Frances Harney Johnson "Quis-quas-hum"

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Frances Harney Johnson "Quis-quas-hum"'s Geni Profile

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Quis-quas-hum Johnson (Harney)

Birthdate:
Death: after 1933
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Jack and Taowhywee of Grants Pass
Wife of Private
Ex-partner of Gen. Philip Henry Sheridan, USA
Sister of George and Agnes

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Frances Harney Johnson "Quis-quas-hum"

wikipedia

"Most of his (Philip Sheridan's) service with the 4th Infantry was in the Pacific Northwest, starting with a topographical survey mission to the Willamette Valley in 1855, during which he became involved with the Yakima War and Rogue River Wars, gaining experience in leading small combat teams, being wounded (a bullet grazed his nose on March 28, 1857, at Middle Cascade, Oregon Territory),[6] and some of the diplomatic skills needed for negotiating with Indian tribes. He lived with a mistress during part of his tour of duty, an Indian Rogue River woman and daughter of Takelma Chief Harney, named Frances by her white friends.[7] He was promoted to first lieutenant in March 1861, just before the Civil War, and to captain in May, immediately after Fort Sumter." ~• note: the name Frances may actually refer to a women who (later?) went by the name Harriet. {MMvB}

Other sources say that his was another woman: known later as Harriet Lindsay. https://wkigerl.wordpress.com/tag/chief-george-harney/

"Great Aunt Frances Harney Johnson also made the long walk up the coast and resettled at Siletz. Her Native name was “Quis-quas-hum,” and she was known to be full of fun. Frances met a young Army lieutenant, Phil Sheridan, who worked on Native American treaties and invited her and her brother, George Harney, to visit Washington D.C. Details of this trip are unclear, except for the 1874 photo of George by the Smithsonian Institute"

Great Aunt Frances bore the traditional 111 chin tattoos (that Grandma Aggie adopted after making friends with traditional tattooists from New Zealand). Frances was well-known among linguists as the source for Edward Sapir’s classic, Takelma Texts, published by the Smithsonian in 1926. Now out-of-print, this volume contains vocabulary and translations of Takelma stories, including one featuring the cultural hero “Dal-Dal,” or Dragonfly.

In the 1930s, Frances began to work with the famous linguist and anthropologist, John Harrington, providing personal accounts about her early life in the Takelma homelands in the Rogue Valley, before her forced removal to Siletz in 1856. Grandma Aggie remembers him well from his stays in their house.

In 1933, Frances (in her 90s) guided Harrington and his research party (including Grandma Aggie’s father and two brothers) to the Rogue Valley near Table Rocks. She led them to the Takelma village site at Ti’lomikh Falls upstream of Gold Hill, where she and Native Americans from numerous tribes had once celebrated the annual Salmon Ceremony.

In 2007, a long-lost 1933 picture of Aggie’s father, sitting in the Story Chair next to the falls, helped Grandma Aggie, Tom Doty (died 2020) and Steve Kiesling (Olympic rower) find this legendary Story Chair again and confirm the location of the Ti’lomikh Falls Salmon Ceremony site, a sacred place indeed. [for more see Rediscovering Ti’lomkh Falls]

~ this her Great Granddaughter Agnes 

See also:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takelma ;
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siletz_Reservation

curator note

~• the most plausible identification of this woman is from one of the sources attached to this profile. : "Great Aunt Frances Harney Johnson also made the long walk up the coast and resettled at Siletz. Her Native name was “Quis-quas-hum,” and she was known to be full of fun. Frances met a young Army lieutenant, Phil Sheridan, who worked on Native American treaties and invited her and her brother, George Harney, to visit Washington D.C. Details of this trip are unclear, except for the 1874 photo of George by the Smithsonian Institute (below).

Great Aunt Frances bore the traditional 111 chin tattoos (that Grandma Aggie adopted after making friends with traditional tattooists from New Zealand). Frances was well-known among linguists as the source for Edward Sapir’s classic, Takelma Texts, published by the Smithsonian in 1926. Now out-of-print, this volume contains vocabulary and translations of Takelma stories, including one featuring the cultural hero “Dal-Dal,” or Dragonfly."

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Frances Harney Johnson "Quis-quas-hum"'s Timeline