Francis Cooke, "Mayflower" Passenger

Is your surname Cooke?

Research the Cooke family

Francis Cooke, "Mayflower" Passenger's Geni Profile

Records for Francis Cooke

2,331,357 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Francis Cooke, "Mayflower" Passenger

Also Known As: "Franchoys Couck", "Franachoic Couck", "Francois Cook", "Mayflower Passenger"
Birthdate: (80)
Birthplace: Perhaps near (operative description), Canterbury, Kent, South East - England, United Kingdom (present day)
Death: April 7, 1663 (76-84)
Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts (Burial Hill)
Place of Burial: Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Unknown father of Francis Cooke; NN Cooke; Unknown mother of Francis Cooke and NN Cooke
Husband of Hester Cooke and Hester Cooke, "Walloon"
Father of Mary Tomson; John Cooke, "Mayflower" Passenger; Child Cooke; Jane Mitchell; Elizabeth Cooke and 3 others

Occupation: Wool Comber, Mayflower, Wool comber
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Francis Cooke, "Mayflower" Passenger

Francis Cooke (c 1583 – April 7, 1663) d. Plymouth, Massachusetts, was one of the 102 passengers on the Mayflower of 1621. [1] This early settler is one of the twenty-six male Pilgrims known to have descendants and the longest living male Mayflower Pilgrim. His burial site is not known.

Parents: ***There is no evidence to support Edward Cooke and Alice Canton as his parents.***. Date and location of birth is unknown. There was a considerable foreign French and Walloon colony in Canterbury (Kent). "Per author Eugene Aubrey Stratton, he was probably born no earlier than 1583, and may have been under age sixty when his name appeared on the 1643 Able to Bear Arms List for Plymouth.". (see Wikipedia).

Married:

  1. some time after July 20, 1603 at Leiden, Holland to Hester le Mahieu (c. 1585-7 April 1663, Plymouth, daughter of Jean Le Mahier and Jeanne ???.

Children of Francis Cooke and Hester Mahieu:

  1. Mary Cooke b 1605 d. 23 Nov 1695 married Francis Tobey b.1602 d.1635
  2. John Cooke, ("Mayflower" Passenger) b. Jan 1607 d. 23 Nov 1695 married Sarah Warren b. Abt 1614 d. Aft 15 Jul 1696
  3. unnamed child buried in Leiden
  4. Jane Cooke b. Bef 1613 d. Abt 1650 married Experience Mitchell b. Abt 1609 d. Abt 11 May 1689
  5. Jacob Cooke b. Abt 1618 d. 18 Dec 1675 married Damaris Hopkins b. May 1617 d. Bef Nov 1669
  6. Hester Cooke b. Abt 1620 d. Aft 21 May 1669 married Richard Wright b. 1608 d. 9 Jun 1691
  7. Mary Cooke b. Abt 1626 d. 21 Mar 1696 married John (Tomson) Thompson b. 1616 d. 16 Jun 1696

Notes

  • In 1651, William Bradford wrote of him:

"And seeing it hath pleased Him to give me [William Bradford] to see thirty years completed since these beginnings, and that the great works of His providence are to be observed, I have thought it not unworthy my pains to take a view of the decreasings and increasings of these persons and such changes as hath passed over them and theirs in this thirty years ...

"Francis Cooke is still living, a very old man, and hath seen his children's children have children. After his wife came over with other of his children; he hath three still living by her, all married and have five children, so their increase is eight. And his son John which came over with him is married, and hath four children living." William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647, ed.

Samuel Eliot Morison (New York : Knopf, 1991), p. 75-6.

Will

Francis’ will was made 10 Jul 1659. He makes his wife Hester and son John executors. It is witnessed by Howland and Alden. Inventory was taken 1663 by Eph. Tuckham and Wm Crowe. 7 December 1659

The last Will and Testament of ffrancis Cooke of Plymouth late Deceased: exhibited before the Court held att Plymouth aforsaid the fift day of June 1663 on the oathes of mr John Aldin and mr John howland; The Last Will and Testament of ffrancis Cooke made this seaventh of the tenth month 1659

I being att prsent weake and Infeirme in body yett in prfect memory throw mercy Doe comitt my soule unto god that gave it and my body to the earthe; which my will is should bee Intered in a Decent and comly manner; As for such goods and lands as I stand posessed of I Doe will and bequeath as followeth; 1 My will is that hester my Dear and loveing wife shall have all my moveable goods and all my Cattle of all kinds; viz: neat Cattle horsekind sheep and swine to be att her Dispose 2 my will is that hester my wife shall have and Injoy my lands both upland and meddow lands which att prsent I posesse During her life

3 I Doe ordaine and appoint my Deare wife and my son John Cooke Joynt exequitors of this my said will 

Witnes John Aldin ffrancis Cooke John howland

Links

Notable descendants of Francis Cooke include Cephas Thompson, William Drew Washburn, Mrs. Anna Mary Robertson ("Grandma Moses"), (George) Orson Welles, Abel Head "Shanghai" Pierce (Texas cattleman who introduced the Brahman cattle breed into Texas), Actor Richard Gere, and Beach Boys Brian, Carl, and Dennis Wilson.[7]

Biography> * from: Francis Cooke

Early life and family:Francis is described in Leiden Walloon church marriage records dating from 1603 as a "woolcomber out of (uyt) England".[1] However, his origins are unknown. He could have been a refugee from religious persecution elsewhere in continental Europe. In Leiden, sometime after July 20, 1603, as Franchoys Couck, he married Hester le Mahieu, the daughter of Protestant refugees from the Walloon Flanders area.[2] The Mahieus, from Lille, had resided in Canterbury, then London, since the 1570s before moving to Leiden in 1590. Hester le Mahieu's sister was Marie le Mahieu, wife of Jan Lano, another Protestant refugee in Canterbury and then Leiden, whose son, Philippe de Lannoy (anglicized to 'Delano') migrated on the Fortune to join his uncle Francis Cooke and his cousin Robert at Plymouth colony in 1621, having been left behind with twenty others when the Mayflower's sailing mate, the Speedwell, foundered and returned to port in England leaving the Mayflower to sail alone. Philippe is the progenitor of the branch of the Delano family from which Franklin Delano Roosevelt descends. While in Leiden, Francis and Hester were members of the Walloon church. In 1606, they left Leiden briefly for Norwich, England, where they joined another Walloon church, returning to Leiden in 1607, possibly for religious reasons. Between 1611 and 1618, the Cookes were members of the Pilgrim Separatist congregation in Leiden. [3] The Pilgrim church was not established in Leiden until 1609, so Francis was living there long before their arrival and must have met up with and joined them afterwards.

The Mayflower and Plymouth In 1620, Francis, his son John, and nephew Philippe de Lannoy boarded Speedwell at Delftshaven. Cooke left wife Hester and their younger children behind to follow when the colony was established. The Leiden Separatists bought the ship in Holland. They then sailed it to Southampton, England to meet the Mayflower, which had been chartered by the merchant investors. In Southampton they joined with other Separatists and the additional colonists hired by the investors.

The two ships began the voyage on August 5, 1620, but the Speedwell leaked badly and had to return to Dartmouth to be refitted at great expense and time. On the second attempt, the two ships sailed about 100 leagues beyond Land's End in Cornwall, but the Speedwell was again found to be leaky. Both vessels returned to Plymouth where the Speedwell was sold. It would later be revealed that there was in fact nothing wrong with the ship. The crew had sabotaged it in order to escape the year long commitment of their contract.

Eleven people from the Speedwell (including Francis and John Cooke) boarded the Mayflower, leaving 20 people (including Robert Cushman and Philippe de Lannoy) to return to London while a combined company of 103 continued the voyage. For a third time, the Mayflower headed for the New World. She left Plymouth on September 6, 1620 and entered Cape Cod Harbor on November 11, 1620. The Fortune eventually followed, arriving at Plymouth Colony one year later on November 9, 1621.

Arriving at what is now Provincetown, Massachusetts, on November 11 (November 21, new-style calendar), forty-one of the passengers, among them Francis Cooke, signed the Mayflower Compact as the boat lay at anchor.

Francis was active in Plymouth civil affairs in the 1630s and 40s - committees to lay out land grants and highways, petit jury, grand jury, coroner's jury. He appears on the 1643 Plymouth list of those able to bear arms. At some point in 1638 or afterward, he settled at Rocky Nook on Jones River, within the limits of Kingston, a few miles from Plymouth.[4]

In 1651, fellow Pilgrim William Bradford wrote of him: "Francis Cooke is still living, a very old man, and hath seen his children's children have children. After his wife came over with other of his children; he hath three still living by her, all married and have five children, so their increase is eight. And his son John which came over with him is married, and hath four children living." [5] Francis Cooke died in 1663 in Plymouth.[6]

  1. Johanna W. Trammel, The Pilgrims and other people from the British Isles in Leiden, 1576-1640 (Isle of Man: Mansk-Svenska Publishing Co. Ltd., 1989), p.152 # Walter J. Harrison, "New Light on Francis Cooke and His Wife Hester Mayhieu and Their Son John," Mayflower Descendant, Vol 27, 145-153. Their betrothal was recorded July 4 and 5,so the 20th was the soonest the marriage could have taken place after banns were read.
  2. Jeremy Dupertuis Bangs. "The Pilgrims and other English in Leiden records: some new Pilgrim documents." New England Historical and Genealogical Register, July 1989, p.195-214.
  3. Robert Charles Anderson, "Francis Cooke", The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, 1995, Vol. I.
  4. William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647, ed. Samuel Eliot Morison (New York: Knopf, 1991), p. 442, 446.
  5. Records of the Colony of New Plymouth in New England, Nathaniel B. Shurtleff and David Pulsifer, eds., (Boston 1855-1861), Vol 8, p. 23
  6. Famous Descendants of Mayflower Passenger Francis Cooke, Francis Cooke Society

Descendency

1 Francis Cooke, (Mayflower) b. Aug 1577 d. 7 Apr 1663 + Hester Mahieu b. 1592 d. 18 Jun 1666

2 John Cooke, (Mayflower) b. Jan 1607 d. 23 Nov 1695 + Sarah Warren b. Abt 1614 d. Aft 15 Jul 1696

2 Jane Cooke b. Bef 1613 d. Abt 1650 + Experience Mitchell b. Abt 1609 d. Abt 11 May 1689

3 Elizabeth Mitchell b. 1628 d. Bef 5 Dec 1684 + John Washburn b. 20 Nov 1620 d. 12 Nov 1686

4 John Washburn b. 1646 d. 1719 [ =>] 4 Thomas Washburn b. 1647 d. 1729 4 Samuel Washburn b. 1652 d. 24 Mar 1720 4 Joseph Washburn b. 1653 d. 20 Apr 1733 4 Jonathan Washburn b. 1653 d. 1720 4 Benjamin Washburn b. Abt 1655 d. 1690 4 Mary Washburn b. 1661 d. 28 Feb 1740 4 Elizabeth Washburn b. Abt 1663 d. 27 Feb 1742 [ =>] 4 Jane Washburn b. Abt 1666 d. Bef 21 Sep 1698 4 James Washburn b. 15 May 1672 d. 11 Jun 1749 4 Sarah Washburn b. 1675 d. 1746 + Samuel Packard d. Yes, date unknown

3 Thomas Mitchell b. 1627-1628 d. Yes, date unknown + Mary Moulton b. 1629 d. Yes, date unknown

3 Mary Mitchell b. Abt 1634 d. 1679 + James Shaw b. Abt 1632 d. 1679

2 Jacob Cooke b. Abt 1618 d. 18 Dec 1675 + Damaris Hopkins b. May 1617 d. Bef Nov 1669 + Elizabeth (Lettice) Shurtleff b. 1637 d. 31 Oct 1693

2 Hester Cooke b. Abt 1620 d. Aft 21 May 1669 + Richard Wright b. 1608 d. 9 Jun 1691

3 Adam Wright b. 1645 d. 20 Sep 1724 + Sarah Soule b. 1660 d. 1693-1699

4 Isaac Wright b. 19 Jan 1686 d. 11 Jan 1766 [ =>] + Mehitabel Barrow b. 1674 d. Yes, date unknown

2 Mary Cooke b. Abt 1626 d. 21 Mar 1696 + John (Tomson) Thompson b. 1616 d. 16 Jun 1696

Bibliographic Information

  • Source: Bullard, Edgar J. Bullard and Allied Families. Private Publisher, Detroit 1930. Page 184:

FRANCIS COOKE, Pilgrim ancestor of this family in America was born in Blythe, Yorkshire, England, about 1583, and came to New England on the Mayflower, 1620. The town or parish of Blythe adjoins Austerfield the home of William Bradford, and Francis Cooke, doubtless had as neighbors, the band of yeomen who formed the church of Scrooby some years after he himself had gone to Leyden. Six years before the Pilgrims came to Leyden, Francis Cooke was married there to Hester Mahieu. The record of their marriage was entered in June, 1603, and reads, "Francis Cooke, woolcomber, unmarried, from England, accompanied by Philip de Vean, and Raphael Roelandt, his acquaintances, and Hester Mahieu, her mother and Jeannie Mahieu, her sister, were married by the Civil Magistrate." When the Pilgrim colony surreptitiously left England in 1608, their plan was to settle in Amsterdam where a nonconformist English church was already established. They went to Amsterdam but becoming dissatisfied with the conduct of the church there, sought a new place of refuge in Leyden. Hester Mahieu was of French blood and doubtless a member of the Huguenot Walloon church at Canterbury, in England, where the name was numerous in this parish. She did not cross in the Mayflower, with her husband and eldest son, but came two years later on the Ann, bringing her younger children with her and in the company of Mistress Warren and her daughters.

Francis Cooke was one of the sterling characters among the noted band of Pilgrims who signed the famous compact in Cape Cod Harbor on November 11, 1620. He was with those sent out to seek a suitable landing place and in the cruises of discovery there were found several places with which his name was later associated.

With his son, John, who came with him in the Mayflower, he soon began to clear a lot of land on the main street of the little village they were building, which had been named Leyden street, and there built a log cabin for the reception of his family waiting in Leyden to cross the seas to him. In the first division of cattle, 1627, Francis Cooke, his wife Hester, and his son John, with ten others drew the first choice. In 1650, Bradford wrote of him "Francis Cooke is still living and hath seen his children's children have children." He lived fifteen years after the memoranda by Bradford, and died in Plymouth, April 7, 1665. The children of Francis and Hester (Maiheu) Cooke, of whom there is record, were:

  • I--JOHN, b. about 1612. (See following.)
  • II--Jacob, b. in Leyden; m. Damaris Hopkins
  • III--Jane, b. .........; m. 1628, Experiance Mitchell.
  • IV--Esther, b. .........; m. 1644, Richard Wright.
  • V--Mary, b. 1626, in Plymouth; m. John Thompson.

Notes for Francis Cooke

Francis2 Cooke, MPC (Edward1) was born November 26, 1584 in Gides Hall, Essex, or Blyth, Yorkshire (West), England, and died April 07, 1663 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Mass.. He married Hester Mahieu June 30, 1603 in Leyden, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands, daughter of Jacques Mahieu and Jennie ?.

A 1620 Mayflower passenger, Francis Cooke married Hester Mayhieu at Leiden 30 June 1603, the records there describing him as a woolcomber, unmarried, from England (MD 8:48). Thus he was in Holland before the arrival of the Clyfton/Robinson Separatists. He was probably born no earlier than 1583, for he must have been under sixty in 1643 when he was on the ATBA for Plymouth, and yet not much after 1583 if he married in 1603. He appears frequently in Plymouth records on grand and trial juries, as a surveyor of the highways, on various ad hoc committees, and in a number of land transactions. (See Bowman's "Francis Cooke and His Descendants," MD 3:95.) He came to Plymouth with son John, and Francis's wife and their daughter Jane and son Jacob arrived on the Anne in 1623. Two more children, Hester and Mary, were born at Plymouth. Jane married Experience Mitchell; Hester married Richard Wright; and Mary married John Thompson. Francis's son Jacob married Damaris Hopkins, daughter of Stephen. Dawes-Gates, 2:239-57 gives a good account of both father Francis Cooke and son Jacob Cooke. Another good account of the Francis Cooke family can be found in Small Descendants, 2:601. Francis died 7 April 1663 (PCR 8:23). Son John Cooke has a separate entry below. See also Walter J. Harrison, "New Light on Francis Cooke and His Wife Hester Mayhieu and Their Son John," MD 27:145. Some confusion about the marriage of Francis Cooke's son Jacob's daughter Mary Cooke, is cleared up by Stratton, "Which John Rickard Married Mary Cooke?," MQ 49:122.

Notes for John Cooke

  • 4 ii. John Cooke, Mayflower Passenger, born Abt. 1606 in Leyden, Holland; died November 23, 1695 in Dartmouth, Mass.

John Cooke was born circa late 1606 at Leyden, Holland.1,2 He was the son of Francis Cooke and Hester Mahieu.[1] John Cooke married Sarah Warren, daughter of Richard Warren and Elizabeth Walker, on 28 March 1634 at Plymouth Plantation.2 John Cooke died on 23 November 1695 at Dartmouth, Bristol County, Massachusetts; John Cooke was the last surviving male passenger of the Mayflower. [2]

John Cooke was baptized in the Walloon Church, Leyden, Holland between January 1 and March 31, 1607 and was, thus, about thirteen years old on arrival at Plymouth, MA with his father, Francis Cooke in 1620 on the Mayflower. There were two John Cooke's. This may have been the John who became a deacon of the Plymouth Church in the 1630's, but he was excommunicated from the church ca. 1757. Probably around the time he was excommunicated, he became a Baptist. He was a Baptist preacher and about 1680 established a Baptist church in what is now Tiverton, near Adamsville.[2]

Citations

from: http://www.citereh.com/p1.htm#i1

  1. [S1] Register Report - COOKE, online http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~sam/cooke.html
  2. [S123] Jr. Ralph V. Wood, Mayflower Families, Francis Cooke.

Notes for Jane Cooke

Jane Cooke was born prob abt 1604 at Leyden, Holland.[1] She was the daughter of Francis Cooke and Hester Mahieu. Jane Cooke married Experience Mitchell after 22 May 1627.[1] Jane Cooke died in 1650. [2] As of after 22 May 1627,her married name was Mitchell.[1]

Jane Cooke was born abt 1604 (probably) in Probably Leyden,Holland. (601)(602) (603) No absolute birth or death records have yet been found for Jane, and as can be seen there are some prior discrepancies on her birth date. The most recent and exhaustive Cooke study suggests a 1604 date, and the rationale for this date assumption. She died after 1631, prior to 1640 in Plymouth, MA. (604)(605) (606) Her latest suggested death date as Experience remarries in this year, though it is noted that she was certainly dead before Bradford prepared his accounting of Mayflower families.

She was married to Experience (1) Mitchell after 22 May 1627 in Plymouth Colony, MA.(607) (608) Rosser, Mayflower Increasings: "m. aft. 22 May 1627, Plymouth, Experience Mitchell . . ." This date reflects that she was still single in the May 22, 1627 Division of Land. Rosser: There is much controversy over the children of the two marriages of Experience Mitchell: "MFIP (Mayflower Families In Progress) , Cook:3 states Elizabeth Mitchell was b. 1628 and Thomas Mitchell c 1631. These two have been accepted by the General Society of Mayflower Descendants as Jane Cooke's. Since Thomas was the only Mitchell child known to have received land from grandfather Francis Cook, doubt is cast on the remaining Mitchell children who were born later than Thomas."

Ralph Wood takes exception, however, in his MF5G:12 volume, 1996, and includes Mary "presumed, quite safely, as a daughter of Jane, based on Mary's approximate date of birth.". Mary is born about 1632, presuming Jane married about 20. There is then a near 10-year span before the rest of Experience's children are born, presumably, by his second wife, Mary,. Another observation is that if Jane died very early in their marriage, Experience was left with near infant children--quite a hardship in any event, and especially so in those days. Many such men would hasten to find a new wife and mother for such small children, and female companionship for themselves, however, Experience doesn't remarry until 1640/1. Children were: Elizabeth (3) Mitchell, Thomas[3] Mitchell Mary Mitchell.

Citations

from: http://www.citereh.com/p1.htm#i1

  1. [S1] Register Report - COOKE, online http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~sam/cooke.html
  2. [S123] Jr. Ralph V. Wood, Mayflower Families, Francis Cooke.

Notes for Elizabeth Cooke

Elizabeth Cooke was born before 26 December 1611 at Leyden, Holland.[1] She was baptized on 26 December 1611 at Walloon Church, Leyden, Holland.[2] She was the daughter of Francis Cooke and Hester Mahieu.[1] Elizabeth Cooke died before 22 May 1627.2 Elizabeth Cooke was a Separatist.[1]

Citations

from: http://www.citereh.com/p1.htm#i1

  1. [S1] Register Report - COOKE, online http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~sam/cooke.html
  2. [S123] Jr. Ralph V. Wood, Mayflower Families, Francis Cooke.

Notes for Jacob Cooke

  • 6 iv. Jacob Cooke, born Abt. 1618 in Leiden, South Holland, Netherlands; died July 07, 1676 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Mass.. He married (1) Damaris Hopkins. He married (2) Elizabeth Shurtleff.

Jacob Cooke was born about 1618 in Leyden,Holland. (590)(591) Rosser: by deposition, MD 2:45 He emigrated in 1623 from Plymouth, MA. Came with mother Hester in the Anne. He died Bet 11-18 Dec 1675 in Plymouth, MA. (592) Will of son, John, Rosser MB&D, Vol 1, p. 316 Two additonal children are Sarah (possible) born about 1671, and Rebecca (probably) living 11 December 1675. [Wood P. 55] Parents: Francis Cooke Mayflower and Hester Le Mahieu.

He was married to Damaris Hopkins Mayflower in 1646.(593) (594) Children were: Elizabeth Cooke, Caleb Cooke, Jacob, Cooke, Mary Cooke, Martha Cooke, Francis Cooke, Ruth Cooke. He was married to Elizabeth Shurtleff on 18 Nov 1669.(595) (596)

Notes for Hester Cooke

  • 7 v. Hester Cooke, born Abt. 1624. She married Richard Wright.

Hester Cooke was born between May 1624 and 22 May 1627 in Plymouth or Leyden, Holland. (583) Wood gives various scenarios for her birthplace, but feels it more likely she was born in Plymouth. She died after 9 May 1669 in prob Plymouth, MA.(584) She died between May 9, 1669 when she releases her dower rights in a deed and June 8, 1691, when she is not mentioned in her husband's will. They had a total of six children: Adam, John (died unmarried), Esther, Isaac (died unmarried), Samuel (died unmarried), Mary.

Parents: Francis Cooke Mayflower and Hester Le Mahieu.

She was married to Richard Wright in Nov 1644 in Plymouth, MA. (585)(586) Children were: Adam Wright, John Wright , Esther Wright, Isaac Wright , Samuel Wright, Mary Wright .

Notes for Mary Cooke

  • 8 vi. Mary Cooke, born Abt. 1627. She married John Tomson.

Mary Cooke was born btw 22-25 Mar 1627 at Plymouth Plantation.1 She was the daughter of Francis Cooke and Hester Mahieu. Mary Cooke married John Tompson on 26 December 1645 at Plymouth Plantation. [1] Mary Cooke died on 21 March 1714. As of 26 December 1645, her married name was Tompson. [1]

Mary Cooke died on 21 Mar 1714 in Middleborough, MA.(370) (585) (617) Wood: in her 88th year. She was born c1624-1627. (585)(618) Wood says she is born between March 22, 1626 and March 21 1627.

She was married to John THOMPSON on 26 Dec 1645 in Plymouth, MA.(585) (619) MFIP: Lists a total of 12 children born in Plymouth and Barnstable. Children were: Adam Thompson, John Thompson, John Thompson, Mary Thompson, Hester/Esther Thompson, Elizabeth Thompson, Sarah Thompson, Lydia Thompson, Jacob Thompson 3 Esq, Thomas Thompson, Peter Thompson, Mercy Thompson.

Citations

from: http://www.citereh.com/p1.htm#i1

  1. [S123] Jr. Ralph V. Wood, Mayflower Families, Francis Cooke.
  2. [S1] Register Report - COOKE, online http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~sam/cooke.html

Francis and his son John immigrated aboard the “Mayflower” landing November 11, 1620. Hester Mahieu Cooke (wife of Francis) along with Jane and Jacob (their children), immigrated aboard the “Anne” in 1623. Francis Cooke was given six shares in the division of lands in 1624. He was one of the ‘Purchasers’ who in 1627 bought all rights of the ‘Adventurers’, and in the division of cattle made Tuesday, May/June 22, 1627, the first lot, the smallest of the four black heifers and two shee goats, fell to his company of thirteen, composed of himself, his wife Hester, his sons John and Jacob, and daughters Jane, Hester, and Mary; along with Experience Mitchell. In 1633-34 he was appointed referee in the settlement of various affairs between different members of the colony’ and surveyor for laying out the highways about Plymouth. Francis Cooke’s great-grandaughter Elizabeth Mitchell married John Washburn, Jr.


Came over on the Mayflower.
Francis arrived on the first voyage of the MAYFLOWER and arrived on 12/21/1620. He brught his son John with him. He left his wife Hester and 3 daughters in Leyden, Holland. They arrived on the third ship ANN in 1623.

REF: ( The English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgram Fathers ) by Charles Edward Banks Baltimore : Geneaological Publishing Co., 1962 pp. 47-48 Per Dutch Marriage Records in Leiden, Holland, name recorded as- Franachoic Couck-marries Hester Mahieu, probably 6/30/1603 ....Witnesses-the Walloons family.

Immigration of Frances Cooke to Colonies of USA Abt. 1620 arrived aboard ship Mayflower 
Probate: 6/05/1663
Will: 12/07/1659

SOURCE< the Mayflower Society and family records. My Spouses 1st cousin, 12 x removed.

Marriage to: Hester "Esther" Mahieu - Leiden, Holland Abt. 7/20/----


He is a Mayflower Passenger, see Mayflower Society # 70376, Gerald James Burkland
Of the Mayflower

He was a Leiden Separatist who came to America in 1620 on the Pilgrim ship Mayflower and a signer of the Mayflower Compact.

He is first noted in historical records on April 25, 1603 in Leiden, Holland as a witness at Raphael Roelandt’s betrothal. For purposes unknown, Francis Cooke resided in Leiden for about six years before the arrival of the congregation of English Separatist Pastor John Robinson in 1609.[3]

Francis Cooke was betrothed to Hester Mahieu at the French Walloon Church (Vrouwekerk) in Leiden on June 30, 1603, with she joining the church one month prior to her betrothal. Her family were Protestant (Walloon) refugees from Lille, France to England. She was probably born in the late 1580s with her family coming to Leiden about 1590. Mary Mahieu, a possible sister of Hester, married Jan de Lannoy in Leiden and their child Philip de Lannoy had Francis Cooke as a witness to his baptism in the Vrouwekerk on November 6, 1603. Cooke’s nephew Philip “Delanoy” would later join the Separatist Church in England and arrived in Plymouth in November 1621 on the ship Fortune.[3]

Here Banks and Johnson betrothal data differs. Per Banks, Leiden records give Francis Cooke’s betrothal as 9 June 1603, and presuming his birth was 1582 or before. In the Leiden church Betrothal Book he was recorded as “Franchois Couck” and his bride being Hester Mahieu with the witnesses to the marriage being two Walloons.[1] They were identified as “from England” (Francis) and as “from Canterbury” (Hester).[4]

It is known that Francis Cooke and his wife departed Leiden in August 1606 for Norwich in county Norfolk in England, which may have been where he originated but there is no proof has been found in records of the time. The Leiden congregation had some Separatist members who had fled Norwich, and the Cooke’s may have contacted the Separatists there. The Cookes did not remain in Norwich long as their son John was baptized at the Walloon Church in Leiden between January and March 1607 with the couple receiving communion in Leiden on January 1, 1608.[5] Francis and his wife Hester were identified as “Franchoys Cooke et Esther sa femme” in Leiden after their return from Norwich, taking communion in Leiden’s Walloon church on New Year’s Day, 1608.[6]

In February 1609, members of Pastor John Robinson’s English Separatist church came to Leiden. The Cookes did not then become members of the Walloon church, but did join the Leiden congregation sometime later, after their daughter Elizabeth was baptized on December 26, 1611.[7]

When the English Separatist church in Leiden decided to go to America in 1620, Francis Cooke decided that from his family only he and his thirteen year–old son John would go over. His wife Hester and younger children would remain in Leiden until the colony was more established.[7]

The Mayflower Voyage[edit]

Signing the Mayflower Compact 1620, a painting by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris 1899 The Mayflower departed Plymouth, England on September 6/16, 1620. The small, 100-foot ship had 102 passengers and a crew of about 30-40 in extremely cramped conditions. By the second month out, the ship was being buffeted by strong westerly gales, causing the ship‘s timbers to be badly shaken with caulking failing to keep out sea water, and with passengers, even in their berths, lying wet and ill. This, combined with a lack of proper rations and unsanitary conditions for several months, attributed to what would be fatal for many, especially the majority of women and children. On the way there were two deaths, a crew member and a passenger, but the worst was yet to come after arriving at their destination when, in the space of several months, almost half the passengers perished in cold, harsh, unfamiliar New England winter.[8]

On November 9/29, 1620, after about 5 months at sea, including 3 months of delays in England, they spotted land, which was the Cape Cod Hook, now called Provincetown Harbor. And after several days of trying to get south to their planned destination of the Colony of Virginia, strong winter seas forced them to return to the harbor at Cape Cod hook, where they anchored on November 11/21. The Mayflower Compact was signed that day.[8][9]

Francis Cooke was not involved in government or politics in Plymouth, and in his life kept a low profile, but his work on behalf of the people of Plymouth colony has been well-recognized by history.

Per Bradford, Francis Cooke was recorded by him as “Francis Cooke and his sone John. But his wife and children came afterwards.”[10]

After the Pilgrim arrival at Cape Cod, Francis Cooke was one of those who signed the Mayflower Compact on November 11, 1620.[7]

Francis Cooke’s house plot in New Plymouth that was assigned late in 1620 was located between the plots of Isaac Allerton and Edward Winslow. Cooke’s wife and children came over on the ship Anne in July 1623.[11]

In the Division of Land in 1623, Cooke received two acres, one for himself and one acre for his son John.[11] He also received 4 “akers” for his wife and children who “came ouer on the shipe called Anne” in 1623.[12]

There was an agreement signed in 1626 in which fifty-eight planters, including Francis Cooke and many other “first comers”, later known as Purchasers, bought from the Merchant Adventurers all their colony stock, shares, land, etc.. Later these Purchasers would assign all shares and debt in the company to eight Plymouth notables and four former Adventurers from London, then to be known as Undertakers. This was to be an investment organization with profits supposedly going largely to the colony.[13]

In the 1627 Division of Cattle at Plymouth, his family was the one recorded first as: “The first lot fell to ffrancis Cooke & his Companie Joyned to him wife Hester Cooke.” Also named in the 1627 records were their children John, Jacob, Jane, Hester and Mary as well as two men – Cooke’s nephew “Phillip Delanoy” (Delano) and Experience Mitchell, who would marry Cooke’s daughter Jane soon after.[14]

On January 3, 1627/8, Francis Cooke was one of six men named to lay out the boundaries for the twenty-acre land grants that would be made to everyone who came as a planter, under the employ of the joint-stock company.[15]

In early 1633, Cooke was assigned by the court to help resolve a dispute of a financial nature between Peter Browne and Dr. Samuel Fuller. These men are believed the men of the same names who were companions of Cooke on the Mayflower voyage, both dying later in 1633.[15]

During the 1630s and 1640s Francis Cooke held a number public sector positions but was never in government or politics. In 1634 he was one of a number of Plymouth men tasked with laying out the highways. In 1637 he was appointed, with others, to lay highways about the towns of Plymouth, Duxbury and Eel River. Cooke and others performed this task and two months later reported back to the Plymouth Court.[16]

On October 1, 1636, John Harmon, son of Edmund Harmon, tailor, of London, became an apprentice to Francis Cooke for a period of seven years.[17]

Francis Cooke was awarded damages by the court on March 7, 1636/7 in a civil case involving the abuse of his cattle against Mr. John Browne the younger, who had previously been an Assistant and magistrate. Others also charged, all being in the service of John Browne the elder and Thomas Willet, were Thomas Lettice, James Walker and Thomas Teley. On June 7, 1637, due to Browne’s failure to the damages, the court reaffirmed the verdict and ordered John Browne to pay.[18]

In May 1640 Francis Cooke and his son John were among those tasked to compute the number of acres of Edward Doty’s meadows and make a report to the next court.[16]

In October 1640 Francis Cooke was appointed to compute the land boundaries between Thomas Prence and Clement Briggs at Jones River.[16]

In 1640/41 he was one of twelve men tasked by the court to designate additional highways, and make a formal survey and mark the boundaries of plots of land in the town of Plain Dealing. The next year he was one of four Plymouth surveyors and was tasked to survey the highway for Jones River. In 1645 he was again highway surveyor for Plymouth. In June 1650, when he was almost seventy, he was still doing survey work, as when he and twelve others reported to the court that they had marked a new way from Jones River to the Massachusetts Path through John Rogers property. And even in August 1659, in his late 70s, he was again called upon by the Plymouth Court to resolve a land boundary dispute between Thomas Pope and William Shurtliff.[2][19]

Although he was specially qualified to survey new highways, he did do other public service work, being on several petty and grand juries. He also served on civil case juries in late 1639, March 1640, mid-and-late 1642 and March 1643 court sessions. Most of the civil case involved trespass, debts or slander. He was also on grand juries in 1638, 1640, 1642 and 1643 which involved crimes of a misdemeanor or felony nature.[20]

In the 1643 Able to Bear Arms (ATBA) List, Francis Cooke and his sons Jacob and John (“John Cooke, Jnr, his boy”) are listed with those from Plymouth.[21]

In 1651 Bradford recorded his impression of Cooke and his family in his later years: “Francis Cooke is still living, a very olde man, and hath seen his children's children have children; after his wife came over, (with other of his children,) he hath 3 still living by her, all married, and have 5 children; so their increase is 8. And his sone John, which came over with him, is maried, and hath 4 children living.”[22]

On June 3, 1662 the General Court approved a list of thirty-three names “as being the first borne children of this govement,” to receive two tracts of land purchased from the Indians by the colony. The list was wider in scope than just being for “first born” settlers, as it named several of the original Mayflower passengers, including Francis Cooke, but was presumably for their children.[23]

Francis Cooke married Hester Mahieu in Leiden, Holland on July 20, 1603 or shortly thereafter. They had seven children. Her parents were Jacques and Jenne/Jeanne Mahieu, from France.

Hester died after June 8, 1666 and was buried at Burial Hill in Plymouth, Mass

On December 7, 1659 Francis Cooke made out his will, describing himself as “at present weak and infirm in body.” He had a very simple will that just gave everything to “Hester my dear and loving wife.” 1609.[29]

Francis Cooke died in Plymouth on April 7, 1663 and was buried on Burial Hill in Plymouth.[25][30]

Francis Cooke died in the spring of 1663 and an inventory of his estate was taken on May 1, 1663. From his estate inventory, it appears that he was involved with sheep and wool as he had sixteen sheep and five lambs, a “woolen wheele & scales,” three pairs of sheep shears, and twenty pounds of wool


Immigrated November 1620 to Plymouth. Came to America on the Mayflower.


Residence Puritan, Fled England about 1603 Leyden, Netherlands

Returned to England 1606 Norwich, Norfolk, England

Occupation Woolcarder Leyden, Netherlands Custom Event

Issue 7 children Source 4 Warren, MFIP, Ed 5, 1995 pg 4 Source 2 FTM CD181, Arms Bearers, pg 501 Source 3 FTM CD181, Eng. Origins-Le Mehieu,pg170 Source 1 Cooke,By Wood,1996,Pict.Press,pg1 -25 Misc 1643 List of Men able to bear arms, Plymouth will 7 DEC 1659 dated, 6-5-1663-presented at court will 7 Dec 1659 Plymouth, Plymouth, MA


https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=34825341

Born in or shortly after 1583. Came from Leiden, Holland to Plymouth in 1620 in the MAYFLOWER.

Died in Plymouth 7 April 1663.

Married in Leiden 20 Jul 1603[NS] or shortly thereafter Hester Mahieu; she died after 8 June 1666. Their 7 children: Jane Mitchell, John, a child buried in Leiden, Elizabeth, Jacob, Hester Wright, & Mary Thomson. Source: Anderson's Pilgrim Migration.

Find A Grave contributor Mary Wiese found this information in an unidentified source: Francis Cooke was born about 1583. His origins have not been discovered, but it is probable he was born in England, perhaps from the Canterbury or Norwich areas. He married Hester le Mahieu on 20 July 1603 in Leiden, Holland; she was a French Walloon whose parents had initially fled to Canterbury, England; she left for Leiden sometime before 1603. Francis Cooke and Hester le Mahieu's marriage occurred in Leiden, Holland six years before the Pilgrim church made its move there, so he was living there long before their arrival and must have met up with and joined them afterwards. His wife Hester was a French Walloon. What brought Francis to Holland in the first place is unknown: religious persecution of Protestants in England did not really begin until after King James took power in 1604. In 1606, the Cookes left Leiden and went to Norwich, Norfolk for a time (for what reason is not known), but returned to have their first son, John, baptized at the French church in Leiden, sometime between January and March, 1607. In Holland, Cooke took up the profession of a woolcomber. Francis, and his oldest son John, came on the Mayflower to Plymouth in 1620.. He left behind his wife Hester and his other children Jane, Jacob, Elizabeth and Hester. After the Colony was founded and better established, he sent for his wife and children, and they came to Plymouth in 1623 on the ship Anne. Francis lived out his life in Plymouth. Although he kept a fairly low profile, he was on a number of minor committees such as the committee to lay out the highways, and received some minor appointments by the Court to survey or lay out land. He was a juror on a number of occasions, and was on the coroner's jury that examined the body of Martha Bishop, the 4-year old daughter who was murdered by her mother Alice. He received some modest land grants at various times throughout his life. He lived to be about 80 years old, dying in 1663; his wife Hester survived him by at least three years and perhaps longer.

Find A Grave contributor Donna & Wayne Cain add. without any source: Father: 71581371 Mother: 71581828


Family links:

Spouse:
 Hester Mahieu Cooke (1582 - 1666)
Children:
 Jane Cooke Mitchell*
 John Soule Cooke (1608 - 1695)*
 Josiah Cooke (1610 - 1673)*
 Elizabeth Cooke (1611 - 1627)*
 Jacob Cooke (1618 - 1676)*
 Hester Cooke Wright (1620 - ____)*
 Mary Cooke Tomson (1625 - 1714)*

Burial: Coles Hill Burial Ground Plymouth Plymouth County Massachusetts, USA


Created by: Linda Mac Record added: Mar 15, 2009 Find A Grave Memorial# 34825341

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Cooke-36

Francis "Franchoijs" Cooke aka Couck

Born 26 Nov 1583 in Gides Hall, Essex, or Blyth, Yorkshire (West), England

Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]

[sibling(s) unknown]

Husband of Hester le (Mahieu) Cooke — married after 30 Jun 1603 in Leiden, Holland

Father of John Cooke, Child Cooke, Elizabeth Cooke, Jane (Cooke) Mitchell, Jacob Cooke, Hester (Cooke) Wright and Mary (Cooke) Tomson

Died 7 Apr 1663 in Plymouth, Plymouth Colony, New England

Categories: Separatists | Puritans, in America | Mayflower Passengers | Mayflower Family Member | Mayflower Compact signatories.

Francis Cooke was a passenger on the Mayflower.

Join: Mayflower Project

Discuss: mayflower

Compiled by: Becky Syphers, Michael Ray Lechner, Ted Harold Lechner, Brian McCullough, M Moroney, Kim Baltz, Ann Fuller, Alan MacLeod, John Putnam, Gregory Nelson, Kennon Edwards, Bryan Sypniewski, Fred Conley, Brent Bowen, Carey Smith, Jeffrey Bowen, Living Louge, David Bishop, DeCoursey, Ron Fedele, Kathryn Greenwald, Grant Knudsen, Elizabeth S, Melinda Bowman, Jim Lynch, Cliff Cobb, Julie Baldwin, ...

"And thus, they found the Lord to be with them in all their ways, and to bless their outgoings & incomings, for which let his holy name have the praise for ever, to all posterity."

The Log of the Mayflower.[1]

Francis Cooke

The most likely year for Francis Cooke's birth is 1583. The place is still unknown.[2] In 1603 "Franchois Couck" became engaged to marry Hester Mahieu. At that time the couple was living in Leiden, Holland. He was English and a wool-comber. She was a Waloon, who had come from Canterbury, England. [3][4] Seven children were born to the couple, with 6 surviving infancy.

In 1620 Francis Cooke and his son John, born in 1607, left Holland on the Speedwell. They joined the Pilgrim Company on the Mayflower and arrived in what would become Plymouth, Massachusetts. Francis signed the Mayflower Compact. Hester Cooke and the younger children came over in 1623 on the Anne. The youngest two children may have been born in the new world. His occupation in the new colony was probably husbandman.

The Plymouth Colony records have references to Francis Cooke. His family received land at the division of land in 1624 and was listed in the division of cattle in 1627. He served as an arbiter of neighbor's disputes, as a juryman, paid taxes, became a freeman, registered his cattle marks, brought a lawsuit. He was also one of the "Purchasers", who had assumed the colony's debt in exchange for controlling trade.[5] In summary, he was very involved in community and Colony affiairs. He maintained his residence at Plmouth even though he had received additional land grants.

"He had many descendants who include Alphonso Taft, William Howard Taft, Charles Taft, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Major General Leonard Wood, and many others." [6]

Francis Cooke died April 7, 1663 and was buried at Rocky Nook, now Kingston, Plymouth Co, Massachusetts. His will and inventory were recorded in the Plymouth Colony Wills and Inventories, Volume II, Part II, folios 1 and 2. Mr.John Alden and Mr John Howland were witnesses.[7] Name

Francis Cooke

Also known as:

   Francis Cooke.[8] 
   ffrancis Cooke. [9] 
   Franchoys Couck. [10] 
   Couk, Franchoys of England. [3][11][12]

Note: The name of Francis Cooke appears in the records of Leiden, The Netherlands, in 1603.[11][3][12] Birth

Francis Cooke was born about 1583, probably in England.

   Born about 1583, probably in England.[8] 
   born about 1583.[8][13] 

Religion

They were members of the Leiden Walloon Church, a congregation of French-speaking Belgian people whose beliefs were very similar to those of the English Separatists.[12]

"On New Year's Day, 1608, among those admitted to communion by letter of transfer from another Walloon congregation were Francois Cooke et Esther sa femme, de Norwich' ... This entry informs us that before 1608, the Cooke-Mahieu couple had lived in Norwich among the Walloons there. They evidently left for Norwich on 8 August 1606, as a note in the Walloon Library of Leiden mentions their departure on that date with letters of transfer ... Both the departure with attestation and the return to communion in Leiden with a similar letter indicate that Francois Cooke, as well as Hester his wife, was a member of the Leiden Walloon congregation. The Cookes evidently returned briefly to Leiden, between the quarterly dates of communion, which they missed, in order to have their son Jean baptized within the Leiden Walloon congregation with family as godparents to raise him in case he became orphaned.

"Scholars at the Leiden Municipal Archives discovered two other children of Francois and Hester besides their son Jean : Elizabeth, baptized on 26 December 1611, and a child, whose name is not given, buried in the Pieterskerk on 20 May 1608 ... The burial record imparts the further information that at that time Franchoys Couck lived on the Levendaal, a canal on the southeast side of Leiden. The Cookes' other children, Jane, Hester, Jacob, and Mary, were presumably baptized in the Separatist congregaton of Leiden, for which no records are preserved, although it is possible that one or two might have been born in Norwich, or some may have been born in the colony of New Plymouth ... [14][15][12]

Note: Both the departure with attestation and the return to communion in Leiden with a similar letter indicate that Francois Cooke, as well as Hester his wife, was a member of the Leiden Walloon congregation. The Cookes evidently returned briefly to Leiden, between the quarterly dates of communion, which they missed, in order to have their son Jean baptized within the Leiden Walloon congregation with family as godparents to raise him in case he became orphaned.[14][15][12] Occupation

By profession, he was a woolcomber.[12]

Francis is described in Leiden Walloon church marriage records dating from 1603 as a "woolcomber out of (uyt) England". [3] However, his origins are unknown. He could have been a refugee from religious persecution elsewhere in continental Europe.[16]

He did have and apprentice, John Harmon, for seven years starting in 1636. Francis Cooke was also on the 1643 Plymouth list of those who were able to bear arms.[17] Early life and family

He was in Leiden as early as 1603 (before the Pilgrim Separatist community had emigrated to Holland)[12][11] [3]

Francis Cooke and Hester le Mahieu's marriage occurred in Leiden, Holland six years before the Pilgrim church made its move there, so he was living there long before their arrival and must have met up with and joined them afterwards.[8]

Marriage June 1603 [11][3] Bruidegom Franchoys Couck (wolkammer) geboren te Engelant Bruid Hester Mahieu geboren te Cantelberch Engelant. Witnesses Groom-Getuigen bruidegom: Phillippe de Veau bekende - Raphael Roelandt bekende. Witnesses Bride-Getuigen bruid: Jenne Mahieu moeder - Jenne Mahieu zuster Translated: Franchoys Couck, of England, Wool-comber, acc[ompanied] by Phillipe de Veau and Raphael Roelandt his acq[aintance]. betr[othed]. 30 June 1603 to Hester Mahieu of Canterbury in England, acc[ompanied]. by Jenne Mahieu her mother and Jenne mahieu her sister ... [11][3]

Although Hester Mahieu is listed as "of Canterbury," she was actually Walloon, French-speaking Belgian, and not English. Many Walloons lived in Canterbury, engaged in the textile trades.[12]

Francis is described in Leiden Walloon church marriage records dating from 1603 as a "woolcomber out of (uyt) England".[11] The Mahieus, from Lille, had resided in Canterbury, then London, since the 1570s before moving to Leiden in 1590. Hester le Mahieu's sister was Marie le Mahieu, wife of Jan Lano, another Protestant refugee in Canterbury and then Leiden, whose son, Philippe de Lannoy (anglicized to 'Delano') migrated on the Fortune to join his uncle Francis Cooke and his cousin Robert at Plymouth colony in 1621, having been left behind with twenty others when the Mayflower's sailing mate, the Speedwell, foundered and returned to port in England leaving the Mayflower to sail alone. Philippe is the progenitor of the branch of the Delano family living in America, from which Franklin Delano Roosevelt descends.

While in Leiden, Francis and Hester were members of the Walloon church. In 1606, they left Leiden briefly for Norwich, England, where they joined another Walloon church, returning to Leiden in 1607, possibly for religious reasons. Between 1611 and 1618, the Cookes were members of the Pilgrim Separatist congregation in Leiden.[14] The Pilgrim church was not established in Leiden until 1609, so Francis was living there long before their arrival and must have met up with and joined them afterwards.

They evidently left for Norwich on 8 August 1606, as a note in the Walloon Library of Leiden mentions their departure on that date with letters of transfer ... [14][15][12]

"On New Year's Day, 1608, among those admitted to communion by letter of transfer from another Walloon congregation were Francois Cooke et Esther sa femme, de Norwich' ... This entry informs us that before 1608, the Cooke-Mahieu couple had lived in Norwich among the Walloons there. They evidently left for Norwich on 8 August 1606, as a note in the Walloon Library of Leiden mentions their departure on that date with letters of transfer ... [14][15][12] Family

Francis Cooke married Hester le Mahieu, 20 July 1603, Leiden.[12][8][3]

"Couk, Franchoys of England, Wool-comber, acc[ompanied] by Phillipe de Veau and Raphael Roelandt his acq[aintance]. betr[othed]. 30 June 1603 to Hester Mahieu of Canterbury in England, acc[ompanied]. by Jenne Mahieu her mother and Jenne Mahieu her sister ..." [11][3]

Although Hester Mahieu is listed as "of Canterbury," she was actually Walloon, French-speaking Belgian, and not English. Many Walloons lived in Canterbury, engaged in the textile trades.[12]

Children:

       John, was baptized in Leiden between January and March 1607. He married Sarah Warren on March 28, 1634, in Plymouth and had five children. He died in Dartmouth on November 23, 1695. She died after July 15, 1696.[18][8]
       A child was buried in Leiden on May 20, 1608.[8]
       Jane, was born about 1609 in Leiden. She married Experience Mitchell in Plymouth after May 22, 1627. Her date of death is unknown, as is the date of his second marriage, but his first three children are generally considered to be hers.[8]
       Elizabeth, was baptized in Leiden on December 26, 1611. There is no further record.[8]
       Jacob, was born about 1618. He married (1) Damaris Hopkins shortly after June 10, 1646, in Plymouth and had seven children. He married (2) Elizabeth (Lettice) Shurtleff on November 18, 1669, in Plymouth and had two children. He died in Plymouth in December 1675.[8]
       Hester, was born about 1620 in Leiden. She married Richard Wright in Plymouth in 1644 and had six children. She died between 1669 and 1691.[8]
       Mary, was born in Plymouth about 1625. She married John Tompson on December 26, 1645, in Plymouth and had twelve children. She died in Middleboro on March 21, 1714. [13][8] 

Note: Francis Cooke married Hester Mahieu in Leiden on July 20, 1603, or shortly thereafter.They had seven children.The birth order for the first three is uncertain. Hester died after June 8, 1666.[13]

Note: "On New Year's Day, 1608, among those admitted to communion by letter of transfer from another Walloon congregation were Francois Cooke et Esther sa femme, de Norwich' ... This entry informs us that before 1608, the Cooke-Mahieu couple had lived in Norwich among the Walloons there. They evidently left for Norwich on 8 August 1606, as a note in the Walloon Library of Leiden mentions their departure on that date with letters of transfer ... Both the departure with attestation and the return to communion in Leiden with a similar letter indicate that Francois Cooke, as well as Hester his wife, was a member of the Leiden Walloon congregation. The Cookes evidently returned briefly to Leiden, between the quarterly dates of communion, which they missed, in order to have their son Jean baptized within the Leiden Walloon congregation with family as godparents to raise him in case he became orphaned. "Scholars at the Leiden Municipal Archives discovered two other children of Francois and Hester besides their son Jean : Elizabeth, baptized on 26 December 1611, and a child, whose name is not given, buried in the Pieterskerk on 20 May 1608 ... The burial record imparts the further information that at that time Franchoys Couck lived on the Levendaal, a canal on the southeast side of Leiden. The Cookes' other children, Jane, Hester, Jacob, and Mary, were presumably baptized in the Separatist congregaton of Leiden, for which no records are preserved, although it is possible that one or two might have been born in Norwich, or some may have been born in the colony of New Plymouth ... [14][15][12]

Note: "Scholars at the Leiden Municipal Archives discovered two other children of Francois and Hester besides their son Jean : Elizabeth, baptized on 26 December 1611, and a child, whose name is not given, buried in the Pieterskerk on 20 May 1608 ... The burial record imparts the further information that at that time Franchoys Couck lived on the Levendaal, a canal on the southeast side of Leiden. The Cookes' other children, Jane, Hester, Jacob, and Mary, were presumably baptized in the Separatist congregaton of Leiden, for which no records are preserved, although it is possible that one or two might have been born in Norwich, or some may have been born in the colony of New Plymouth ... [14][15][12] Note: Two more daughters, Hester and Mary, were born to Francis and Hester Cooke in Plymouth.[12]

Note: The date of his marriage to Hester Mahieu in Leyden, Holland has often been printed incorrectly (e.g., 30 June 1603) [3]. However, an article in Mayflower Descendant 27:145-55 (New Light on Francis Cooke and His Wife Hester Mahieu and Their Son John) goes to great pains to give an estimated date and states the the previous published date was incorrect. Marriage intentions were entered July 4, 1603 and July 5, 1603 which means the three banns were proclaimed July 6, July 13 and July 20 (three successive Sundays); therefore, the marriage took place on or after July 20, 1603. Hester Mahieu, the daugther of Jennie le Mahieu of Canterbury, England died. after June 8, 1666 in Plymouth.[19]

Note: Jacob Cooke was born about 1618 in Leyden,Holland. (590)(591) Rosser: by deposition, MD 2:45 He emigrated in 1623 from Plymouth, MA. Came with mother Hester in the Anne. He died Bet 11-18 Dec 1675 in Plymouth, MA. (592) Will of son, John, Rosser MB&D, Vol 1, p. 316 Two additonal children are Sarah (possible) born about 1671, and Rebecca (probably) living 11 December 1675. [Wood P. 55] Parents: Francis Cooke Mayflower and Hester Le Mahieu. [20] Life in England

Life in England: Francis Cooke and his family spent some time in Norwich, Norfolk between 1606 and 1608, but the purpose is unknown. Hester Cooke identified herself as being from Canterbury in her betrothal registration.[13] Life in Holland

Life in Holland: Francis Cooke was living in Leiden by April 1603, when he worked there as a woolcomber. [3] His wife’s family were Walloons, originally from the town of Lille in Flanders, coming to Leiden from London in 1590. Hester joined the Walloon church just before her betrothal, but there is no record of Francis joining. He did appear in the records as witness to a baptism and a betrothal.Three of their children are listed in the church records between 1607–1611, but none thereafter and they may have joined the English Separatist church at that time.[13] The Mayflower and Plymouth

"The names of those which came over first, in the year 1620, and were by the blessing of God the first beginners and in a sort the foundation of all the Plantations and Colonies in New England; and their families ... "Francis Cooke and his son John; but his wife and other children came afterwards." [21][22][12]

Francis arrived in Plymouth in 1620 on the Mayflower with his teenage son John.[12][8]

Hester Mayhieu Cooke and the couples two other children, Jane and Jacob, arrived on the Anne in 1623.[12][8]

In 1620, Francis, his son John, and nephew Philippe de Lannoy boarded Speedwell at Delftshaven. Cooke left wife Hester and their younger children behind to follow when the colony was established. The Leiden Separatists bought the ship in Holland. They then sailed it to Southampton, England to meet the Mayflower, which had been chartered by the merchant investors. In Southampton they joined with other Separatists and the additional colonists hired by the investors.

The two ships began the voyage on August 5, 1620, but the Speedwell leaked badly and had to return to Dartmouth to be refitted at great expense and time. On the second attempt, the two ships sailed about 100 leagues beyond Land's End in Cornwall, but the Speedwell was again found to be leaky. Both vessels returned to Plymouth where the Speedwell was sold. It would later be revealed that there was in fact nothing wrong with the ship. The crew had sabotaged it in order to escape the year long commitment of their contract.

Eleven people from the Speedwell (including Francis and John Cooke) boarded the Mayflower, leaving 20 people (including Robert Cushman and Philippe de Lannoy) to return to London while a combined company of 103 continued the voyage. For a third time, the Mayflower headed for the New World. She left Plymouth on September 6, 1620 and entered Cape Cod Harbor on November 11, 1620. The Fortune eventually followed, arriving at Plymouth Colony one year later on November 9, 1621.

Arriving at what is now Provincetown, Massachusetts, on November 11 (November 21, new-style calendar), forty-one of the passengers, among them Francis Cooke, signed the Mayflower Compact as the boat lay at anchor.

Francis was active in Plymouth civil affairs in the 1630s and 40s - committees to lay out land grants and highways, petit jury, grand jury, coroner's jury. He appears on the 1643 Plymouth list of those able to bear arms. At some point in 1638 or afterward, he settled at Rocky Nook on Jones River, within the limits of Kingston, a few miles from Plymouth.[23]

In 1651, fellow Pilgrim William Bradford wrote of him: "Francis Cooke is still living, a very old man, and hath seen his children's children have children. After his wife came over with other of his children; he hath three still living by her, all married and have five children, so their increase is eight. And his son John which came over with him is married, and hath four children living."[21] Francis Cooke died in 1663 in Plymouth.[24] Signer of the Mayflower Compact

Francis Cooke : Signer of the Mayflower Compact

"I shall ... begin with a combination made by them before they came ashore ; being the first foundation of their government in this place. Occasioned partly by the discontented and mutinous speeches that some of the strangers amongst them had let fall from them in the ship: That when they came ashore they would use their own liberty, for none had power to command them, the patent they had being for Virginia and not for New England ... And partly that such an act by them done, this their condition considered, might be as firm as any patent, and in some respects more sure.

"The form was as followeth : IN THE NAME OF GOD, AMEN. We whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread Sovereign Lord King James, by the Grace of God of Great Britain, France and Ireland King, Defender of the Faith, etc. Having undertaken, for the Glory of God and advancement of the Christian Faith and Honour of our King and Country, a Voyage to plant the First Colony in the Northern parts of Virginia, do by these presents solemnly and mutually in the presence of God and one of another, Covenant and Combine ourselves together into a Civil Body Politic, for our better ordering and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute and frame such just and equal Laws, Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions and Offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the Colony, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience. In witness whereof we have hereunder subscribed our names at Cape Cod, the 11th of November, in the year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord King James, of England, France and Ireland the eighteenth, and of Scotland the fifty-fourth. Anno Domini 1620." [21][22][12] Life in New England

Life in New England: Francis Cooke and his son John came to New England aboard the Mayflower. Hester, Jane, Jacob and Hester joined them in the summer of 1623, coming over on the Anne or Little James. Francis was in the 1633 list of Plymouth freemen and served on various committees and juries over the years. Although he owned land on the North River and Namaskett, he remained in Plymouth.[13] Early Years of Plymouth Colony

Francis Cooke & the early years of Plymouth Colony "Friday, the 16th [February 16, 1621], was a fair day; but the northly wind continued, which continued the frost. This day, after noon, one of our people being a fowling, and having taken a stand by a creek side in the reeds, about a mile and a half from our plantation, there by him twelve Indians, marching towards our plantation, and in the woods he heard the noise of many more. He lay close till they passed, and then with what speed he could he went home and gave the alarm. So the people abroad in the woods returned and armed themselves, but saw none of them; only, toward the evening, they made a great fire about the place where they were first discovered. Captain Miles Standish and Francis Cooke being at work in the woods, coming home left their tools behind them; but before they returned, their tools were taken away by the savages. This coming of the savages gave us occasion to keep more strict watch, and to make our pieces and furniture ready, which by moisture and rain were out of temper." [25][26][12] 1621, The First Thanksgiving

Pilgrims Gave Thanks To God

   The grateful Pilgrims therefore declared a three-day feast in December 1621 to thank God and to celebrate with their Indian friends.
   It is primarily from the Pilgrim’s Thanksgiving celebration of 1621 that we derive the current tradition of Thanksgiving Day. 

“And thus, they found the Lord to be with them in all their ways, and to bless their outgoings & incomings, for which let his holy name have the praise for ever, to all posterity.

They began now to gather in the small harvest they had, and to fit up their houses and dwellings against winter, being all well recovered in health and strength and had all things in good plenty. For as some were thus employed in affairs abroad, others were exercised in fishing, about cod and bass and other fish, of which they took good store, of which every family had their portion. All the summer there was no want; and now began to come in store of fowl, as winter approached, of which this place did abound when they came first (but afterward decreased by degrees). And besides waterfowl there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many, besides venison, etc. Besides, they had about a peck of meal a week to a person, or now since harvest, Indian corn to that proportion. Which made many afterwards write so largely of their plenty here to their friends in England, which were not feigned but true reports.”

The Log of the Mayflower.[1] A Freemen

Francis Cooke was also listed on the original list of freemen for Plymouth and was found on this list again in 1633, 1637 and 1658. As a freemen he had several duties which were thrust upon him. He served twice on the Grand Inquest, once in 1638 and a second time in 1640. Cooke also served on numerous juries from the years 1638-48. His most notable case was that of Allis Bishop. She admitted to murdering her four year old daughter by slashing her throat and windpipe with a knife. His major service to the community, however, seemed to come in the highway realm. In 1637 he was appointed to the committee to lay out highways. He followed this appointment with the job of surveyor of the highways for Plymouth in 1641, 1642 and again in 1645. He even served on a committee to find the best route for a new road.[17][12]

3 January 1627 : "it was agreed in a full Court; about deuision of lands as foloweth.

"That the first deuision of the Acers should stand, and continue firme, according to the former deuision made ...

[This is followed by several paragraphs detailing how lands should be laid out and distributed.]

"Lastly, that euery man of ye surueighers haue a peck of corne for euery share of land laid out by them; to be payed by the owner therof when the same is layd out.

"The names of the layers-out were these. William Bradford, Edward Winslow, John Howland, Francis Cook, Josua Pratt, Edward Bangs." [27][12] A 1626 Purchaser

Francis Cooke : a 1626 Purchaser

"In 1621, King James I authorized the Council for New England to plant and govern land in this area. This Council granted the Peirce Patent, confirming the Pilgrims' settlement and governance of Plymouth. Peirce and his associates, the merchant adventurers, were allotted 100 acres for each settler the Company transported. The Pilgrims had a contract with the Company stating all land and profits would accrue to the Company for 7 years at which time the assets would be divided among the shareholders. Most of the Pilgrims held some stock. The Pilgrims negotiated a more favorable contract with the Company in 1626. In 1627, 53 Plymouth freemen, known as "The Purchasers," agreed to buy out the Company over a period of years. In turn, 12 "Undertakers" (8 from Plymouth and 4 from London) agreed to pay off Plymouth's debts in return for trade benefits.

The list we have of the 1626 Purchasers includes the name "Francis Cooke." [12]

Francis Cooke appears to have been granted many different parcels of land in and around Plymouth. Some of this land he gave to his sons Jacob and John, which they sold portions of. Francis even sold some land to William Bradford. His neighbors included Isaak Allerton, Edward Winslow, and Thomas Prence as well as his 2 sons John and Jacob.[17] 1627 Division of Cattle

Francis Cooke & the 1627 Division of Cattle

Plymouth Colony Records, Deeds, &c., Vol I 1627-1651 also tells of the 1627 Division of Cattle:

"At a publique court held the 22th of May it was concluded by the whole Companie, that the cattell wch were the Companies, to wit, the Cowes & the Goates should be equally devided to all the psonts of the same company ... & so the lotts fell as followeth, thirteene psonts being pportioned to one lot ...

"The first lot fell to ffrancis Cooke & his Companie Joyned to him his wife Hester Cooke (3) John Cooke (4) Jacob Cooke (5) Jane Cooke (6) Hester Cooke (7) Mary Cooke (8) Moses Simonson (9) Phillip Delanoy (10) Experience Michaell (11) John ffance (12) Joshua Pratt (13) Phinihas Pratt. To his lot fell the least of the 4 black heyfers Came in the Jacob, and two shee goats." [12] Plymouth Colony Records

Francis lived out his life in Plymouth. Although he kept a fairly low profile, he was on a number of minor committees such as the committee to lay out the highways, and received some minor appointments by the Court to survey or lay out land. He was a juror on a number of occasions, and was on the coroner's jury that examined the body of Martha Bishop, the 4-year old daughter who was murdered by her mother Alice. He received some modest land grants at various times throughout his life.[8]

Francis Cooke and the Plymouth Colony Records 1650

Francis Cooke : 1650

"And seeing it hath pleased Him to give me [William Bradford] to see thirty years completed since these beginnings, and that the great works of His providence are to be observed, I have thought it not unworthy my pains to take a view of the decreasings and increasings of these persons and such changes as hath passed over them and theirs in this thirty years ... "Francis Cooke is still living, a very old man, and hath seen his children's children have children. After his wife came over with other of his children; he hath three still living by her, all married and have five children, so their increase is eight. And his son John which came over with him is married, and hath four children living." [21][22] Will

The Last Will and Testament of ffrancis Cooke made this seaventh of the tenth month 1659

I being att prsent weake and Infeirme in body yett in prfect memory throw mercy Doe comitt my soule unto god that gave it and my body to the earthe ; which my will is should bee Intered in a Decent and comly manner; As for such goods and lands as I stand posessed of I Doe will and bequeath as followeth:

1 My will is that hester my Dear and loveing wife shall have all my moveable goods and all my Cattle of all kinds ; viz : neat Cattle horsekind sheep and swine to be att her Dispose

2 my will is that hester my wife shall have and Injoy my lands both upland and meddow lands which att prsent I posesse During her life

3 I doe ordaine and appoint my Deare wife and my son John Cooke Joynt exequitors of this my said will

   ffrancis Cooke 
   Witnes 
   John Alden 
   John howland

Sources: [12][28] Death

Francis Cooke lived to be about 80 years old, dying 7 April 1663, Plymouth. His wife Hester survived him by at least three years and perhaps longer.[8]

   Francis Cooke died in 1663.[12] 
   He died in Plymouth on April 7, 1663.[13] 
   "Francis Cooke died the seauenth of Aprill, 1663." [29] 
   died 7 April 1663, Plymouth.[8] 
   He lived to be about 80 years old, dying in 1663; his wife Hester survived him by at least three years and perhaps longer.[8] 

Buried

Francis Cooke's burial site is unknown.[12] Inventory

Inventory of the estate of Francis Cooke, deceased 1663

Note: inventories are valued in pounds (L), shillings (s) and pence (d). There were 12 pence (or pennies) to a shilling and 20 shillings to a pound.

Tool Glossary

   L s d 
   Imprs 2 Iron potts & 1 Iron skillett 00 16 00 
   Item 2 paire of pott hookes 00 01 00 
   Item 7 pewter Dishes & 2 basons 00 17 06 
   Item 3 pewter potts 00 06 06 
   Item 1 pewter bason 2 porringers & 1 salt seller 00 02 00 
   Item 1 pewter Candlesticke 00 02 00 
   Item 2 Alcemy spoones 00 03 00 
   Item 1 lanthorn 1 gallypot 00 01 00 
   Item halfe a Dozen of trenchers and one stone bottle 00 01 00 
   Item 3 olde ladles 00 00 06 
   Item 1 woodden tray 6 trenchers 00 01 00 
   Item 1 morter and pestell 00 02 00 
   Item 4 wooden Dishes 00 00 08 
   Item 1 earthen pan and 2 earthen potts 00 00 09 
   Item 1 great brasse kettls 01 06 00 
   Item 2 smaller kettles 00 08 00 
   Item 3 wooden pailes 00 03 06 
   Item 1 pewter Chamber pott 00 02 06 
   Item 1 warming pan 1 frying pan 00 10 06 
   Item 1 thwart saw 1 hand saw 00 03 06 
   Item 1 paire of pincers 1 hammar 00 02 06 
   Item 1 Drawing Knife 00 00 06 
   Item 1 water Tubb 00 01 06 
   Item 1 axe 00 01 06 
   Item 1 great Chaire 00 05 00 
   Item 3 smale Chaires 00 03 00 
   Item 1 gridiron 1 fiershovell 1 paire of tonggs 00 05 00 
   Item 2 paire of pothangers 00 06 00 
   Item 2 old musketts 00 12 00 
   Item 1 paire of sheers 1 paire of sissers 00 00 09 
   Item 1 great bible & 4 old bookes 00 10 00 
   Item 1 brush 00 00 02 
   Item 1 file and 1 paire of pincers 00 00 06 
   Item 1 Table & forme 00 06 00 
   Item 1 old bucking Tubb 00 02 06 
   Item 1 tubb & 2 kimnells 00 05 00 
   Item 1 Chist 00 03 00 
   Item 1 pair of Cards and one baskett 00 01 00 
   Item 1 Chist 00 02 00 
   Item 4 earthen potts 1 Cupp 2 wooden trayes 00 05 00 
   Item 1 Chern 1 old Cask & four bottles 00 05 06 
   Item 1 old trough & a forme 00 00 06 
   Item 1 woolen wheele & scales 00 04 00 
   Item 1 Iron Driping pan 00 03 00 
   Item 1 sifting trough and one old trough 00 03 00 
   Item 1 tray 1 tubb 1 box 00 03 00 
   Item 2 seives 00 02 06 
   Item 3 paire of sheep sheers 00 03 00 
   Item 3 paire of old Cards 00 01 06 
   Item 1 Cheespresse 1 Cheesfatt 00 01 00 
   Item 2 old ferkins & som sope 00 01 06 
   Item 2 old basketts & yarne 00 04 00 
   Item 1 feather bed & bolster 02 00 00 
   Item 1 paire of sheets 00 12 00 
   Item 1 Coverlid & blankett 01 00 00 
   Item 1 pound of Candles 00 00 06 
   Item 2 hoes 00 01 06 
   Item 1 Cushien 00 00 06 
   Item 2 Chistes & 3 boxes 01 06 00 
   Item 1 feather bed 1 bolster 1 pillow 03 10 00 
   Item 1 paire of sheets 10s 1 blankett 1 coverlid 15 01 15 00 
   Item 2 old Curtaines & vallence 00 02 00 
   Item 2 paire of sheets 01 10 00 
   Item 3 halfe sheets 00 06 00 
   Item 2 hatts 00 15 00 
   Item 1 long coate 25s 2 short coates 30s 02 15 00 
   Item 1 old coate & 1 Jerkin 00 15 00 
   Item 2 paire of briches 1 paire of Drawers 01 10 00 
   Item old clothes stockens gloves shooes 01 00 00 
   Item 4 shirts & smale linnine 01 10 00 
   Item 1 bed & beding in the loft 03 00 00 
   Item 20 lb of woole & 2 paire of old stockens 01 07 00 
   Item 8 paire of stockens 01 05 00 
   Item some other old lumber about the house 00 02 00 
   Item 2 mares & one yearling mare 26 00 00 
   Item 2 Cowes & one Calfe 07 10 00 
   Item 1 2 yeare old and 1 yearling heiffers 03 10 00 
   Item 16 sheep 08 00 00 
   Item 5 lambes 01 00 00 
   Item 4 smale swine 01 04 00

The sume apprised is 85 01 01

   Debtes Due to the estate from severall about 04 00 00 
   Due from the estate of severall about 02 10 00
   summs totalis 86 11 01
   esides the housing and land; the goods and Chattels amount to eighty six pounds eleven shillings and a peney;

apprised by us, Ephraim Tinkham his E T , William Crow

Sources: [12][30] Notes Note Additional Reading

   The Story of the Pilgrim Fathers, 1606-1623 A. D.: As Told by Themselves, Their Friends, and Their Enemies, Ward and Downey, 1897 - 634 pages. GoogleBook 
   Bradford's History "Of Plymouth Plantation", Wright & Porter Printing Company,Boston, 1898. 
   History of Plymouth Plantation, William Bradford, Little, Brown and company, 1856 - 476 pages. GoogleBook 
   Willison, George F., Saints and Strangers, The Cornwall Press, Cornwall, NY, 1943, Third Printing 
   Banks, Charles Edward, The English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers Who Came to Plymouth 
   GOODWIN, JOHN A., The Pilgrim Republic: An Historical Review of the Colony of New Plymouth, Boston: Ticknor & Co., 1888. Second edition. Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1920 
   Bowman, George Ernest, The Mayflower Reader, Baltimore, Genelogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1978 
   Ames, Azel. The May-Flower and Her Log, July 15, 1620-May 6, 1621, 

Chiefly from Original Sources. Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin, 1907 Further Research

   The Plymouth Colony Archive Project 
   Records of the Colony of New Plymouth, in New England: Deeds, &c., 1620-1651. Book of Indian records for their lands, New Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts. General Court, Press of W. White, 1861. GoogleBook. 

Sources

   ↑ 1.0 1.1 #S1 The Log of the Mayflower.
   ↑ Possibilities for Francis Cooke's origin include Gides Hall, Essex, or Blyth, Nottinghanshire, or Yorkshire (west), England, or the area around Norwich, England. Most sources agree that he was probably born in England, although he may have been Waloon, as his wife Hester was. It is also possible that he came from Leiden. The year of his birth seems most likely 1582 or 1583, based on references in contemporary records. FamilySearch.org has a Francis Cooke christened on May 5, 1582 in Leiden, Zuid, Holland, without a primary source listed.Parents listed in the merged profiles were Richard or Edward Cooke and Alice Caunton or Elizabeth Nichols.
   ↑ 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 Erfgoed Leiden en Omstreken Bron: Bronvermelding NH Ondertrouw E. mei 1602 - oktober 1604., archiefnummer 1004, Nederlands Hervormd Ondertrouw (1575-1795), inventarisnummer 5, blad E - 069v Gemeente: Leiden Periode: 1602-1604 doop-, trouw- en begraafregister Soort registratie: DTB Marriage-Trouwen June 1604 Plaats: Leiden Inventarisnummer 5 van archiefnummer 1004 in Archieven
   ↑ All of the wittnesses to the betrothal were Waloon, suggesting that Francis may have also been a Waloon.
   ↑ This information comes from the "Silver Book" and from NEHGR Vol. 143 p. 571.
   ↑ John Walker Family Newsletter 1982, No. 1.
   ↑ Biography entered by Brian McCullough. The following WikiTree People Contributed to this profile: Brian McCullough (detailed Biography), Becky Syphers (merge and editing), M Moroney, Kim Baltz, Ann Fuller, Alan MacLeod, John Putnam, Gregory Nelson, Kennon Edwards, Bryan Sypniewski, Fred Conley, Brent Bowen, Carey Smith, Jeffrey Bowen, Living Louge, David Bishop, DeCoursey, Ron Fedele, Kathryn Greenwald, Grant Knudsen. Note: This list may not be complete.
   ↑ 8.00 8.01 8.02 8.03 8.04 8.05 8.06 8.07 8.08 8.09 8.10 8.11 8.12 8.13 8.14 8.15 8.16 8.17 Francis Cooke at MayflowerHistory.com. #mrl
   ↑ The will of Francis Cooke. #mrl
   ↑ Walter J. Harrison, "New Light on Francis Cooke and His Wife Hester Mayhieu and Their Son John," Mayflower Descendant, Vol 27, 145-153. Their betrothal was recorded on July 4 and 5, so the 20th was the soonest the marriage could have taken place after banns were read. #mrl
   ↑ 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 Johanna W. Tammel, The Pilgrims and other people from the British Isles in Leiden, 1576-1640 (Isle of Man : Mansk-Svenska Publishing Co. Ltd., 1989), p. 152. #mrl
   ↑ 12.00 12.01 12.02 12.03 12.04 12.05 12.06 12.07 12.08 12.09 12.10 12.11 12.12 12.13 12.14 12.15 12.16 12.17 12.18 12.19 12.20 12.21 12.22 12.23 12.24 12.25 12.26 12.27 Pilgrim Hall Museum.Pilgrimhall.org. #mrl
   ↑ 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 13.5 13.6 Pilgrim Village Families Sketch: Francis Cooke. #mrl
   ↑ 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.5 14.6 Jeremy Dupertuis Bangs. "The Pilgrims and other English in Leiden records : some new Pilgrim documents." The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, July 1989, p. 195-214. #mrl
   ↑ 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 15.4 15.5 [Dr. Bangs' article also discusses possible family connections between the Mahieus and other Pilgrim families, including the Delanos.] #mrl
   ↑ Wikipedia.org. #mrl
   ↑ 17.0 17.1 17.2 Francis COOKE of Plymouth, A Biographical Research Profile. #mrl
   ↑ #S1 Francis Cooke at MayflowerHistory.com
   ↑ Sam's Genealogy, by Susanne "Sam" Behling. #mrl
   ↑ Winn.ged on Dec 20, 2011 by Elizabeth S.
   ↑ 21.0 21.1 21.2 21.3 William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647, ed. Samuel Eliot Morison (New York: Knopf, 1991), p. 442, 446. #mrl
   ↑ 22.0 22.1 22.2 Samuel Eliot Morison (New York : Knopf, 1991), p. 441-3. #mrl
   ↑ Robert Charles Anderson, "Francis Cooke", The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, 1995, Vol. I. #mrl
   ↑ Records of the Colony of New Plymouth in New England, Nathaniel B. Shurtleff and David Pulsifer, eds., (Boston 1855-1861), Vol 8, p. 23. #mrl
   ↑ Mourt's Relation, ed. Jordan D. Fiore (Plymouth, Mass. #mrl
   ↑ Plymouth Rock Foundation, 1985), p. 44. #mrl
   ↑ Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 12, p. 13-14. #mrl
   ↑ The Will and Inventory of Francis Cooke. mayflowerfamilies.com. #mrl
   ↑ Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 8, p. 23. #mrl
   ↑ The Will and Inventory of Francis Cooke. mayflowerfamilies.com. #mrl
   Wood, Ralph V., Jr., Mayflower Families through Five Generations Volume 12, Rockland, Maine: Picton Press, Revised Edition,2011 a/k/a "The Silver Book"
   Lora Altine Woodbury Underhill, Descendants of Edward Small of New England, Riverside Press, Rev. edition, Houghton Mifflin,Co., New York,1934.
   Walter James Harrison, New Light on Francis Cooke,et al The Mayflower Descendant,Vol XXVII, No 4, Oct, 1925, p.145.
   https://www.familysearch.org/ This is the URL for the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Family History Files. Francis Cooke's Ancestral File Number is 7TSS-LT .
   Family History Library, 35 N West Temple Street, Salt Lake City, Utah 84150 USA. This is the repository of some of the source materials.
   Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created.
   "John Walker Family Newsletter 1982, No. 1". walkerfamily.org
   Jeremy Dupertuis Bangs, The Pilgrims and other English in Leiden records: some new Pilgrim documents, The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, July 1989, p. 195-214.
   Robert Charles Anderson, "Francis Cooke", The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Vol.I. Boston, New England Historic Genelogical Society 1995.
   Wikipedia Francis Cooke
   Wikipedia Waloons
   mayflowerhistory.com
   Pilgrim Village Families Sketch: Francis Cooke, by Robert Charles Anderson, New England Historic Genealogical Society. americanancestors.org
   Francis Cooke of Plymouth, A Biographical Research Profile, David Haas, The Plymouth Colony Archive Project. histarch.uiuc.edu
   Pilgrims' Writings – Thanksgiving to God, The First Thanksgiving At Plymouth – to honor God for His deliverance and providence. As narrated by the Pilgrim, Captain and Governor William Bradford in his manuscript “Of Plymoth Plantation” (originally titled “The Log of the Mayflower”). Attached.
   Our New England Ancestors and Their Descendants, Compiled by Henry Whittemore, New England Ancestral Publishing Co., 1900. Attached.
   Francis Cooke in 17th Century Records, Pilgrim Hall Museum. Updated 18 May, 2005. Pilgrimhall.org
   Francis Cooke, MayflowerHistory.com
   Mayflower Families: Francis Cooke for Five Generations.
   Wikipedia Francis Cooke.
   The Will and Inventory of Francis Cooke. Communicated by Edith Forrester Pratt (MD 2:24-27), mayflowerfamilies.com
   Mayflower Links, by Mae M. Douglas. Attached.
   Sam's Genealogy, by Susanne "Sam" Behling, 1997-2007. Rootsweb
   Lechner Family History, compiled by Michael Lechner, with my father Ted Harrold Lechner. Lechner Family History.
   family search/genealogies/family tree accessed by elizabeth joslin shaw 

Citing this Record

WikiTree contributors, "Francis Cooke (November 26, 1583 - April 7, 1663)," WikiTree, http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Cooke-36 (accessed October 12, 2017). Acknowledgements

The following WikiTree People Contributed to this profile:

   M Moroney (first profile 
   Brian McCullough (detailed Biography), 
   Becky Syphers (merge and editing), 
   Michael Lechner (Sourcing and Documentation) mrl,

M Moroney, Kim Baltz, Ann Fuller, Alan MacLeod, John Putnam, Gregory Nelson, Kennon Edwards, Bryan Sypniewski, Fred Conley, Brent Bowen, Carey Smith, Jeffrey Bowen, Living Louge, David Bishop, DeCoursey, Ron Fedele, Kathryn Greenwald, Grant Knudsen, Elizabeth S, Melinda Bowman, Jim Lynch, Cliff Cobb, Julie Baldwin, Joseph St. Denis, Becky Syphers, Jan, Elizabeth Joslin Shaw

Note: This list may not be complete.

General Notes: From Mayflower Web Page:There is conflicting evidence about the birth of Francis Cooke. A note scribbled in Bradford's Journal says Francis Cooke died above the age of 80, meaning he was born before 1583. However in August 1643, he was in a list of men of Plymouth between the age of 16 and 60 allowed to bear arms. This means he was born after 1583. Also, he was married in Leyden in 1603, so he probably would have been at least 21 at the time. This means a birth before 1583. The fact that all these records seem to conflict suggests that Francis Cooke was probably born in 1583.

His wife Hester was from Canterbury, England, so perhaps that is where he is from as well.

William Bradford recorded his list of passengers that came over in the Mayflower. "Francis Cooke and his son John, but his wife and other children came afterwards". Later in 1651, he writes "Francis Cooke is still living, a very old man, and hath seen his children's children have children. After his wife came over with other of his children; he hath three still living by her, all married and have five children, so their increase is eight. And his son John which came over with him is married, and hath four children living."

Francis and Hester (Mahieu) Cooke had lived in Leyden as early as 1603, about five years before the Pilgrims fled there from England. In 1606, they left Leyden to live at Norwich, England where they joined a French Walloon church; however, they did not stay long in England--Probably because of religious persecution--and by 1607 were back in Leyden as members of the French Walloon church there.

Sources:Mayflower Families in Progress: Francis Cooke for Four Generations, by Robert S. Wakefield, General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 3rd edition, 1994 Mayflower Descendants, 8:48-50, "The Mayflower Marriage Records at Leyden and Amsterdam:Francis Cooke". New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 107:61, 143:195-199 (records of the Cooke and Mahieu families in Holland and England).

Jane Cooke 1608 – 1666

John Cooke 1607 – 1695

Elizabeth Cooke 1611 –

Jacob Cooke 1618 – 1675

Hester Cooke 1625 – 1669

Mary Cooke 1627 – 1713

Francis married Hester Mahieu, daughter of Jennie le Mahieu and Jeanne, on 4 Jul 1603 in Leyden, Holland. Hester was born about 1585 in Canterbury, Kent, England and died after 8 Jun 1666 in Plymouth, Plymouth, MA.

General Notes: From Genealogies of Mayflower Families; Hester Le Mahieu, Wife of Francis Cooke It has long been known that Hester Le Mahieu of Francis Cooke of the Mayflower, was a Walloon from Canterbury, where the Walloon Church was established in 1547, in the crypt of the Cathedral, by refugees fleeing from persecution in Brabant. On 5 July 1603 Francis Cooke, woolcarder, from England, was betrothed to Hester le Mahieu, singlewoman, accompanied by her mother and sister, both named Jennie le Mahieu from Canterbury (Mayflower Descendant, vol. 27 p. 145 sq.). The records of the Walloon-French Church in Canterbury contain a number of references to the le Mahieus. On 27 March 1582 Jonas, son of Hercules Landsheare and Clarette Mahieu, was baptized. On 11 November 1604 Anthony, son of Jean le Mahieu, native of Coulon, near Calais, married Martha Cornart, daughter of the late Noe Carnart, native of Canterbury. Babtized 29 Sept. 1605 Marye, daughter of Antoine Mahieu (Registers of the Walloon and Huguenot Church Canterbury, vol. 1, p. 4.) It may be suggested that Hester or Esther was probably a sister of Antoine and daughter of Jean le Mahieu from Coulon.

Francis Cooke was a 1620 Mayflower passenger originally from Blythe, Yorkshire, England and later of Kent County. The records in Holland describe him as a woolcomber and he appeared there before the arrival of the Clyfton/Robinson Separatists.

The date of his marriage to Hester Mahieu in Leyden, Holland has often been printed incorrectly (e.g., 30 June 1603). However, an article in Mayflower Descendant 27:145-55 (New Light on Francis Cooke and His Wife Hester Mahieu and Their Son John) goes to great pains to give an estimated date and states the the previous published date was incorrect. Marriage intentions were entered July 4, 1603 and Luly 5, 1603 which means the three banns were proclaimed July 6, July 13 and July 20 (three successive Sundays); therefore, the marriage took place on or after July 20, 1603. Hester Mahieu, the daugther of Jennie le Mahieu of Canterbury, England died. after June 8, 1666 in Plymouth.

Francis Cooke appears frequently in Plymouth records on grand and trial juries, as a surveyor of the highways, on various ad hoc committees, and in a number of land transactions. He came to Plymouth with son John, and his wife and their daughter, Jane and son, Jacob arrived on the ship Anne in 1623. Two more children, Hester and Mary, were born at Plymouth. Francis died April 7, 1663 "above 80" years of age.

The will of Francis Cooke of Plymouth, dated 7th 10th mo. 1659, exhibited 5 June 1663, names wife Hester and son John. His inventory is dated May 1, 1663. An agreement made June 8, 1666 between John Cooke, Jacob Cooke, Hester Wright the wife of Richard Wright and Mary Tomson the wife of John Tompson disposed of the land of Francis Cooke. The agreement mentions Hester Cookie is still living. On the same date John Cooke confirmed to Richard Wright and Thomas Mitchell, in equal shares, sixty acres of upland, near Jones River Meadow formerly given them by Francis Cooke. On July 5, 1670 a court record mentions that land called "old Cookes Holes," lying at Jones River was given by Francis Cooke to Richard Wright and Thomas Mitchell and since his (Francis) decease confirmed unto Richard Wright and Thomas Mitchell by John Cooke. On 1 Aug. 1672 Thomas Mitchell of Duxbury sold to Richard Wright of Plymouth his share in the above grant and states it was given to him by his grandfather, Francis Cooke. Editor's Note

Because the facts of Francis Cooke's bith and parents are in dispute, the following parents have been removed from the profile: edward Cooke, Alice Caunton, and Richard Cooke. Edward Cooke and Alice Caunton .

The parents are disputed or no 16th and 17th documentation has yet been found that names the parents. This action is in accordance with WikiTree Policy.

[31]

Sources

   Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Volume Twelve, Francis Cooke
   http://franciscookesociety.org/
   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Cooke
   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walloon_church 

Thank you to Mark Hutchens for creating Cook-7486 on 12 Nov 13. Click the Changes tab for the details on contributions by Mark and others.


view all 41

Francis Cooke, "Mayflower" Passenger's Timeline

1583
April 25, 1583
Leiden, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands
1583
Canterbury, Kent, South East - England, United Kingdom (present day)
1606
June 7, 1606
Age 23
Leiden, Rhynland, Holland, Republiek der Zeven Verenigde Nederlanden
1608
May 20, 1608
Age 25
Leiden, Rhynland (present Zuid-Holland), Holland, Republiek der Zeven Verenigde Nederlanden (present The Netherlands)
1609
1609
Age 26
Leiden, Rhynland, Holland, Republiek der Zeven Verenigde Nederlanden (present The Netherlands)
1611
December 26, 1611
Age 28
Leyden, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands
1618
May 20, 1618
Age 35
Leiden, South Holland, Netherlands