Friedrich I, Graf von Diessen

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Friedrich I von Diessen (Buren , Pfalsgrave of Swabia), Graf von Andechs

Birthdate: (55)
Birthplace: Ober Isar, Bavaria, Medieval States
Death: Died in Wassenberg, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
Immediate Family:

Son of Berchtold I, margrave in the Bavarian Nordgau and Cunigunde de Lorraine
Husband of Kunigunde (Hemma) von Önningen, Pfalzgräfin in Schwaben
Father of Count Berthold II von Diessen, Pfalzgraf von Bayern; Christine von Diessen, countess; Pilihild von Diessen; Frederick von Buren; Otto I Von Diessen, Graf von Diessen and 2 others
Brother of Heilika von Schweinfurt., Äbtissin in Niederburg; N.N. von Diessen, Gräfin; N.N. Isar von Wasserburg; Dietrich von Bayern; Otto Markgraf von Bayern and 1 other
Half brother of Heinrich I. von Schweinfurt Markgraf im Nordgau

Occupation: Graf im Raum Dießen, Wolfratshausen, Andechs, Haching/Sundergau an der oberen Isar (1003) und Wasserburg (1010/20/27), Comte palatin, de Souabe, Greve
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Friedrich I, Graf von Diessen

From Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands Database http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIAN%20NOBILITY.htm#_Toc427227713:

GRAFEN von DIESSEN


The mention in the De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses of the construction by "Razzo comes" in 954 of "cœnobium in honore Salvatoris omnium Werde" at the foot of his castle "Razenwerge" is the earliest reference to a member of the family of the Grafen von Diessen[587]. The De Fundatoribus records that the church, in which Razzo was buried, was consecrated by "sanctus Udalricus episcopus Augustensis" (chronologically consistent with the bishopric of Ulrich von Dillingen who died in 973) but that it was later destroyed "ab hostibus et invasoribus". Count Razzo has not been identified and his connection with the later counts of Diessen is unknown. "Razo comes" heads a long list of family members associated with the monastery of Diessen which is also included in the De Fundatoribus[588], which suggests a tradition of family relationship. However, the accuracy of the document is uncertain, at least so far as its coverage of the earlier years is concerned, as the author records that it was compiled as late as 1478, although presumably based on earlier sources which have since disappeared. The De Fundatoribus should not be dismissed entirely, however, as despite its late composition many details can be verified against other earlier sources as will be seen below.


1. RAZZO, son of --- (-19 Jun 954, bur Werde). The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses names "Razzo comes" as founder in 954 of "cœnobium in honore Salvatoris omnium Werde" at the foot of his castle "Razenwerge", specifying that he was buried there[589]. "Razo comes" heads a long list of family members associated with the monastery of Diessen which is also included in the De Fundatoribus[590]. The necrology of Diessen records the death "Jun XIII Kal" of "Raze com qui cenobium in Werde construxit"[591].


The next recorded Graf von Diessen is Friedrich, who died before 1020. The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses names "Fridericus comes dictus Roch" as successor of "Razzo comes"[592], without specifying any relationship between the two. The chronological gap between the death of Razzo (recorded as occurring in 954) and the appearance of Friedrich (first recorded in 1003) suggests an intervening generation if the two were related. The absence of the name Razzo, or any derivatives resembling the name, among the descendants of Friedrich suggests that there was no family connection between them. According to Wegener, Graf Friedrich [I] was the son of Berthold von Reisensburg, son of Arnulf Pfalzgraf in Bavaria [Luitpoldinger][593]. He bases this on a "Berthold" witnessing several exchanges of property in the oberen Isar dated [990/99], and equating him with Berthold von Reisensburg. Several points can be made about this theory. Firstly, it seems surprising that such an illustrious connection with the Luitpoldinger Dukes of Bavaria would not have been mentioned by the various contemporary sources which relate the early history of the Grafen von Diessen. Secondly, the estimated birth date of Berthold von Reisensburg is restricted to the limited period [929/31], bearing in mind the known dates of his own career and the likely birth date of his father. His last known mention is dated 976. Another burst of activity fourteen years after that date would be surprising when he would then have been in his sixties. Thirdly, judging from the 976 entry, Berthold von Reisensburg appears to have fallen into disgrace with Emperor Otto II. There is no record of his return to favour. It is likely therefore that he died soon after and that his descendants (if any) fell into obscurity. Fourthly, it is surprising that Berthold von Reisensburg would not have been described as comes even in entries relating to the period after his disgrace as he would presumably have continued to claim and use the title.


1. FRIEDRICH [I] "Roch" (-Jerusalem before 1020, bur Jerusalem). The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses names "Fridericus comes dictus Roch" as successor of "Razzo comes"[594], without specifying any relationship between the two. The same source records that Friedrich went to Jerusalem where he died and was buried. "Henricus…rex" granted property "inter suos fluvios Ysara et Liubasa…in comitatu Friderici…in Hachingun in pago Sundergouue" to "comitis Adalberonis" by charter dated 30 Jun 1003[595]. Wegener refers to "Fridericus comes, Dietricus comes" witnessing a charter relating to land at Weiher, near Wasserburg, dated [1010/20][596]. m KUNIGUNDE [Kunizza], daughter of [KONRAD I Duke of Swabia [Konradiner] & his wife Richlint ---] (-6 Mar after 1020, bur Diessen St Stefan). The Genealogia Welforum refers to the four daughters of "Chuno comes [et] filia Ottonis Magni imperatoris", specifying that the fourth (unnamed) married "comite de Andhese"[597]. The Historia Welforum refers to the four daughters of "Couno comes" and "filia Ottonis magnis imperatoris…Richlint", specifying that they married "una Roudolfo isti [=Welforum], alia cuidam de Rinveldin, parenti Zaringiorum, tercia regie Rugiorum, quarta comiti de Diezon"[598]. As noted in the document SWABIA DUKES, these two sources are unreliable in their recording of the sons of Konrad I Duke of Swabia, so should not be assumed to be any more precise in recording his daughters. The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses names "Kunizza comitissa" as wife of "Fridericus comes dictus Roch", but specifying that she was the sister of "sancta Richgardis que Ebersberg cenobium construxit" and that "Otto imperator magnus" was their "avus"[599]. On the other hand, the Chronico Eberspergense names "Rihcardem sororem Marhwardi presidis de Carinthia"[600]. No other indication has been found that Richardis may have been the sister of Kunigunde. The De Fundatoribus records that Kunizza founded "monasterium sancti Stephani" in 1020 after the death of her husband. The necrology of Diessen records the death "Mar Non" of "Chuniza com, sepulta in media basilica s Stephani, uxor Friderici comes Rochen"[601].


2. DIETRICH (-[1010/20] or after). Wegener refers to "comes Dietricus" named in a charter dated [1003/12][602]. "...Dietricus comes qui dedit Pfans..." witnessed the undated charter under which “comes...Arnoldus” donated property “in villa Taerzina” to Kloster Benediktbeuren dated [1015][603]. Wegener dates this document to [1015][604]. Wegener refers to "Fridericus comes, Dietricus comes" witnessing a charter relating to land at Weiher, near Wasserburg, dated [1010/20], suggesting that the two may have been brothers[605].


The following Graf Friedrich [II] is recorded in 1025 (as the father of Berthold [I]), in 1027 (twice, once as father of Otto [I]), and in 1030. He was therefore presumably a different person from Graf Friedrich [I], who is recorded as having died in Jerusalem before 1020. It is not known how the two Grafen Friedrich may have been related, if at all. However, the continuity of references to Diessen suggests a close connection, maybe father and son. Wegener conflates Graf Friedrich [I] and Graf Friedrich [II] as he appears to ignore the reference to the death of the former before 1020[606]. The De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses does not name a second Graf Friedrich, although this is not surprising considering that it appears to ignore the generations between Graf Friedrich [I] and Otto Graf von Wolfratshausen[607]. Generally, the reconstruction of the family of the Grafen von Diessen is hindered rather than helped by the speculative connections suggested by Wegener. An attempt has been made in the following passages to explain these speculations and highlight any contradictions with primary sources which he does not cite. Unfortunately, it appears that many of these misleading speculations have found their way into the tables in Europäische Stammtafeln in which they appear as definite. In the case of this family, therefore, it is more important than ever to use the "back to basics" approach and start again from scratch in compiling information from primary sources. Hopefully, the results are relatively accurate but it is admitted that it is particularly challenging to achieve a definitive reconstruction of this family and no doubt further improvements are possible.

  • [587] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 329.
  • [588] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses I, MGH SS XVII, p. 328.
  • [589] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 329.
  • [590] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses I, MGH SS XVII, p. 328.
  • [591] Necrologium Diessense, Augsburg Necrologies, p. 7, footnote 5 adding "954 Razo com primus fundator monasterii in Werd sepulta".
  • [592] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 329.
  • [593] Wegener (1965/67), p. 148.
  • [594] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 329.
  • [595] D H II 54, p. 65.
  • [596] Quellen bayerischen Geschichte, Neue Folge, Band 8, p. 230 n 287, cited in Wegener (1965/67), p. 148.
  • [597] Genealogia Welforum 4, MGH SS XIII, p. 734.
  • [598] Historia Welforum Weingartensis 6, MGH SS XXI, p. 460.
  • [599] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 329.
  • [600] Chronico Eberspergense, MGH SS XX, p. 12.
  • [601] Necrologium Diessense, Augsburg Necrologies, p. 7.
  • [602] Quellen bayerischen Geschichte, Neue Folge, Band 9, p. 4 n 4, cited in Wegener (1965/67), p. 149.
  • [603] Monumenta Boica, Vol. VII, p. 38.
  • [604] Wegener (1965/67), p. 149.
  • [605] Quellen bayerischen Geschichte, Neue Folge, Band 8, p. 230 n 287, cited in Wegener (1965/67), p. 148.
  • [606] Wegener (1965/67), p. 149.
  • [607] De Fundatoribus Monasterii Diessenses III, MGH SS XVII, p. 329.
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Friedrich I, Graf von Diessen's Timeline

972
972
Ober Isar, Bavaria, Medieval States
998
998
Age 26
Bavaria, Germany
1015
1015
Age 43
Of, Diessen, Oberbayern, Bavaria
1017
1017
Age 45
Of, Diessen, Oberbayern, Bavaria
1019
1019
Age 47
Diessen, Freudenstadt, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany
1021
1021
Age 49
Diessen, Oberbayern, Bavaria
1023
1023
Age 51
Dießen am Ammersee, Upper Bavaria, Bavaria, Germany
1027
1027
Age 55
Wassenberg, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
????