcolm III of Scotland (Gaelic Máel Coluim III) and his wife Margaret of Wessex, the third oldest of the latter and the probable sixth oldest of the former. He took his name, almost certainly, from Margaret's great-grandfather Æthelred the Unready. He became the lay abbot of Dunkeld.

Brothers

Although four of Ethelred’s brothers (both older and younger) were kings of Scotland, Etheldred was debarred from the succession for reasons unknown.[1] His older half-brother was King Duncan II of Scotland (the son of Malcolm III's first wife, Ingibiorg Finnsdottir). He reigned from May 1094 to 12 November 1094. Of his full brothers (the sons of Margaret), Edgar reigned from 1097 to 1107; Alexander I, from 1107 to 1124; and David I, from 1124 to 1153. Another brother, Edward, died alongside his father at the Battle of Alnwick in Northumberland in 1093. His brother Edmund became a monk. Lay Abbot of Dunkeld

Though called the abbot of Dunkeld, Ethelred was not necessarily a churchman. It has been argued that because of the decaying state of the Celtic Church, abbacies in this time period “were often held by laymen, who drew the revenues and appointed churchmen to perform the ecclesiastical offices.”[2]

Lands

Along with the appointment as lay abbot of Dunkeld, Ethelred was granted extensive territories, which extended on both sides of the Firth of Forth. From these lands, he made substantial gifts to the Church. North of the firth, for example, he gave the lands of Ardmore to the Culdees of Loch Leven “with every freedom, and without any exaction or demand whatever in the world from bishop, king, or earl.” South of the firth, in Midlothian, he founded the church and parish of Hales, giving the lands of Hales to the Church of the Holy Trinity at Dunfermline.”[3] Dispute Regarding Earldom of Fife

Ethelred was often said to have held the office Mormaer (Earl) of Fife, but this is now disputed. The source of the confusion was the Gaelic notitia of a grant to the Céli Dé (Culdee) monks of Loch Leven, which was later translated into Latin and incorporated in the Register of the Priory of St Andrews. The grant, dated between 1093 and 1107, begins with the words, “Edelradus vir venerandae memoriae filius Malcolmi Regis Scotiae, Abbas de Dunkeldense et insuper Comes de Fyf.” Translated, this is "Ethelred, man of venerable memory, son of King Máel Coluim of Scotland, Abbot of Dunkeld and also Mormaer of Fife." Sir James Dalrymple theorized that the phrase comes de fyfe referred not to the title of Earl, but to the area where the lands were situated, a slip made by a monk working with the manuscripts.[4]

John Bannerman offers a different explanation. He noted that the notitia in the Register records a number of witnesses, among whom were Ethelred’s brothers David and Alexander, as well as a witness identified as Constantinus Comes de Fyf, (Causantín, Earl of Fife). Causantín, not Ethelred, was clearly earl of Fife at that time. Bannerman argues that the translator was thrown off by the use of a singular Gaelic verb for a joint grant (i.e., where the verb had two subjects), common in Gaelic charters. As a result, the translator omitted the mormaer, Causantín.[5]

Abthainries

Medieval Scotland had only three abthainries, lands held of the king by an abbot: Dull, Kilmichael, and Madderty. Scottish historian William Forbes Skene has argued that these abthainries were first created for Ethelred by his brother King Edgar. They reverted to the crown at Ethelred’s death.[6]

Death and burial

Lockhart, citing Andrew of Wyntoun (c. 1350 – c. 1425), stated that Ethelred was with his mother, Margaret, at Edinburgh Castle as she was dying. Shortly after hearing the news of the deaths of her husband and son Edward at Alnwick, she died. “After her death, and during the so-called usurpation of Donalbane, he [Ethelred] conveyed her lifeless body secretly out of the western gate of the castle, taking, as is said, the advantage of a fog, on to Dunfermline, and in all probability he died soon afterwards, and was buried not at St Andrews, as some seem to say, but at Dunfermline, in the same resting-place where the bodies of his father and mother and eldest brother were laid.”[7]

In his metrical chronicle, Andrew of Wyntoun narrated those events, thus:

  Hyr swne Ethelrede, quene thys felle / 
   That wes hys modyr nere than by / 
   Gert at the west yhet prewaly / 
   Have the cors forth in a myst / 
   Or mony of hyr endying wyst; / 
   And wyth that body thai past syne / 
   But ony lat til Dwnfermelyne. / 
   Before the Rwde Awtare wyth honoure / 
   She was laid in Haly Sepulture.[8]

(This is supposed to be in rhyming couplets, but Geni has no good way of representing them.)

References

  1. Hughes, David (2007). The British Chronicles, Vol. 1. Westminster, MD: Heritage. p. 311. ISBN 978-0788444906. Retrieved 11 November 2016.
  2. Lockhart, William (8 February 1892). "Notices of Ethelred, Earl of Fife, and Abbot of Dunkeld and His Place in the Royal Family of Scotland in the Eleventh Century". Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. 26: 107. Retrieved 11 November 2016.
  3. Lockhart. "Notices": 108.
  4. Dalrymple, David (1776). History of Scotland from the Accession of Malcolm III Surnamed Canmore to the Accession of Robert I. Edinburgh. pp. 42–43. Retrieved 11 November 2016.
  5. Grant, A.; Stringer, K., eds. (1993). Medieval Scotland: Crown, Lordship and Community, Essays Presented to # G.W.S. Barrow. Edinburgh. pp. 20–38. ISBN 978-0748611102.

Skene, William Forbes (1902). The Highlanders of Scotland, Vol. 2. Stirling: Mackay. pp. 136–37. ISBN # 978-1507612651. Retrieved 11 November 2016.

  1. Lockhart. "Notices": 109.
  2. Lockhart. ""Notices"": 110.

Bibliography

  • Bannerman, John, "MacDuff of Fife," in A. Grant & K.Stringer (eds.) Medieval Scotland: Crown, Lordship and Community, Essays Presented to G.W.S. Barrow, (Edinburgh, 1993), pp. 20–38
  • Dalrymple, David (1776). History of Scotland from the Accession of Malcolm III Surnamed Canmore to the Accession of Robert I. Edinburgh. pp. 42–43.
  • Grant, A.; Stringer, K., eds. (1993). Medieval Scotland: Crown, Lordship and Community, Essays Presented to G.W.S. Barrow. Edinburgh. pp. 20–38.
  • Hughes, David (2007). The British Chronicles, Vol. 1. Westminster, MD: Heritage. p. 311. ISBN 978-0788444906.
  • Lockhart, William (8 February 1892). "Notices of Ethelred, Earl of Fife, and Abbot of Dunkeld and His Place in the Royal Family of Scotland in the Eleventh Century". Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. 26: 107.
  • Skene, William Forbes (1902). The Highlanders of Scotland, Vol. 2. Stirling: Mackay. pp. 136–37. ISBN 978-1507612651.

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The following information is often highly speculative and disputed - Maven

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Note: FHL - "The Book of McKee," pg 271 - pedigree from William Skene, D.C.L., LL.D., Historiographer-Royal of Scotland, in "Celtic Scotland," Edinburgh 1890; this shows the history of Scotland as being the Irish Kings; also from "The Mackays of Strathnaver," pg 305a (also in Book of McKee); "The Family of Alexander McCoy 929.273 M137mce states: The fourth [son] was Ethelred who was appointed by his father to be the abbot of Dunkeld, hence also the Primate of the Scottish Catholic Church founded by St. Columba in the 6th century A.D...Elthelred did [marry] so; his wife was the daughter of Lulach, a halfbreed Lord of Moray in extreme northern Scotland. His Saxon name, Ethelred, was unacceptable in the Highlands so he shortened it to Eth which was pronounced very much like the Celtic Aodha. Ethelred's grandson, one Iye MacEth, became the first chief of Clan MacKay. The clan was named for him and one should expect it to be MacIye. In fact it is for the only acceptable pronunciation of MacKay in Scotland is MacKie, like Pie or Iye." 1 [Mash-merges Aed of Moray with Ethelred of Dunkeld - probably two completely different people..]

http://thepeerage.com [Not a reliable source.]


Edelrad [son of Malcolm III], apparently Earl of Fife, who fl. early 12th century [sic - he is never heard of again after c. 1097 at the latest] and was also Abbot of Dunkeld; possibly the same person as Eth. [Burke's Peerage, p. 2538] Burke's Peerage, page 1058, on the Earldom of Fife, previous creations: Fife, constituted one of the Mormaerships into which much of pre-1st Millennium Scotland was divided. By the beginning of the 12th century the former Mormaer of Fife was beginning to be called Earl of Fife. The first of the new designation seems to have been Beth, who as either Earl of Fife or Moray (more probably the former [sic]) is recorded as having been active in 1115. (The historic figure Macbeth was son of a Mormaer of Moray, and since "Mac" means "son of" there may be a connection. [This is onomastic nonsense - the practice of using "Mac" in a first name was already well-established as referring to nonhuman entities or abstract concepts - "son of life", "righteous son", "son of the willow", etc - see O Corrain & Maguire, Irish Names, a standard reference on Celtic names generally.] ) However, another figure referred to as Earl of Fife about the same time, that is to say during the reign of David I (reigned 1124-1153), is a shadowy personage called in contemporary documents either "Ed" or "Head" and identified by [some] leading authorities with Edelread, son of Malcolm III (reigned 1058-93).[This is NOT true - Aed/Head's mormaership, if he had one, was Moray, not Fife. He is NEVER named explicitly as ruler of Fife in ANY primary source.] Yet a third Earl of Fife appears to have existed in the person of Constantine, who died in the late 1120's. [Constantine, or Causantin, is actually documented all the way back to the "Ethelred charter" as "comes de Fyf", and he is unusually well documented for so early a historical figure - partly because of his importance in Scottish law.]

The first person to hold the Earldom of Fife on a hereditary basis may well have been Gillemicel MacDuff, who died about the mid-1130's. Certainly the title remained in his family, passing almost always from father to son, till 1353, when the 8th Earl's only child, Elizabeth or Isabel, became Countess of Fife. She married four times, each of her husbands being known as Earl of Fife in right of his wife. She died without issue, having made over the Earldom to her second husband's brother Robert Stewart, Earl of Menteith, her 2nd husband and he being second and third sons respectively of Robert II. Beth, who, as "Beth, Comes" was witness to the charter of Scone in 1115, may not improbably be considered as Earl of Fife, though possibly as Earl of Moray. There appears also to have been one "Ed [Edelrad?] Comes" or "Head, Comes" in charters temp. David I, who probably was Edelrad (son of Malcolm III), Abbot of Dunkeld, and, according to some accounts, Earl of Fife. This "Ed, Comes" was contemporary with Earl Beth and with Earl Constantine, his successor [sic]. [Complete Peerage V:372]

Note: Burke is not infallible, and earlier editions contained some serious errors.


Discussions:

_________________

1. MALCOLM (1031-killed in battle near Alnwick, Northumberland 13 Nov 1093, buried Tynemouth, later transferred to Dunfermline Abbey, Fife, and later still to Escorial, Madrid). He succeeded in 1058 as MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland. Cawley’s Medlands

The 12th century Cronica Regum Scottorum names "Malcolaim filii Donnchada" in one of its lists[307]. The Chronicon of Marianus Scottus records that "Moelcol…filius Donchael" succeeded Lulach in 1058[308]. [Florence of Worcester records that "dux Northhymbrorum Siwardus" defeated "rege Scottorum Macbeotha" in battle, dated to 1054, and installed "Malcolmum regis Cumbrorum filium" in his place[309]. The Annales Dunelmenses record that "Siwardus" put "Macbeth" to flight in 1054 and installed "Malcolmum rege" in the following year[310]. It is not clear that these two accounts refer to the future King Malcolm III: it is uncertain why King Malcolm would be called "regis Cumbrorum filium".] The Annals of Tigernach record that “Lulach rí Alban” was killed by “Mael-Coluimb, son of Donnchad” in 1058[311]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that Malcolm recaptured his kingdom with the help of "Siward Earl of Northumberland" and killed "Machabeus" 5 Dec 1056[312]. He succeeded in 1058 as MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland, crowned 25 Apr 1058 at Scone Abbey, Perthshire. Duncan cites sources which demonstrate that this nickname was first applied to King Malcolm III in the 13th century[313]. He suggests[314] that it was originally applied to King Malcolm IV who, he asserts, suffered from Paget's disease, involving a deformation of the bones particularly observable in the skull, and was later misapplied to King Malcolm III. King Malcolm supported the claim to the English crown of Edgar ætheling, whose sister he had married, and led plundering raids into England. Florence of Worcester records that he did homage to William I King of England at Abernethy in Aug 1072[315]. The same source records that King Malcolm invaded Northumberland in 1091, but did fealty to Willam II King of England after peace was negotiated between the two kings[316]. Florence of Worcester records that "rex Scottorum Malcolmus et primogenitus filius suus Eadwardus" were killed in battle in Northumbria "die S Bricii" [13 Nov] by the army of "Rotberti Northymbrorum comitis"[317]. William of Malmesbury records that he was killed, with his son Edward, by Morael of Bamborough, steward of Robert Mowbray Earl of Northumberland, while leading a raid into England[318]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Mael Coluim son of Donnchad, over-king of Scotland, and Edward his son, were killed by the French in Inber Alda in England"[319]. Cawley’s Medlands

m [secondly] (Dunfermline Abbey 1070) MARGARET of England, daughter of EDWARD Ætheling of England & his wife Agatha --- ([in Hungary] [1046/53]-Edinburgh Castle 16 Nov 1093, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife, transferred to Escorial, Madrid, her head bur Jesuit College, Douai). Although Margaret's birth is often placed in [1045/46][321], a later birth would be more consistent with the "German" theory of her mother's origin (as discussed in the document ANGLO-SAXON KINGS). Margaret's birth as late as 1053 would still be consistent with her having given birth to four children before her daughter Edith/Matilda (later wife of Henry I King of England), whose birth is estimated to have taken place in [1079/80]. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that Margaret left England with her mother in Summer 1067 and found refuge at the court of Malcolm King of Scotland[322]. Florence of Worcester records that "clitone Eadgaro et matre sua Agatha duabusque sororibus suis Margareta et Christina" left England for Scotland, in a passage which deals with events in mid-1068[323]. Florence of Worcester records that "regina Scottorum Margareta" died from grief after learning of the death of her husband and oldest son[324]. The Annals of Ulster record that "his queen Margaret…died of sorrow for him within nine days" after her husband was killed in battle[325]. She was canonised in 1250, her feast day in Scotland is 16 Nov[326]. Cawley’s Medlands

King Malcolm III & his second wife, Margaret, had eight children[350]:

[Cawley's birth order is debatable, particularly the placement of Ethelred after Alexander. This may be an attempt to dodge the question of why Ethelred was never considered as heir to the throne of Scotland. Walls Of Text.]

3. EDWARD (-Edwardsisle, near Jedburgh 16 Nov 1093, bur Tynemouth St Albans). Florence of Worcester records that "rex Scottorum Malcolmus et primogenitus filius suus Eadwardus" were killed in battle in Northumbria "die S Bricii" [13 Nov] by the army of "Rotberti Northymbrorum comitis"[351]. He is named, and his parentage given, by Roger of Hoveden, who lists him first of the sons[352]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun names "Edward, Edmund, Ethelred, Edgar, Alexander and…David" as the sons of King Malcolm and his wife[353]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that, according to "William", "Edmund…was privy to his brother Duncan´s death, having…bargained with his uncle [Donald] for half the kingdom" but was captured and "kept in fetters for ever"[354]. He died from wounds received at the battle of Alnwick during a raid on England led by his father. The Annals of Ulster record that "Mael Coluim son of Donnchad, over-king of Scotland, and Edward his son, were killed by the French in Inber Alda in England"[355]. Matthew Paris reports that the remains of "regis Scotorum Malcolmi et Edwardi filii sui" were found at Tynemouth, commenting that both had been killed fighting "Robertus de Mumbrai"[356]. Cawley’s Medlands

4. EDMUND (-after 1097, bur [Montacute]). He is named, and his parentage given, by Roger of Hoveden, who lists him second of the sons[357]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun names "Edward, Edmund, Ethelred, Edgar, Alexander and…David" as the sons of King Malcolm and his wife, adding in a later passage that Edmund "was buried at Montacute in England"[358]. He succeeded in 1094 as EDMUND joint King of Scotland, jointly with his uncle King Donald III "Bane", ruling south of the Forth/Clyde. He was deposed in 1097 by his brother Edgar, and became a monk at Montacute Abbey. Edmund is not mentioned either by Orderic Vitalis in his brief account of the usurpation of King Donald "Bane"[359], or by Florence of Worcester in his account of the deposition of King Donald in 1097[360]. If Edmund was older than his brother Edgar, it is not clear why their uncle Edgar Ætheling, who led the English army which deposed their uncle, would have supported the accession of Edgar in place of Edmund. The Annals of Ulster record that he was involved in the killing of his half-brother King Duncan[361]. William of Malmesbury records that "Edmund was the only degenerate son of Margaret", that he "[partook] in his uncle Donald's crime and…had been accessory to his brother's death", was "doomed to perpetual imprisonment", and "on his near approach of death, ordered himself to be buried in his chains"[362]. The 12th century Cronica Regum Scottorum records that "Edmundus" was buried "apud Montem Acutum in…cella Cluniacensi"[363]. Cawley’s Medlands

5. EDGAR ([1074]-[Dundee or Edinburgh Castle] 6 Jan 1107, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife). He is named, and his parentage given, by Roger of Hoveden, who lists him third of the sons[364]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun names "Edward, Edmund, Ethelred, Edgar, Alexander and…David" as the sons of King Malcolm and his wife[365]. He succeeded in 1097 as EDGAR King of Scotland. Florence of Worcester records that "clitorem Eadgarum" led an army to Scotland in [1097] to place "consobrinum suum Eadgarum Malcolmi regis filium" on the Scottish throne after expelling "patruo suo Dufenaldo"[366]. The reign of Edgar is ignored by Orderic Vitalis, who says that Alexander succeeded when King Donald was deposed[367]. "Edgarus filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" made grants for the souls of "fratrum meorum Doncani et Edwardi" by charter dated 30 Aug 1095, subscribed by "Egeri regis, Alexandri fratri eius, Manyanium, Agulfi, filii Doncani, Eyluerti, filii Eghe Omani, Uhtredi, filii Magdufe, Constantini, Rodberti de humet, Ætele, A. gulfi, Alimoldi filii sui, David"[368]. The precise dating of this charter and the unusual list of subscribers suggest that it may be spurious. "Edgarus…Rex Scottorum" made grants for the souls of "Malcolmi patris nostri et Margaretæ matris nostræ…ac Edwardi et Duncani fratrum nostrorum" by charter dated 1095[369]. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1107 of "Edgarus rex Scotiæ"[370]. Florence of Worcester records the death "VIII Id Jan" in [1107] of "Eadgarus rex Scottorum"[371]. The Chronicle of the Picts and Scots dated 1251 records that "Edgar mac Malcolm" reigned for 9 years, died "in Dunedin", and was buried "in Dumferline"[372]. Cawley’s Medlands

6. ALEXANDER ([1077/78]-Stirling Castle 23, 25 or 27 Apr 1124, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife). He is named, and his parentage given, by Roger of Hoveden, who lists him fourth of the sons[373]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun names "Edward, Edmund, Ethelred, Edgar, Alexander and…David" as the sons of King Malcolm and his wife[374]. Robert of Torigny records that "Alexander frater eius" succeeded in 1107 on the death of "Edgarus rex Scotiæ"[375]. He succeeded his brother in 1107 as ALEXANDER I "the Fierce" King of Scotland. Florence of Worcester records that "Alexanderfrater eius" succeeded his brother King Edgar in [1107][376]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "VII Kal Mai" [1124] of "Alexander rex Scottorum"[377]. "Alexander…rex Scottorum filius regis Malcolmi et regine Margerete et…Sibilla regina Scottorum filia Henrici regis Anglie" reformed Scone Abbey by charter dated to [1114/15], witnessed by "Alexander nepos regis Alexandri, Beth comes, Gospatricius Dolfini, Mallus comes, Madach comes, Rothri comes, Gartnach comes, Dufagan comes, Willelmus frater regine, Edwardus constabularius, Gospatricius filius Walthef, Ufieth Alfricus pincerna"[378]. The Chronicle of the Picts and Scots dated 1251 records that "Alexander" reigned for 17 years and 3 months, died "in Crasleth", and was buried "in Dumferline"[379].

m (before [1114/15]) SIBYL, illegitimate daughter of HENRY I King of England & his mistress [---/Sibyl Corbet] (-Island of the Women, Loch Tay, Perthshire 12/13 Jul 1122, bur Island of the Women, Loch Tay). William of Malmesbury records the marriage of Alexander to the unnamed illegitimate daughter of King Henry, but adds "there was…some defect about the lady either in correctness of manners or elegance of person"[380], which appears to imply mental retardation. "Alexander…rex Scottorum filius regis Malcolmi et regine Margerete et…Sibilla regina Scottorum filia Henrici regis Anglie" reformed Scone Abbey by charter dated to [1114/15][381]. Her name is confirmed by various charters, including the charter dated to [1120] under which "Alexander…Rex Scottorum filius Regis Malcolmi et Reginæ Margaretæ et…Sibilla regina Scottorum filia Henrici regis Angliæ" made grants[382]. Considering the date of her marriage, it is unlikely that she was born much later than [1095]. The Complete Peerage[383] suggests that she was the daughter of Sibyl Corbet, both because of her name and also because of the possible co-identity between "…Willelmo fratre reginæ…", who witnessed the charter dated 1124 under which "Alexander…Rex Scottorum" granted jurisdiction to the prior of Scone[384], and "…Willielmo fratre meo…" who witnessed the charter dated to [1163/75] under which "Reginaldus, Henrici Regis filius, comes Cornubiæ" granted property to "Willielmo de Boterell, filio Aliziæ Corbet, materteræ meæ"[385]. However, this co-identity is not ideal from a chronological point of view. William, brother of Renaud Earl of Cornwall, died after 1187. If he was the same person as the brother of Sibyl Queen of Scotland, he could only have been a child when he subscribed the Scottish charters in which he is named. In addition, as noted in the document ENGLAND KINGS, it is possible that William, brother of Earl Renaud, may have been his uterine brother, in which case it is unlikely that he would have been chosen to accompany the queen to Scotland. Another factor is that the birth of Herbert FitzHerbert, son of Sibyl Corbet by her marriage, is estimated to [1125/35] (see the document UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY). This means that he could only have been Sibyl´s half-brother if she had been a young girl at the time of her marriage. On the other hand, "Robert Corbet" witnessed charters in Scotland which are dated to late in the reign of King Alexander and the early years of the reign of his brother King David (see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY). If Robert Corbet was Queen Sibyl´s maternal grandfather or her maternal uncle, this could account for his presence at the Scottish court at the time. The Extracta ex Cronicis Scocie records the death in 1122 "apud Lochtay cellam canonicorum de Scona" of "Sibilla…regine Scocie uxor regis Alexandri, filia Henrici Beuclerk regis Anglie"[386]. Cawley’s Medlands

King Alexander I had one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress:

a) MALCOLM ([1105/15]-after 1158). Orderic Vitalis names Malcolm as bastard son of King Alexander[387]. Robert of Torigny records that "Aragois comes Morefie cum Melcolmo notho filio Alexandri fratri regis David" invaded Scotland in 1130[388]. same person as …? MALCOLM MacHeth (-23 Oct 1168[389]). Duncan suggests that Malcolm, son of King Alexander I, and Malcolm MacHeth were two different persons, the latter being the son of "Aed" or "Heth" who witnessed two charters in the early years of the reign of King David I[390]. He was reconciled with King Malcolm IV in 1157. Malcolm MacHeth was created Earl of Ross in 1162 or before[391]. Cawley’s Medlands

7. ETHELRED (-before [1107], bur [St Andrew´s Church, Kilremont]). He is named, and his parentage given, by Roger of Hoveden, who lists him fifth of the sons[392]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun names "Edward, Edmund, Ethelred, Edgar, Alexander and…David" as the sons of King Malcolm and his wife, adding in a later passage that Ethelred "as some assert…lies buried in St Andrew´s church at Kilremont"[393]. Lay abbot of Dunkeld. "Edelradus…filius Malcolmi Regis Scotiæ Abbas de Dunkeldense et insuper Comes de Fyf" made donations to the Keledei of Loch Leven by undated charter, witnessed by "duo fratres Hedelradi…David et Alexander…Constantini comitis de Fyf et Nesse et Cormac filii Macbeath et Malnethte filii Beollani sacerdotum de Abyrnethyn et Mallebride alterius sacerdotis"[394]. Cawley’s Medlands


8. EADGYTH (1079-1 Jun 1118). Orderic Vitalis records that their mother sent Eadgyth and her sister Mary to be brought up by their maternal aunt Christina, nun at Romsey Abbey[395]. Florence of Worcester records the marriage of King Henry and "regis Scottorum Malcolmi et Margaretæ reginæ filiam Mahtildem" and her coronation as queen in a passage dealing with events in late 1100[396]. She adopted the name MATILDA on her marriage. Crowned Queen Consort of England 11 or 14 Nov 1100. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Kal Mai" of "MatildisAnglorum regina"[397]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "Kal Mai " at Westminster of "Mahthildis regina Anglorum", and her burial at Westminster Abbey[398].

m (11 Nov 1100) as his first wife, HENRY I "Beauclerc" King of England, son of WILLIAM I "the Conqueror" King of England & his wife Mathilde de Flandre (Selby, Yorkshire Sep 1068-Saint-Denis le Ferment, Forêt d’Angers near Rouen 1/2 Dec 1135, bur Reading Abbey, Berkshire). Cawley’s Medlands

9. DAVID ([1080]-Carlisle 24 May 1153, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife). He is named, and his parentage given, by Roger of Hoveden, who lists him as the sixth son of his parents[399]. He succeeded his brother in 1124 as DAVID I King of Scotland. Cawley’s Medlands

10. MARY (-31 May 1116 or 18 Apr 1118, bur Bermondsey Priory). Orderic Vitalis records that their mother sent Mary and her sister Eadgyth to be brought up by their maternal aunt Christina, nun at Romsey Abbey[400]. Florence of Worcester records that Henry I King of England arranged the marriage of "Mariam reginæ sororem" and "Eustatio Bononensium comiti" in [1102][401]. Her marriage is also recorded by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her daughter[402]. The Genealogica comitum Buloniensium records that "Eustachius, frater Balduini regis Iheruslame" married "Mariam filiam regis Scotiæ"[403]. The 12th century Cronica Regum Scottorum records the death "II Kal Jun" in 1116 of "Maria…comitissa" and her burial "apud Bermundseiam"[404]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that "Mary countess of Bouillon" died in "the third year before her sister´s death"[405].

m (1102) EUSTACHE III Comte de Boulogne, son of EUSTACHE [II] "Gernobadatus" Comte de Boulogne and Lens & his second wife Ida of Lotharingia (-after 1125). Cawley’s Medlands


Name: Duff MacEth, ABT 1078 - ?, <- 44 93-> , [14] [Possibly fictional, certainly not Ethelred.]

Birth: ABT 1078 at Methil; Fifeshire; Scotland

Children:

Gillimichael MacDuff ABT 1098 - BEF JUL 1136

Ghillechriost Dufugan Angus ABT 1094 - ?


There is mystery surrounding the identities of the early holders of the Earldom of Fife and it is by no means certain that (for example) Gillemichael (shown below as the 3rd Earl) was in fact descended from Dufagan (shown below as the 1st Earl). Some web sites report the old suggestion that Dufagan was son of MacDuff, ie. grandson of King Duff (or Dubh), but this is rejected by most serious genealogists simply because MacDuff is thought to have never existed.

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=ryk_brown&id=I07955

Dufagan is the predecessor of Constantine as Earl of Fife. It is not known if Dufagan was actually the father of Constantine. He is presumed to be Constantine's father based solely on the succession of the earldom.

Stirnet.com reports that Dufagan is claimed to be a grandson of King Duff by his son MacDuff, but this is "rejected by most serious genealogists simply because MacDuff is thought to have never existed."

Dufagan was also known as "Beth" (= "Beodhe" in Gaelic). [No evidence for this.] King Duff did have a grandson (by Kenneth) named Beodhe of whom little is known -- this could provide the legitimate link to make Dufagan/Beth=Beodhe the grandson of King Duff without any fictional MacDuff.

"Dufagan" may = Dubh + Eoghan = "Black Hugh" [this is more onomastic nonsense - "Dufagan" more probably represents a genuine Celtic name, either Dubhagan ("little dark lad") or Duibhgenn ("dark-haired person"). O Corrain & Maguire, pp. 77, 78 - Maven

links

Ethelred of Dunkeld, Earl of Fife1 M, #104733, b. after 1071, d. circa 1097

Last Edited=15 Dec 2012

Ethelred of Dunkeld, Earl of Fife was born after 1071. He was the son of Malcolm III 'Caennmor', King of Scotland and Saint Margaret 'the Exile' (?).2 He died circa 1097.1 He was buried at Kilremont Church, Scotland.1

He was also known as Edelrad (?).3 He gained the title of Earl of Fife.1 He was Lay Abbot of Dunkeld.1 Child of Ethelred of Dunkeld, Earl of Fife

Gillemich(A)el Macduff+4 d. c 1133

Citations [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 184. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.

[S106] Royal Genealogies Website (ROYAL92.GED), online

ftp://ftp.cac.psu.edu/genealogy/public_html/royal/index.html. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogies Website.

[S37] BP2003 volume 3, page 3510. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]

[S37] BP2003. [S37]


Following comments mine - Maven

Although his grandfather Crinan was Abbot of Dunkeld without having to take Holy Orders, by this time the Church was starting to crack down on such irregular arrangements. Also, it seems that Ethelred's vocation was very real - he took no part in the succession wars that followed his father's death (no primary or even secondary accounts of his having anything to do with *any* of it, and it was extremely messy), and was never considered to be in the line of succession (passed over for his younger(?) brother Edgar). "Royal Dunfermline" http://www.royaldunfermline.com/ cites a burial date for Ethelred of 1098 in one place, 1105 in another.)

Considering how very religious Margaret of Wessex was (she was canonized as Saint Margaret in the year 1250, which was fairly quick work for the Vatican then *or* now), it would not be all that strange for one of her sons to prefer the cloister to the crown.

Ethelred may have had other reasons besides a priestly vocation for opting out of the dynastic struggles. The Celtic peoples had a very strong tradition of demanding that their rulers be without blemish, deformity or disability (cf. the legend of Nuada of the Silver Hand), and if Ethelred had some obvious physical imperfection (such as a club foot), that would basically rule him out of the succession. (This is probably why Ethelred's uncle Donald Bane was blinded after his second usurpation - not so much out of savagery as to make sure that he could never, ever stage a third attempt.)

It is questionable whether he was the ruler of Fife (that title was held in his own time by Causantin (Constantine) of the macDuffs), and he is not the same person as the Aedh/Heth/Head/(Hugh) who witnessed several royal charters in the early 12th century. The latter may possibly have been the otherwise unknown husband of Lulach's unnamed daughter, and father of Óengus [Angus] of Moray (killed in battle 1130, after which the title to Moray lapsed until the Scottish Crown saw fit to grant it again).

He is not reliably reported to have married anyone, nor to have had any offspring (Gille Mathiel/Gillemichael of Fife, Causantin's successor, was of the clan MacDuff, as were all his known predecessors - the house of Dunkeld was not counted as part of the clan MacDuff).


http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Dunkeld-111

Heth MacCrinan "Aethelred" Earl of Fife formerly Dunkeld Born about 1062 in Morayshiremap Son of Malcolm III (Dunkeld) Ceannmore and Margaret (Wessex) Ceannmore Brother of Thora Canmore, Millicent Canmore, Duncan (Dunkeld) of Scotland, Edith Sigulfson, Donald (Dunkeld) of Scotland, Edward (Dunkeld) of Scotland, Edmund Dunkeld, Malcom of Scotland, Aethelred (Dunkeld) Canmore, Edgar (Dunkeld) of Scotland, Alexander mac Maíl Coluim (Dunkeld) of Scotland, Margaret (Stewart) Mormaer, Eadgith (Dunkeld) of Scotland, Mary (Dunkeld) Scotland, David I (Dunkeld) of Scotland and Breatrix (Canmore) Cranmor Husband of Tul (Alpin) of Moray — married [date unknown] in Burkes Peerage,map Father of Unknown (Moray) MacEth, Ethelred mac Máel Coluim, Lay Abbott of Dunkeld, Angus Athelred, Causantin Duffagan of Fife Angus, Edelrad Duff Of Fife, Duff McEth (Moray) of Moray, Gruaide Athelred, Unknown Maceth, Angus MacHeth and Gillemichel MacDuff Died about 1093 in Methil, Fifeshiremap [uncertain] Profile managers: Katherine Patterson private message [send private message], Ted Williams private message [send private message], and Alexander Sives private message [send private message] Dunkeld-111 created 18 Jan 2014 | Last modified 15 Aug 2015 This page has been accessed 2,523 times.

Contents

[hide] 1 Biography 1.1 Name 2 Sources 2.1 Occupation 2.2 Source 3 = Footnotes Biography

Name

Name: Heth /Aethelred/[1] Sources

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=aet-t&id=I48880 Ethelred, Lay Abbot of Dunkeld Source: S004386 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Note: #NS043861

↑ Source: #S004386 Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=6436419&pid=-1286185890

Date: ABT 1062 Occupation

Occupation: Earl of Fife & Abbot of Dunkeld Not named as a son of Malcolm III at Wikipedia This person was created through the import of Williams_AndersForWikiTree.ged on 07 May 2011. This person was created through the import of Williams_AndersForWikiTree.ged on 07 May 2011. This person was created through the import of Williams_AndersForWikiTree.ged on 07 May 2011. WikiTree profile Aethelred-6 created through the import of Mears Family Tree as Oct 200.ged on Dec 24, 2011 by David Mears. This person was created through the import of Williams_AndersForWikiTree.ged on 07 May 2011. This person was created through the import of Williams_AndersForWikiTree.ged on 07 May 2011. This person was created through the import of Williams_AndersForWikiTree.ged on 07 May 2011. This person was created through the import of Acrossthepond.ged on 21 February 2011. Source

Source: #S-2041639488 Page: Ancestry Family Trees http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=21525863&pid=1548647232

Source S-2041639488 Repository: #R-2041639490 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Repository R-2041639490 Name: Ancestry.com Address: http://www.Ancestry.com Source S-2041639488 Repository: #R-2041639490 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Repository R-2041639490 Source S-2041639488 Repository: #R-2041639490 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Repository R-2041639490 Name: Ancestry.com Source: S-2100314565 Repository: #R-2140967628 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=11448774&pid=3096 Repository: R-2140967628 Name: Ancestry.com Source S-2041639488 Repository: #R-2041639490 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Repository R-2041639490 Source: #S-2041639488 Page: Ancestry Family Trees http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=21525863&pid=1456753761

Source: #S-2041639488 Page: Ancestry Family Trees http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=21525863&pid=1456753761

Source S-2041639488 Repository: #R-2041639490 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Repository R-2041639490 Name: Ancestry.com Source S-2041639488 Repository: #R-2041639490 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Repository R-2041639490 Source S-2041639488 Repository: #R-2041639490 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Repository R-2041639490 Name: Ancestry.com

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Ethelred, Lay Abbot of Dunkeld's Timeline

1075
1075
Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, United Kingdom
1093
1093
Age 18
Fife, Scotland, UK
????
Kilremont, Scotland