George de Hevesy, Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1943

Is your surname de Hevesy?

Research the de Hevesy family

George de Hevesy, Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1943's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

George Charles de Hevesy (Bischitz)

Hebrew: ג'ורג' צ'ארלס דה הוושי (בישיץ)
Also Known As: "Bischitz de Heves", "Bisicz de Heves", "Hevesy de Heves", "etc."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Budapest, Magyarország (Hungary)
Death: July 05, 1966 (80)
Freiburg im Breisgau, Baden-Württemberg, Deutschland (Germany) (fyrsy buried in Kerepesi Cemetery in Budapest, Hungary.[)
Place of Burial: Budapest, Hungary
Immediate Family:

Son of Ludwig (Lajos) Bischitz de Heves and Baroness Eugénia (nee von Schossberger) Bischitz de Hevesi
Husband of Pia de Hevesy
Father of Private; Private; Private and Private
Brother of Vilmos William Bischitz de Hevesi; André Andor Bischitz de Hevesi; Ödön Bischitz de Hevesi; Pál Paul Bischitz de Hevesi and Sarolta Hevesy

Occupation: Scientist, won Nobel prize
Managed by: Yigal Burstein
Last Updated:

About George de Hevesy, Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1943

https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hevesy_Gy%C3%B6rgy

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_de_Hevesy

George Charles de Hevesy, Georg Karl von Hevesy, (1 August 1885 – 5 July 1966) was a Hungarian radiochemist and Nobel laureate, recognized in 1943 for his key role in the development of radioactive tracers to study chemical processes such as in the metabolism of animals.

Biography

Early years

Hevesy György was born in Budapest, Hungary to a Roman Catholic family of Hungarian Jewish descent, the fifth of eight children from his wealthy parents Lajos (Louis) Bischitz and Eugenia (Jenny) Schossberger. George grew up in Budapest and graduated high school in 1903 from Piarista Gimnázium. The family's name in the 1904 was Hevesy-Bischitz, and Hevesy later changed his own.

De Hevesy began his studies in chemistry at the University of Budapest for one year, and at the Technical University of Berlin for several months, but changed to the University of Freiburg. There he came in contact with Ludwig Gattermann. In 1906 he started his Ph.D. thesis with Georg Franz Julius Meyer, acquiring his doctorate in physics in 1908. In 1908 Hevesy got a position at the ETH.

Research

When Richard Lorenz left for the University of Frankfurt and Richard Willstätter tried to convince him to stay in Zurich he decided to go to the University of Karlsruhe to work with Carl Bosch. To learn new methods, de Hevesy joined Ernest Rutherford's laboratory at the University of Manchester in 1911 where he met and became friends with Niels Bohr.

In 1923 de Hevesy co-discovered hafnium (72Hf) (Latin Hafnia for "Copenhagen", the home town of Niels Bohr), with Dirk Coster. Mendeleev's periodic table in 1869 put the chemical elements into a logical system, however there was missing a chemical element with 72 protons. On the basis of Bohr's atomic model Hevesy came to the conclusion that there must be a chemical element that goes there. The mineralogical museum of Norway and Greenland in Copenhagen furnished the material for the research. Characteristic X-ray spectra recordings made of the sample indicated that a new element was present. This earned him the 1943 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Hevesy was offered and accepted a job from the University of Freiburg. Supported financially by the Rockefeller Foundation, he had a very productive year. He developed the X-ray florescence analytical method, and discovered the Samarium alpha-ray. It was here he began the use of radioactive isotopes in studying the metabolic processes of plants and animals, by tracing chemicals in the body by replacing part of stable isotopes with small quantities of the radioactive isotopes. [edit] World War II and beyond

When Germany invaded Denmark in World War II, de Hevesy dissolved the gold Nobel Prizes of Max von Laue and James Franck with aqua regia to prevent the Nazis from stealing them. He placed the resulting solution on a shelf in his laboratory at the Niels Bohr Institute. After the war, he returned to find the solution undisturbed and precipitated the gold out of the acid. The Nobel Society then recast the Nobel Prizes using the original gold.

In 1943, Copenhagen was no longer seen as safe for a Jewish scientist, and de Hevesy fled to Sweden, where he worked at the Stockholm University College until 1961. Interestingly enough, in Stockholm, de Hevesy was received at the department of German-Swedish professor and Nobel Prize winner Hans von Euler-Chelpin, who remained strongly pro-German throughout the war. Despite this, de Hevesy and von Euler-Chelpin collaborated on many scientific papers during and after the war.

During his time in Stockholm, de Hevesy received the Nobel Prize in chemistry. He later was inducted as a member of the Royal Society and received the Copley Medal, of which he was particularly proud. De Hevesy stated: "The public thinks the Nobel Prize in chemistry for the highest honor that a scientist can receive, but it is not so. Forty or fifty received Nobel chemistry prizes, but only ten foreign members of the Royal Society and two (Bohr and Hevesy) received a medal-Copley." George de Hevesy was elected a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1942, and his status was later changed to Swedish member. In 1949 he was elected Franqui Professor in the University of Ghent. He received the Atoms for Peace Award in 1958 for his peaceful use of radioactive isotopes. George de Hevesy's grave in Budapest. Cemetery Kerepesi: 27 Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

De Hevesy married Pia Riis in 1924. They had one son and three daughters together. De Hevesy died in 1966 at the age of eighty and was buried in the Kerepesi Cemetery in Budapest, Hungary. He had made a total of 397 scientific publications. At his family's request, his ashes were interred at his birthplace in Budapest on April 19, 2001.


they had 1 son and 3 daughters

omikk.bme.hu his profile

wikipedia - George Charles de Hevesy, Georg Karl von Hevesy, (1 August 1885 - 5 July 1966) was a Hungarian radiochemist and Nobel laureate, recognized in 1943 for his key role in the development of radioactive tracers to study chemical processes such as in the metabolism of animals.

Early years


Hevesy György was born in Budapest, Hungary to a wealthy and ennobled Hungarian Jewish[1] family, the fifth of eight children to his parents Lajos (Louis) Bischitz and Baroness Eugenia (Jenny) Schossberger (ennobled as "De Tornya"). Grandparents from both sides of the family had provided the presidents of the Jewish community of Pest.[2] George grew up in Budapest and graduated high school in 1903 from Piarista Gimnázium. The family's name in the 1904 was Hevesy-Bischitz, and Hevesy later changed his own.


De Hevesy began his studies in chemistry at the University of Budapest for one year, and at the Technical University of Berlin for several months, but changed to the University of Freiburg. There he came in contact with Ludwig Gattermann. In 1906 he started his Ph.D. thesis with Georg Franz Julius Meyer, acquiring his doctorate in physics in 1908. In 1908 Hevesy got a position at the ETH.


Research


When Richard Lorenz left for the University of Frankfurt and Richard Willstätter tried to convince him to stay in Zurich he decided to go to the University of Karlsruhe to work with Carl Bosch. To learn new methods, de Hevesy joined Ernest Rutherford's laboratory at the University of Manchester in 1911 where he met and became friends with Niels Bohr.


In 1923 de Hevesy co-discovered hafnium (72Hf) (Latin Hafnia for "Copenhagen", the home town of Niels Bohr), with Dirk Coster. Mendeleev's periodic table in 1869 put the chemical elements into a logical system, however there was missing a chemical element with 72 protons. On the basis of Bohr's atomic model Hevesy came to the conclusion that there must be a chemical element that goes there. The mineralogical museum of Norway and Greenland in Copenhagen furnished the material for the research. Characteristic X-ray spectra recordings made of the sample indicated that a new element was present. This earned him the 1943 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.


Hevesy was offered and accepted a job from the University of Freiburg. Supported financially by the Rockefeller Foundation, he had a very productive year. He developed the X-ray florescence analytical method, and discovered the Samarium alpha-ray. It was here he began the use of radioactive isotopes in studying the metabolic processes of plants and animals, by tracing chemicals in the body by replacing part of stable isotopes with small quantities of the radioactive isotopes.


World War II and beyond


When Germany invaded Denmark in World War II, de Hevesy dissolved the gold Nobel Prizes of Max von Laue and James Franck with aqua regia to prevent the Nazis from stealing them. He placed the resulting solution on a shelf in his laboratory at the Niels Bohr Institute. After the war, he returned to find the solution undisturbed and precipitated the gold out of the acid. The Nobel Society then recast the Nobel Prizes using the original gold.[3][4][5]


In 1943, Copenhagen was no longer seen as safe for a Jewish scientist, and de Hevesy fled to Sweden, where he worked at the Stockholm University College until 1961. Interestingly enough, in Stockholm, de Hevesy was received at the department of German-Swedish professor and Nobel Prize winner Hans von Euler-Chelpin, who remained strongly pro-German throughout the war. Despite this, de Hevesy and von Euler-Chelpin collaborated on many scientific papers during and after the war.


During his time in Stockholm, de Hevesy received the Nobel Prize in chemistry. He later was inducted as a member of the Royal Society and received the Copley Medal, of which he was particularly proud. De Hevesy stated: "The public thinks the Nobel Prize in chemistry for the highest honor that a scientist can receive, but it is not so. Forty or fifty received Nobel chemistry prizes, but only ten foreign members of the Royal Society and two (Bohr and Hevesy) received a medal-Copley." George de Hevesy was elected a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1942, and his status was later changed to Swedish member. In 1949 he was elected Franqui Professor in the University of Ghent. He received the Atoms for Peace Award in 1958 for his peaceful use of radioactive isotopes.


George de Hevesy's grave in Budapest. Cemetery Kerepesi: 27 Hungarian Academy of Sciences. De Hevesy married Pia Riis in 1924. They had one son and three daughters together. De Hevesy died in 1966 at the age of eighty and was buried in the Kerepesi Cemetery in Budapest, Hungary.[6] He had published a total of 397 scientific publications, one of which was the Becquerel-Curie Memorial Lecture, in which he had reminisced about the careers of pioneers of radiochemistry.[7] At his family's request, his ashes were interred at his birthplace in Budapest on April 19, 2001.


See also

  1. List of Jewish Nobel laureates
  2. Johanna Bischitz de Heves
  3. 10444 de Hevesy

References.....

About חתן פרס נובל בכימיה 1943 (עברית)

ג'ורג' צ'ארלס דה הוושי (1 באוגוסט 1885 - 5 ביולי 1966) היה כימאי פיזיקלי הונגרי ממוצא יהודי, שנודע בזכות תרומתו לפיתוח שיטת הסמנים, בה סמנים רדיואקטיביים משמשים לחקר תהליכים כימיים כגון מטבוליזם של בעלי חיים. על תרומתו זו זכה בפרס נובל לכימיה לשנת 1943.

משפחתו

דה הוושי נולד בבודפשט במשפחה קתולית ממוצא יהודי מיוחסת ומתבוללת. משפחת אביו, לאיוש, נקראה במקור בישיץ (Bischitz - שם קשור ליישוב בבוהמיה - Byšice), ובשנת 1895 הוענק לה מידי הקיסר פרנץ יוזף תואר אצולה תחת השם ההונגרי הוושי (Hevesy). בתחילה קרא לעצמו האב בשם המשפחה Hevesy-Bischitz, והחל משנת 1906 השאיר רק את השם "הוושי". אם האב, סבתו של המדען, יוהנה בישיץ פון הווש, קנתה לעצמה שם על ידי פעילויות פילאנתרופיות בבודפשט. ג'ורג' היה בנו החמישי של לאיוש הוושי, יועץ חצר, ושל אוגניה (ז'ני), ברונית לבית שוסברגר. משפחת האם, שוסברגר, הייתה אף היא משפחה יהודית שמוצאה מאזור העיר ניטרה שבמורביה וקיבלה תואר אצולה עוד בשנת 1863.

בדומה לג'ורג', קיבלו גם אחיו השכלה רחבה. הבכור, וילמוש (וילהלם), היה מהנדס חשמל ואחד מעוזריו של חלוץ התעופה לואי בלריו בצרפת. האח השני, אנדור, מוכר כאנדרה דה הווס, חי גם הוא בצרפת והיה סופר והיסטוריון, נשוי לרוזנת. האח השלישי, אדן, המשיך בעסקי אביהם, והאח הרביעי, פאל (פאול), היה מחבר ודיפלומט בשירות הקיסרות האוסטרו-הונגרית בטורקיה, המזרח התיכון וכולי, אחר כך בשירות הונגריה, וערק לבריטניה בעת מלחמת העולם השנייה.

לימודיו

לאחר סיום לימודי התיכון בבית הספר של הנזירים הפיאריסטים בבודפשט בשנת 1903, למד פיזיקה, כימיה ומתמטיקה באוניברסיטת בודפשט ובאוניברסיטה הטכנית של ברלין, וקיבל תואר דוקטור לפילוסופיה באוניברסיטת פרייבורג ב-1903. אז עבד כשנתיים כעוזר מחקר במכון לכימיה פיזיקלית באוניברסיטה הטכנית של שווייץ, ועבד תקופה קצרה עם פריץ הבר. ב-1908 סיים השתלמות נוספת באוניברסיטה בפרייבורג, וב-1910 נסע לאנגליה לעבוד אצל ארנסט רתרפורד במנצ'סטר.

פעילותו האקדמית ומחקריו ב-1913 ביצע את הניסויים הראשונים של סמנים רדיואקטיביים עם פרדריק פנת' במכון לחקר הרדיום בווינה. ב-1915 גויס לצבא אוסטרו-הונגריה. ב-1919 נסע לקופנהגן, לעבוד במכון נילס בוהר החדש.

ב-1923 גילה (יחד עם דירק קוסטר) את היסוד הפניום (נקרא על שם שמה הלטיני של קופנהגן), ובכך אישש את תחזיתו של מנדלייב מ-1869.

ב-1926 חזר לפרייבורג כפרופסור לכימיה פיזיקלית, וב-1930 קיבל משרה באוניברסיטת קורנל באית'קה, ניו יורק. ב-1934 חזר למכון נילס בוהר, שם פעל עד 1943 כשבימי הכיבוש הנאצי נאלץ לברוח לשוודיה. שם חי ופעל עד שנת 1961 כפרופסור במכון המלכותי למחקר בכימיה אורגנית בסטוקהולם. ב-1943 הוענק לו פרס נובל לכימיה, על תרומתו לפיתוח שיטת הסמנים הרדיואקטיביים.

בשנותיו בקופנהגן עסק תחילה בהפרדות איזוטופיות, ומאוחר יותר היה חלוץ בשימוש בסמנים איזוטופיים במחקרים אנאורגניים וביולוגיים כאחד. בפרייבורג היה מעורב בשימוש הקליני הראשון באיזוטופים. כשחזר לקופנהגן הדגים את יצירתם של איזוטופים רדיואקטיביים מלאכותיים חדשים, והציג שיטה חדשה של אנליזת עירור על ידי הפגזת היסוד הנחקר בנייטרונים.

כאשר פלשה גרמניה לדנמרק במלחמת העולם השנייה, המיס דה הוושי את מדליות הנובל (העשויות זהב) של מקס פון לאואה וג'יימס פרנק במי מלך, כדי למנוע מהנאצים לגנוב אותן. הוא הציב את התמיסה שנוצרה על מדף במעבדתו במכון נילס בוהר, ועזב לשוודיה. כשחזר, לאחר המלחמה, מצא את התמיסה במקומה, ושיקע את הזהב מהתמיסה. קרן נובל אז יצקה מחדש את המדליות תוך שימוש בזהב המקורי.

דה הוושי נשא לאישה את פיה ריס (Pia Riis) ב-1924, ולזוג נולדו בן ושלוש בנות. הוא נפטר בפרייבורג, ב-1966. לפי בקשת משפחתו, אפרו הובא בטקס מיוחד למנוחת עולם בעיר הולדתו, בודפשט, באפריל 2001.

פרסים ואותות

  • פרס קניצארו של האקדמיה דיי לינצ'אי מאיטליה בשנת 1929
  • פרס נובל לכימיה ב-1943 - על עבודתו בתחום הסמנים הרדיואקטיביים
  • מדליית קופלי של החברה המלכותית הלונדונית בשנת 1949
  • מדליית ביילי בשנת 1951
  • מדליית הזהב הבינלאומית ע"ש נילס בוהר (1955) בשנת 1961
  • ג'ורג' דה הוושי היה חבר בחברה המלכותית הלונדונית, באקדמיה השוודית למדעים, באקדמיה ההונגרית למדעים וב-11 אקדמיות נוספות.

ספרים

  • "היסוד הפניום" (1927) Das Element Hafnium
  • "האנליזה הכימית עם קרני רנטגן" (1932) Chemical Analysis with X-Rays
  • "סמנים רדיואקטיביים" (1948) Radioactive Indicators

https://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%92%27%D7%95%D7%A8%D7%92%27_%D7%93%D7%94_%D7%94%D7%95%D7%95%D7%A9%D7%99

view all

George de Hevesy, Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1943's Timeline

1885
August 1, 1885
Budapest, Magyarország
1966
July 5, 1966
Age 80
Freiburg im Breisgau, Baden-Württemberg, Deutschland
2001
April 19, 2001
Age 80
Budapest, Hungary