Foulques V 'le Jeune' d'Anjou, comte de Anjou et roi de Jérusalem (1089 - 1143) MP

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Nicknames: "Le Jeune", "/Fulk/ V", "o Jovem", "Foulcques", "Foulco", "Fulk", "le Jeune", "Fulk the Younger", "Fulk of Anjou", "Foulques", "Fulco", "Foulque", "King of Jerusalem Foulques le Jeune V", "King of Jersualem /Fulk V/", "Count of /Anjou/", "King of Jerusalem", "the Younger", "'the", "King F..."
Birthplace: Angers, Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France
Death: Died in Acre, The Holy Land
Cause of death: died from riding accident while hunting near Acre
Occupation: Comte d'Anjou, Comte de Tours (vv.1109-1129), Comte du Maine (vv.1110-1129), Roi de Jérusalem (vv.1131-1143), Count of Anjou, King of England, Comte d'Anjou et du Maine, roi de Jérusalem, King of Jerusalem, Greve av Anjou Kung av Jerusalem
Managed by: Sally Gene Cole
Last Updated:

About Foulques V 'le Jeune' d'Anjou, comte de Anjou et roi de Jérusalem

Foulques V "le Jeune" de Anjou


Knight Templar, King of Jerusalem 1131 - 1142/3 9th Count of Anjou 1109 - 1129

b 1089 to 1092 d 13 Nov 1142/3, Plains of Acre, Holy Land (died from riding accident)

buried Church of the Holy Sepulcher, Jerusalem

Parents: Fulk IV of Anjou & Bertrade de Montfort

Spouse 1: Ermengarde du Maine

  • Child: Elie II Count of Maine (-1151)
  • Child: Geoffrey V Count of Anjou m Mathilda, Princess of England
  • Child: Matilda of Anjou m William IV Atheling Duke of Normandy
  • Child: Sibylle d'Anjou m1 William Clito m2 Thierry I Count of Flanders
  • Child: Alice / Isabella m William Adelin who died on the White Ship, became a nun at Fontevrault Abbey
  • Child: Elias II of Maine

Spouse 2: Melisende de Rethel Queen of Jerusalem (notes) (1105-1160) dtr of Baldwin of Bourg

  • Child: Baldwin III of Jerusalem King of Jerusalem m Theodora Comnena
  • Child: Amalric I Anjou King of Jerusalem m Agnes de Courtenai

Sources

1. 15. "Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came to America before 1700", Frederick Lewis Weis, 1992, seventh edition. and/or " Ancestral Roots Of Sixty Colonists", 6th edition, Line 50, by Dr. Frederich Lewis Weis.

2. 52. 52 "British Kings & Queens" by Mike Ashley, Carroll & Graf Publications, Inc, 1998 (in Lady Anne's library)

3. 107. "The Lineage and Ancestry of HRH Prince Charles", Gerald [Paget]

4. 109. "Dynastic Genealogy Files", Paul Theroff. Based primarily on Europaeische Stammtafeln

5. 110. "[Plantagenet ]Ancestry", by Turton

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Fulk (1089/1092 in Angers – November 13, 1143 in Acre), also known as Fulk the Younger, was Count of Anjou (as Fulk V) from 1109 to 1129, and King of Jerusalem from 1131 to his death. He was also the paternal grandfather of Henry II of England.

Fulk was born in Angers between 1089 and 1092, the son of Count Fulk IV of Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort. In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France.

He became count of Anjou upon his father's death in 1109, at the age of approximately twenty. In that year, he married Erembourg of Maine, cementing Angevin control over the County of Maine.

In 1110, Fulk married Ermengarde of Maine (died 1126), the daughter of Elias I of Maine. Their four children were:

  • 1. Geoffrey V of Anjou, father of Henry II of England.
  • 2. Sibylla of Anjou (1112–1165, Bethlehem), married in 1123 William Clito (div. 1124), married in 1134 Thierry, Count of Flanders.
  • 3. Alice (or Isabella) (1107–1154, Fontevrault), married William Adelin; after his death in the White Ship she became a nun and later Abbess of Fontevrault.
  • 4. Elias II of Maine (died 1151)

His second wife was Melisende, Queen of Jerusalem

  • 1. Baldwin III of Jerusalem
  • 2. Amalric I of Jerusalem

Sources

  • Orderic Vitalis
  • Robert of Torigny
  • William of Tyre
  • Medieval Women, edited by Derek Baker, the Ecclesiastical History Society, 1978
  • Payne, Robert. The Dream and the Tomb, 1984
  • The Damascus Chronicle of Crusades, trans. H.A.R. Gibb, 1932.

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Foulques became count of Anjou upon his father's death in 1109, at the age of approximately twenty. He was originally an opponent of King Henry I of England and a supporter of King Louis VI of France, but in 1127 he allied with Henry when Henry arranged for his daughter Matilda to marry Fulk's son Geoffrey of Anjou. Fulk went on crusade in 1120, and become a close friend of the Knights Templar. After his return he began to subsidize the Templars, and maintained two knights in the Holy Land for a year.

By 1127 Fulk was preparing to return to Anjou when he received an embassy from King Baldwin II of Jerusalem. Baldwin II had no male heirs but had already designated his daughter Melisende to succeed him. Baldwin II wanted to safeguard his daughter's inheritance by marrying her to a powerful lord. Fulk was a wealthy crusader and experienced military commander, and a widower. His experience in the field would prove invaluable in a frontier state always in the grip of war.

However, Fulk held out for better terms than mere consort of the Queen; he wanted to be king alongside Melisende. Baldwin II, reflecting on Fulk's fortune and military exploits, acquiesced. Fulk abdicated his county seat of Anjou to his son Geoffery and left for Jerusalem, where he married Melisende on June 2, 1129. Later Baldwin II bolstered Melisende's position in the kingdom by making her sole guardian of her son by Fulk, Baldwin III, born in 1130.

Fulk and Melisende became joint rulers of Jerusalem in 1131 with Baldwin II's death. From the start Fulk assumed sole control of the government, excluding Melisende altogether. He favored fellow countrymen from Anjou to the native nobility. The other crusader states to the north feared that Fulk would attempt to impose the suzerainty of Jerusalem over them, as Baldwin II had done; but as Fulk was far less powerful than his deceased father-in-law, the northern states rejected his authority. Melisende's sister Alice of Antioch, exiled from the Principality by Baldwin II, took control of Antioch once more after the death of her father. She allied with Pons of Tripoli and Joscelin II of Edessa to prevent Fulk from marching north in 1132; Fulk and Pons fought a brief battle before peace was made and Alice was exiled again.

In 1143, while the king and queen were on holiday in Acre, Fulk was killed in a hunting accident. His horse stumbled, fell, and Fulk's skull was crushed by the saddle, "and his brains gushed forth from both ears and nostrils", as William of Tyre describes. He was carried back to Acre, where he lay unconscious for three days before he died. He was buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Though their marriage started in conflict, Melisende mourned for him privately as well as publicly. Fulk was survived by his son Geoffrey of Anjou by his first wife, and Baldwin III and Amalric I by Melisende.

According to William, Fulk was "a ruddy man, like David... faithful and gentle, affable and kind... an experienced warrior full of patience and wisdom in military affairs." His chief fault was an inability to remember names and faces.

William of Tyre described Fulk as a capable soldier and able politician, but observed that Fulk did not adequately attend to the defense of the crusader states to the north. Ibn al-Qalanisi (who calls him al-Kund Anjur, an Arabic rendering of "Count of Anjou") says that "he was not sound in his judgment nor was he successful in his administration." The Zengids continued their march on the crusader states, culminating in the fall of the County of Edessa in 1144, which led to the Second Crusade.

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Fulk was born between 1089 and 1092, the son of Count Fulk IV of Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort. In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France.

He became count of Anjou upon his father's death in 1109, at the age of approximately twenty. He was originally an opponent of King Henry I of England and a supporter of King Louis VI of France, but in 1127 he allied with Henry when Henry arranged for his daughter Matilda to marry Fulk's son Geoffrey of Anjou. Fulk went on crusade in 1120, and became a close friend of the Knights Templar. After his return he began to subsidize the Templars, and maintained two knights in the Holy Land for a year.

The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the other Crusader states (in shades of green) in 1135 CE, during the reign of Fulk.By 1127 Fulk was preparing to return to Anjou when he received an embassy from King Baldwin II of Jerusalem. Baldwin II had no male heirs but had already designated his daughter Melisende to succeed him. Baldwin II wanted to safeguard his daughter's inheritance by marrying her to a powerful lord. Fulk was a wealthy crusader and experienced military commander, and a widower. His experience in the field would prove invaluable in a frontier state always in the grip of war.

However, Fulk held out for better terms than mere consort of the Queen; he wanted to be king alongside Melisende. Baldwin II, reflecting on Fulk's fortune and military exploits, acquiesced. Fulk abdicated his county seat of Anjou to his son Geoffery and left for Jerusalem, where he married Melisende on June 2, 1129. Later Baldwin II bolstered Melisende's position in the kingdom by making her sole guardian of her son by Fulk, Baldwin III, born in 1130.

Fulk and Melisende became joint rulers of Jerusalem in 1131 with Baldwin II's death. From the start Fulk assumed sole control of the government, excluding Melisende altogether. He favored fellow countrymen from Anjou to the native nobility. The other crusader states to the north feared that Fulk would attempt to impose the suzerainty of Jerusalem over them, as Baldwin II had done; but as Fulk was far less powerful than his deceased father-in-law, the northern states rejected his authority. Melisende's sister Alice of Antioch, exiled from the Principality by Baldwin II, took control of Antioch once more after the death of her father. She allied with Pons of Tripoli and Joscelin II of Edessa to prevent Fulk from marching north in 1132; Fulk and Pons fought a brief battle before peace was made and Alice was exiled again.

In Jerusalem as well, Fulk was resented by the second generation of Jerusalem Christians who had grown up there since the First Crusade. These "natives" focused on Melisende's cousin, the popular Hugh II of Le Puiset, count of Jaffa, who was devotedly loyal to the Queen. Fulk saw Hugh as a rival, and it did not help matters when Hugh's own stepson accused him of disloyalty. In 1134, in order to expose Hugh, Fulk accused him of infidelity with Melisende. Hugh rebelled in protest. Hugh secured himself to Jaffa, and allied himself with the Muslims of Ascalon. He was able to defeat the army set against him by Fulk, but this situation could not hold. The Patriarch interceded in the conflict, perhaps at the behest of Melisende. Fulk agreed to peace and Hugh was exiled from the kingdom for three years, a lenient sentence.

However, an assassination attempt was made against Hugh. Fulk, or his supporters, were commonly believed responsible, though direct proof never surfaced. The scandal was all that was needed for the queen's party to take over the government in what amounted to a palace coup. Author and historian Bernard Hamilton wrote that the Fulk's supporters "went in terror of their lives" in the palace. Contemporary author and historian William of Tyre wrote of Fulk "he never attempted to take the initiative, even in trivial matters, without (Melisende's) consent". The result was that Melisende held direct and unquestioned control over the government from 1136 onwards. Sometime before 1136 Fulk reconciled with his wife, and a second son, Amalric was born.

Jerusalem's northern border was of great concern. Fulk had been appointed regent of the Principality of Antioch by Baldwin II. As regent he had Raymund of Poitou marry the infant Constance of Antioch, daughter of Bohemund II and Alice of Antioch, and niece to Melisende. However, the greatest concern during Fulk's reign was the rise of Atabeg Zengi of Mosul.

In 1137 Fulk was defeated in battle near Barin but allied with Mu'in ad-Din Unur, the vizier of Damascus. Damascus was also threatened by Zengi. Fulk captured the fort of Banias, to the north of Lake Tiberias and thus secured the northern frontier.

Fulk also strengthened the kingdom's southern border. His butler Paganus built the fortress of Kerak to the south of the Dead Sea, and to help give the kingdom access to the Red Sea, Fulk had Blanche Garde, Ibelin, and other forts built in the south-west to overpower the Egyptian fortress at Ascalon. This city was a base from which the Egyptian Fatimids launched frequent raids on the Kingdom of Jerusalem and Fulk sought to neutralise this threat.

In 1137 and 1142, Byzantine emperor John II Comnenus arrived in Syria attempting to impose Byzantine control over the crusader states. John's arrival was ignored by Fulk, who declined an invitation to meet the emperor in Jerusalem.

The death of Fulk, as depicted in MS of William of Tyre's Historia and Old French Continuation, painted in Acre, 13C. Bib. Nat. Française.)

Death:

In 1143, while the king and queen were on holiday in Acre, Fulk was killed in a hunting accident. His horse stumbled, fell, and Fulk's skull was crushed by the saddle, "and his brains gushed forth from both ears and nostrils", as William of Tyre describes. He was carried back to Acre, where he lay unconscious for three days before he died. He was buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Though their marriage started in conflict, Melisende mourned for him privately as well as publicly. Fulk was survived by his son Geoffrey of Anjou by his first wife, and Baldwin III and Amalric I by Melisende.

According to William, Fulk was "a ruddy man, like David... faithful and gentle, affable and kind... an experienced warrior full of patience and wisdom in military affairs." His chief fault was an inability to remember names and faces.

William of Tyre described Fulk as a capable soldier and able politician, but observed that Fulk did not adequately attend to the defense of the crusader states to the north. Ibn al-Qalanisi (who calls him al-Kund Anjur, an Arabic rendering of "Count of Anjou") says that "he was not sound in his judgment nor was he successful in his administration." The Zengids continued their march on the crusader states, culminating in the fall of the County of Edessa in 1144, which led to the Second Crusade (see Siege of Edessa).

Family:

In 1110, Fulk married Ermengarde of Maine (died 1126), the daughter of Elias I of Maine. T

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From http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ANJOU,%20MAINE.htm#_Toc216764588

FOULQUES de Château-Landon (1043-14 Apr 1109, bur Anjou Sainte-Trinité).  The Historiæ Andegavensis names "Goffridi de Castro Landono et Ermengardis filia Fulconis Comitis Andegavensis" as parents of "Fulco comes Andegavensis"[214].  "Gaufredus comitatus Andecavensis naturalis heres" made donations to Marmoutier dated 1055 in which he names "nepotibus meis…Fulcone vincocinensium comite naturali, Gaufredo et altero Fulcone"[215].  He succeeded, after deposing his brother, as FOULQUES IV "le Rechin" Comte d'Anjou.  The Chronicon Vindocinense records that "Fulconi fratri Gaufridi comitis Andegavorum" captured "Salmuri castri…Kal Mar" in 1067 and "II Kal Apr" captured and imprisoned "fratrem suum…comes Gaufredus junior…Barbatum" until his death, although another paragraph of the Chronicon dates the capture to 1068[216].  He ceded Château-Landon and Gâtinais to Philippe I King of France in 1069 in return for the king's recognition of his accession as count[217].  He expelled the Normans from Maine but peace was imposed by William I King of England[218].  The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "XVIII Kal Mai" of "Fulco…comes Andagavensis nepos Gaufridi prioris Martelli"[219].  The necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "XVIII Kal Mai" of "Fulco comes Andegavorum"[220].  A list of anniversaries of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "XVIII Kal Mai" of "Fulconis comitis qui iacet in Aquaria"[221].  The Chronicon Vindocinense records the death "XVIII Kal Mai" in 1109 of "Fulco comes Andegavorum…frater comitis Gosfridi…Barbatus" and his burial "in monasterio nostro Andegavense S. Trinitatis"[222].  m firstly ([1068]) HILDEGARDE de Baugency, daughter of LANCELIN [II] de Baugency & his wife --- (-before 1070).  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum refers to the first wife of "Fulco Rechin" as "filiam Lancelini de Baugenciaco"[223].  The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.  m secondly (1070, divorced) as her first husband, ERMENGARDE de Bourbon, daughter of ARCHAMBAUD [IV] "le Fort" Sire de Bourbon & his second wife Béliarde ---.  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names "Ermengardim filiam Archenbaldi Fortis de Borbone" as second wife of "Fulco Rechin", recording that he divorced her[224].  She married secondly Guillaume Seigneur de Jaligny.  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum names her second husband "Guillelmo Jalinniaci ortam" when recording the marriage of her daughter by this second marriage[225].  m thirdly (21 Jan 1076, divorced 1080) ORENGARDE de Châtelaillon, daughter of ISEMBART Seigneur de Châtelaillon & his wife ---.  Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the dating clause of a charter dated 21 Jan "1070" (redated to 1076) which records this as the date of the marriage of "comes Fulco" and "Aurengarde, filia Isemberti de Castello Allione"[226].  Comte Foulque "Rechin" donated property to Saint-Nicolas d´Angers, for the salvation of "sa femme Orengarde", by charter dated 17 May 1076[227].  She became a nun after her divorce.  m fourthly (after 1080, divorced before 1089) --- de Brienne, daughter of GAUTHIER I Comte de Brienne & his wife Eustachie Ctss de Bar-sur-Saône .  A genealogy presented by Foulques IV "le Réchin" Comte d'Anjou to the bishop of Angers in [1085], justifying the annulment of his fourth marriage with the daughter of Gauthier Comte de Brienne, lists "ex Letaldo, Albericus natus est, ex Alberico, Beatrix, ex Beatrice, Gosfredus de Castello Landonensi, ex Gaufrido, Gaufridus et Fulco presens"[228].  m fifthly (1089, divorced [15 May 1092]) as her first husband, BERTRADE de Montfort, daughter of SIMON I Comte de Montfort-l'Amaury & his third wife Agnès d'Evreux (-Fontevrault end-1115/1116, bur church of the priory of Hautes-Bruyères, Saint-Remy-l’Honoré, Yvelines).  Her parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[229].  The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum refers to the "third wife" of "Fulco Rechin" as "sororem Amalrici de Monte Forti"[230].  She married secondly (15 May 1092, repudiated 1104) as his second wife, Philippe I King of France (-29 Aug 1108), who abducted Bertrade from her first husband and married her bigamously[231].  The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses names "Fulconi Richin Andegavensi comiti uxorem suam nomine Bertradam" as second wife of King Philippe whom he abducted from her first husband after repudiating his first wife[232].  William of Tyre records this marriage[233].  Pope Urban II at the Council of Autun excommunicated the king 16 Oct 1094, confirmed at the Council of Clermont 18/28 Nov 1095[234].  The church finally admitted the validity of the marriage after the Council of Paris 2 Dec 1104[235].  Orderic Vitalis alleges that Bertrade tried to poison her stepson Louis so her own sons could succeed to the throne[236].  "Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][237].  Comte Foulques IV & his first wife had one child:

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FOULQUES d'Anjou, son of FOULQUES IV "le Réchiin" Comte d'Anjou & his fifth wife Bertrade de Montfort (1092-Acre 10 or 13 Nov 1144). The Gesta Consulum Andegavorum records that "Fulco" was the son of "Fulco Rechin" and "sororem Amalrici de Monte Forti", referring to her as his third wife[258]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridum iuniorem Martellum et Fulconam" as the two sons of "Fulco"[259]. William of Tyre names him and states his parentage[260]. His parentage is given by Orderic Vitalis[261]. "Fulco Andegavensis comes" donated property to Angers with the consent of "filiis meis Gaufrido et Fulconello et filia mea Ermengarde" by charter dated 23 Jun 1096[262]. William of Tyre records that Foulques was imprisoned by the Comte de Poitou but released after the intervention of his mother, who was by then queen of France[263]. He succeeded his father in 1109 as FOULQUES V "le Jeune" Comte d'Anjou. "Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][264]. "Fulcho iunior comes Fulchonis comitis filius, frater Martelli Iunioris" donated property to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by charter dated 4 Jan 1113[265]. He swore fealty to Henry I King of England, who invested him with the county of Maine, at "Petra Peculata" near Alençon in late Feb 1113, the alliance being confirmed by the betrothal of Henry's son to Foulques's daughter[266]. He fought with Henry I King of England over the inheritance of his first wife. There was also a dispute over King Henry's retention of the dowry of his daughter Alice after her husband's death in the Blanche Nef [White Ship][267]. The quarrel finally ended with his son's marriage to the king's daughter in 1128. Orderic Vitalis records that he went on pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1120 and remained there "for some time attached to the Knights of the Temple"[268]. He left France in early 1129, resigning the county of Anjou to his older son by his first marriage, and landed at Acre in May 1129 before travelling to Jerusalem for his marriage[269]. He was crowned FOULQUES King of Jerusalem 14 Sep 1131, by right of his second wife. He imposed himself as regent of Antioch after his sister-in-law Alix Ctss of Antioch attempted to reassert her right to the regency after the death of her father. He rescued Pons Count of Tripoli from the Castle of Montferrand in 1133, where he had fled after being ambushed by Turkomans in the Nosairi Mountains. He also relieved Antioch which was being threatened by Sawar Governor of Aleppo[270]. Zengi marched on Homs and besieged the castle of Montferrand. King Foulques went to relieve the siege, but his army was massacred, and he was obliged to seek refuge in the castle which he was eventually obliged to surrender as the price for his own release[271]. He agreed an alliance with Unur of Damascus in 1139 against Zengi atabeg of Aleppo, who was threatening Damascus, and forced the latter's retreat to Aleppo[272]. King Foulques died after being thrown from his horse during a hunting party[273]. The necrology of Angers Cathedral records the death "IV Id Nov" of "Fulco prius Andegavorum comes postea rex Hierusalem"[274].

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Foulque V d'Anjou, dit le Jeune, né vers 1090 à Angers, mort le 10 novembre 1143 ou 1144 à Acre, fut comte d'Anjou et de Tours de 1109 à 1129, comte du Maine de 1110 à 1129, puis roi de Jérusalem de 1131 à 1143. Il était de la famille des Ingelgeriens et fils cadet de Foulque IV Réchin, comte d'Anjou et de Tours, et de Bertrade de Montfort.

Son demi-frère aîné Geoffroy Martel, s'était révolté contre leur père et Foulque soutint son père contre son frère. Geoffroy fut assassiné au siège de Candé en 1106, et Foulque le Réchin mourut en 1109. Foulques le jeune devint alors comte d'Anjou et de Tours.

Sommaire

1 Comte d'Anjou et du Maine

2 Roi de Jérusalem

3 Mariage et enfants

4 Sources


Comte d'Anjou et du Maine

La majeure partie de ses activités en tant que comte d'Anjou est de mater et réduire ses vassaux les plus turbulents, notamment ceux d'Amboise. Il prend et fait détruire plusieurs châteaux parmi les plus menaçants pour son pouvoir. Juste après son avènement, il épouse Erembourg, fille et héritière d'Hélie de Beaugency, comte du Maine. Ce mariage rattache définitivement le Maine à l'Anjou, mais le contraint à mener une politique louvoyante entre Henri Ier Beauclerc, roi d'Angleterre et duc de Normandie, et Louis VI le Gros, roi de France. Au fil de ces renversement d'alliances, il marie sa fille au fils d'Henri Ier en 1113.

Il part combattre en Terre Sainte en 1120 et, à son retour, se rallie au roi de France et le soutient dans sa lutte contre l'empereur Henri V et le roi Henri Ier. A l'occasion, il marie sa fille Sibylle à Guillaume Cliton, prétendant au trône d'Angleterre. Au renversement d'alliances suivant, en 1124, ce mariage sera annulé et son fils Geoffroy V épousera en 1128 Mathilde, fille d'Henri Beauclerc et veuve de l'empereur Henri V. Ce mariage est à l'origine de la dynastie des Plantagenêts.

Roi de Jérusalem

mariage entre Foulque d'Anjou et Mélisende de Jérusalem

Mort de Foulque suite à une chute de cheval. Guillaume de Tyr, XIIIe siècle

Au cours de son premier pèlerinage en 1120, il avait acquis en Terre sainte une grande réputation, et, devenu veuf en 1126, il est pressenti pour épouser Mélisende de Jérusalem, fille du roi de Jérusalem Baudouin II. Il retourne donc en Terre sainte en 1129, abandonnant à son fils Geoffroy le Bel toutes ses possessions en France.

À la mort de Baudouin II en 1131, il est élu roi de Jérusalem. Foulque doit lutter contre la rébellion d'Hugues II du Puiset, comte de Jaffa, contre sa belle-sœur Alix de Jérusalem, princesse d'Antioche qui n'hésita pas à appeler à son aide l'atabeg Zengi et soutenue par Pons de Tripoli. Il vint à bout de tous ces troubles et parvint à maintenir un équilibre entre les Francs et les Musulmans.

Il meurt à Acre le 10 novembre 1143 d'une chute de cheval, laissant deux fils mineurs, les futurs Baudouin III et Amaury Ier.

Mariage et enfants

Il avait épousé en premières noces en 1110 Erembourg († 1126), comtesse du Maine, fille d'Hélie de Beaugency, comte du Maine, et de Mathilde de Château-Du-Loir, et avait eu :

Geoffroy V le Bel ou Plantagenêt († 1151), comte d'Anjou, de Tours, du Maine et duc de Normandie

Hélie II († 1151), comte du Maine

Mathilde (1108 † 1155), mariée à Guillaume Adelin († 1120), fils et héritier du roi Henri Ier d'Angleterre; elle fut abbesse de Fontevraud (1149-1155).

Sibylle († 1119), mariée en 1121 à Guillaume Cliton. Le mariage fut annulé en 1124, et elle se remaria en 1139 avec Thierry d'Alsace, comte de Flandre.

Veuf, il se remaria avec Mélisende de Jérusalem (1101 † 1161), fille de Baudouin II, roi de Jérusalem, et de Morfia de Malatya. Ils eurent :

Baudouin III (1131 † 1163), roi de Jérusalem

Amaury Ier (1136† 1174), roi de Jérusalem

Précédé par Foulque V d'Anjou Suivi par

Foulque IV le Réchin comte d'Anjou et de Tours

Geoffroy V le Bel ou Plantagenêt

Hélie de Beaugency comte du Maine

avec Erembourg

Baudouin II roi de Jérusalem

avec Mélisende

Baudouin III

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Count of Anjou and King of Jerusalem. Fulk V is a lineal descendant of Pepin, the King of Lombardy and Italy. This Pepin was the son of Charlemagne (721-814), "Emperor of the West" and was the gr. grandson of Charles Martel (688-741). Some genealogists claim that the lineal ancestry is easily traceable from here to Julius Caesar, 1st of Caesar's who lived c300 B.C.

In the line between Caesar and Clovis stands the name of King Colius II of Britain whose name has been preserved in "Mother Goose Tales" as "Old King Cole".

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Fulk of Jerusalem, Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem

Reign 1131-1143

Coronation 1131

Born 1089/92

Died 13 November 1143

Place of death Acre

Buried Church of the Holy Sepulchre Jerusalem

Consort

Melisende (1105-1164)

In 1110, Fulk married Ermengarde of Maine (died 1126), the daughter of Elias I of Maine. Their four children were:

Geoffrey (1113–1151)

Sibylla (1112–1165)

Alice (1107–1154

Elias (11??-1151)

Father Fulk IV of Anjou (1043–1109)

Mother Bertrade de Montfort (c.1070-1117)

Fulk V (1089/1092 – November 13, 1143), also known as Fulk the Younger, was Count of Anjou from 1109 to 1129, and King of Jerusalem from 1131 to his death.


Fulk was born between 1089 and 1092, the son of Count Fulk IV of Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort. In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France.

He became count of Anjou upon his father's death in 1109, at the age of approximately twenty. He was originally an opponent of King Henry I of England and a supporter of King Louis VI of France, but in 1127 he allied with Henry when Henry arranged for his daughter Matilda to marry Fulk's son Geoffrey of Anjou. Fulk went on crusade in 1120, and became a close friend of the Knights Templar. After his return he began to subsidize the Templars, and maintained two knights in the Holy Land for a year.


By 1127 Fulk was preparing to return to Anjou when he received an embassy from King Baldwin II of Jerusalem. Baldwin II had no male heirs but had already designated his daughter Melisende to succeed him. Baldwin II wanted to safeguard his daughter's inheritance by marrying her to a powerful lord. Fulk was a wealthy crusader and experienced military commander, and a widower. His experience in the field would prove invaluable in a frontier state always in the grip of war.

However, Fulk held out for better terms than mere consort of the Queen; he wanted to be king alongside Melisende. Baldwin II, reflecting on Fulk's fortune and military exploits, acquiesced. Fulk abdicated his county seat of Anjou to his son Geoffery and left for Jerusalem, where he married Melisende on June 2, 1129. Later Baldwin II bolstered Melisende's position in the kingdom by making her sole guardian of her son by Fulk, Baldwin III, born in 1130.

Fulk and Melisende became joint rulers of Jerusalem in 1131 with Baldwin II's death. From the start Fulk assumed sole control of the government, excluding Melisende altogether. He favored fellow countrymen from Anjou to the native nobility. The other crusader states to the north feared that Fulk would attempt to impose the suzerainty of Jerusalem over them, as Baldwin II had done; but as Fulk was far less powerful than his deceased father-in-law, the northern states rejected his authority. Melisende's sister Alice of Antioch, exiled from the Principality by Baldwin II, took control of Antioch once more after the death of her father. She allied with Pons of Tripoli and Joscelin II of Edessa to prevent Fulk from marching north in 1132; Fulk and Pons fought a brief battle before peace was made and Alice was exiled again.

In Jerusalem as well, Fulk was resented by the second generation of Jerusalem Christians who had grown up there since the First Crusade. These "natives" focused on Melisende's cousin, the popular Hugh II of Le Puiset, count of Jaffa, who was devotedly loyal to the Queen. Fulk saw Hugh as a rival, and it did not help matters when Hugh's own stepson accused him of disloyalty. In 1134, in order to expose Hugh, Fulk accused him of infidelity with Melisende. Hugh rebelled in protest. Hugh secured himself to Jaffa, and allied himself with the Muslims of Ascalon. He was able to defeat the army set against him by Fulk, but this situation could not hold. The Patriarch interceded in the conflict, perhaps at the behest of Melisende. Fulk agreed to peace and Hugh was exiled from the kingdom for three years, a lenient sentence.

However, an assassination attempt was made against Hugh. Fulk, or his supporters, were commonly believed responsible, though direct proof never surfaced. The scandal was all that was needed for the queen's party to take over the government in what amounted to a palace coup. Author and historian Bernard Hamilton wrote that the Fulk's supporters "went in terror of their lives" in the palace. Contemporary author and historian William of Tyre wrote of Fulk "he never attempted to take the initiative, even in trivial matters, without (Melisende's) consent". The result was that Melisende held direct and unquestioned control over the government from 1136 onwards. Sometime before 1136 Fulk reconciled with his wife, and a second son, Amalric was born.

Jerusalem's northern border was of great concern. Fulk had been appointed regent of the Principality of Antioch by Baldwin II. As regent he had Raymund of Poitou marry the infant Constance of Antioch, daughter of Bohemund II and Alice of Antioch, and niece to Melisende. However, the greatest concern during Fulk's reign was the rise of Atabeg Zengi of Mosul.

In 1137 Fulk was defeated in battle near Barin but allied with Mu'in ad-Din Unur, the vizier of Damascus. Damascus was also threatened by Zengi. Fulk captured the fort of Banias, to the north of Lake Tiberias and thus secured the northern frontier.

Fulk also strengthened the kingdom's southern border. His butler Paganus built the fortress of Kerak to the south of the Dead Sea, and to help give the kingdom access to the Red Sea, Fulk had Blanche Garde, Ibelin, and other forts built in the south-west to overpower the Egyptian fortress at Ascalon. This city was a base from which the Egyptian Fatimids launched frequent raids on the Kingdom of Jerusalem and Fulk sought to neutralise this threat.

In 1137 and 1142, Byzantine emperor John II Comnenus arrived in Syria attempting to impose Byzantine control over the crusader states. John's arrival was ignored by Fulk, who declined an invitation to meet the emperor in Jerusalem.

The death of Fulk, as depicted in MS of William of Tyre's Historia and Old French Continuation, painted in Acre, 13C. Bib. Nat. Française.)

In 1143, while the king and queen were on holiday in Acre, Fulk was killed in a hunting accident. His horse stumbled, fell, and Fulk's skull was crushed by the saddle, "and his brains gushed forth from both ears and nostrils", as William of Tyre describes. He was carried back to Acre, where he lay unconscious for three days before he died. He was buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Though their marriage started in conflict, Melisende mourned for him privately as well as publicly. Fulk was survived by his son Geoffrey of Anjou by his first wife, and Baldwin III and Amalric I by Melisende.

According to William, Fulk was "a ruddy man, like David... faithful and gentle, affable and kind... an experienced warrior full of patience and wisdom in military affairs." His chief fault was an inability to remember names and faces.

William of Tyre described Fulk as a capable soldier and able politician, but observed that Fulk did not adequately attend to the defense of the crusader states to the north. Ibn al-Qalanisi (who calls him al-Kund Anjur, an Arabic rendering of "Count of Anjou") says that "he was not sound in his judgment nor was he successful in his administration." The Zengids continued their march on the crusader states, culminating in the fall of the County of Edessa in 1144, which led to the Second Crusade (see Siege of Edessa).

Geoffrey V of Anjou

Sibylla of Anjou (1112–1165, Bethlehem), married in 1123 William Clito (div. 1124), married in 1134 Thierry, Count of Flanders

Alice (or Isabella) (1107–1154, Fontevrault), married William Adelin; after his death in the White Ship she became a nun and later Abbess of Fontevrault.

Elias II of Maine (died 1151)

His second wife was Melisende, Queen of Jerusalem

Baldwin III of Jerusalem

Amalric I of Jerusalem

--------------------

Fulk (1089/1092 in Angers – November 13, 1143 in Acre), also known as Fulk the Younger, was Count of Anjou (as Fulk V) from 1109 to 1129, and King of Jerusalem from 1131 to his death. He was also the paternal grandfather of Henry II of England.

Count of Anjou

Fulk was born in Angers between 1089 and 1092, the son of Count Fulk IV of Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort. In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France.

He became count of Anjou upon his father's death in 1109, at the age of approximately twenty. In that year, he married Erembourg of Maine, cementing Angevin control over the County of Maine.

He was originally an opponent of King Henry I of England and a supporter of King Louis VI of France, but in 1127 he allied with Henry when Henry arranged for his daughter Matilda to marry Fulk's son Geoffrey of Anjou. Fulk went on crusade in 1120, and became a close friend of the Knights Templar. After his return he began to subsidize the Templars, and maintained two knights in the Holy Land for a year.

Crusader and King

By 1127 Fulk was preparing to return to Anjou when he received an embassy from King Baldwin II of Jerusalem. Baldwin II had no male heirs but had already designated his daughter Melisende to succeed him. Baldwin II wanted to safeguard his daughter's inheritance by marrying her to a powerful lord. Fulk was a wealthy crusader and experienced military commander, and a widower. His experience in the field would prove invaluable in a frontier state always in the grip of war.

However, Fulk held out for better terms than mere consort of the Queen; he wanted to be king alongside Melisende. Baldwin II, reflecting on Fulk's fortune and military exploits, acquiesced. Fulk abdicated his county seat of Anjou to his son Geoffery and left for Jerusalem, where he married Melisende on June 2, 1129. Later Baldwin II bolstered Melisende's position in the kingdom by making her sole guardian of her son by Fulk, Baldwin III, born in 1130.

The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the other Crusader states (in shades of green) in 1135 CE, during the reign of Fulk.

Fulk and Melisende became joint rulers of Jerusalem in 1131 with Baldwin II's death. From the start Fulk assumed sole control of the government, excluding Melisende altogether. He favored fellow countrymen from Anjou to the native nobility. The other crusader states to the north feared that Fulk would attempt to impose the suzerainty of Jerusalem over them, as Baldwin II had done; but as Fulk was far less powerful than his deceased father-in-law, the northern states rejected his authority. Melisende's sister Alice of Antioch, exiled from the Principality by Baldwin II, took control of Antioch once more after the death of her father. She allied with Pons of Tripoli and Joscelin II of Edessa to prevent Fulk from marching north in 1132; Fulk and Pons fought a brief battle before peace was made and Alice was exiled again.

In Jerusalem as well, Fulk was resented by the second generation of Jerusalem Christians who had grown up there since the First Crusade. These "natives" focused on Melisende's cousin, the popular Hugh II of Le Puiset, count of Jaffa, who was devotedly loyal to the Queen. Fulk saw Hugh as a rival, and it did not help matters when Hugh's own stepson accused him of disloyalty. In 1134, in order to expose Hugh, Fulk accused him of infidelity with Melisende. Hugh rebelled in protest. Hugh secured himself to Jaffa, and allied himself with the Muslims of Ascalon. He was able to defeat the army set against him by Fulk, but this situation could not hold. The Patriarch interceded in the conflict, perhaps at the behest of Melisende. Fulk agreed to peace and Hugh was exiled from the kingdom for three years, a lenient sentence.

However, an assassination attempt was made against Hugh. Fulk, or his supporters, were commonly believed responsible, though direct proof never surfaced. The scandal was all that was needed for the queen's party to take over the government in what amounted to a palace coup. Author and historian Bernard Hamilton wrote that the Fulk's supporters "went in terror of their lives" in the palace. Contemporary author and historian William of Tyre wrote of Fulk "he never attempted to take the initiative, even in trivial matters, without (Melisende's) consent". The result was that Melisende held direct and unquestioned control over the government from 1136 onwards. Sometime before 1136 Fulk reconciled with his wife, and a second son, Amalric was born.

Securing the borders

Jerusalem's northern border was of great concern. Fulk had been appointed regent of the Principality of Antioch by Baldwin II. As regent he had Raymund of Poitou marry the infant Constance of Antioch, daughter of Bohemund II and Alice of Antioch, and niece to Melisende. However, the greatest concern during Fulk's reign was the rise of Atabeg Zengi of Mosul.

In 1137 Fulk was defeated in battle near Barin but allied with Mu'in ad-Din Unur, the vizier of Damascus. Damascus was also threatened by Zengi. Fulk captured the fort of Banias, to the north of Lake Tiberias and thus secured the northern frontier.

Fulk also strengthened the kingdom's southern border. His butler Paganus built the fortress of Kerak to the south of the Dead Sea, and to help give the kingdom access to the Red Sea, Fulk had Blanche Garde, Ibelin, and other forts built in the south-west to overpower the Egyptian fortress at Ascalon. This city was a base from which the Egyptian Fatimids launched frequent raids on the Kingdom of Jerusalem and Fulk sought to neutralise this threat.

In 1137 and 1142, Byzantine emperor John II Comnenus arrived in Syria attempting to impose Byzantine control over the crusader states. John's arrival was ignored by Fulk, who declined an invitation to meet the emperor in Jerusalem.

The death of Fulk, as depicted in MS of William of Tyre's Historia and Old French Continuation, painted in Acre, 13C. Bib. Nat. Française.)

Death

In 1143, while the king and queen were on holiday in Acre, Fulk was killed in a hunting accident. His horse stumbled, fell, and Fulk's skull was crushed by the saddle, "and his brains gushed forth from both ears and nostrils", as William of Tyre describes. He was carried back to Acre, where he lay unconscious for three days before he died. He was buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Though their marriage started in conflict, Melisende mourned for him privately as well as publicly. Fulk was survived by his son Geoffrey of Anjou by his first wife, and Baldwin III and Amalric I by Melisende.

According to William, Fulk was "a ruddy man, like David... faithful and gentle, affable and kind... an experienced warrior full of patience and wisdom in military affairs." His chief fault was an inability to remember names and faces.

William of Tyre described Fulk as a capable soldier and able politician, but observed that Fulk did not adequately attend to the defense of the crusader states to the north. Ibn al-Qalanisi (who calls him al-Kund Anjur, an Arabic rendering of "Count of Anjou") says that "he was not sound in his judgment nor was he successful in his administration." The Zengids continued their march on the crusader states, culminating in the fall of the County of Edessa in 1144, which led to the Second Crusade (see Siege of Edessa).

Family

In 1110, Fulk married Ermengarde of Maine (died 1126), the daughter of Elias I of Maine. Their four children were:

Geoffrey V of Anjou, father of Henry II of England.

Sibylla of Anjou (1112–1165, Bethlehem), married in 1123 William Clito (div. 1124), married in 1134 Thierry, Count of Flanders.

Alice (or Isabella) (1107–1154, Fontevrault), married William Adelin; after his death in the White Ship she became a nun and later Abbess of Fontevrault.

Elias II of Maine (died 1151)

His second wife was Melisende, Queen of Jerusalem

Baldwin III of Jerusalem

Amalric I of Jerusalem

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulk_V_of_Anjou

--------------------

AKA: Fulk The Younger (or Le Jeune)

Birth: 1092 in of, , Anjou, France

Death: 10 Nov 1143 in Jerusalem, , Jerusalem

Burial: Church of Holy Sepulcher, Jerusalem, Jerusalem

--------------------

Count Fouiques - must have died during the Crusades.

Count of Anjou and King of Jerusalem. Fulk V is a lineal descendant of Pepin, the King of Lombardy and Italy. This Pepin was the son of Charlemagne (721-814), "Emperor of the West" and was the gr. grandson of Charles Martel (688-741). Some genealogists claim that the lineal ancestry is easily traceable from here to Julius Caesar, 1st of Caesar's who lived c300 B.C.

In the line between Caesar and Clovis stands the name of King Colius II of Britain whose name has been preserved in "Mother Goose Tales" as "Old King Cole".

Fulk was killed in a hunting accident. His horse stumbled, fell, and Fulk's skull was crushed by the saddle. He was carried back to Acre, where he died and was buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulk_V_of_Anjou

--------------------

The name Plantagenet, according to Rapin, came from when Fulk the Great being stung from remorse for some wicked action, in order to atone for it, went a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and was scourged before the Holy Sepulchre with broom twigs. Earlier authorities say it was because Geoffrey bore a branch of yellow broom (Planta-genistae) in his helm.

--------------------

Also called Fulco Rex Ierosolimitanis.4 Foulques V "le Jeune", roi de Jérusalem also went by the name of Fulk "the Younger" of Anjou. He was born in 1092.3 He was the son of Foulques IV "le Rechin", comte d' Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort, comtessa d' Anjou.5,6,4 He installed as joint ruler of Anjou with his father following the death of his half-brother, Geoffrey, in 1106.5 9th Count of Anjou in France, between 1106 and 1129.5 He succeeded his father as sole count of Anjou on 14 April 1109.5 He aquired the countship of Maine by marriage to Ermengarde in 1110.5 He married Ermengarde de La Fleche, comtessa du Maine, daughter of Elié I, comte du Maine and Matilde de Château-du-Loire, in 1110; His 1st.5,7,6 Count of Maine, jure uxoris in France, between 11 July 1110 and 1129.5 He resigned Anjou and Maine to his eldest son, Geoffrey, in 1129.5 It had been left to King Louis VI to select a suitable husband from among the French nobility for Melisende, who was to be Baldwin II of Jerusalem's heir. The king chose Fulk V, Count of Anjou. Count of Tyre and Ptolmaïde in Outremer, between 1129 and 1143.5 He married Mélisende, reine de Jérusalem, daughter of Baudouin II "du Bourg", roi de Jérusalem and Malfia the Armenian, on 2 June 1129; His 2nd.8,9 King of Jerusalem in Outremer, between 21 August 1131 and November 1143.10,11 He was crowned King of Jerusalem on 14 September 1131.5 He died on 10 November 1143 in Jerusalem, Outremer, at age 51 years. Fulk was at the height of his power and popularity, well-respected and obeyed. On this November day, the king was out hunting when his horse stumbled and threw him. He struck his head, and three days later, King Fulk died. He was survived by his wife, Melisende, and two sons: Baldwin, aged thirteen, and Amalric, aged seven. Both would eventually be king, but right now their mother was regent. She had Baldwin crowned king and she ruled with him.3 Foulques V "le Jeune", roi de Jérusalem was buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, Jerusalem.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulk_V_of_Anjou

--------------------

Fulk (1089/1092 in Angers – November 13, 1143 in Acre), also known as Fulk the Younger, was Count of Anjou (as Fulk V) from 1109 to 1129, and King of Jerusalem from 1131 to his death. He was also the paternal grandfather of Henry II of England.

Contents [hide]

1 Count of Anjou

2 Crusader and King

3 Securing the borders

4 Death

5 Family

6 Sources

7 Historical Fiction


[edit] Count of Anjou

Fulk was born in Angers between 1089 and 1092, the son of Count Fulk IV of Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort. In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France.

He became count of Anjou upon his father's death in 1109, at the age of approximately twenty. In that year, he married Erembourg of Maine, cementing Angevin control over the County of Maine.

He was originally an opponent of King Henry I of England and a supporter of King Louis VI of France, but in 1127 he allied with Henry when Henry arranged for his daughter Matilda to marry Fulk's son Geoffrey of Anjou. Fulk went on crusade in 1120, and became a close friend of the Knights Templar. After his return he began to subsidize the Templars, and maintained two knights in the Holy Land for a year.

[edit] Crusader and King


The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the other Crusader states (in shades of green) in 1135 CE, during the reign of Fulk.By 1127 Fulk was preparing to return to Anjou when he received an embassy from King Baldwin II of Jerusalem. Baldwin II had no male heirs but had already designated his daughter Melisende to succeed him. Baldwin II wanted to safeguard his daughter's inheritance by marrying her to a powerful lord. Fulk was a wealthy crusader and experienced military commander, and a widower. His experience in the field would prove invaluable in a frontier state always in the grip of war.

However, Fulk held out for better terms than mere consort of the Queen; he wanted to be king alongside Melisende. Baldwin II, reflecting on Fulk's fortune and military exploits, acquiesced. Fulk abdicated his county seat of Anjou to his son Geoffery and left for Jerusalem, where he married Melisende on June 2, 1129. Later Baldwin II bolstered Melisende's position in the kingdom by making her sole guardian of her son by Fulk, Baldwin III, born in 1130.

Fulk and Melisende became joint rulers of Jerusalem in 1131 with Baldwin II's death. From the start Fulk assumed sole control of the government, excluding Melisende altogether. He favored fellow countrymen from Anjou to the native nobility. The other crusader states to the north feared that Fulk would attempt to impose the suzerainty of Jerusalem over them, as Baldwin II had done; but as Fulk was far less powerful than his deceased father-in-law, the northern states rejected his authority. Melisende's sister Alice of Antioch, exiled from the Principality by Baldwin II, took control of Antioch once more after the death of her father. She allied with Pons of Tripoli and Joscelin II of Edessa to prevent Fulk from marching north in 1132; Fulk and Pons fought a brief battle before peace was made and Alice was exiled again.

In Jerusalem as well, Fulk was resented by the second generation of Jerusalem Christians who had grown up there since the First Crusade. These "natives" focused on Melisende's cousin, the popular Hugh II of Le Puiset, count of Jaffa, who was devotedly loyal to the Queen. Fulk saw Hugh as a rival, and it did not help matters when Hugh's own stepson accused him of disloyalty. In 1134, in order to expose Hugh, Fulk accused him of infidelity with Melisende. Hugh rebelled in protest. Hugh secured himself to Jaffa, and allied himself with the Muslims of Ascalon. He was able to defeat the army set against him by Fulk, but this situation could not hold. The Patriarch interceded in the conflict, perhaps at the behest of Melisende. Fulk agreed to peace and Hugh was exiled from the kingdom for three years, a lenient sentence.

However, an assassination attempt was made against Hugh. Fulk, or his supporters, were commonly believed responsible, though direct proof never surfaced. The scandal was all that was needed for the queen's party to take over the government in what amounted to a palace coup. Author and historian Bernard Hamilton wrote that the Fulk's supporters "went in terror of their lives" in the palace. Contemporary author and historian William of Tyre wrote of Fulk "he never attempted to take the initiative, even in trivial matters, without (Melisende's) consent". The result was that Melisende held direct and unquestioned control over the government from 1136 onwards. Sometime before 1136 Fulk reconciled with his wife, and a second son, Amalric was born.

[edit] Securing the borders

Jerusalem's northern border was of great concern. Fulk had been appointed regent of the Principality of Antioch by Baldwin II. As regent he had Raymund of Poitou marry the infant Constance of Antioch, daughter of Bohemund II and Alice of Antioch, and niece to Melisende. However, the greatest concern during Fulk's reign was the rise of Atabeg Zengi of Mosul.

In 1137 Fulk was defeated in battle near Barin but allied with Mu'in ad-Din Unur, the vizier of Damascus. Damascus was also threatened by Zengi. Fulk captured the fort of Banias, to the north of Lake Tiberias and thus secured the northern frontier.

Fulk also strengthened the kingdom's southern border. His butler Paganus built the fortress of Kerak to the south of the Dead Sea, and to help give the kingdom access to the Red Sea, Fulk had Blanche Garde, Ibelin, and other forts built in the south-west to overpower the Egyptian fortress at Ascalon. This city was a base from which the Egyptian Fatimids launched frequent raids on the Kingdom of Jerusalem and Fulk sought to neutralise this threat.

In 1137 and 1142, Byzantine emperor John II Comnenus arrived in Syria attempting to impose Byzantine control over the crusader states. John's arrival was ignored by Fulk, who declined an invitation to meet the emperor in Jerusalem.


The death of Fulk, as depicted in MS of William of Tyre's Historia and Old French Continuation, painted in Acre, 13C. Bib. Nat. Française.)

[edit] Death

In 1143, while the king and queen were on holiday in Acre, Fulk was killed in a hunting accident. His horse stumbled, fell, and Fulk's skull was crushed by the saddle, "and his brains gushed forth from both ears and nostrils", as William of Tyre describes. He was carried back to Acre, where he lay unconscious for three days before he died. He was buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Though their marriage started in conflict, Melisende mourned for him privately as well as publicly. Fulk was survived by his son Geoffrey of Anjou by his first wife, and Baldwin III and Amalric I by Melisende.

According to William, Fulk was "a ruddy man, like David... faithful and gentle, affable and kind... an experienced warrior full of patience and wisdom in military affairs." His chief fault was an inability to remember names and faces.

William of Tyre described Fulk as a capable soldier and able politician, but observed that Fulk did not adequately attend to the defense of the crusader states to the north. Ibn al-Qalanisi (who calls him al-Kund Anjur, an Arabic rendering of "Count of Anjou") says that "he was not sound in his judgment nor was he successful in his administration." The Zengids continued their march on the crusader states, culminating in the fall of the County of Edessa in 1144, which led to the Second Crusade (see Siege of Edessa).

[edit] Family

In 1110, Fulk married Ermengarde of Maine (died 1126), the daughter of Elias I of Maine. Their four children were:

Geoffrey V of Anjou

Sibylla of Anjou (1112–1165, Bethlehem), married in 1123 William Clito (div. 1124), married in 1134 Thierry, Count of Flanders

Alice (or Isabella) (1107–1154, Fontevrault), married William Adelin; after his death in the White Ship she became a nun and later Abbess of Fontevrault.

Elias II of Maine (died 1151)

His second wife was Melisende, Queen of Jerusalem

Baldwin III of Jerusalem

Amalric I of Jerusalem

[edit] Sources

Orderic Vitalis

Robert of Torigny

William of Tyre

Medieval Women, edited by Derek Baker, the Ecclesiastical History Society, 1978

Payne, Robert. The Dream and the Tomb, 1984

The Damascus Chronicle of Crusades, trans. H.A.R. Gibb, 1932.

[edit] Historical Fiction

Judith Tarr, "Queen of Swords", A Forge Book, Published by Tom Doherty LLC., 1997

Preceded by

Fulk IV Count of Anjou

1106–1129 Succeeded by

Geoffrey V

Preceded by

William Rufus Count of Maine

1110–1126

Preceded by

Baldwin II King of Jerusalem

1131–1143

(with Melisende) Succeeded by

Melisende and Baldwin III

--------------------

Fulk (1089/1092 in Angers – 13 November 1143 in Acre), also known as Fulk the Younger, was Count of Anjou (as Fulk V) from 1109 to 1129, and King of Jerusalem from 1131 to his death. He was also the paternal grandfather of Henry II of England.

Contents [hide]

1 Count of Anjou

2 Crusader and King

3 Securing the borders

4 Death

5 Family

6 Sources

7 Historical Fiction


[edit] Count of Anjou

Fulk was born in Angers between 1089 and 1092, the son of Count Fulk IV of Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort. In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France.

He became count of Anjou upon his father's death in 1109, at the age of approximately twenty. In that year, he married Erembourg of Maine, cementing Angevin control over the County of Maine.

He was originally an opponent of King Henry I of England and a supporter of King Louis VI of France, but in 1127 he allied with Henry when Henry arranged for his daughter Matilda to marry Fulk's son Geoffrey of Anjou. Fulk went on crusade in 1120, and became a close friend of the Knights Templar. After his return he began to subsidize the Templars, and maintained two knights in the Holy Land for a year.

[edit] Crusader and King

By 1127 Fulk was preparing to return to Anjou when he received an embassy from King Baldwin II of Jerusalem. Baldwin II had no male heirs but had already designated his daughter Melisende to succeed him. Baldwin II wanted to safeguard his daughter's inheritance by marrying her to a powerful lord. Fulk was a wealthy crusader and experienced military commander, and a widower. His experience in the field would prove invaluable in a frontier state always in the grip of war.

However, Fulk held out for better terms than mere consort of the Queen; he wanted to be king alongside Melisende. Baldwin II, reflecting on Fulk's fortune and military exploits, acquiesced. Fulk abdicated his county seat of Anjou to his son Geoffery and left for Jerusalem, where he married Melisende on 2 June 1129. Later Baldwin II bolstered Melisende's position in the kingdom by making her sole guardian of her son by Fulk, Baldwin III, born in 1130.


The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the other Crusader states (in shades of green) in 1135 AD, during the reign of Fulk.Fulk and Melisende became joint rulers of Jerusalem in 1131 with Baldwin II's death. From the start Fulk assumed sole control of the government, excluding Melisende altogether. He favored fellow countrymen from Anjou to the native nobility. The other crusader states to the north feared that Fulk would attempt to impose the suzerainty of Jerusalem over them, as Baldwin II had done; but as Fulk was far less powerful than his deceased father-in-law, the northern states rejected his authority. Melisende's sister Alice of Antioch, exiled from the Principality by Baldwin II, took control of Antioch once more after the death of her father. She allied with Pons of Tripoli and Joscelin II of Edessa to prevent Fulk from marching north in 1132; Fulk and Pons fought a brief battle before peace was made and Alice was exiled again.

In Jerusalem as well, Fulk was resented by the second generation of Jerusalem Christians who had grown up there since the First Crusade. These "natives" focused on Melisende's cousin, the popular Hugh II of Le Puiset, count of Jaffa, who was devotedly loyal to the Queen. Fulk saw Hugh as a rival, and it did not help matters when Hugh's own stepson accused him of disloyalty. In 1134, in order to expose Hugh, Fulk accused him of infidelity with Melisende. Hugh rebelled in protest. Hugh secured himself to Jaffa, and allied himself with the Muslims of Ascalon. He was able to defeat the army set against him by Fulk, but this situation could not hold. The Patriarch interceded in the conflict, perhaps at the behest of Melisende. Fulk agreed to peace and Hugh was exiled from the kingdom for three years, a lenient sentence.

However, an assassination attempt was made against Hugh. Fulk, or his supporters, were commonly believed responsible, though direct proof never surfaced. The scandal was all that was needed for the queen's party to take over the government in what amounted to a palace coup. Author and historian Bernard Hamilton wrote that the Fulk's supporters "went in terror of their lives" in the palace. Contemporary author and historian William of Tyre wrote of Fulk "he never attempted to take the initiative, even in trivial matters, without (Melisende's) consent". The result was that Melisende held direct and unquestioned control over the government from 1136 onwards. Sometime before 1136 Fulk reconciled with his wife, and a second son, Amalric was born.

[edit] Securing the borders

Jerusalem's northern border was of great concern. Fulk had been appointed regent of the Principality of Antioch by Baldwin II. As regent he had Raymund of Poitou marry the infant Constance of Antioch, daughter of Bohemund II and Alice of Antioch, and niece to Melisende. However, the greatest concern during Fulk's reign was the rise of Atabeg Zengi of Mosul.

In 1137 Fulk was defeated in battle near Barin but allied with Mu'in ad-Din Unur, the vizier of Damascus. Damascus was also threatened by Zengi. Fulk captured the fort of Banias, to the north of Lake Tiberias and thus secured the northern frontier.

Fulk also strengthened the kingdom's southern border. His butler Paganus built the fortress of Kerak to the south of the Dead Sea, and to help give the kingdom access to the Red Sea, Fulk had Blanche Garde, Ibelin, and other forts built in the south-west to overpower the Egyptian fortress at Ascalon. This city was a base from which the Egyptian Fatimids launched frequent raids on the Kingdom of Jerusalem and Fulk sought to neutralise this threat.

In 1137 and 1142, Byzantine emperor John II Comnenus arrived in Syria attempting to impose Byzantine control over the crusader states. John's arrival was ignored by Fulk, who declined an invitation to meet the emperor in Jerusalem.


The death of Fulk, as depicted in MS of William of Tyre's Historia and Old French Continuation, painted in Acre, 13C. Bib. Nat. Française.)[edit] Death

In 1143, while the king and queen were on holiday in Acre, Fulk was killed in a hunting accident. His horse stumbled, fell, and Fulk's skull was crushed by the saddle, "and his brains gushed forth from both ears and nostrils", as William of Tyre describes. He was carried back to Acre, where he lay unconscious for three days before he died. He was buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Though their marriage started in conflict, Melisende mourned for him privately as well as publicly. Fulk was survived by his son Geoffrey of Anjou by his first wife, and Baldwin III and Amalric I by Melisende.

According to William, Fulk was "a ruddy man, like David... faithful and gentle, affable and kind... an experienced warrior full of patience and wisdom in military affairs." His chief fault was an inability to remember names and faces.

William of Tyre described Fulk as a capable soldier and able politician, but observed that Fulk did not adequately attend to the defense of the crusader states to the north. Ibn al-Qalanisi (who calls him al-Kund Anjur, an Arabic rendering of "Count of Anjou") says that "he was not sound in his judgment nor was he successful in his administration." The Zengids continued their march on the crusader states, culminating in the fall of the County of Edessa in 1144, which led to the Second Crusade (see Siege of Edessa).

[edit] Family

In 1110, Fulk married Ermengarde of Maine (died 1126), the daughter of Elias I of Maine. Their four children were:

1.Geoffrey V of Anjou, father of Henry II of England.

2.Sibylla of Anjou (1112–1165, Bethlehem), married in 1123 William Clito (div. 1124), married in 1134 Thierry, Count of Flanders.

3.Alice (or Isabella) (1107–1154, Fontevrault), married William Adelin; after his death in the White Ship she became a nun and later Abbess of Fontevrault.

4.Elias II of Maine (died 1151)

His second wife was Melisende, Queen of Jerusalem

1.Baldwin III of Jerusalem

2.Amalric I of Jerusalem

[edit] Sources

Orderic Vitalis

Robert of Torigny

William of Tyre

Medieval Women, edited by Derek Baker, the Ecclesiastical History Society, 1978

Payne, Robert. The Dream and the Tomb, 1984

The Damascus Chronicle of Crusades, trans. H.A.R. Gibb, 1932.

[edit] Historical Fiction

Judith Tarr, "Queen of Swords", A Forge Book, Published by Tom Doherty LLC., 1997

Preceded by

Fulk IV Count of Anjou

1106 – 1129 Succeeded by

Geoffrey V

Preceded by

William Rufus Count of Maine

1110 – 1126

Preceded by

Baldwin II King of Jerusalem

1131 – 1143

With: Melisende of Jerusalem Succeeded by

Melisende and Baldwin III

[show]v • d • eMonarchs of the Kingdom of Jerusalem


Godfrey* · Baldwin I · Baldwin II · Melisende · Fulk Co-Ruler with Melisende · Baldwin III Co-Ruler with Melisende · Amalric I · Baldwin IV · Baldwin V · Sibylla · Guy Co-Ruler with Sibylla · Isabella I · Conrad I Co-Ruler with Isabella I · Henry I Co-Ruler with Isabella I · Amalric II Co-Ruler with Isabella I · Maria · John Co-Ruler with Maria · Isabella II · Conrad II · Conrad III · Hugh I · John II · Henry II


  • Did not take the title "King"

[show]v • d • ePrinces of the Principality of Antioch


Reigning Princes

(1098–1268) Bohemond I · Tancred (regent) · Bohemond II · Roger (regent) · Baldwin (regent) · Constance · Fulk (regent) · Raymond I (by marriage) · Raynald (by marriage) · Bohemond III · Raymond II (regent) · Bohemond IV · Raymond-Roupen · Bohemond IV (restored) · Bohemond V · Bohemond VI


Titular Princes

(1268–1457) Bohemond VI · Bohemond VII · Lucia · Philip · Marguerite · John I · John II · John III


Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulk_of_Jerusalem"

Categories: Kings of Jerusalem | Jure uxoris kings | Counts of Anjou | Deaths by horse-riding accident | 11th-century births | 1143 deaths | People from Angers | Burials at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem

--------------------

1092-1143. Count of Anjou (1109-29); king of Jerusalem (1131-43). Fulk married the only daughter of Elias, count of Maine, in 1109, thereby ultimately uniteing Anjou and Maine. In 1120 he went on pilgrimage to the Holy Land. In 1128 a delegation from Baldwin II, king of Jerusalem, arrived in France, asking Louis VII to choose one of the French nobility to marry his daughter Melisande and become heir to the throne of Jerusalem. Fulk, by then a widower, was chosen. He married Melisande in 1129 and succeeded as king of Jerusalem in 1131. To defend the holy city from the Muslim champion, Zengi, Fulk allied with the emir of Damscus and the emperor of Constantinople during the early 1130s. Turkish raiders took him prisoner in 1137, but then freed him.

Source:

The Plantagenet Chronicles: 19, 37-9, 46-8, 60-1

Input by Mimi Arcala

--------------------

Fulk (in French: Foulque; 1089/1092 Angers - 13 November 1143 Acre), also known as Fulk the Younger, was Count of Anjou (as Fulk V) from 1109 to 1129, and King of Jerusalem from 1131 to his death. He was also the paternal grandfather of Henry II of England.

Contents [hide]

1 Count of Anjou

2 Crusader and King

3 Securing the borders

4 Death

5 Depictions

6 Family

7 Sources

8 Historical Fiction


[edit] Count of Anjou

Fulk was born in Angers between 1089 and 1092, the son of Count Fulk IV of Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort. In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France.

He became count of Anjou upon his father's death in 1109, at the age of approximately twenty. In that year, he married Erembourg of Maine, cementing Angevin control over the County of Maine.

He was originally an opponent of King Henry I of England and a supporter of King Louis VI of France, but in 1127 he allied with Henry when Henry arranged for his daughter Matilda to marry Fulk's son Geoffrey of Anjou. Fulk went on crusade in 1120, and became a close friend of the Knights Templar. After his return he began to subsidize the Templars, and maintained two knights in the Holy Land for a year.

[edit] Crusader and King

By 1127 Fulk was preparing to return to Anjou when he received an embassy from King Baldwin II of Jerusalem. Baldwin II had no male heirs but had already designated his daughter Melisende to succeed him. Baldwin II wanted to safeguard his daughter's inheritance by marrying her to a powerful lord. Fulk was a wealthy crusader and experienced military commander, and a widower. His experience in the field would prove invaluable in a frontier state always in the grip of war.

However, Fulk held out for better terms than mere consort of the Queen; he wanted to be king alongside Melisende. Baldwin II, reflecting on Fulk's fortune and military exploits, acquiesced. Fulk abdicated his county seat of Anjou to his son Geoffrey and left for Jerusalem, where he married Melisende on 2 June 1129. Later Baldwin II bolstered Melisende's position in the kingdom by making her sole guardian of her son by Fulk, Baldwin III, born in 1130.


The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the other Crusader states (in shades of green) in 1135 AD, during the reign of Fulk.Fulk and Melisende became joint rulers of Jerusalem in 1131 with Baldwin II's death. From the start Fulk assumed sole control of the government, excluding Melisende altogether. He favored fellow countrymen from Anjou to the native nobility. The other crusader states to the north feared that Fulk would attempt to impose the suzerainty of Jerusalem over them, as Baldwin II had done; but as Fulk was far less powerful than his deceased father-in-law, the northern states rejected his authority. Melisende's sister Alice of Antioch, exiled from the Principality by Baldwin II, took control of Antioch once more after the death of her father. She allied with Pons of Tripoli and Joscelin II of Edessa to prevent Fulk from marching north in 1132; Fulk and Pons fought a brief battle before peace was made and Alice was exiled again.

In Jerusalem as well, Fulk was resented by the second generation of Jerusalem Christians who had grown up there since the First Crusade. These "natives" focused on Melisende's cousin, the popular Hugh II of Le Puiset, count of Jaffa, who was devotedly loyal to the Queen. Fulk saw Hugh as a rival, and it did not help matters when Hugh's own stepson accused him of disloyalty. In 1134, in order to expose Hugh, Fulk accused him of infidelity with Melisende. Hugh rebelled in protest. Hugh secured himself to Jaffa, and allied himself with the Muslims of Ascalon. He was able to defeat the army set against him by Fulk, but this situation could not hold. The Patriarch interceded in the conflict, perhaps at the behest of Melisende. Fulk agreed to peace and Hugh was exiled from the kingdom for three years, a lenient sentence.

However, an assassination attempt was made against Hugh. Fulk, or his supporters, were commonly believed responsible, though direct proof never surfaced. The scandal was all that was needed for the queen's party to take over the government in what amounted to a palace coup. Author and historian Bernard Hamilton wrote that the Fulk's supporters "went in terror of their lives" in the palace. Contemporary author and historian William of Tyre wrote of Fulk "he never attempted to take the initiative, even in trivial matters, without (Melisende's) consent". The result was that Melisende held direct and unquestioned control over the government from 1136 onwards. Sometime before 1136 Fulk reconciled with his wife, and a second son, Amalric was born.

[edit] Securing the borders

Jerusalem's northern border was of great concern. Fulk had been appointed regent of the Principality of Antioch by Baldwin II. As regent he had Raymund of Poitou marry the infant Constance of Antioch, daughter of Bohemund II and Alice of Antioch, and niece to Melisende. However, the greatest concern during Fulk's reign was the rise of Atabeg Zengi of Mosul.

In 1137 Fulk was defeated in battle near Barin but allied with Mu'in ad-Din Unur, the vizier of Damascus. Damascus was also threatened by Zengi. Fulk captured the fort of Banias, to the north of Lake Tiberias and thus secured the northern frontier.

Fulk also strengthened the kingdom's southern border. His butler Paganus built the fortress of Kerak to the south of the Dead Sea, and to help give the kingdom access to the Red Sea, Fulk had Blanche Garde, Ibelin, and other forts built in the south-west to overpower the Egyptian fortress at Ascalon. This city was a base from which the Egyptian Fatimids launched frequent raids on the Kingdom of Jerusalem and Fulk sought to neutralise this threat.

In 1137 and 1142, Byzantine emperor John II Comnenus arrived in Syria attempting to impose Byzantine control over the crusader states. John's arrival was ignored by Fulk, who declined an invitation to meet the emperor in Jerusalem.


The death of Fulk, as depicted in MS of William of Tyre's Historia and Old French Continuation, painted in Acre, 13C. Bib. Nat. Française.)[edit] Death

In 1143, while the king and queen were on holiday in Acre, Fulk was killed in a hunting accident. His horse stumbled, fell, and Fulk's skull was crushed by the saddle, "and his brains gushed forth from both ears and nostrils", as William of Tyre describes. He was carried back to Acre, where he lay unconscious for three days before he died. He was buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Though their marriage started in conflict, Melisende mourned for him privately as well as publicly. Fulk was survived by his son Geoffrey of Anjou by his first wife, and Baldwin III and Amalric I by Melisende.

[edit] Depictions

According to William, Fulk was "a ruddy man, like David... faithful and gentle, affable and kind... an experienced warrior full of patience and wisdom in military affairs." His chief fault was an inability to remember names and faces.

William of Tyre described Fulk as a capable soldier and able politician, but observed that Fulk did not adequately attend to the defense of the crusader states to the north. Ibn al-Qalanisi (who calls him al-Kund Anjur, an Arabic rendering of "Count of Anjou") says that "he was not sound in his judgment nor was he successful in his administration." The Zengids continued their march on the crusader states, culminating in the fall of the County of Edessa in 1144, which led to the Second Crusade (see Siege of Edessa).

[edit] Family

In 1110, Fulk married Ermengarde of Maine (died 1126), the daughter of Elias I of Maine. Their four children were:

1.Geoffrey V of Anjou, father of Henry II of England.

2.Sibylla of Anjou (1112–1165, Bethlehem), married in 1123 William Clito (div. 1124), married in 1134 Thierry, Count of Flanders.

3.Alice (or Isabella) (1107–1154, Fontevrault), married William Adelin; after his death in the White Ship she became a nun and later Abbess of Fontevrault.

4.Elias II of Maine (died 1151)

His second wife was Melisende, Queen of Jerusalem

1.Baldwin III of Jerusalem

2.Amalric I of Jerusalem

[edit] Sources

Orderic Vitalis

Robert of Torigny

William of Tyre

Medieval Women, edited by Derek Baker, the Ecclesiastical History Society, 1978

Payne, Robert. The Dream and the Tomb, 1984

The Damascus Chronicle of Crusades, trans. H.A.R. Gibb, 1932.

from wiki

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulk_V_of_Anjou

--------------------

From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps05/ps05_417.htm

Fulk V was "King of Jerusalem" as a Crusader. His wife was Ermenburge "of La Fleche" (aka Erembourg of Maine); after her death he married Melisande, eldest daughter of Baldwin II (King of Jerusalem, whom Fulk V succeeded as its third royal ruler) - this marriage occured in 1129. An eye--witness, Archbishop William of Tyre, described Fulk as "...a ruddy man, like David...faithful and gentle, affable and kind...a powerful prince...and very successful in ruling his own people...an experienced warrior full of patience and wisdom in military affairs."{-"The Plantagenet Chronicles," ed. by E. Hallam, p.38.}

References: [AR7],[Moncreiffe],[RFC],[Talbot1],[Paget1], [FarisPA],[Weis1],[PlantagenetA]

--------------------

Fulk of Jerusalem

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fulk V (1089/1092 – November 13, 1143), also known as Fulk the Younger, was Count of Anjou from 1109 to 1129, and King of Jerusalem from 1131 to his death.

Count of Anjou

Fulk was born between 1089 and 1092, the son of Count Fulk IV of Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort. In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France.

He became count of Anjou upon his father's death in 1109, at the age of approximately twenty. He was originally an opponent of King Henry I of England and a supporter of King Louis VI of France, but in 1127 he allied with Henry when Henry arranged for his daughter Matilda to marry Fulk's son Geoffrey of Anjou. Fulk went on crusade in 1120, and become a close friend of the Knights Templar. After his return he began to subsidize the Templars, and maintained two knights in the Holy Land for a year.

Crusader and King

By 1127 Fulk was preparing to return to Anjou when he received an embassy from King Baldwin II of Jerusalem. Baldwin II had no male heirs but had already designated his daughter Melisende to succeed him. Baldwin II wanted to safeguard his daughter's inheritance by marrying her to a powerful lord. Fulk was a wealthy crusader and experienced military commander, and a widower. His experience in the field would prove invaluable in a frontier state always in the grip of war.

However, Fulk held out for better terms than mere consort of the Queen; he wanted to be king alongside Melisende. Baldwin II, reflecting on Fulk's fortune and military exploits, acquiesced. Fulk abdicated his county seat of Anjou to his son Geoffery and left for Jerusalem, where he married Melisende on June 2, 1129. Later Baldwin II bolstered Melisende's position in the kingdom by making her sole guardian of her son by Fulk, Baldwin III, born in 1130.

Fulk and Melisende became joint rulers of Jerusalem in 1131 with Baldwin II's death. From the start Fulk assumed sole control of the government, excluding Melisende altogether. He favored fellow countrymen from Anjou to the native nobility. The other crusader states to the north feared that Fulk would attempt to impose the suzerainty of Jerusalem over them, as Baldwin II had done; but as Fulk was far less powerful than his deceased father-in-law, the northern states rejected his authority. Melisende's sister Alice of Antioch, exiled from the Principality by Baldwin II, took control of Antioch once more after the death of her father. She allied with Pons of Tripoli and Joscelin II of Edessa to prevent Fulk from marching north in 1132; Fulk and Pons fought a brief battle before peace was made and Alice was exiled again.

In Jerusalem as well, Fulk was resented by the second generation of Jerusalem Christians who had grown up there since the First Crusade. These "natives" focused on Melisende's cousin, the popular Hugh II of Le Puiset, count of Jaffa, who was devotedly loyal to the Queen. Fulk saw Hugh as a rival, and it did not help matters when Hugh's own stepson accused him of disloyalty. In 1134, in order to expose Hugh, Fulk accused him of infidelity with Melisende. Hugh rebelled in protest. Hugh secured himself to Jaffa, and allied himself with the Muslims of Ascalon. He was able to defeat the army set against him by Fulk, but this situation could not hold. The Patriarch interceded in the conflict, perhaps at the behest of Melisende. Fulk agreed to peace and Hugh was exiled from the kingdom for three years, a lenient sentence.

However, an assassination attempt was made against Hugh. Fulk, or his supporters, were commonly believed responsible, though direct proof never surfaced. The scandal was all that was needed for the queen's party to take over the government in what amounted to a palace coup. Author and historian Bernard Hamilton wrote that the Fulk's supporters "went in terror of their lives" in the palace. Contemporary author and historian William of Tyre wrote of Fulk "he never attempted to take the initiative, even in trivial matters, without (Melisende's) consent". The result was that Melisende held direct and unquestioned control over the government from 1136 onwards. Sometime before 1136 Fulk reconciled with his wife, and a second son, Amalric was born.

[edit]Securing the borders

Jerusalem's northern border was of great concern. Fulk had been appointed regent of the Principality of Antioch by Baldwin II. As regent he had Raymund of Poitou marry the infant Constance of Antioch, daughter of Bohemund II and Alice of Antioch, and niece to Melisende. However, the greatest concern during Fulk's reign was the rise of Atabeg Zengi of Mosul.

In 1137 Fulk was defeated in battle near Barin but allied with Mu'in ad-Din Unur, the vizier of Damascus. Damascus was also threatened by Zengi. Fulk captured the fort of Banias, to the north of Lake Tiberias and thus secured the northern frontier.

Fulk also strengthened the kingdom's southern border. His butler Paganus built the fortress of Kerak to the south of the Dead Sea, and to help give the kingdom access to the Red Sea, Fulk had Blanche Garde, Ibelin, and other forts built in the south-west to overpower the Egyptian fortress at Ascalon. This city was a base from which the Egyptian Fatimids launched frequent raids on the Kingdom of Jerusalem and Fulk sought to neutralise this threat.

In 1137 and 1142, Byzantine emperor John II Comnenus arrived in Syria attempting to impose Byzantine control over the crusader states. John's arrival was ignored by Fulk, who declined an invitation to meet the emperor in Jerusalem.

Death

In 1143, while the king and queen were on holiday in Acre, Fulk was killed in a hunting accident. His horse stumbled, fell, and Fulk's skull was crushed by the saddle, "and his brains gushed forth from both ears and nostrils", as William of Tyre describes. He was carried back to Acre, where he lay unconscious for three days before he died. He was buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Though their marriage started in conflict, Melisende mourned for him privately as well as publicly. Fulk was survived by his son Geoffrey of Anjou by his first wife, and Baldwin III and Amalric I by Melisende.

According to William, Fulk was "a ruddy man, like David... faithful and gentle, affable and kind... an experienced warrior full of patience and wisdom in military affairs." His chief fault was an inability to remember names and faces.

William of Tyre described Fulk as a capable soldier and able politician, but observed that Fulk did not adequately attend to the defense of the crusader states to the north. Ibn al-Qalanisi (who calls him al-Kund Anjur, an Arabic rendering of "Count of Anjou") says that "he was not sound in his judgment nor was he successful in his administration." The Zengids continued their march on the crusader states, culminating in the fall of the County of Edessa in 1144, which led to the Second Crusade (see Siege of Edessa).

[edit]Family

In 1110, Fulk married Ermengarde of Maine (died 1126), the daughter of Elias I of Maine. Their four children were:

Geoffrey of Anjou

Sibylla of Anjou (1112–1165, Bethlehem), married in 1123 William Clito (div. 1124), married in 1134 Thierry, Count of Flanders

Alice (or Isabella) (1107–1154, Fontevrault), married William Adelin; after his death in the White Ship she became a nun and later Abbess of Fontevrault.

Elias II of Maine (died 1151)

His second wife was Melisende, Queen of Jerusalem

Baldwin III of Jerusalem

Amalric I of Jerusalem

[edit]Sources

Orderic Vitalis

Robert of Torigny

William of Tyre

Medieval Women, edited by Derek Baker, the Ecclesiastical History Society, 1978

Payne, Robert. The Dream and the Tomb, 1984

The Damascus Chronicle of Crusades, trans. H.A.R. Gibb, 1932.

--------------------

BIOGRAPHY: b. 1092

d. November 1143, Acre, Palestine [now 'Akko, Israel]

byname FULK THE YOUNGER, French FOULQUES LE JEUNE, count of Anjou and Maine as Fulk V (1109-31) and king of Jerusalem (1131-43).

Son of Fulk IV the Surly and Bertrada of Montfort, he was married in 1109 to Arenburga of Maine. Fulk exerted his control over his vassals and was later caught up in dynastic quarrels between the French and English kings. In 1128 his son Geoffrey Plantagenet married Matilda, daughter of Henry I of England, and became the progenitor of England's branch of the Angevin dynasty. Fulk first visited Palestine in 1120 and returned in 1129 to marry Melisend, daughter of King Baldwin II of Jerusalem.

Fulk became king of Jerusalem on Baldwin II's death in 1131 and spent the first year of his reign settling a dispute in Antioch (Turkey) and putting down a revolt led by his wife's lover, Hugh of Le Puiset. In 1137 he allied himself with the Byzantines against a Turkish leader, 'Imad ad-Din Zangi, of Mosul (Iraq), and in 1140 helped the Muslims of Damascus ward off Zangi's armies. He protected Jerusalem in the south by constructing a series of fortresses, including Krak of Moab.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

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Wikipedia entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulk_V_of_Anjou

--------------------

Fulk was born between 1089 and 1092, the son of Count Fulk IV of Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort. In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France.

He became count of Anjou upon his father's death in 1109, at the age of approximately twenty. He was originally an opponent of King Henry I of England and a supporter of King Louis VI of France, but in 1127 he allied with Henry when Henry arranged for his daughter Matilda to marry Fulk's son Geoffrey of Anjou. Fulk went on crusade in 1120, and became a close friend of the Knights Templar. After his return he began to subsidize the Templars, and maintained two knights in the Holy Land for a year.

--------------------

ALIA: Fulk V "le Jeune" /King of Jerusalem/

Birth: 1092 in Anjou, France

Death: 10 NOV 1143 in Plains of Acre, Palestine

_FA1: Acceded: 1109. Lord of the Angevin Lands: Anjou, Touraine, and Maine.

_FA2: Made the Angevin Lands a principality unsurpassed in France.

_FA3: The Angevin Lands had more resources than Normandy.

_FA4: Became King of Jerusalem 1131 on the death of his 2nd Father-in-Law.

_FA5: 9th Comte de Anjou. Buried at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem.

Burial: St Sepulcre, Jeruselem, Palestine

Note:

The name Plantagenet, according to

Rapin, came from when Fulk the Great being stung from remorse for some wicked

action, in order to atone for it, went a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and was

scourged before the Holy Sepulchre with broom twigs. Earlier authorities say

it was because Geoffrey bore a branch of yellow broom (Planta-genistae) in

his helm.

became King of Jerusalem 1131 on the death of his 2nd Father-in-Law

Fulk

Pronounced As: fulk , 1092-1143, Latin king of Jerusalem (1131-43), count of Anjou (1109-29) as Fulk V, great-grandson of Fulk Nerra. He journeyed (1120) to the Holy Land as a pilgrim and returned there in 1129, making his son, Geoffrey

Plantagenet, count of Anjou as Geoffrey IV. Having taken as his new wife Melisende, daughter of King Baldwin II of Jerusalem, he succeeded his father-in-law in 1131. Fulk's reign was disturbed by dissensions among the Latin princes and by the

raids of the Turks, whose prisoner he was for a time in 1137. He was succeeded as king of Jerusalem by his son by Melisende, Baldwin III.

FULK (1092-1143), king of Jerusalem, was the son of Fulk IV, count of Anjou, and his wife Bertrada (who ultimately deserted her husband and became the mistress of Philip I of France). As Fulk V, he became count of Anjou in 1109. Within his country he was active in asserting and recovering his powers over his vassals; outside it he played a part in the conflicts between Henry I of England and Louis VI of France, supporting each side in turn. But his ties with Henry became closer when his son Geoffrey Plantagenet married Henry's daughter Matilda. Already in 1120 Fulk had visited the Holy Land and become a close friend of the Templars. On his return he assigned to the order of the Templars an annual subsidy, while he also maintained two knights in the Holy Land for a year. In 1128 he was preparing to return to the east when he received an embassy from Baldwin II, king of Jerusalem, who had no male heir to succeed him, offering his daughter Melisinda in marriage with the right of eventual succession to the kingdom. Fulk accepted the offer; and in 1129 he was married to Melisinda, receiving the towns of Acre and Tyre as her dower. In 1131 he became king of Jerusalem.

His reign was not marked by any considerable events. The kingdom, which had reached its zenith under Baldwin II, was quietly prosperous under Fulk's rule. In the beginning of his reign he had to act as regent of Antioch and to provide a husband, Raymund of Poitou, for the infant heiress Constance. But the great problem with which he had to deal was the progress of the atabeg Zengi of Mosul. In 1137 he was beaten near Barin and, escaping into the fort, was surrounded and forced to capitulate. A little later, however, he greatly improved his position by strengthening his alliance with the vizier of Damascus, who also feared the progress of Zengi (1140); and in this way he was able to capture the fort of Banias, to the north of Lake Tiberias. Like his predecessors in Anjou, Fulk was a great builder of castles. In southern Palestine he constructed Ibelin, Blanche Garde and Gibelin as a means of checking the Mohammedan garrison of Askalon. Belvoir was founded to survey the Jordan valley south of the Sea of Galilee, while in Trans-Jordan, Kerak was fortified by a royal vassal. Twice in Fulk's reign the eastern emperor, John Comnenus, appeared in northern Syria (1137 and 1142); but his coming did not affect the king, who was able to decline politely a visit which the emperor proposed to make to Jerusalem.

Fulk died in 1143 leaving two sons who both became kings and reigned as Baldwin III and Amalric I.

Fulk continued the tradition of good statemanship and sound churchmanship which Baldwin I and Baldwin II had begun. Unfortunately he was unable to head a combined resistance to the rising power of Zengi of Mosul [Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1961 ed., Vol. 9, p. 910, FULK]

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Fulk was born between 1089 and 1092, the son of Count Fulk IV of Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort. In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France.

He became count of Anjou upon his father's death in 1109, at the age of approximately twenty. He was originally an opponent of King Henry I of England and a supporter of King Louis VI of France, but in 1127 he allied with Henry when Henry arranged for his daughter Matilda to marry Fulk's son Geoffrey of Anjou. Fulk went on crusade in 1120, and became a close friend of the Knights Templar. After his return he began to subsidize the Templars, and maintained two knights in the Holy Land for a year.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulk_of_Jerusalem

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulk_V_of_Anjou

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In French, he was referred to as Foulques V, le Jeune. He was a Knight of the Third Crusade and crowned King of Jerusalem by right of his father.

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Fulk V of Anjou (1089/1092 – November 13, 1143), also known as Fulk the Young, and after 1131 as Fulk of Jerusalem, was Count of Anjou from 1109 to 1129, and King of Jerusalem from 1131 to his death.

The Kingdom of Jerusalem was a Christian kingdom established in the Levant in 1099 after the First Crusade. It lasted less than two hundred years, until 1291 when the last remaining outpost, Acre, was destroyed by the Mamluks.

At first the kingdom was little more than a loose collection of towns and cities captured during the crusade. Its first king, Godfrey of Bouillon, seems not to have called himself "king" at all; it was a subject of dispute whether Jerusalem would be a secular kingdom or theocratic state under papal authority. The secular faction was victorious, however, and the kingdom developed along the same lines as the monarchies of Western Europe, with which it had close connections, both politically and through the familial relationships of its rulers. It was, however, a relatively minor kingdom in comparison and often lacked financial and military support from Europe. The kingdom had closer ties to the neighbouring Kingdom of Armenia and the Byzantine Empire, which had an "orientalizing" influence on the western crusaders.

At its height, the Kingdom roughly encompassed the territory of modern Israel, the West Bank, and the Gaza Strip; it extended from modern Lebanon in the north to the Sinai Desert in the south, and into modern Jordan and Syria in the east. There were also attempts to expand the kingdom into Fatimid Egypt. Its kings also held a certain amount of authority over the other crusader states, Tripoli, Antioch, and Edessa.

Fulk was born between 1089 and 1092, the son of Count Fulk IV of Anjou and Bertrade de Montfort. In 1092, Bertrade deserted her husband and bigamously married King Philip I of France.

He became count of Anjou upon his father's death in 1109, at the age of approximately twenty. He was originally an opponent of King Henry I of England and a supporter of King Louis VI of France, but in 1127 he allied with Henry when Henry arranged for his daughter Matilda to marry Fulk's son Geoffrey of Anjou. Fulk went on crusade in 1120, and become a close friend of the Knights Templar. After his return he began to subsidize the Templars, and maintained two knights in the Holy Land for a year.

The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the other Crusader states (in shades of green) in 1135 CE, during the reign of Fulk.

By 1127 Fulk was preparing to return to Anjou when he received an embassy from King Baldwin II of Jerusalem. Baldwin II had no male heirs but had already designated his daughter Melisende to succeed him. Baldwin II wanted to safeguard his daughter's inheritance by marrying her to a powerful lord. Fulk was a wealthy crusader and experienced military commander, and a widower. His experience in the field would prove invaluable in a frontier state always in the grip of war.

However, Fulk held out for better terms than mere consort of the Queen; he wanted to be king alongside Melisende. Baldwin II, reflecting on Fulk's fortune and military exploits, acquiesced. Fulk abdicated his county seat of Anjou to his son Geoffery and left for Jerusalem, where he married Melisende on June 2, 1129. Later Baldwin II bolstered Melisende's position in the kingdom by making her sole guardian of her son by Fulk, Baldwin III, born in 1130.

Fulk and Melisende became joint rulers of Jerusalem in 1131 with Baldwin II's death. From the start Fulk assumed sole control of the government, excluding Melisende altogether. He favored fellow countrymen from Anjou to the native nobility. The other crusader states to the north feared that Fulk would attempt to impose the suzerainty of Jerusalem over them, as Baldwin II had done; but as Fulk was far less powerful than his deceased father-in-law, the northern states rejected his authority. Melisende's sister Alice of Antioch, exiled from the Principality by Baldwin II, took control of Antioch once more after the death of her father. She allied with Pons of Tripoli and Joscelin II of Edessa to prevent Fulk from marching north in 1132; Fulk and Pons fought a brief battle before peace was made and Alice was exiled again.

In Jerusalem as well, Fulk was resented by the second generation of Jerusalem Christians who had grown up there since the First Crusade. These "natives" focused on Melisende's cousin, the popular Hugh II of Le Puiset, count of Jaffa, who was devotedly loyal to the Queen. Fulk saw Hugh as a rival, and it did not help matters when Hugh's own step-son accused him of disloyalty. In 1134, in order to expose Hugh, Fulk accused him of infidelity with Melisende. Hugh rebelled in protest. Hugh secured himself to Jaffa, and allied himself with the Muslims of Ascalon. He was able to defeat the army set against him by Fulk, but this situation could not hold. The Patriarch interceded in the conflict, perhaps at the behest of Melisende. Fulk agreed to peace and Hugh was exiled from the kingdom for three years, a lenient sentence.

However, an assassination attempt was made against Hugh. Fulk, or his supporters, were commonly believed responsible, though direct proof never surfaced. The scandal was all that was needed for the queen's party to take over the government in what amounted to a palace coup. Author and historian Bernard Hamilton wrote that the Fulk's supporters "went in terror of their lives" in the palace. Contemporary author and historian William of Tyre wrote of Fulk "he never attempted to take the initiative, even in trivial matters, without (Melisende's) consent". The result was that Melisende held direct and unquestioned control over the government from 1136 onwards. Sometime before 1136 Fulk reconciled with his wife, and a second son, Amalric was born.

Jerusalem's northern border was of great concern. Fulk had been appointed regent of the Principality of Antioch by Baldwin II. As regent he had Raymund of Poitou marry the infant Constance of Antioch, daughter of Bohemund II and Alice of Antioch, and niece to Melisende. However, the greatest concern during Fulk's reign was the rise of Atabeg Zengi of Mosul.

In 1137 Fulk was defeated in battle near Barin but allied with Mu'in ad-Din Unur, the vizier of Damascus. Damascus was also threatened by Zengi. Fulk captured the fort of Banias, to the north of Lake Tiberias and thus secured the northern frontier.

Fulk also strengthened the kingdom's southern border. His butler Paganus built the fortress of Kerak to the south of the Dead Sea, and to help give the kingdom access to the Red Sea, Fulk had Blanche Garde, Ibelin, and other forts built in the south-west to overpower the Egyptian fortress at Ascalon. This city was a base from which the Egyptian Fatimids launched frequent raids on the Kingdom of Jerusalem and Fulk sought to neutralise this threat.

In 1137 and 1142, Byzantine emperor John II Comnenus arrived in Syria attempting to impose Byzantine control over the crusader states. John's arrival was ignored by Fulk, who declined an invitation to meet the emperor in Jerusalem.

In 1143, while the king and queen were on holiday in Acre, Fulk was killed in a hunting accident. His horse stumbled, fell, and Fulk's skull was crushed by the saddle, "and his brains gushed forth from both ears and nostrils", as William of Tyre describes. He was carried back to Acre, where he lay unconscious for three days before he died. He was buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Though their marriage started in conflict, Melisende mourned for him privately as well as publicly. Fulk was survived by his son Geoffrey of Anjou by his first wife, and Baldwin III and Amalric I by Melisende.

According to William, Fulk was "a ruddy man, like David... faithful and gentle, affable and kind... an experienced warrior full of patience and wisdom in military affairs." His chief fault was an inability to remember names and faces.

William of Tyre described Fulk as a capable soldier and able politician, but observed that Fulk ------------------------------------------------------------

Pedigree Resource File Ver a la persona en el modo de cuadro genealógico

name:

Foulques V, King of Jerusalem, Count of Anjou (AFN: 4HWC-Z7W)

sexo: male

nacimiento: 1092

                           of, , Anjou, France 

defunción: 10 November 1143

                     At Acre 

entierro: Church of the Holy Sepulcher, Jerusalem

matrimonio: 11 July 1110

                           , , , France 

(NOTA: Los siguientes corrresponden al mismo 2° matrimonio) matrimonio: 2 June 1129

matrimonio: 1129

                   , , , France 

número de CD: 43

Padres

Padre: Fulk IV (AFN: 4HWD-3G1)

madre: Bertrade de Montfort Queen of France (AFN: 4HWD-47Q)

Padre:

Foulques IV, Count of Anjou (AFN: 4J2B-GB9)

Matrimonios (3)

cónyuge: Ermengarde (Ermentrude) du MAINE (AFN: 4HWD-1BT)

matrimonio: 11 July 1110

                      , , , France 

Ocultar hijos (4)

hijo 1:

Mathilde D' Anjou Duchess of Normandy (AFN: 4HZS-TRJ)

sexo: female nacimiento: aproximadamente 1104

                       of, Angers, Maine-et-Loire, France 

defunción: 1154

                       Fontevrault Abbey, Fontevrault, Maine-et-Loire, France 

hijo 2:

Sibilla D' Anjou Countess of Flanders (AFN: 4HXC-DP0)

sexo: female nacimiento: aproximadamente 1105

                         of, , Anjou, France 

defunción: 1165 / 1167 divorcio:

hijo 3:

Elias D' Anjou Count Du Maine (AFN: 4HZS-VJ8)

sexo: male nacimiento: aproximadamente 1111

                         of, , Anjou, France 

defunción: 15 January 1151

                        St Serge Abbey, Angers, Anjou, France 

entierro: l'Abbey des Sergela, Angers, France

hijo 4:

Geoffrey Plantagenet V, Count of Anjou &

view all 80

Foulques V le Jeune, comte de Anjou et roi de Jérusalem's Timeline

1067
1067
- 1109
1089
1089
Angers, Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France
1104
1104
Age 15
Anjou, Maine-et-Loire, Pays de la Loire, France
1109
1109
Age 20
Anjou, France
1109
- 1129
Age 20
1109
Age 20
became count of Anjou
1109
Age 20
Anjou, France
1109
- 1129
Age 20
1110
July 11, 1110
Age 21
France
1111
1111
Age 22
Anjou, Isere, Rhone-Alpes, France