Geoffroy of Hauteville, count of Capitanata

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About Geoffroy of Hauteville, count of Capitanata

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Geoffrey of Hauteville

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Geoffrey of Hauteville (also Gottfried, Godfrey, Goffredo, or Gaufrido) was a Norman military leader, the second youngest son of Tancred of Hauteville by his first wife Muriella. He joined his brothers in the Mezzogiorno around 1053, arriving with his half-brothers Mauger and William. He was certainly present at the Battle of Civitate in that year.

In that year, Humphrey, his brother the count of Apulia, gave Mauger and William the Capitanate and the Principate, respectively, with the title of count. When Mauger died later that decade (in 1054, according to Goffredo Malaterra), the county passed to William, who gave it to Geoffrey. In 1059, his brother Robert Guiscard, Humphrey's successor over Geoffrey, who was older, but had not been in the south as long, helped him quell a revolt in the Capitanate. He also ruled the region around Loritello, where his son Robert was invested as count, and he expanded his domains into those of the pope, conquering Gissi in the Abruzzi. His death is a matter of confusion. The Breve Chronicon Northmannicum states, on the authority of Goffredo Malaterra, that he died in 1063, but the chronicler apparently confused the many Geoffreys of the period. He probably died circa 1071.

He had been married in Normandy and he had three sons from that union: the aforementioned Robert; Ralph, who inherited Catanzaro; and William, who inherited Tiriolo. In the Mezzogiorno, he married, like his eldest brother William Iron Arm, a niece of the Prince Guaimar IV of Salerno, Theodora of Capaccio, daughter of Pandulf, lord of Capaccio, Guaimar's brother. From this second marriage was born at least one son, named Tancred, who was alive in 1103 and 1104. He also had a son, of unknown parentage, named Drogo or Tasso[1].

It seems that Ralph participated in the Battle of Hastings (1066) and obtained thereby a fief in Wiltshire before 1086 (the time of the Domesday Book), thus founding the English branch of his illustrious family.

[edit] Sources

   * Chalandon, Ferdinand. Histoire de la domination normande en Italie et en Sicile. Paris, 1907.
   * Norwich, John Julius. The Normans in the South 1016-1130. Longmans: London, 1967.

Godefroi (Geoffroy) of Conversana/Conversano

m SICHELGAITA di Molise, daughter of RODULF de Moulins Conte di Boiano & Altruda di Guardia

Children: ROBERT di Conversano

                 Allesandro
                Tancred
                Silvestro
                Rodolfe
                Guillaume
                Richard
                Sibylle  

From Medlands:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NEAPOLITAN%20NOBILITY.htm#SibillaConversanodied1103

GODEFROI [Geoffroy] (-[Sep] [Feb 1104/Apr 1107]). Malaterra names "Gaufridum de Conversano neptem suis [Roberti ducis]…filius…sororis suæ"[656]. The Gesta Roberti Wiscardi names "Robertus de Scabioso Monte comes…Gosfredi frater, et ambo orti germana fuerant ducis"[657]. Guerrieri highlights that "Gosfredi" in this passage has been identified as Godefroi Conte di Conversano but that it is not possible to confirm that this is correct[658]. If the speculation is right, Godefroi was the same person as Godefroi, son of Armand Comte de Mortain & his wife Beatrix de Hauteville. Conte di Conversano. Lord of Nardò. "Robertus comes Lorotelli, Amicus inclitus comes, Riccardus Andrie comes, Goffredus comes Cupersani, Petrus comes de Lesena, Robertus comes filius Guillelmi Ybonis comitis" declared the restitution of property to the monastery of Banzi by charter dated Jun 1063[659]. [The Chronicon Breve Normannicum records the death in Apr 1063 of "Gauffredus comes" and that "Goffridus filius eius" captured Taranto and "Castru Motule"[660]. "Gauffredus comes" in this source can probably be identified as Godefroi Conte di Loritello (see CENTRAL ITALY), who is not otherwise recorded as having a son named Godefroi. It is possible therefore that the Chronicon Breve incorrectly records his parentage and that the reference to the younger Godefroi, as well as the succeeding passages in the same source, relate to Godefroi Conte di Conversano. The Chronicon Breve Normannicum records "Goffridus comes" captured "Castanetum" in 1064[661]. The Chronicon Breve Normannicum records that "Goffridus comes" captured "Montem Pillosum" in Jun 1068, that "Hydrontum" was recaptured in Oct 1068, that "Goffridus comes" led a large fleet in attacking Brindisi in 1070, and captured Palermo in 1072[662].] Protospatarius records "magnum homicidium factum…in civitate Brundusii" in Jan 1070 and that "Robertus dux" entered Brindisi in 1071[663]. Presumably Godefroi was appointed Lord of Brindisi after its capture, but the date of his appointment has not been confirmed in any of the primary sources so far consulted during the preparation of the present document. According to Orderic Vitalis, he was nepos of Robert "Guiscard" Duke of Apulia who called him to his deathbed in 1085[664]. "Goffridus…comes" donated land of S. Nicola to the abbot of Santa Maria di Nardò by charter dated May 1092, signed by "Sikelgaite comitisse, Roberti Cupersanensis…Rogerii vice comitis"[665]. "Goffridus…Brundusine civitatis dominator" donated property in the city of Brindisi to the abbess of Santa Maria veterana, in the presence of "Ursonis nostri vicecomitis", by charter dated Feb 1097[666]. "Goffridus…[co]me[s] dominator civitatis Neritoni…cum Sechelgayta comitissa uxore mea et cum filiis nostris [R]oberto et [A]lexandri[o]" donated the church of Santa Anastasia di Matino, near Gallipoli to the monastery of Santa Maria di Nardò by charter dated Jan 1099[667]. "Goffridus…comes, Brundusine civitatis dominator…et mea uxor domina Sichelgaita" donated the churches of the parishes of Santa Maria antica and San Andrea dell´isola, Brindisi to the church of San Leucio, Brindisi by charter dated Aug 1100[668]. "Goffridus…comes dominator civitatis Neritoni…cum Sechelgayta comitissa uxore mea et cum filiis nostris domino Roberto et Alexandro" donated the church of SS Trinità, Nardò and other churches to the monastery of Santa Maria by charter dated Feb 1104, signed by "Robertus infans, Alexander, Ugo vice come…"[669]. Lupus Protospatarius records the death in Sep 1101 of "Goffridus comes" and that "Alexius filius eius" invaded Materia, although the charter quoted above, if correctly dated, shows that Godefroi was still alive in Feb 1104[670]. m SICHELGAITA di Molise, daughter of RODULF de Moulins Conte di Boiano & his first wife Altruda di Guardia (-after Sep 1101). "Goffridus…comes" donated land of S. Nicola to the abbot of Santa Maria di Nardò by charter dated May 1092, signed by "Sikelgaite comitisse, Roberti Cupersanensis…Rogerii vice comitis"[671]. "Sikelgaita filia Rao de Mulisi" is named with "son époux Geoffroy de Conversano" in a charter dated Oct 1093[672]. "Goffridus…[co]me[s] dominator civitatis Neritoni…cum Sechelgayta comitissa uxore mea et cum filiis nostris [R]oberto et [A]lexandri[o]" donated the church of Santa Anastasia di Matino, near Gallipoli to the monastery of Santa Maria di Nardò by charter dated Jan 1099[673]. "Goffridus…comes, Brundusine civitatis dominator…et mea uxor domina Sichelgaita" donated the churches of the parishes of Santa Maria antica and San Andrea dell´isola, Brindisi to the church of San Leucio, Brindisi by charter dated Aug 1100[674]. "Goffridus…comes dominator civitatis Neritoni…cum Sechelgayta comitissa uxore mea et cum filiis nostris domino Roberto et Alexandro" donated the church of SS Trinità, Nardò and other churches to the monastery of Santa Maria by charter dated Feb 1104, signed by "Robertus infans, Alexander, Ugo vice come…"[675]. "Sichelgaita comitissa, Goffredi comitis…quondam uxor…meique filii domini Tanchedi…comes" donated "il casale di Tuterano…il casale di Valerano, quello di Fenestrito" to the monastery of Santa Maria veterana di Brindisi by charter dated Apr 1107, signed by "Tanchredus comes---Constantia, Raimundi filius magni Raimundi…Sendi nepotis comitisse…"[676]. "Rogerius…Sicilie et Italie rex…Rogerii primi comitis heres et filius" confirmed past donations by "…comitis quoque Goffridi Cupersani et uxoris eius Sikelgaite comitisse" by charter dated 28 Sep 1133[677]. Godefroi & his wife had [eight] children:

i) ROBERT di Conversano (-[Feb 1104/Apr 1107]). "Goffridus…comes" donated land of S. Nicola to the abbot of Santa Maria di Nardò by charter dated May 1092, signed by "Sikelgaite comitisse, Roberti Cupersanensis…Rogerii vice comitis"[678]. "Goffridus…[co]me[s] dominator civitatis Neritoni…cum Sechelgayta comitissa uxore mea et cum filiis nostris [R]oberto et [A]lexandri[o]" donated the church of Santa Anastasia di Matino, near Gallipoli to the monastery of Santa Maria di Nardò by charter dated Jan 1099[679]. "Goffridus…comes dominator civitatis Neritoni…cum Sechelgayta comitissa uxore mea et cum filiis nostris domino Roberto et Alexandro" donated the church of SS Trinità, Nardò and other churches to the monastery of Santa Maria by charter dated Feb 1104, signed by "Robertus infans, Alexander, Ugo vice come…"[680]. The charter dated Apr 1130, under which his brother "Tanchredus Cupersani…Brundusii comes" confirmed the donation "del casale di S. Donaci una volta dipendenti de sua madre" to the church of San Giovanni Battista, Brindisi, for the souls of "bone memorie domini Goffredi…comitis patris mei et domine Sichelgaite comitisse matris mee ac domini Roberti comitis fratris mei"[681], suggests that Robert briefly survived his father and succeeded as Conte di Conversano.

ii) ALESSANDRO (-after 1161). "Goffridus…[co]me[s] dominator civitatis Neritoni…cum Sechelgayta comitissa uxore mea et cum filiis nostris [R]oberto et [A]lexandri[o]" donated the church of Santa Anastasia di Matino, near Gallipoli to the monastery of Santa Maria di Nardò by charter dated Jan 1099[682]. "Goffridus…comes dominator civitatis Neritoni…cum Sechelgayta comitissa uxore mea et cum filiis nostris domino Roberto et Alexandro" donated the church of SS Trinità, Nardò and other churches to the monastery of Santa Maria by charter dated Feb 1104, signed by "Robertus infans, Alexander, Ugo vice come…"[683]. Lupus Protospatarius records the death in Sep 1101 of "Goffridus comes" and that "Alexius filius eius" invaded Materia, although the charter quoted above, if correctly dated, shows that Godefroi was still alive in Feb 1104[684]. Conte di Conversano. "Alexandro…comite Cupersani" donated the church of San Nicolò di Ciliano to the abbot of Santa Maria di Nardò by charter dated May 1119, signed by "dopni Alexandri Cupersani comitis, dopni Tancredi filii Cupersani comitis"[685]. The Romoaldi Annales record that "regina Constancia" was captured by "comite Alexandro et Grimoaldo Barense in Umenatia civitate" and taken to Bari in Aug, dated to 1119[686]. Bohémond II Prince of Antioch appointed as administrator of his Italian lands either the Pope or Alessandro Conte di Conversano[687] before sailing from Otranto for Palestine in Sep 1126. The Chronicle of Romualdo Guarna records that "Boamundis juvenis" left for Antioch in Sep 1127 and appointed "comiti domino Alexandro consanguineo suo" as "vice sua" in "omnes civitates suas Apuliæ"[688]. The Chronicle of Romualdo Guarna records that "dominus Tancredus…cum domino Alexandro comite fratre suo et…domino Grimoaldo Barensi" made peace with Duke Roger 10 Aug [1129/30][689]. "Alexander Cupersanensis comes et Tanc Cupersani et Gauf Catenzarii comes et Robertus Gravini" signed a charter dated 22 Jun 1132 relating to the city of Bari[690]. He joined the barons opposing Roger II after his coronation as king of Sicily, but fled to Dalmatia in 1133[691]. The Chronicle of Romualdo Guarna records that "Riccardus…de Claromonte" was killed at Bari in 1133 and that "Alexander…frater eius" retreated "in Romaniam"[692]. Hugo Falcandus names "Alexander of Conversano" among those responsible for the capture of Guillaume I King of Sicily in 1161[693], although it is not known whether this refers to the same person. m ---. The name of Alessandro's wife is not known. Alessandro & his wife had two children:

(a) GEOFFROY (-after May 1133). The Chronicle of Romualdo Guarna records that "Goffredus…domini Alexandri comitis filius et Riccardus Clarimontis dominus" defended Brindisi in 1133 against King Roger who had returned from Sicily in May 1133 to recapture the citadel[694].

(b) ROBERT (-after 16 Oct 1133). Roger II King of Sicily confirmed the possessions of the monastery of Santa Maria di Tercia by charter dated 16 Oct 1133, including property donated by "comite Alexandro et Roberto filio suo"[695].

iii) TANCRED (-after 1133). "Sichelgaita comitissa, Goffredi comitis…quondam uxor…meique filii domini Tanchedi…comes" donated "il casale di Tuterano…il casale di Valerano, quello di Fenestrito" to the monastery of Santa Maria veterana di Brindisi by charter dated Apr 1107, signed by "Tanchredus comes---Constantia, Raimundi filius magni Raimundi…Sendi nepotis comitisse…"[696]. Conte di Conversano. "Alexandro…comite Cupersani" donated the church of San Nicolò di Ciliano to the abbot of Santa Maria di Nardò by charter dated May 1119, signed by "dopni Alexandri Cupersani comitis, dopni Tancredi filii Cupersani comitis"[697]. The De Rebus Gestis Rogerii Siciliæ Regis of Alessandro Abbot of Telese records that "Grimoaldus Barensium princeps, Gofridus comes Andrensis, Tancredus de Conversano atque Rogerius Orianensis comes…et Robertus Capuanorum princeps" supported the Pope in opposing the accession of Roger Count of Sicily in Apulia (in 1127)[698]. The Chronicle of Romualdo Guarna records that "dominus Tancredus…cum domino Alexandro comite fratre suo et…domino Grimoaldo Barensi" made peace with Duke Roger 10 Aug [1129/30][699]. "Tanchredus Cupersani…Brundusii comes" confirmed the donation "del casale di S. Donaci una volta dipendenti de sua madre" to the church of San Giovanni Battista, Brindisi, for the souls of "bone memorie domini Goffredi…comitis patris mei et domine Sichelgaite comitisse matris mee ac domini Roberti comitis fratris mei", by charter dated Apr 1130[700]. "Alexander Cupersanensis comes et Tanc Cupersani et Gauf Catenzarii comes et Robertus Gravini" signed a charter dated 22 Jun 1132 relating to the city of Bari[701]. He joined the barons opposing Roger II after his coronation as King of Sicily. The Chronicle of Romualdo Guarna records that "Tancredus" besieged Brindisi in Sep 1132 after King Roger had returned to Sicily[702]. He was besieged at Matera, escaped to Montepeloso, where he was captured in 1133 and taken to Sicily[703]. The Annales Casinenses record that "Roggerius rex" entered Apulia in 1133 and disinherited "comites Conversanenses et Andrensem" but does not name the counts[704]. Guerrieri cites a work in which "la triste dine di Tancredi, la sua morte e la descrizione del suo sepulcro" are described[705].

iv) [SILVESTRO di Conversano . Guerrieri names "Silvestro", enemy "del celebre Maione", as another son of Godefroi Conte di Conversano, but he does not cite the corresponding primary source[706]. Chalandon says that he was named as son of Godefroi di Conversano by Capecaltro[707], but that there is no information about the parentage of the Silvestro who is named by Hugo Falcandus[708].]

v) RODOLPHE di Conversano (-after 1093). Guerrieri records that "Rodolfo", son of Godefroi Conte di Conversano, is named in a charter of his father dated 1093, but he does not cite the corresponding primary source[709]. Chalandon cites a source[710].

vi) GUILLAUME di Conversano (-after [1102]). Orderic Vitalis records that, brother of Sibylle, he was captured by Robert de Bellême [near Exmes] in [1102][711]. Orderic Vitalis states that it was said that he dominated his brother-in-law Robert III Duke of Normandy[712].

vii) RICHARD (-killed Bari 1133). Signor di Chiaromonte. The Chronicle of Romualdo Guarna records that "Goffredus…domini Alexandri comitis filius et Riccardus Clarimontis dominus" defended Brindisi in 1133 against King Roger who had returned from Sicily in May 1133 to recapture the citadel[713]. The Chronicle of Romualdo Guarna records that "Riccardus…de Claromonte" was killed at Bari in 1133 and that "Alexander…frater eius" retreated "in Romaniam"[714].

viii) SIBYLLE (-Rouen [Feb/Mar] or [21 Mar] 1103, bur Caen or Rouen Cathedral). She is named by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her father and repeats that he was the nephew of Robert "Guiscard"[715]. Guillaume de Jumièges records that Robert married "Sibylle sœur de Guillaume comte de Conversano"[716]. Her husband married her on his return from Palestine, receiving an "immense sum" by way of dowry which he "lavished so profusely that in a few days he was penniless"[717]. She was poisoned and died "in Lent"[718]. The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death "XII Kal Apr" of "Sibilla comitissa Normannie"[719], although if this refers to Sibylle de Conversano it is not clear why she was not called "ducissa". It is unlikely to refer to her daughter-in-law Sibylle d'Anjou as she was Ctss of Flanders when she died. m (Apulia 1100) ROBERT “Curthose” Duke of Normandy, son of WILLIAM I King of England & his wife Mathilde de Flandres (Normandy [1052/4]-Cardiff Castle 3/10/15 Feb 1135, bur Gloucester Cathedral).

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